A Popular Science View of Checkpoint Inhibitor Cancer Immunotherapies
Checkpoint inhibitor therapies are a demonstrably successful approach to cancer immunotherapy. They suppress a mechanism that normally restrains immune cells from attacking other cells. This mechanism is abused by cancers, alongside a variety of other ways in which the immune system can be subverted or quieted. Any advanced tumor tends to have evolved into a state in which it is ignored or even helped by the immune system. Checkpoint inhibitor therapies are an improvement on chemotherapy when it comes to the trade-off between harming the cancer and harming the patient, as well as in the odds of success, but still present r...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Future Trends Help You Choose The Most Fitting Medical Specialty
“I’m a medical student. Which specialty should I choose and what skills will a future doctor need?” “I’m in radiology. Looking at the recent advancements in medical technology, was it a wise choice or should I train myself in something different, too?” These are the questions I most frequently receive after my keynote speeches. While all should be aware of their own physical and intellectual capabilities, here are a few pieces of advice which skills to concentrate on based on the current and future trends in healthcare. The most significant trends in healthcare Artificial intelligence, w...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 13, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Education Medical Professionals capabilities crowdsourcing digital digital health digital literacy gamification Healthcare Innovation medical specialties medical specialty patient design skills tech Source Type: blogs

Against A Highly Regressive “Meat Tax”
Some economists want to make it more expensive for the less well-off to enjoy aclear revealed pleasure: eating red and processed meat.The  average household in the poorest fifth of the income distribution dedicates 1.3 percent of spending towards it. That’s over double average household spending in the richest quintile. Yet meat is now a new “public health” target. Once, lifestyle controls stopped at smoking and drinking. They recently expanded to soda and even caffeine. Now, even the hallowe d steak is not sacred.Last week,  a report by University of Oxford academics calculated suppos...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 12, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

University of Missouri Research Reactor Now Supplying Iodine-131 for Thyroid Treatment
Medical radioisotopes are widely used in cancer treatment, but their production has been hampered to the point that obtaining them has become a challenge. The lack of Technetium-99m is probably the most widely known, but there’s also a shortage of Iodine-131 (I-131), a radioisotope commonly used for diagnosing and treating thyroid conditions because the thyroid absorbs iodine naturally. Things are now looking up as the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), a 10 megawatt reactor, has just produced the first commercial batch of I-131.  International Isotopes, Inc. is the buyer and dis...
Source: Medgadget - November 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nuclear Medicine Oncology Public Health Radiation Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Extracellular NAD+ Declines with Age
Current enthusiasm for the development of means to boost levels of NAD+ in older people is driven in part by research such as the open access paper noted here, in which the authors show a clear decline with age in NAD+ outside cells. Inside cells, NAD+ is an important component in the machinery that allows mitochondria to generate chemical energy store molecules to power all cellular functions. Importantly, there is evidence that comparatively straightforward approaches to increase NAD+ levels can produce beneficial effects, such as improved mitochondrial function leading to lowered blood pressure via reduced dysfunction o...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Why Positive Thinking Doesn ’t Work – And What Does
You're reading Why Positive Thinking Doesn’t Work – And What Does, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. You might be anxiously wondering where this article is going to go, so just in case you're about to judge me as some negative Nancy that's going to bash positive thinking, I'd like to clear that up because that's not what I'm about to do. I'm going to use a deep dive into The Three Principles understanding of Mind, Consciousness, and Thought to awaken you to the fact that we don't need to try to ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: robkish Tags: featured psychology self improvement happiness pickthebrain positive thinking success Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 12th 2018
This study's researchers approached all people turning 85 in 2006 in two cities in the UK for participation. At the beginning of the study in 2006-2007, there were 722 participants, 60 percent of whom were women. The participants provided researchers with information about what they ate every day, their body weight and height measurements, their overall health assessment (including any level of disability), and their medical records. The researchers learned that more than one-quarter (28 percent) of very old adults had protein intakes below the recommended dietary allowance. The researchers noted that older adults w...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The civilian casualties of being a doctor
As an ER doctor, I often meet people on the worst day of their lives. I ’m the guy who gets to tell you your mom is dead. I’m the one who works the futile code on your four-year-old, while your screams cut right through everyone in the room. I find your cancer. I tell you […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/side-hustle-scrubs" rel="tag" > Side Hustle Scrubs, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

National Cancer Institute Designates BrainHQ as a Research-Tested Intervention Program
----National Cancer Institute Designates BrainHQ as a Research-Tested Intervention Program //Posit Science | Brain Fitness& Brain TrainingMonday, November 5, 2018 (SAN FRANCISCO) — The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the US National Institutes of Health has designated BrainHQ online brain exercises, made by Posit Science, as a part of its " Research-Tested Intervention Programs " (RTIPs). BrainHQ is now included in the NCI database of evidence-based cancer interventions and program materials for program planners and public health practitioners.The RTIPs program was set up by NCI to more rapidly move ...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - November 9, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

BMC ‘Research in progress’ photo competition – one week to go!
Source: Cultura Creative (RF) / Alamy Stock Photo We’ve received some fantastic entries so far but it’s not too late if you’re yet to enter your photos. Anyone interested in research and photography can enter from anywhere in the world. Your image should be related to research and can be focused on any area of your work and from any discipline including physical sciences, mathematics and engineering. The overall winner will receive a cash prize of €550 (~£490/$645), while the runner-up will receive €350 (~£310/$410). Inspiration Sarah Boyle’s winning photograph from last year&r...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - November 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Davy Falkner Tags: Uncategorized Research in progress photo competition Source Type: blogs

The Starting Five: Vitamins for Improved Health
You're reading The Starting Five: Vitamins for Improved Health, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. “By the proper intakes of vitamins and other nutrients…you can, I believe, extend your life and years of well-being by twenty-five or even thirty-five years,” said Nobel Prize winning scientist Linus Pauling. Modern research has confirmed Pauling’s belief as it has identified five vitamins that may improve overall health. Vitamin D Vitamin D provides many important health benefits. It ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: IndySummers Tags: featured health and fitness pickthebrain self improvement vitamins what vitamins should i take Source Type: blogs

PSA-based screening for prostate cancer: Interpreting the changing guidelines
Comparing the 2018  U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on prostate cancer screening in the October 15th issue of American Family Physician with its previous recommendation, the first question family physicians ought to ask is: What new evidence compelled the USPSTF to move from recommending against PSA screening in all men to determining that there was a small net […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kenneth-lin" rel="tag" > Kenneth Lin, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Conference on Drug Pricing Injects New Statistics Into Debate, Few New Insights (Part 1 of 2)
The price of medications has become a leading social issue, distorting economies around the world and providing easy talking points to politicians of all parties (not that they know how to solve the problem). Last week I attended a conference on the topic at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. On one level, the increasing role that drugs play in health care is salutary. Wouldn’t you rather swallow a pill than go in for surgery, with the attendant risks of anesthesia, postoperative pain opiates, and exposure to the increasingly scary bacteria that lurk in h...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 8, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: Healthcare Reform Medical Economics Personalized Medicine Precision Medicine Drug Pricing Healthcare Costs Medication Pricing Source Type: blogs

Hairy Coating Keeps Nanoparticles Safe from Immune System, Liver
Nanoparticles are seemingly a great way to treat tumors, but they’re so rapidly washed out by the bloodstream that few of the nanoparticles actually reach their targets. Researchers at Drexel University have now developed a surface treatment that gives nanoparticles a significant advantage to overcome the body’s filtration system and therefore make nanotherapies much more effective. The researchers developed hairy polymer shells within which nanoparticles can be encapsulated, and which the immune system ignores, while the liver lets the shells circulate back into the bloodstream. Plasma proteins are a primary w...
Source: Medgadget - November 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD Me-too deja vu I read the report of a phase 3 RCT of a “new” breast cancer drug but I had the feeling that I had already read this before. Later I realized that this was indeed a new trial of a new drug, but that I had read a very similar report of a very similar drug with very similar results and conclusions. This new drug is a PARP inhibitor called talazoparib and the deja vu was related to another PARP inhibitor drug called olaparib tested in the same patient population of advanced breast cancer patients with a BRCA mutation. The control arms were the same: physician ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Drug Discovery Pharmaceuticals Bishal Gyawali Cancer immunotherapy Oncology Source Type: blogs

A CT scan for kidney cancer? It may depend on where you live.
About one in fifty people reading this essay will be diagnosed with kidney cancer at some time in their life. In fact, one out of one people  writing this essay has already been diagnosed with kidney cancer. (I had a small tumor removed from my left kidney not long after I turned 50.) But how many people […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Nephrology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Podcast: How Can You Stop Emotional Overeating?
  Emotional overeating is an extremely common problem for many people, particularly among those who live with depression. Many of us have a tendency to “eat our feelings,” resorting to food to make us feel better and as an escape from the things that bother us. As one would expect, this kind of behavior leads to weight gain, which only adds to the negative feelings that we’re trying to escape from. In this episode, we’ll learn about emotional overeating, including what it is and isn’t, its relation to hunger, and how to deal with the ever-present food during holidays, work functions, a...
Source: World of Psychology - November 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders General The Psych Central Show Emotional Overeating Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

3 Easy Tips to a Good Night Sleep
You're reading 3 Easy Tips to a Good Night Sleep, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Good night sleep. The best thing in the world (Second to a nice Cheeseburger on a rainy morning). According to a 2010 survey, 30 percent of Australians reported experiencing a severe sleeping disorder. Whereas in America, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that one of every four Americans reports not getting enough night sleep. This corresponds with another survey saying that around 60 million Americans...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marwan Jamal Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement health benefits of sleep how to get a good sleep pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

myLAB Box STI at-home Test Kits. Interview with Lora Ivanova, Co-Founder and CEO at myLAB Box
myLAB Box, a healthcare company based in California, has developed and pioneered an at-home sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing service. With the number of STDs rising, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 20 million new STDs occur annually in the US, and half of these are in people aged 15 to 24. STDs are often symptomless, but can have significant consequences. For instance, an estimated 24,000 women become infertile every year because of undiagnosed STDs. An estimated 80% of sexually active people will have a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection at some point in their lives, and HP...
Source: Medgadget - November 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Molecular Electronic Devices to Detect E. Coli
Detecting the presence of E. coli and other pathogenic bacteria is time consuming and expensive, requiring biological cell cultures or DNA amplification. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, University of Washington, and TOBB University of Economics and Technology in Turkey have used a single-molecule break junction, a molecular electronic device, to detect RNA from different pathogenic strains of E. coli.  “The reliable, efficient and inexpensive detection and identification of specific strains of microorganisms such as E. coli is a grand challenge in biology and the...
Source: Medgadget - November 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Pathology Source Type: blogs

I Heart Research: We speak to the winner of last year ’s ‘Research in progress’ photo competition
“I Heart Research”Sarah Boyle, Centre for Cancer Biology, Adelaide, South Australia. Tell us about your winning image from last year’s BMC ‘Research in progress’ photo competition Sarah Boyle, winner of the ‘Research in progress’ photo competition 2017. Breast cancer is the most widely diagnosed cancer in women world-wide, and despite advances in treatment, still remains a major cause of cancer-related death. My winning image, “I Heart Research”, was of a fluorescent mouse mammary tumor, captured during my studies into breast cancer progression. This mouse was genetical...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - November 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Davy Falkner Tags: Uncategorized Research in progress photo competition Source Type: blogs

Philips and Augusta University Partner to Improve Patient Care: Interview with Philips CMO
A few months ago, we heard about how Philips and Augusta University Health are working together in a long-term partnership for the co-development of clinical solutions such as a hybrid operating room. To learn more about the partnership as well as the unique, hybrid operating room into which multiple technologies and procedures have been combined, Medgadget heard from Dr. Joe Frassica, Philips’ CMO and Head of Research for the Americas.   Michael Batista, Medgadget: Thank you for taking the time to speak with us about the recent news regarding Philips’ partnership with Augusta University Hea...
Source: Medgadget - November 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Surgery Source Type: blogs

A patient ’s experience of chemotherapy and radiation
I had my first mammogram at age 35, and for the next 35 years I had mammograms regularly. On my way, I’d pass the entrance to the Thomas Johns Cancer Hospital, outside of Richmond, VA, never thinking that I’d one day cross that threshold myself. When I heard the“C” word, I didn’t know what […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lynn-lazos" rel="tag" > Lynn Lazos < /a > Tags: Patient Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

This is what the face of resilience looks like
At the age of 17, my younger sister Elisabeth noticed a change in her body — enlargement of the front of her neck. “I just thought I was building muscle from working out,” she innocently rationalized. A series of laboratory tests and imaging followed and led to a much more grave discovery — cancer. There […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rebekah-fenton" rel="tag" > Rebekah Fenton, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Oncology/Hematology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Notes on the 2018 Longevity Forum in London
The Longevity Forum, hosted by investor Jim Mellon and company yesterday in London, was a reminder that we still have a way to go when it comes to guiding the conversation on longevity and rejuvenation in a useful direction. On the one hand, most people give medicine and aging little serious thought until it is too late, and if we want large-scale funding for the goal of human rejuvenation through realization of the SENS research agenda, then the public at large really has to be on board in the same way that they are reflexively in favor of doing something about cancer and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, the first ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

A warning from the past
From BoingBoing (and tip o'the hat to Brad DeLong), words from Lyndon Johnson prior to the 1966 mid-terms. Johnson did a lot of good, but sadly Viet Nam ruined his legacy.I can think of nothing more dangerous, more divisive, or more self-destructive than the effort to prey on what is called'white backlash.'I thought it was a mistake to pump this issue up in the 1964 campaign, and I do not think it served the purpose of those who did. I think it is dangerous because it threatens to vest power in the hands of second-rate men whose only qualification is their ability to pander to other men's fears. I think it divides this nat...
Source: Stayin' Alive - November 6, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Another Recent Study Assesses the Financial Burden of Excess Fat Tissue
The personal cost of being overweight or obese is sizable, even when considering only financial matters, the greater expenditure on medical needs and the opportunity costs that accompany sickness and loss of capacity. Additional weight in the form of visceral fat tissue both shortens life expectancy and increases lifetime medical expense, this much is well established in the scientific literature. Summing those costs over the entire population produces some staggeringly large numbers. Those numbers can vary widely depending on the assumptions and what is included; those here are on the high end. Yet the cost of excess weig...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An interview with Sunil Krishnan, new co-EiC of Cancer Nanotechnology
As you can read about here, we are delighted to welcome Sunil Krishnan of MD Anderson, Tyler, Texas, as a new co-Editor-in-Chief of Cancer Nanotechnology. Sunil will join existing Editors-in-Chief Fred Currell, Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, UK, and Steve Curley, CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances, Texas, in helping to make Cancer Nanotechnology a premiere venue for research of its kind. We caught up with Sunil to find out a bit more about him, his research and how he feels about his new role on the journal. Sunil Krishnan; image courtesy of MD Anderson Sunil, congratulations on becoming an EiC...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - November 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Matthew Smyllie Tags: Health Medicine Open Access Publishing cancer nanotechnology interview Source Type: blogs

There ’ s a Psychiatrist Crisis in America That Few Are Talking About
There’s a psychiatrist crisis in America and virtually nobody is having a serious conversation about how to fix it. It’s not clear how we, as a nation, can brag about our amazing healthcare system when finding a psychiatrist who takes your insurance and is open to new patients is virtually impossible in most places in the U.S. Even worse is that the crisis is still growing and little is being done to avert it. Over at Popula, Jameson Rich details his ordeal in trying to find a new psychiatrist that takes his insurance: My therapist would make a dosage recommendation in consultation with some other doctors, she...
Source: World of Psychology - November 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Treatment american psychiatrist lack of psychiatrists psychiatrist crisis Source Type: blogs

Greater Cancer Risk for Taller People is Near Entirely Due to Having More Cells
There has been some debate in the research community as to whether the observed relationship between cancer risk and height in our species is due to (a) taller people having more cells, and thus more chances to suffer a cancerous mutation, or (b) some more indirect factor, such as, for example, the role of growth hormone in cellular metabolism. The author of this study marshals data to argue convincingly for the former hypothesis, for most forms of cancer. The multistage model of carcinogenesis predicts cancer risk will increase with tissue size, since more cells provide more targets for oncogenic somatic mutation...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 5, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A new EiC and new identity for Cancer Nanotechnology
There have been some exciting developments recently for Cancer Nanotechnology. In August, the journal joined the BMC family of journals, and in doing so, became a part of a brand that has been a true innovator in open access publishing since its founding in the late nineties. Itself a pioneer as a research venue at the intersection of cancer research and nanotechnology, Cancer Nanotechnology is naturally at home with BMC, and those of us working the journal are delighted to be a member of this prestigious family. We look forward to this new chapter in the journal’s life, and we invite you to learn more about our new ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - November 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Matthew Smyllie Tags: Health Medicine Open Access Publishing cancer nanotechnology materials science Source Type: blogs

Questioning Your Doctor is Ok
I received a good question(s) from a reader: In your “Changing the culture” posting there is the comment: “Patients seeking medical treatment should not assume a prescribed therapy is beneficial just because a doctor says it is.”… How then does a patient evaluate a proposed treatment in a way that they aren’t thwarting a doctor from performing what may be a needed course of treatment? … Other writing I’ve seen describes doctors being too accommodative to patients reluctance at a treatment. A bad feedback loop if there was one. Patients sho...
Source: Dr John M - November 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 5th 2018
In conclusion, weight cycling significantly increased life-span relative to remaining with obesity and had a similar benefit to sustained modest weight loss. Support for Oxidized Cholesterol as a Primary Cause of Atherosclerosis https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/11/support-for-oxidized-cholesterol-as-a-primary-cause-of-atherosclerosis/ In the paper I'll point out today, the authors provide evidence in support of the concept that it is specifically oxidized cholesterol that is the primary cause of atherosclerosis rather than the condition resulting from too much cholesterol in general. In atheroscl...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Nurses, Nursing, and the Nature of Suffering
In the course of many nurses'healthcare careers, witnessing the illness, suffering, and death of others is commonplace. From dialysis and med-surg to home health and the ICU, nurses create therapeutic relationships with patients and their families, providing spiritual and emotional comfort, compassion, and expert skilled care based on many decades of nursing science and evidence-based interventions.Aside from witnessing the challenges faced by others, nurses are themselves human beings with their own life experiences, victories, and suffering. How a nurse navigates their own personal suffering plays a role in determining h...
Source: Digital Doorway - November 4, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: healthcare nurse nurses nursing Source Type: blogs

Grander Lessons from a Failure of Robotic Surgery
This week on my podcast, I deviated briefly from cardiology to discuss a shocking and sad study highlighting the vital nature of doing randomized controlled trials in the practice of medicine. The reason I mentioned a trial comparing 2 types of hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) in women with early stage cervical cancer was not to opine on matters of cancer, but because the tragic story shows the harm doctors can do if we incorporate therapies without proper testing. The New England Journal of Medicine published a trial in which women with early cervical cancer were randomized to two types of hysterectomy: One...
Source: Dr John M - November 4, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Where Does Blood Testing Stand Today?
The dream about a drop of blood signaling a wide range of diagnostic results was shattered with Elizabeth Holmes and the Theranos scam. The machination of the company has set back the innovation of blood testing and investment into the field for years. However, there’s always hope. The Medical Futurist looked around where blood testing stands today and what’s the future it is heading towards. Dreaming about a home laboratory Stephen just came home from walking his dog, Barney, an always smiling labrador. The 40-something got off his smart shoes, sat back on the yellow couch that he and her partner, Sara, were f...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 3, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Biotechnology Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Portable Diagnostics Researchers blood blood draw blood test blood testing digital health health market home Innovation laboratory theranos Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 79-year-old man with a sacral ulcer
Test your medicine knowledge with the  MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 79-year-old man is evaluated for pain in the buttocks region. He was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin large B-cell lymphoma 6 months ago. Although his lymphoma has responded well to therapy and he is without evidence of active d isease, he required hospitalization […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Recent Research into the Interaction of Exercise and Aging
Today's open access papers touch on aspects of the interaction between exercise and the pace of aging. People age at somewhat different rates, and for the vast majority of us lifestyle is a far greater determinant of that rate than our genes. Until such time as the clinical deployment of rejuvenation therapies is well underway, and in regions of the world sufficiently wealthy to have tamed the majority of infectious disease, it remains the case that our choices regarding our health, such as calorie restriction and exercise, are the most reliable means of improving life expectancy. The size of the effect is not enormous in ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

November Is National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month
Historically, American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities have been disproportionately affected by many health issues such as heart disease, cancer, substance abuse and sudden infant death syndrome. As the largest biomedical research agency in the world, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to honoring the health of Native communities by conducting initiatives that aim to advance research and expand the reach of health information relevant to them. In this special NIH-wide collaborative issue of Honoring Health, you will find a sample of the health resources available from many of the NIH Institut...
Source: BHIC - November 2, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kay Deeney Tags: General Minority Health Concerns Public Health Source Type: blogs

Nonsense-Based Health Care - in the Service of Political Ideology and Sectarian Beliefs
ConclusionSince 2016, we have seen increasing attempts to distort or ignore medical science, clinical and epidemiological research findings to support the political ideology of the ruling party and the religious beliefs of their extreme fundamentalist supporters.  As we have discussed, most recentlyhere, the Trump regime has seen fit to put ill-informed people in positions of power in health care and public health agencies.  Some of these people have put their political and/or religious agendas ahead of the public's health.  Our examples above show a continuing inclination by the administration, its sympathi...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 2, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: DHHS disinformation Donald Trump ill-informed management mission-hostile management propaganda Source Type: blogs

Could an ELF Have Saved Baselga?
by Lisa Kearns, MS, MA, and Arthur Caplan, PhD A few months ago we called for a new conflict of interest (COI) disclosure policy. Recent events at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) underscore the urgency in addressing COI. We encourage researchers to create an “ELF,” an electronic long-form disclosure statement that lists financial relationships, as well as any political, advocacy, or religious points of view, pertinent investments, and the like — any information that could help readers assess potential author bias.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Arthur Caplan Tags: Conflict of Interest Featured Posts Science publication Source Type: blogs

Nope. We STILL Shouldn't Claim Prolonged Survival in Hospice and Palliative Care
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A group of investigators from Tulanerecently published a meta-analysis in Annals of Behavioral Medicine indicating that outpatient palliative care improves survival and quality of life in advanced cancer patients (free full-text available here, although I'm not sure if that's permanent).Perhaps you'll remember inJune of this year when I pleaded with our community to stop claiming that palliative care prolongs survival (my littleTwitter rant about this starts here).My basic plea was this:Hospice and palliative care community, I'm calling for a moratorium on all blanket, unqualified claims that h...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - November 2, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Tags: journal article outpatient pallimed writing group research research issues rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs

Scripps Research Translational Institute Partners To Develop AI Applications
The Scripps Research Translational Institute has agreed to work with graphics processing unit-maker NVIDIA to support the development of AI applications. The partners plan to forge AI and deep learning best practices, tools and infrastructure tailored to supporting the AI application development process. In collaboration with NVIDIA, Scripps will establish a center of excellence for artificial intelligence in genomics and digital sensors. According to Dr. Eric Topol, the Institute’s founder and director, AI should eventually improve accuracy, efficiency, and workflow in medical practices. This is especially true of t...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 2, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: Digital Health Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR Genomic Medicine Genomics Health Sensors Healthcare AI HealthCare IT Personalized Medicine Precision Medicine Dr. Eric Topol Graphics Processing Unit NIH NVI Source Type: blogs

Coffee may help your skin stay healthy
Here’s a medical news story that combines a common habit (drinking coffee) with a common skin condition (rosacea) — and it even has a happy ending. What is rosacea? Rosacea is probably something you’ve seen plenty of times and didn’t know what it was — or perhaps you have it yourself. It’s that pink or red discoloration on the cheeks some people have, especially fair-haired women. Sometimes there are small bumps that may look a bit like acne. If you look closely (after asking nicely for permission, of course), you’ll see tiny blood vessels just under the surface of the skin. In mor...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

23andMe ’s Pharmacogenetic Test Approved by FDA
The FDA has just approved 23andMe’s Personal Genomic Service (PGS) Pharmacogenetic Reports. This marks the first direct-to-consumer test for pharmacogenetics of enzyme variants that may affect the way patients break down medications. Consumers collect their saliva into 23andMe’s testing kit, mail it to the company’s labs, and then receive the results via an online portal. The approved pharmacogenetic assessment system looks for 33 variants of common enzymes that affect medication metabolism, including CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP3A5, UGT1A1, DPYD, TPMT, SLCO1B1, and CYP2D6. The full list of variants can be found ...
Source: Medgadget - November 1, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ben Ouyang Tags: Diagnostics Genetics News Source Type: blogs

Something Smells Fishy
​A 32-year-old woman and her 36-year-old husband with no past medical history presented to the ED with palpitations, headache, a feeling of warmth all over, and a rash extending from their upper chests to their faces.The blood pressures of the wife and husband were 91/56 mm Hg and 93/61 mm Hg, respectively. Both were mildly tachycardic with heart rates of 112 bpm and 108 bpm. The patients described intense pruritus, and they had patchy blanching and erythema over their chests and faces with mild eyelid edema. They reported that their symptoms started five to 10 minutes after sharing an ahi tuna poke bowl.What Is the...
Source: The Tox Cave - November 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Silence isn ’t golden when it comes to health
When I was a preemie — all two-and-a-half pounds of me — my mom was understandably worried. She said her doctor wheeled her down the hall to the newborn nursery, and my mom could hear me screaming all the way down the hall. She said, “I’ve got to hand it to you. You let your […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/r-lynn-barnett" rel="tag" > R. Lynn Barnett < /a > Tags: Patient Oncology/Hematology Patients Source Type: blogs

Final Stretch Goal for the Lifespan.io NAD+ Mouse Study Crowdfunding Event
The latest Lifespan.io crowdfunding project launched last month and is already closing in on the final stretch goal of $75,000; congratulations to everyone involved. The funds will be used to run a mouse study of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) supplementation, one of a number of similar approaches that can increase NAD+ levels in older animals. This in turn improves mitochondrial function, though without addressing any of the underlying causes of mitochondrial decline with aging - it is a way to narrowly compensate for some of the metabolic consequences of aging, or to selectively override some of the reactions to the b...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Market Analysts on the Future of Aging
In this report, we explore the current landscape of initiatives that aim to slow down the aging process, and in turn, reduce the likelihood of several diseases. We look at how these initiatives could promote longevity and what this market looks like for both investors and consumers. Link: https://www.cbinsights.com/research/report/future-aging-technology-startups/ (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - November 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Recent Research into the Effects of Obesity on Aging
In conclusion, weight cycling significantly increased life-span relative to remaining with obesity and had a similar benefit to sustained modest weight loss. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - October 31, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs