Improving Medical AI Safety by Addressing Hidden Stratification
Jared Dunnmon Luke Oakden-Rayner By LUKE OAKDEN-RAYNER MD, JARED DUNNMON, PhD Medical AI testing is unsafe, and that isn’t likely to change anytime soon. No regulator is seriously considering implementing “pharmaceutical style” clinical trials for AI prior to marketing approval, and evidence strongly suggests that pre-clinical testing of medical AI systems is not enough to ensure that they are safe to use.  As discussed in a previous post, factors ranging from the laboratory effect to automation bias can contribute to substantial disconnects between pre-clinical performance of AI sys...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Data Health Tech Health Technology AI Jared Dunnmon Luke Oakden-Rayner machine learning Source Type: blogs

Amazon Pays Costs for Its Employees to Seek Specialized, Early Cancer Care
Employers are becoming increasingly active in providing special health services to their employees. Such an employee/employer cohort is being called a aSmart Health Community, the activities of which are beneficial to both parties (see:Smart health communities and the future of health). Now comes news that Amazon is assisting its employees in getting high quality cancer care from a specified cancer hospital (see:Amazon Joins Trend of Sending Workers Away for Health Care). Below is an excerpt from the article:Employers are increasingly going the distance to control health spending, paying to send workers across the cou...
Source: Lab Soft News - October 17, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Cost of Healthcare Diagnostics Healthcare Innovations Medical Consumerism Public Health Radiology Source Type: blogs

Autoimmunity Against AT1 Receptor Spurs Endothelial Cellular Senescence and Vascular Aging
In this study, AT1-AAs were detected in the sera of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the positive rate was 44.44% vs. 17.46% in non-PAD volunteers. In addition, analysis showed that AT1-AAs level was positively correlated with PAD. To reveal the causal relationship between AT1-AAs and vascular aging, an AT1-AAs-positive rat model was established by active immunization. The carotid pulse wave velocity was higher, and the aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was attenuated significantly in the immunized rats. Morphological staining showed thickening of the aortic wall. Histological examination showe...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

My Most Favoritest Person in the Whole Wide World, My Auntie Judy
Thursday, October 17, 2019Current Mood:  SadI wrote this letter to my Auntie Judy shortly after she passed back on February 1st of this year .  I haven't really shared it with too many people but I thought since it was Breast Cancer Awareness Month it was the perfect way to honor an amazing woman who was sadly taken by this horrific disease.  Dear Auntie Judy,You were my “My Favoritest Person in the Whole Wide World.”  Every child should be blessed to have such an amazing Auntie in their life. I remember my Mom telling me a story... We were over your house in Granby and I...
Source: Sharing My Cancer Crapness - October 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

If you are happy and you know it … you may live longer
Plenty of research suggests optimistic people have a reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, and declines in lung capacity and function. Optimism is also associated with a lower risk of early death from cancer and infection. And now a new study links optimism to living a longer life. What does this new research on optimism tell us? The study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that people who had higher levels of optimism had a longer life span. They also had a greater chance of living past age 85. The researchers analyzed data gleaned from two large population studies: about 70,000 women from the Nurse...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David R. Topor, PhD, MS-HPEd Tags: Behavioral Health Healthy Aging Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Becoming Overweight Raises the Risk of Many Cancers
In conclusion, adult weight gain was associated with increased risk of several major cancers. The degree, timing, and duration of overweight and obesity also seemed to be important. Preventing weight gain may reduce the cancer risk. Link: https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyz188 (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - October 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Report of the independent review of adult screening programmes in England
This report says that the NHS has the opportunity to upgrade cancer screening to save thousands more lives each year. It calls for people to be given much greater choice over when and where they are screened and recommends that local screening services should put on extra evening and weekend appointments for breast, cervical and other cancer checks.ReportNHS England - news (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 16, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Source Type: blogs

Bayer to support 11 digital health startups, 5 of which are developing behavioral/ cognitive/ mental health solutions
_______________ Bayer inks deals with eleven startups under G4A Digital Health Partnerships program (press release): “Bayer announced today that the company has signed collaboration agreements with eleven digital health startups. As part of the program, Bayer will support these startup companies aiming for longer-term collaborations to drive forward the development of specific digital solutions to improve patients’ health in the fields of cardiovascular diseases, oncology, ophthalmology, pulmonology, radiology as well as digital therapeutics.” Out of the eleven digital health startups, five are developing...
Source: SharpBrains - October 15, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Professional Development Technology anxiety Bayer behavioral intervention cognitive-behavioral-therapy Cognitive-Training depression digital health digital therapeutics Litesprite mental h Source Type: blogs

3D Liquid-Cell Electron Microscopy Imaging Now Possible
Electron microscopy revealed a world that exists at scales smaller than the wavelength of light. Advancements in this field have allowed scientists to visualize ever more objects and processes, but actually seeing living cells in 3D and within a liquid environment has been impossible. Now, a team of researchers from Penn State University, Virginia Tech, and a company called Protochips have developed a system that allows for an electron microscope to be used to volumetrically visualize living cells and biological systems that exist in a liquid. “With this technology that we developed in collaboration with Pr...
Source: Medgadget - October 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Diagnostics Materials Nanomedicine News Oncology Pathology Radiology microscopy Source Type: blogs

The ONE Secret Trick to Kill Negative Thinking Immediately
You're reading The ONE Secret Trick to Kill Negative Thinking Immediately, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Do you ever have those bad days where your thoughts are just so negative all day long, everything feels like it’s too much for one person to handle. You obsessively question every decision you’ve ever made in your life, every small thing that has happened to you and basically just indulge in negative thinking to the point where you cry yourself asleep at night?   Don’t ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: lynettekotze Tags: featured happiness psychology self improvement how to get rid of negative thoughts Overcoming negative thoughts positive self talk positive thinking positivity Source Type: blogs

The irrational exuberance of early cancer detection
Here ’s some good news for a change about cancer: Cancer mortality — the rate of death from cancer — has fallen substantially over the last four decades. There is also, however, some not-so-good news: Cancer incidence — the rate of cancer diagnoses — has been rising. This doesn’t reflect incr easing dangers in our environment, but […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/h-gilbert-welch" rel="tag" > H. Gilbert Welch, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

How are hospitals supposed to reduce readmissions? Part III
By KIP SULLIVAN, JD The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) and other proponents of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) justified their support for the HRRP with the claim that research had already demonstrated how hospitals could reduce readmissions for all Medicare fee-for-service patients, not just for groups of carefully selected patients. In this three-part series, I am reviewing the evidence for that claim. We saw in Part I and Part II that the research MedPAC cited in its 2007 report to Congress (the report Congress relied on in authorizing the HRRP) contained no studies supporting tha...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Medicare health reform Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program HRRP Kip Sullivan MedPAC Source Type: blogs

Dirty dishes
I’ve been interested in this topic ever since, months ago, I watched an interview on CNN with the neuroscientist Matthew Walker. Eight hours of sleep, he says, is what we need. Eight hours of sleep in complete darkness (otherwise our brains won’t release melatonin, something I didn’t know…). An important point (again, something I didn’t know!): taking naps to catch up on our sleep doesn’t count. “Unfortunately, says Matthew Walker,” “sleep is not like the bank. You cannot accumulate a debt and then hope to pay it off at a later time.” And, he added, “Human...
Source: Margaret's Corner - October 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll sleep deprivation Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 14th 2019
In conclusion, a polypharmacology approach of combining established, prolongevity drug inhibitors of specific nodes may be the most effective way to target the nutrient-sensing network to improve late-life health. Deletion of p38α in Neurons Slows Neural Stem Cell Decline and Loss of Cognitive Function in Mice https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/10/deletion-of-p38%ce%b1-in-neurons-slows-neural-stem-cell-decline-and-loss-of-cognitive-function-in-mice/ Researchers here provide evidence for p38α to be involved in the regulation of diminished neural stem cell activity with age. It is thought...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Why multidisciplinary and coordinated cancer care matters
While it would be ideal if all of our decisions in medicine were based on clear and definitive data, that isn ’t the case, for most of what we face with our patients. Data is open to interpretation, studies can always be criticized, and the results are not always clear. Still, as clinicians we must help […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/don-s-dizon" rel="tag" > Don S. Dizon, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Is Displaced Nuclear DNA a Meaningful Cause of Chronic Inflammation in Aging?
Sterile inflammation arises without external cause, such as infection or injury, and chronic sterile inflammation is a characteristic of aging. Inflammatory signaling becomes constant and pronounced in tissues, and the immune system is constantly roused to action. Processes, such as regeneration from injury, that depend upon a clear cycle of inflammation that starts, progresses, and resolves are significantly disrupted. It is no exaggeration to say that the downstream consequences of chronic inflammation accelerate the progression of all of the common age-related conditions. It is of great importance in atherosclerosis and...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Brain Training And Counting Bees: This Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web There’s not much evidence that brain training apps really improve our cognitive abilities –  so why do so many people use them? Sabrina Weiss at Wired has the answers. More colour-related research this week: people who live in grey, rainy countries far away from the equator are more likely to associate yellow with joy, reports Eva Frederick in Science. Most people in Finland, for instance, felt that yellow was related to the feeling of joy, while very few of those in countries like Egypt and Saudi Arabia made that associat...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

Busy busy busy
Time does fly, doesn’t it? Yesterday I realized I haven’t posted anything since September 6 (!). Ouch! I don’t think that’s my record for NOT posting, but it has to be close! Anyway, this morning I have a bit of free time, hah!, so I thought I’d post a note just to let you know that I’m fine, Stefano’s fine, the kitties are fine. We’re just all SUPER BUSY! Well, okay, truth be told, the kitties aren’t that busy,  except with finding the best spot to take a nice nap,  preferably on our bed, in the sunlight…Or, as in the above photo, on the couch (Pandora...
Source: Margaret's Corner - October 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Investigating the Superior DNA Defenses of Tardigrades
Tardigrades are extremely resilient to radiation induced DNA damage, and here researchers delve into some of the mechanisms involved. Mining other species for potential improvements to our own biochemistry, or the basis for therapies, is an expanding line of work in the life science community. Possible ways to improve mammalian defenses against damage to nuclear DNA are of interest for a range of reasons, not least of which is that it is the present consensus that stochastic mutation to nuclear DNA contributes to both cancer risk and aging itself, as mutations in stem cells or progenitor cells can spread throughout tissues...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Farewell (film) – Hiding Cancer Diagnosis from the Patient
The Farewell was released this summer. It depicts a grandmother who has been diagnosed with terminal cancer. The grandmother's family gathers to say goodbye without letting her know that the end is near. Each family member weighs their guilt abou... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The culture of silence in Canada ’s medical institutions is in desperate need of reform
Canada ’s health care system has been a source of national pride for as long as I can remember — a view that was shattered following my experience as a patient advocate during my late father Henry’s cancer journey. The depths of perversity were made apparent to me when I was charged over $1,000 to a ccess my […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/iris-kulbatski" rel="tag" > Iris Kulbatski, PhD < /a > < /span > Tags: Policy Practice Management Source Type: blogs

How To Play Tricks On Artificial Intelligence?
While in the last years, sci-fi stories, experts and even some opinion-leader public figures frequently spelled the end of mankind through artificial intelligence, lately, it turned out just how easy it is to play tricks on smart algorithms and fool them into making errors. We looked around how researchers can hack A.I. and what that means for medicine and healthcare, mainly from a security perspective. Does A.I. have an Achilles heel? As the saying goes, a chain is as strong as its weakest link – and the ancient Greeks knew it. No matter that Achilles had extraordinary strength, courage, and loyalty, that he f...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 10, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Security & Privacy adversarial adversarial example AI autonomous data security digital digital health hack Healthcare self-driving technology Source Type: blogs

Ranitidine (Zantac) recall expanded, many questions remain
As anticipated, recall of the popular heartburn medicine ranitidine (Zantac) has expanded. But we still have more questions than answers. As I mentioned in my original blog post on this topic, the online pharmacy Valisure, which originally alerted the FDA to the issue, found what they called “extremely high levels” of the probable cancer-causing substance N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in ranitidine products. The FDA has indicated that its own preliminary testing has detected low levels of NDMA in ranitidine. Testing methods may have influenced NMDA results The FDA has clarified that the testing method that...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joshua Gagne, PharmD, ScD Tags: Digestive Disorders Drugs and Supplements Source Type: blogs

The SENS Research Foundation on the Beneficial Nature of Senolytic Therapies
The SENS Research Foundation should need no introduction to this audience, but, just in case, this is one of the few non-profit organizations dedicated to advancing the state of the art in rejuvenation research and development. The focus of the SENS Research Foundation staff is on unblocking lines of research that are presently moving too slowly, rather than on reinforcing success. The co-founder, Aubrey de Grey, assembled the Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence (SENS) going on twenty years ago. It was, and is, a synthesis of what is known in the research community regarding the root causes of aging. In the SEN...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Deep Learning Spots Organs on CT Scans to Prevent Radiation Damage
Radiotherapy is a well established method for attacking tumors within the body. There are a number of techniques that are used to administer radiation to a lesion, but they all come with the risk of injuring nearby tissues and organs. Gamma beams and other directed high energy devices result in the exposure of all the tissues that are on the way to and on the other side of a target, which is a serious problem. Knowing where the important organs are in individual patients can allow clinicians to prepare radiation therapy treatments so that as little collateral damage occurs as possible. CT scans are usually used to map the ...
Source: Medgadget - October 9, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Informatics Oncology Radiation Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Gene testing to guide antidepressant treatment: Has its time arrived?
Depressive disorders are among the most common conditions that disrupt lives. Fortunately, medications, psychotherapies, and lifestyle changes are usually successful in treating depression and related disorders, even if symptoms are not entirely eliminated. Sometimes people don’t gain sufficient relief from treatment, or must try several medications before finding one that works well. In an age of exciting advances, including brain imaging and genetic testing, many doctors and patients reasonably hope that new technologies will offer answers. And in fact, for antidepressant choice, several companies sell genetic test...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bruce M. Cohen, MD, PhD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Mental Health Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

We don ’t just have cancer. We have a whole life to live.
When asking about a potentially overwhelming side-effect of an impending new medication, my nurse told me,“Don’t worry until you get there.” OK, I get it. I just didn’t die from breast cancer. I’ve had worse. But come on. Let’s do better. Let’s have a conversation. There are many things nobody tells you about cancer. […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 9, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/elizabeth-lerner-papautsky" rel="tag" > Elizabeth Lerner Papautsky, PhD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Deletion of p38 α in Neurons Slows Neural Stem Cell Decline and Loss of Cognitive Function in Mice
Researchers here provide evidence for p38α to be involved in the regulation of diminished neural stem cell activity with age. It is thought that the loss of stem cell activity with age, throughout the body and not just in the brain, is an evolved response to rising levels of damage that serves to reduce the risk of cancer that arises from the activity of damaged cells. The cost, however, is a slow decline into dysfunction and tissue failure. There are many therapeutic approaches under development in labs and startups that involve ways to force stem cell populations to go back to work, overriding their normal reaction...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

RAGE Session: Resuscitology Case – Oncology Patient in Resus
Dr Chris Nickson RAGE Session: Resuscitology Case – Oncology Patient in Resus Cliff Reid, Geoff Healy, and Chris Nickson discuss a fictionalised case from the Resuscitology course: "Oncology Patient in Resus", including airway management and failure of video laryngoscopy, and the challenges of resuscitation in the context of potentially terminal illness. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 9, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Chris Nickson Tags: RAGE Resuscitation Airway Management oncology resuscitationists awesome guide to everything Video Laryngoscopy Source Type: blogs

Staying Positive While Caregiving Under Frustrating Circumstances
Dear Candid Caregiver: My dad is in the middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Meanwhile, my mom is recovering from cancer surgery, and the prognosis isn’t good. I’m trying my best to be a good caregiver for both of them and stay positive while doing it, but it’s hard. I recognize that we’re fortunate in that my parents are able to hire an agency that supplies a rotation of in-home caregivers. The other side of it is that... Read more on HealthCentral for tips on staying positive while caregiving under frustrating circumstances: Carol is the Candid Caregiver Support a caregiver or jum...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 9, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

The Many Roles of Senescent Cells
Long-lived senescent cells accumulate with age, initially quite slowly as they are efficiently removed by the immune system when their own programmed cell death processes fail, but once the immune system starts to decline with age, the burden of cellular senescence ramps up dramatically. Senescent cells secrete a potent mix of signals known as a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). It spurs chronic inflammation, destructively remodels nearby tissue, encourages nearby cells to also become senescent, and causes all sorts of other issues as well. It is very harmful, and the more senescent cells there are, the wor...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

3D Microenvironments to Grow Brain Tumors in Lab
Clinical researchers are constantly thwarted by the inability to quickly and easily try new therapies in tumors and other disease targets. Tumors within the brain are particularly hard to study because of the difficulty with access and the incredible fragility of nearby tissues. Researchers at Tufts University have just developed a way to create an environment that closely mimics that of the brain and were able to grow pediatric and adult tumors within it. The microenvironment allows for non-invasive imaging of the tumors and for easy manipulation of the cells growing within. The model tumors were grown in the presence ...
Source: Medgadget - October 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Neurosurgery Oncology Source Type: blogs

From Surgeries To Keeping Company: The Place Of Robots In Healthcare
Assisting surgeries, disinfecting rooms, dispensing medication, keeping company: believe it or not these are the tasks medical robots will soon undertake in hospitals, pharmacies, or your nearest doctor’s office. These new ‘colleagues’ will definitely make a difference in every field of medicine. Here’s our overview to understand robotics in healthcare better so that everyone can prepare for the appearance of mechanic helpers in medical facilities. Metallic allies for the benefit of the vulnerable While there are concerns for machines replacing people in the workforce, we believe there are adv...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Robotics blood digital health future of hospital Healthcare medical medical robot nanorobot nanotechnology pharmacies social social companion social companion robot Surgery telemedical Source Type: blogs

The Rise and Rise of Quantitative Cassandras
By SAURABH JHA, MD Despite an area under the ROC curve of 1, Cassandra’s prophesies were never believed. She neither hedged nor relied on retrospective data – her predictions, such as the Trojan war, were prospectively validated. In medicine, a new type of Cassandra has emerged –  one who speaks in probabilistic tongue, forked unevenly between the probability of being right and the possibility of being wrong. One who, by conceding that she may be categorically wrong, is technically never wrong. We call these new Minervas “predictions.” The Owl of Minerva flies above its denominator. ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Data Medical Practice Physicians RogueRad @roguerad acute kidney injury AI deep learning machine learning predictions Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2019 Announced for Cell Oxygen Regulation
Two Americans and an English knight have won this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of how cells detect how much oxygen is available to them and the mechanism that regulates how they adapt to changes in oxygen levels. The Nobel Laureates: William G. Kaelin Jr., Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza While the scientific community recognized the importance of oxygen for animal cells a very long time ago, what actually happens at the cellular level took a great deal of effort to uncover. William G. Kaelin Jr., Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe, and Gregg L. Semenzafor provided the explana...
Source: Medgadget - October 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Red Light Activated Cancer Drug Improves Treatment in Mice
Researchers from the City University of Hong Kong have developed a new, controllable cancer drug called phorbiplatin that only becomes active and potent after red light stimulation. Their work demonstrates that in the dark the cancer drug does not have substantial toxicity, but the drug is able to substantially reduce tumor size when activated by red light. One day, this technology may be used to improve cancer treatment and reduce its side effects. Currently, many cancer drugs are administered and have toxic effects on both cancer cells and our body’s healthy cells. This leads to incredibly challenging side effe...
Source: Medgadget - October 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Medicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Cells & Oxygen Availability | Nobel Special | Episode 54 Bonus
Host Kevin Patton summarizes the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to three scientists "for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability." A special bonus episode.00:41 | Introduction to Bonus Episode02:00 | Sponsored by HAPS02:24 | Summary of Discovery04:13 | Oxygen at Center Stage05:24 | HIF Enters the Scene08:08 | Sponsored by AAA08:26 | VHL - An Unexpected Partner11:37 | Oxygen sHIFts the Balance13:20 | Oxygen Shapes Physiology& Pathology15:15 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program15:48 | Our Course23:46 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see o...
Source: The A and P Professor - October 7, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 7th 2019
In conclusion, our findings link the calcification of the vascular tissue with the expression of FGF23 in the vessels and with the elevation of circulating levels this hormone. Permanently Boosting Levels of Natural Killer Cells in Mice to Increase Cancer Resistance https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/permanently-boosting-levels-of-natural-killer-cells-in-mice-to-increase-cancer-resistance/ Researchers here demonstrate a very interesting approach to immunotherapy: they introduce engineered stem cells in mice that will give rise to additional natural killer T cells, boosting the capability of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Part 6 - Why Is Cancer Pain So Special?
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 6, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: cancer opioids pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs

Part 5 - Why Do We Lump the Non-Cancer Pain Syndromes Together?
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 6, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: opioid pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs

Loss of Long-time Spouse Can Send Older Adult Into Decline
Photo credit Jeremy Wong Dear Carol: My 87-year-old dad died three months ago from cancer. He and Mom had been married more than 56 years and his loss was devastating to her. Dad had been Mom’s main caregiver for nearly 20 years because of her past cancer and ongoing vascular dementia. What upsets me is that Mom isn’t making any progress in coping with dad’s death. We talk a lot about how we miss him but she always follows the conversation by saying, “He’s not gone.” On better days she’ll say, “I can’t believe he’s gone,” but mostly she says, “He&rsquo...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 6, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Is Mourning Rewarding? (revisited)
Can we reduce the persistent, unbearable pain of losing a loved one to 15-20 voxels of brain activity in the nucleus accumbens (O'Connor et al., 2008)? No? Then what if I told you that unrelenting grief — and associated feelings of sheer panic, fear, terminal aloneness, and existential crisis — isn't “suffering”. It's actually rewarding!Well I'm here to tell you that it isn't.Looking back on apost from 2011, you never realize it's going to be you.1The top figure shows that activity in thenucleus accumbens was greater in response to grief-related words vs. neutral words in a group of 11 women with &l...
Source: The Neurocritic - October 6, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Part 4 - Everything We Were Taught About High Doses Was Wrong, and the Same Hand-Crafted Graph
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 4th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 5, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: opioids pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs

The Top Health Wearables For A Healthy Lifestyle
Fitbit or Apple Watch for running? Garmin or Misfit for swimming? Sleep Cycle or Sleep as Android for sleep tracking? What about measuring heart rate, blood pressure, or tracking how to cut out stress from your life? Dozens of gadgets on the healthcare wearable market promise you a healthier lifestyle, but it’s easy to go astray in the jungle of digital health gadgets. Let me show you my top choices when it comes to health wearables and trackers. Guidance in the health wearable universe By now, I have tested and used more than a hundred devices and gadgets that measure health parameters or vital signs. Thus,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics activity fitness fitness trackers Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation meditation mental health Personalized medicine sleep sleep optimization sleep tracking stress technology wear Source Type: blogs

Targeting GAS1 to Put Muscle Stem Cells Back to Work in Old Tissues
A great many projects at various stages of development are characterized by their goal of forcing greater stem cell activity in old tissues, but without meaningfully addressing the underlying causes of stem cell decline in later life. This sort of research and development operates at the level of proximate causes, adjusting protein levels to change cell behavior. Among the potential therapies I'd place into this category: telomerase gene therapy; GDF11 upregulation; FGF2 inhibition; NAD+ upregulation; and so on. Muscle stem cells known as satellite cells are one of the better studied stem cell populations in this context, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 4, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Free App Scans Everyday Photos of Kids for Signs of Disease
Leukocoria, also known as white puppilary reflex, is a symptom of a number of diseases, including retinoblastoma, Coats’ disease, and congenital cataracts. When light enters the eye at certain angles in people with leukocoria, a white reflection from the retina can be seen. While easy to spot with ophthalmic equipment, the condition, and the underlying disease, often goes unnoticed for much too long. Retinoblastoma, for example, is detected via identification of leukocoria during general physicals in fewer than 10% of cases. Researchers at Baylor University have now developed an app that can scan through the photo...
Source: Medgadget - October 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Ophthalmology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

PrEP prevents HIV — so why aren’t more people taking it?
Each year, 1.7 million people globally are newly infected with HIV — more than 38,000 in the United States alone. This year, President Trump announced a 10-year initiative aimed at reducing new HIV infections in the US, and ultimately ending an epidemic that has plagued this country, and the world, since HIV first emerged in the early 1980s. A key part of that plan is pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP, a daily medication to help prevent HIV that is recommended for people at high risk. Recently, the FDA approved a new formulation of PrEP for many — but not all — of those at risk. What is PrEP and who should...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert Goldstein, MD, PhD Tags: Health HIV Infectious diseases Men's Health Sexual Conditions Women's Health Source Type: blogs

A Profile of Tissue Engineering Efforts at LyGenesis
LyGenesis is the company founded to develop the technique of implanting organoid tissue into lymph nodes in order to allow it to survive and grow in the body. Some organs can carry out much or all of their function more or less regardless of location in the body, such as the liver and thymus. Thus any viable transplant strategy that leads to functional tissue thriving in the body should help patients. LyGenesis is initially focused on restoring liver function via this approach, but the thymus is next in line, with an eye to reversing some of the age-related decline in immune function. Let's spend a little bit of t...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 4, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Deeper Delve into the Mechanisms of Thymic Atrophy
The faltering quality of the immune system in later life is driven by several quite different factors, but the one that is perhaps most evident in the immune declines of middle age is the atrophy of the thymus. The thymus is a small organ located under the sternum and over the heart; it is where thymocytes produced in the bone marrow mature into T cells. As ever more of the active tissue of the thymus is replaced with fat, the ongoing supply of new T cells diminishes. The adaptive immune system becomes ever more a closed system and its cells become ever more dysfunctional: exhausted, senescent, misconfigured and overly foc...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Part 2 - We Were Wrong 20 Years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid Doses
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)This is the second in a series of several posts about many aspects of my current thinking about opioids.The first post is here:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Over-prescribing fueled the current drug overdose epidemic, and many of us who thought we were stamping out needless suffering contributed to the epidemic.A lot of what I read and believed about opioids early on in my career was wrong.I ’m old enough to remember those heady days in which there was a pretty large and ‘successful’ movement in American medicine to gr...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 3, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: opioids pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs