Dietary rut? 5 ways to snap out of it
Why is it that despite so many interesting foods in the world, we sometimes fall into dietary rut? For busy working families, lapsing into a boring menu routine may be due to a lack of time, planning, or know-how. Years ago, when I anchored the local TV news at dinnertime, my husband Jay made noodles with takeout meatballs so often that our three kids (even the baby) would tease him about it. “I didn’t know how to cook and I didn’t give much thought to dinner until everybody was hungry,” remembers Jay, my prince who would work all day, pick up the kids, and feed them before I got home. “We&rsq...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Exercise versus the Hallmarks of Aging
The paper I'll point out today walks through the ways in which exercise is known to beneficially affect the Hallmarks of Aging. The Hallmarks are a list of the significant causes of aging that I disagree with about half of. The SENS catalog of root causes of aging, first published earnestly in the literature back in 2002, isn't cited anywhere near as much as the much later Hallmarks of Aging - which owes a great deal to its predecessor while failing to mention it in any way. There is some overlap between the two, but many of the Hallmarks are not causes of aging, but rather manifestations of aging, meaning secondary and la...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 19, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Special Nanoparticles Cloaked in Tumor Cells Deliver Protein to Kill Cancer
Many cancers tumors are actually quite easy to kill, if not for our extremely skeptical immune systems. There are proteins, for example, that are quite toxic to some cancers, but they get broken down rapidly as soon as they are injected into the body. Researchers at Penn State University have now created a way of encapsulating a protein called gelonin, derived from a plant, within a nano-package that stays below the radar of the immune system. This so-called biomimetic nanosystem consists of self-assembled metal-organic framework nanoparticles that hold the cargo, but which are wrapped in a layer made from cells deriv...
Source: Medgadget - June 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Hairy Frosted Glass Slides Capture Circulating Tumor Cells for Screening and Early Diagnosis
Biopsies are typically the way prostate cancer is identified, but prostate cancers also release circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that are telltale signs of the presence of the disease. Because they’re so rare and difficult to separate from whole blood, CTCs remain rarely used for establishing diagnoses. Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Scientists have now developed a cheap and easy way to capture CTCs using silica nanowires grown on frosted glass slides and antibodies that make the connection to the cancer cells. The silica nanowires were grown directly on the glass slides, following which a special adhesion mol...
Source: Medgadget - June 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Oncology Pathology Source Type: blogs

Elekta Unity, a Revolutionary Combo of MRI and Linear Accelerator, Cleared in Europe
Elekta won European CE Mark approval for its Unity system that combines magnetic resonance imaging with a linear accelerator for highly targeted, real-time radiotherapy. The technology was originally the brainchild of physicists at UMC Utrecht in The Netherlands. Before their research found breakthroughs, it was believed that combining an MRI machine and a particle accelerator was impossible. Fast moving, electrically charged particles are strongly influenced by a powerful magnetic field, so keeping them on track while near an MRI seemed like an impossibility. On our recent visit to UMC Utrecht, we learned that though it s...
Source: Medgadget - June 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiation Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Separating children and parents at the border causes lifelong damage
There is an important scientific fact that we need to be aware of as the political drama at the border unfolds: when children are separated from their parents, they can be damaged for the rest of their lives. Research shows that when children face strong, frequent, or prolonged adversity without adequate support from adults, it causes a stress response that can have terrible consequences. This “toxic stress” affects both the mind and the body. It disrupts normal brain development, leading to not just emotional problems, but problems with thinking and learning. Children who are exposed to toxic stress have a hig...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Source Type: blogs

Who should NOT do the L. reuteri yogurt?
Because consumption of the L. reuteri yogurt made with the ATCC PTA 6475 and DSM 17938 strains work by raising levels of oxytocin (in addition to local probiotic benefits on reducing H. pylori and acid reflux, for example, unusual for its upper, not just lower, gastrointestinal benefits), there are people who probably should not consume the yogurt.. Oxytocin is a multi-faceted hormone whose levels decline as we age, much as does growth hormone and other hormones. But, among its many varied effects is the potential for causing uterine contraction. That is why oxytocin is administered to provoke delivery of a term infan...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle anti-aging healing oxytocin probiotic reuteri skin wrinkles Source Type: blogs

Google ’ s Masterplan for Healthcare
Verily, Calico, Deepmind, more than 150 patents in life sciences and countless collaborations with pharma companies. The search engine’s parent company, Alphabet takes its move into healthcare and medicine seriously. We looked thoroughly at what Google in healthcare looks like. My Apple health chatbot referred me to the Amazon hospital where I got Google drugs It’s 2030, a rainy Tuesday morning in downtown Seattle. While my self-driving car is taking me to a digital health symposium, I’m working on my keynote speech. Suddenly I receive a notification from my Apple health chatbot, Miri. The sensors m...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Genomics AI calico digital health genetics google google deepmind Healthcare Innovation longevity research tech technology verily Source Type: blogs

Misdiagnosis: Obamacare Tried to Fix the Wrong Things and Prescribed the Wrong Treatments
By CHARLES SILVER and DAVID A.HYMAN Today THCB is happy to publish a piece reflecting the learnings from Charles Silver and David Hyman’s forthcoming book Overcharged: Why Americans Pay Too Much For Health Care, shortly to be published by the libertarian leaning Cato Institute. In subsequent weeks we’ll feature commentary from the right (Michael Cannon) and from the left (Andy Slavitt) about the book and its proposals. For now please give your views in the comments–Matthew Holt There are many reasons why the United States is “the most expensive place in the world to get sick.” In Par...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Economics OP-ED Cato Institute Charles Silver David A. Hyman Obamacare Overcharged Source Type: blogs

Newfound Enthusiasm in Mining Senescent Cells for Mechanisms Relevant to Therapy
In this study, we investigate mitochondrial energetics and mtDNA methylation in senescent cells, and evaluate the potential of humanin and MOTS-c as novel senolytics or SASP modulators that can alleviate symptoms of frailty and extend health span by targeting mitochondrial bioenergetics. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - June 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

DocPanel Announces Partnership with the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Largest online marketplace of radiologists gives consumers access toworld class medical experts NEW YORK, NEW YORK – MAY 2, 2018 – Today,DocPanel announced a partnership with theUniversity of Southern California (USC) Keck School of MedicineDepartment of Radiology that will give consumers access to Keck ’s 60 world class radiology sub-specialists. DocPanel is an industry solution. It enables imaging centers to use USC experts who are focused on specific areas of the body, therefore, providing unique perspective and accurate insights.Already, imaging centers are benefiting from DocPanel’s access...
Source: radRounds - June 18, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Philip Templeton Source Type: blogs

Pureed Food Recipes: Swallowing Impairment Needn't Signal the End of Great Eating
Dysphagia is a swallowing impairment that can occur after someone has a stroke or any type of brain injury. Dysphagia is also a concern with Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), oral cancer, and many other injuries and diseases. However, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), dysphagia is also a growing concern in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). The NIH says that dysphagia “frequently leads to aspiration pneumonia, a common cause of death in this population, particularly in the later stage of AD.” Read full article on HealthCentral and get free downloads, and free re...
Source: Minding Our Elders - June 18, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Rebuilding my body: breast reconstruction in England
This report compiles evidence from Freedom of Information (FOI) requests conducted by the Breast Cancer Now in 2017. It shows that 47 out of 208 clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England (22.6 per cent) have established policies to restrict reconstruction services for non-clinical reasons. With a further nine CCGs (4.3 per cent) having draft policies or informal restrictions in place. The emerging policies – which have been described by the charity as'totally unacceptable' and'not in the best interest of patients' – include limiting the number of surgeries women are allowed, enforcing a ti...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - June 18, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Patient involvement, experience and feedback Source Type: blogs

It ’s time to create the safety net by normalizing psychiatric care
I’ve thought a great deal about what to say, if anything, about the two suicides recently of two people who were not merely celebrities in the TMZ sense, but people who represented creativity — perhaps in a way that seemed tangible to the rest of us — and seem to have become celebrities almost by happenstance. Suicide is not an unfamiliar or difficult topic for me. After all, I am someone who has spent the better part of the last nine years addressing someone’s struggle with suicide, day in and day out. As a physician, I’ve been exposed many times to untimely death — whether intentional ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/torie-sepah" rel="tag" > Torie Sepah, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 18th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 17, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Call suicide by what it is: the cause of death
As is often the case when flying I was rewarded for offering a greeting to my row mate on the plane with a bit of insight and knowledge I’d have missed had I not simply reached out a hand and said, “Hi, I’m Darrell.” My momentary companion (we each moved to more spacious seats) had been a schoolmate of the recently deceased Kate Spade. He confirmed her years-long struggle with a depression that defied logic and was thus a depression that was as pathological as diabetes or heart disease or cancer. Opening my Sunday papers brings stories from the friends of Anthony Bourdain, also deceased, and his dec...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/darrell-white" rel="tag" > Darrell White, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Chest Pain and Inferior ST Elevation.
Conclusion:In hemodynamically stable patients with chest pain, sinus tachycardia aids in the identification of patients unlikely to have type I MI, especially in those with HR> 120 bpm. (Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog)
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

NIH Disbands Alcohol Clinical Trial Because of Scientific and Ethical Breaches
In a decision that I applaud, NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins announced yesterday that based on the recommendation of his Advisory Committee after an extensive investigation, he is discontinuing the MACH15 (Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health) clinical trial of moderate alcohol consumption (see original news reportshere andhere).In itsreport, the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director concluded as follows:" To understand the context that led NIAAA to embark on the MACH trial, the ACD WG considered the nature and extent of interactions among NIAAA staff, select extramural investigators, and industry representat...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - June 16, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

The story of a physician who fought back against MOC
Today one of my favorite families came for a visit.  The kids were behind on their check-ups, but this wasn’t too surprising. Their young mom was recently diagnosed with stage 3 cancer and was working her way through surgeries and chemo.  The length of time since our last visit made me worry that mom’s health kept the kids from their routine visits,  but upon entering the room she looked well. We chatted for a bit and caught up on her health before moving to talk about the kids. “Sorry, we’re behind. Our insurance company sent a letter saying you were no longer a provider, so we had t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/meg-edison" rel="tag" > Meg Edison, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Researchers test curcumin in new bone-building study
After enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin using polymers, a group of Washington State University researchers proved that curcumin can increase bone growth by between 30% and 45%  in a matter of weeks: “The presence of curcumin in TCP results in enhanced bone formation after 6 weeks.” (Quoted from the abstract.) The researchers are currently testing other natural extracts as well, namely “aloe vera, saffron, Vitamin D, garlic, oregano and ginger [… ] that might help with bone disorders, including those that encourage bone growth or that have anti-inflammatory, infection control, or a...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll bone building bone formation curcumin myeloma Source Type: blogs

Clearance of Senescent Cells as a Therapy for Age-Related Muscle Loss and Frailty
Today's open access review looks over the evidence for senescent cells to contribute to the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, leading to sarcopenia and frailty. Regular readers will know that the research community has found many mechanisms that are arguably important contribution to the characteristic weakness of old age. This part of the field is rife with competing evidence for processes ranging from the comparatively mundane, such as an inadequate dietary intake of protein in older people, to the highly complex, such as the biochemical disarray that causes loss of neuromuscular junctions, and the interactio...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

An emotional day as a doctor
My first patient of the day has metastatic pancreatic cancer. She’s had it, in fact, for two years. Getting chemo for two years. Her hair has fallen out, her pain is becoming uncontrollable and she’s been in and out of the hospital. Her daughters came to the clinic with her. She is tearful. Her daughters pull me aside. “Tell her to focus on the positive,” they request. I wonder if there is ever a positive twist on having metastatic pancreatic cancer, but I keep my thoughts to myself. This is not about me. It’s about this patient who is living with it. Every question I ask her gets answered by ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/uzma-khan" rel="tag" > Uzma Khan, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Particles Made of Silk Protect Immune System Boosting Drugs to Fight Cancer
Peptides, or strings of amino acids, are being investigated as a way to help activate the immune system to fight cancer and other diseases. Delivering them into the interior of immune system’s cells is difficult because they’re easily broken apart by the body. Now a team of researchers from Switzerland and Germany have developed a way of creating hybrid silk-based particles and using them to encapsulate peptides for safe transport to disease sites. “To develop immunotherapeutic drugs effective against cancer, it is essential to generate a significant response of T lymphocytes,» says Professor Carole...
Source: Medgadget - June 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Source Type: blogs

Over-Screening, Rigid Protocols, and Changing Guidelines: A Personal Journey Through the Looking-Glass
by Craig Klugman A new JAMAarticle reports on a US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation against routine ECG in patients without symptoms of heart disease: “For asymptomatic adults at low risk of CVD events (individuals with a 10-year CVD event risk less than 10%), it is very unlikelythat the information from resting or exercise ECG (beyond that obtained with conventional CVD risk factors) will result in a change in the patient’s risk category….”The report states that over-screening can lead to harms such as “invasive procedures, overtreatment, and labeling.”Such advice follows ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 13, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Ethics Featured Posts ECG JAMA protocols Source Type: blogs

Am I the cold and detached physician?
It’s 9:30 a.m. on a Wednesday, I get on the elevator, and I hear a man in his 40s, having a conversation on his cell. He says: “He had a brain bleed yesterday, and they had to put a breathing tube in, they don’t know how much damage his brain has suffered at this point.” He gets off on the adult ICU floor. I quickly think “that sucks” and carry on. A little bit later that day, as if the theme for the day was brain injury, I walk by a woman standing on the street. She speaks on her cell phone and says: “There was a blood clot that went to his head, and now they are trying to bust it...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michelle-ramirez" rel="tag" > Michelle Ramirez, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Critical Care Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Exercise as part of cancer treatment
In a first, a national cancer organization has issued formal guidelines recommending exercise as part of cancer treatment, for all cancer patients. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) is very clear on the directive. Its recommendations are: Exercise should be embedded as part of standard practice in cancer care and viewed as an adjunct therapy that helps counteract the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment. All members of the multi-disciplinary cancer team should promote physical activity and help their patients adhere to exercise guidelines. Best practice cancer care should include referral to an accr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Cancer Exercise and Fitness Health Source Type: blogs

You can't breathe. You cannot breathe.
That's Orange Julius,as quoted by David Cutler and Francesca Dominici, referring to environmental regulations which he claims are " destroying us. " And professional thief Scott Pruitt has indeed proposed eliminating a whole lot of them.That's very popular with owners and executives of regulated industries, such as, oh for example the Koch brothers, who are known to make campaign contributions, and others who pay bribes directly to Mr. Pruitt.Anyway, Cutler and Dominici run down some of the ways America will be Great Again once this all happens. For example, repeal of the Clean Power Plan will result  in par...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

A Reminder that Excess Visceral Fat is Harmful
This popular science article takes a high level look at the vast array of research data showing that excess visceral fat causes great harm to long term health. One of the more important mediating mechanisms is an increase in chronic inflammation, a state of dysfunction in the operation of the immune system that disrupts organ function and tissue maintenance, and accelerates the development of all of the common age-related diseases. There are numerous other connections between the pace of aging and the activities of visceral fat tissue, however. Becoming overweight is the path to a shorter life expectancy, greater incidence...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Dander Still Up. Drowning in Great Dismal Swamp. Film at Eleven.
Maybe this is the last in my series of dander-raising essays, as recent national and world events have most definitely left so many of us with a raging case of TDS. (Trump Derangement Syndrome, look it up it's a thing).So many damned browser tabs open. So little time.Or maybe not. Who knows. Where are all these suicides coming from?My editor keeps telling me, " don't let it make you paralytic. " Hey, I'm trying.Just sensing a kind of coalescence in all the corruption our bloggers keep writing about. How do we even differentiate these activities across so many sectors of society. We were going to see our swamp dra...
Source: Health Care Renewal - June 12, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: blogs

Resuscitated cardiac arrest – Cardiology MCQ – Answer
Thirty year old male was resuscitated from cardiac arrest. His temperature was 37 degrees centigrade and serum potassium was 4.5 mEq/litre. ECG showed an abnormal wave at the end of the QRS complex. He is likely to have: Correct answer:  c) Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia The wave at the end of the QRS is likely to be Epsilon wave. It is sometimes called ‘post excitation’ by analogy with the delta wave seen at the beginning of the QRS in pre-excitation. Hypothermia and hypokalemia can cause cardiac arrest, which are excluded from the data given. Osborne wave in hypothermia is also seen...
Source: Cardiophile MD - June 12, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

This physician vows not to rush
My last patient of the day was an elderly woman with metastatic lung cancer, a non-smoker who had been battling this terrible disease for more than a year. I was running thirty minutes behind. I had a packed afternoon with difficult cases and patients who required more of my time and care. I peeked into her room, said hello and apologized for running late. Ms. B.  greeted me with her kind, gentle smile as she always did and said, “I am not in a rush; take your time Dr. T.” “Take your time.” Her words rang through my mind as I completed the visit with the patient before her and stayed with me th...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kristine-tatosyan-jones" rel="tag" > Kristine Tatosyan-Jones, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

BMC Biomedical Engineering: the BMC series expands into engineering!
I am delighted to announce that BMC Biomedical Engineering, a new open access, peer-reviewed journal is now open for submissions and with it the BMC series enters for the first time a new subject area: engineering. This is the first of two newly launched journals in the BMC series. Editor Harriet Manning discusses the launch of BMC Chemical Engineering in her blog post. 2018 has been declared as the “Year of Engineering” by the UK government, an initiative that has seen wide support by hundreds of national and international organisations. We see no better time to expand our offering to this diverse and crucial ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - June 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alexandros Houssein Tags: Medicine BMC Biomedical Engineering BMC Series Source Type: blogs

7 Easy Sleeping Tips to Prevent Sleep Problem
You're reading 7 Easy Sleeping Tips to Prevent Sleep Problem, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. We all know how important the sleep is! Sleep is one of the principals for having a better life. Proper sleep helps us a lot to keep our body healthy and the mind calm. But you know what, about one-third of the total world’s population has sleep problems. There are a lot of reasons behind sleep problem. As the sleep has a deep relation to our lifestyle, it’s really important to have at least 5-8 hours ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Harris Tags: health and fitness balanced diet good mattress sleep problem Source Type: blogs

AMA Rejects Recommendation to Reaffirm Opposition to Medical Aid in Dying
The American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates today voted 53 to 47 percent to reject a report by its Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) that recommended the AMA maintain its Code of Medical Ethics’ opposition to medical aid in dying. Instead, the House of Delegates referred the report back to CEJA for further work. The AMA Code of Medical Ethics Opinion 5.7 adopted 25 years ago in 1993 before medical aid in dying was authorized anywhere in the United States says: “...permitting physicians to engage in assisted suicide would ultimately cause more harm than good. Physician-assisted suic...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Sugar Nanoparticles Reprogram Immune Cells to Help Destroy Tumors
This report is in line with a number of recent papers from the Weissleder Lab and labs around the world to reprogram the immune system to fight cancer. Cancer immunotherapy was ranked the biggest breakthrough in 2012 by the magazine Science, and teams around the world are working on unlocking its potential to cure more patients of cancer. Tumor associated macrophages have been implicated in preventing T cells from doing their cancer-killing jobs, so these macrophage-targeting nanoparticles are poised solve the next hurdle in the immunotherapy story. The cyclodextrin nanoparticles are formed by FDA-approved individual compo...
Source: Medgadget - June 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ben Ouyang Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Ming Lei to Direct Research Capacity Building Division
I’m pleased to announce that Ming Lei will join NIGMS later this month as the new director of our Division for Research Capacity Building. Ming is a molecular geneticist with extensive experience overseeing fellowship, career development, and training and education grant programs. Ming is currently deputy director of the Center for Cancer Training and chief of the Cancer Training Branch at the National Cancer Institute, which he joined in 2008 as a program director. His experience before that includes leading the Genes and Genome Cluster in the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences at the National Science Fo...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - June 11, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Dr. Jon Lorsch Tags: Director’s Messages Job Announcements News NIGMS Staff News Source Type: blogs

Colon cancer screening at age 45: Here ’s what a gastroenterologist thinks
The American Cancer Society (ACS) recently released new guidelines regarding colorectal cancer screening for the average-risk individual. The big news is that they now recommend that screening for colorectal cancer begin at age 45 rather than age 50. This reduction in the starting age was in reaction to recent data showing that colon cancer is increasing in younger Americans for unclear reasons. By screening people at a younger age, the hope is that we can detect and prevent colon cancer in more people. The ACS states that 20 percent of new cases of colorectal cancer occur in the younger-than-55 crowd. Furthermor...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/frederick-gandolfo" rel="tag" > Frederick Gandolfo, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

7 Easy Sleeping Tips to Prevent Sleep Problem
You're reading 7 Easy Sleeping Tips to Prevent Sleep Problem, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. We all know how important the sleep is! Sleep is one of the principals for having a better life. Proper sleep helps us a lot to keep our body healthy and the mind calm. But you know what, about one-third of the total world’s population has sleep problems. There are a lot of reasons behind sleep problem. As the sleep has a deep relation to our lifestyle, it’s really important to have at least 5-8 hours ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Harris Tags: health and fitness balanced diet good mattress sleep problem Source Type: blogs

Alcohol Clinical Trial Continues to Crumble: Anheuser-Busch Pulls Its Funding
In another setback for the NIAAA's and alcohol industry's study of the " health benefits " of encouraging people to drink, Anheuser-Busch has pulled its funding from the clinical trial because recent controversy over how the research funding was solicited has undermined the study's credibility.According to anarticle by Roni Caryn Rabin in theNew York Times:" Brewing giant Anheuser-Busch InBev, one of five alcohol companies underwriting a $100 million federal trial on the health benefits of a daily drink, is pulling its funding from the project, saying controversy about the sponsorship threatens to undermine ...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - June 10, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 11th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Unknown Part of Anthony Bourdain
“Last time I saw all this, I think it’s fair to say, I was at a turning point in my life,” Anthony Bourdain says before embarking into the Borneo jungle. He was not afraid to discuss his long battle with substance use, an issue that millions of Americans struggle with. In fact, recent data shows that annual deaths from opioid misuse have surpassed deaths by car accidents, guns, or breast cancer, highlighting an astoundingly dramatic increase in nationwide substance use disorders. 1, 2 “I have been hardened by the last 10 years. I don’t know what that says about me… but, there it is.&rdq...
Source: World of Psychology - June 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amanda Marie Cardinale Tags: Celebrities Depression General Stigma Suicide anthony bourdain bourdain suicide suicide of anthony bourdain Source Type: blogs

Weekly Overseas Health IT Links – 9th June, 2018
Here are a few I came across last week.Note: Each link is followed by a title and few paragraphs. For the full article click on the link above title of the article. Note also that full access to some links may require site registration or subscription payment.-----https://www.digitalhealth.net/2018/05/breast-cancer-screening-error-thousands-more/Breast cancer screening error ‘may have affected thousands more’The breast cancer screening error may have affected thousands more women across England, one researcher at Kings College London has claimed.Hanna Crouch – 31 May 2018Jeremy Hunt told MPs in May that a...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - June 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

My first patient to be diagnosed with cancer
“I feel very dizzy when standing,” was Ms. A’s* chief complaint. She originally came to the ER for sudden onset double vision and severe balance issues. After briefing myself, I took the stairs to the fourth floor and found her. When I arrived, Ms. A was the only person there. She was wearing a silver visor and a crisp white shirt. As a native of west Texas, she loved her BBQ, local football, and farming. After I went through my usual routine and gathered her history, I proceeded to the physical exam. I listened to her heart, breath, and belly sounds, then palpated with my fingers her cervical and clavicu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/ton-la-jr" rel="tag" > Ton La, Jr. < /a > Tags: Education Oncology/Hematology Primary Care Source Type: blogs

A Selection of Recent Research in the Alzheimer's Field
Today I'll point out a few recent examples of research into Alzheimer's disease; they are representative of present shifts in emphasis taking place in the field. There is a great deal of reexamination of existing mechanisms, alongside a search for new mechanisms. This is prompted by the continued failure to obtain meaningful progress towards patient improvement via clearance of amyloid, which some are interpreting as a need to look elsewhere for a viable basis for therapy. I believe it probably has more to do with the condition arising from multiple processes that have similarly sized contributions to cognitive decline: am...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Patients know what ’s wrong with the industry more than we do
As a system, we don’t invest as much time in understanding the broader context of the patient in front of us. The before/after factors that we don’t notice have a far-reaching impact on care. Recently, I shadowed a patient through a day procedure at an endoscopy center from the time that the nurse checked her weight to the time that she was discharged. Let’s call her Nancy. She was 82 years old and sprightly with silvery hair curled up all over her head. She smiled easily. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/praveen-suthrum" rel="tag" > Praveen Suthrum < /a > Tags: Tech Oncology/Hematology Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Prescription monitoring programs: Helpful or harmful?
The crushing toll of the opioid crisis is daily news, including stories about ways to “fix” it. A wide array of initiatives has been brought forward in an attempt to curb this epidemic and the damage it causes. Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) are one of them. The goal of PMPs is a good one — to identify patients who are being prescribed multiple medications by multiple clinicians. It is a means to introduce some stewardship for preventing overuse and misuse of prescription drugs. How prescription monitoring programs work Prescription monitoring programs are state-based electronic databases that pr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephen P. Wood, MS, ACNP-BC Tags: Addiction Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

Ending Aging Now Translated into Portuguese
Ending Aging is an important book, a concise explanation of the SENS approach to the development of rejuvenation therapies. It is aimed at laypeople, but with enough depth for scientists to use it as a starting point for their own further reading as well. It covers the extensive evidence gathered by the research community over the decades to support the concept that aging is caused by the accumulation of a few classes of molecular damage to cells and tissues. It outlines proposed therapies that could, if fully developed, repair or work around that damage in order to remove its contribution to aging. Since its public...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Immunosenescence and Neurodegeneration
How greatly does the onset of dementia depend on the age-related decline of the immune system? The most evident contributions to neurodegeneration are vascular aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates such as amyloid-β, tau, and α-synuclein. These are only indirectly connected to the aging of the immune system, in the sense that immune function influences in some way near all aspects of tissue function, and its progressive failure tends to make everything at least a little less functional. Chronic inflammation appears to play a direct and important role in the progression of most neurodegenerative condit...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs