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Fermented foods to beat back SIBO and dysbiosis
If you’ve been following the Wheat Belly discussions, you already know that efforts to cultivate healthy bowel flora in the wake of wheat/grain elimination is a key factor in regaining health. While I’ve emphasized the importance of a high-potency (e.g., 50 billion or more CFUs per day), multi-species probiotic supplement and prebiotic fibers, I’ve not focused on the importance of fermented foods. This issue comes to light in particular with our experience in battling small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO. Dysbiosis, or disrupted composition of bowel flora in the colon, is exceptionally common, e...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora fermented foods grain-free Inflammation kefir kimchi kombucha probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth yogurt Source Type: blogs

Is red wine good actually for your heart?
Have you ever topped off your glass of cabernet or pinot noir while saying, “Hey, it’s good for my heart, right?” This widely held impression dates back to a catchphrase coined in the late 1980s: the French Paradox. The French Paradox refers to the notion that drinking wine may explain the relatively low rates of heart disease among the French, despite their fondness for cheese and other rich, fatty foods. This theory helped spur the discovery of a host of beneficial plant compounds known as polyphenols. Found in red and purple grape skins (as well as many other fruits, vegetables, and nuts), polyphenols ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Prevention Source Type: blogs

Towards Lasting Therapeutic Manufactories that Operate Inside the Body
Gene therapies involve delivering instructions into cells to ensure that specific proteins are manufactured, either temporarily or permanently. This is effectively a hijacking or programming of cellular mechanisms. There is another approach, which is to deliver suitable DNA machinery into the body, capable of manufacturing the desired proteins outside cells. This isn't helpful for all types of protein, but in many cases it is. That machinery needs protection, however: naked, it would be quickly removed by the immune system or otherwise broken down. One possibility is to employ engineered bacteria, which removes the need to...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 19, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Quackademic medicine versus being “ science-based ”
A couple of weeks ago, I was interviewed by the a reporter from the Georgetown student newsletter about its integrative medicine program. It got me to thinking how delusion that one’s work is science-based can lead to collaborations with New Age “quantum” mystics like Deepak Chopra. "Integrative medicine" doctors engaging in what I like to refer to as quackademic medicine all claim to be "evidence-based" or "science-based." The words apparently do not mean what integrative medicine academics think they mean. The post Quackademic medicine versus being “science-based&rdqu...
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 19, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture Aviad Haramati Chopra Center Deepak Chopra featured Georgetown University Hakima Amri homeopathy Source Type: blogs

A Good Book Ruined By A Bit of Reality
I am a bookworm. As a child I always wanted to go to the library and didn't mind that if I read my newly selected books on the way home I might start to be a bit woozy from the wiggly New England roads. (Highways are much better for car reading.)In times of stress (read'medical disasters'among other things) I often turn to books as my personal form of avoidance. This was fine until my medical maladies kept interfering with my reading enjoyment. That would really suck.During college, after thyroid cancer, with my small paperback book collection, I would avoid studying or read in bed something less enlightening than any requ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: books cancer stigma coping reading Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 19th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Contribute to Brain Disorders?
In this study published in July 2017, researchers looked at the vitamin D levels and cognitive function in patients who experienced psychosis. They found an association between low levels of vitamin D and decreased processing speed and verbal fluency. The authors suggested the next step should be randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation in those with psychosis and vitamin D deficiency. Another study, published in Psychiatry Research in August 2017, looked at whether vitamin B12, homocysteine folic acid, and vitamin D might be connected to childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-two children an...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Brain and Behavior Health-related Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Brain Disorder Mental Illness Vitamin D Vitamin Deficiency Source Type: blogs

Nanomachines Create Clots Inside Vessels Feeding Cancer Tumors
Researchers from Arizona State University and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a remarkable new way of killing tumors. They’ve developed robot-like nanoscale devices that cling to the walls of tumor vessels, release a clotting agent, and block the tumor from receiving nutrients. These nanorobots, which consist of sheets made of strings of DNA, have DNA aptamers that target a protein produced only by certain tumor types. The sheets are rolled up into cylinders and thrombin, the clotting enzyme, is attached to the interior of the newly formed tubes. W...
Source: Medgadget - February 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Comparing Prognostic Breast Cancer Tests
Back in the late 2000's, I heard about the new Oncotype Dx test that was just coming available for women who had early stage breast cancer and could help in the decision making process - whether to chemotherapy or not. The test was supposed to tell your risk of recurrence. That was great news (of course I was not eligible because of my medical history...) and many women found their risk and made the big chemotherapy decision.New research has looked at the results of these tests and compared them. They looked at these four tests: Oncotype Dx Recurrence Score, PAM50-based Prosigna Risk of Recurrence Score (ROR), Breast Cance...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer recurrence test results Source Type: blogs

You don ’t know what your patient’s end-of-life wishes are
As I walked in the room, I noticed it immediately: Norman was worse. The recurrent invasive cancer in his neck was impairing the drainage of fluid from his face making it difficult for him to turn his head, and it had progressed overnight. Despite his alarming appearance, he seemed calm. There were no more cancer-specific treatment options: the surgeons had declined to operate again; he had received maximum dose radiation; and the risks of chemotherapy outweighed any potential benefits. His pain required doses of opioids high enough that he often fell asleep in the middle of conversations. Because of his tracheostomy, Norm...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lauge-sokol-hessner" rel="tag" > Lauge Sokol-Hessner, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Machine Learning for Building Personalized Cancer Nanomedicines: Interview with Dr. Daniel Heller
Dan Heller Researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute and the Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences in New York have developed a machine learning approach to design personalized nanoparticle therapies for cancer. Personalized cancer therapies aim to provide a treatment that is tailored to the genetic makeup of a patient’s tumor. They can still cause side effects, however, when they accumulate in certain off-target tissues. Nanoparticles can help to increase drug accumulation in the tumor, and reduce off-target tissue exposure, helping to increase drug effectiveness and reduce side effects. This research...
Source: Medgadget - February 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

A MGUS and SMM patient study on the possible impact of meditation in myeloma progression
A recent Patient Power video caught my attention a few days ago, but I was caught up in my andrographolide research, so I ignored it until today. It’s titled “Can smoldering myeloma progress to full-blown myeloma?” The obvious answer is yes, it can, of course. We know that. Here’s the link to the video, which has other interesting things, too: goo.gl/e3ksk1 At one point, Dr. Raje talks about a Harvard project, called the , during which MGUS and SMM patients used meditation and mindfulness to try to stop progressing to full-blown myeloma. The study’s main purpose is to look at the genomic ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll meditation MGUS relaxation response resiliency program SMM stress Source Type: blogs

Treatment Resistance Breast Cancer
Most breast cancers are hormone receptor positive or (ER+) and are treated with multiple therapies including chemotherapy and hormone therapies including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. But the problem is then that after they metastasize,  a third of them become resistance to treatment and will cause your demise." Such endocrine therapies, including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitor drugs, can prevent recurrence of early breast cancer, and can slow the progression of metastatic disease. However, in about one-third of patients with metastatic ER-positive breast cancer, treatment with endocrine therapies l...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research clinical trials metastatic cancer Source Type: blogs

How to welcome back a colleague who is in recovery
It can be awkward or difficult to welcome back a colleague who has been absent for reasons related to mental health. These issues, historically, have been taboo, and are loaded with stigma. It is hard to know how to act toward a colleague who has returned from treatment for a mental health issue. Do I ask about it? Do I pretend that nothing happened? Do I say that I hope they are feeling better? Usually, none of these options feels right. This difficulty is particularly true when colleagues return from being treated for problems with drugs or alcohol. The stigma in our society against people suffering from addiction is ram...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Mental Health Workplace health Source Type: blogs

Inscrutable Genes
" In most cases, the molecular consequences of disease, or trait-associated variants for human physiology, are not understood. " from: Manolio TA, Collins FS, Cox NJ, Goldstein DB, Hindorff LA, Hunter DJ, et al. Finding the missing heritability of complex diseases. Nature 2009;461:747 –53. The 1960s was a wonderful decade for the field of molecular genetics. Hundreds of inherited metabolic diseases were being studied. Most of these diseases could be characterized by a simple inherited mutation in a disease-causing gene. Back then, we thought we understood genetic diseases. Here ’s how it all might hav...
Source: Specified Life - February 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: genetic heterogeneity genetics multi-step pathogenesis precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Injection Assembles into Nanocarrier Implant for Long-Term Delivery of Nanomedicines
A good deal of the field of nanomedicine is focused on delivering drugs to specific sites within the body, such as specific organs or cancer tumors. While many nanomedicines have well developed targeting mechanisms, they often are best delivered a small amount at a time. Yet, continuous slow-release of nanomedicines has typically required the use of polymer matrix implants that don’t degrade very gracefully. Now researchers at Northwestern University have developed an unusual new liquid material that, after being injected, assembles into a gel containing drug nanocarriers that can then release themselves at a pr...
Source: Medgadget - February 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Why IVF treatment does not increase your risk of getting cancer
(Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog)
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - February 14, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

What ’s love got to do with it: lessons from a dying physician
They came from all corners of the globe to bid him farewell. He looked cachetic, his frail form interrupted by swelling in his abdomen and legs, a result of end-stage pancreatic cancer. It was Dr. Yeat’s last week in the hospital before being transferred to a nearby hospice.  He was now on morphine, and despite severe fatigue and difficulty breathing, he always managed a smile. Some of his visitors were former colleagues; others were friends, previous medical trainees, and mentees. Amidst moments of laughter, crying, and sober reflection, each recounted one anecdote after another of their encounters with Dr. Yea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/charles-a-odonkor" rel="tag" > Charles A. Odonkor, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Doctors As Patients
I think doctor's make the worst patients. A friend's father, she told me, was a doctor but ignored his own cancer symptoms and said he was fine until he wasn't. I have never met a doctor who rushed to be a patient....But I think the best training for a doctor is to be a patient - particularly a patient of the disease or ailment they treat. This would provide so much more understanding for them.Here is the story ofa British breast cancer surgeon who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015 and finally returned to work in 2017. She never expected to face this diagnosis. I don't anyone ever does." Doctors face particular...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient breast cancer treatment doctors surgery Source Type: blogs

Andrographolide and parthenolide kill myeloma stem cells
This study shows that parthenolide AND andrographolide do just that: they go after the ruffians. The abstract calls them two “potent anti-MM-CSC agents.” Potent…I like that! Okay, I’m going to see if I can extract some gems from the full study. As we’ve seen, it’s not enough to target the circulating plasma cells. If we want to get rid of the myeloma weed, we must go after the stem cells, the “clone troopers” (Star Wars, anyone?  No, I’m not really a fan, but I do remember that expression…). The only way to prevent relapses is to kill the cloners! Parthenol...
Source: Margaret's Corner - February 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll andrographolide CSC myeloma parthenolide Source Type: blogs

DNA Machinery that can Sabotage the Blood Supply of Tumors
Researchers have been building simple molecular machines out of DNA for some years now. This approach to molecular machinery is well suited to applications that involve conditional activation based on the proteins present in the surrounding environment; a lot of the necessary functional parts already exist in DNA and just have to be assembled in the right way. The Oisin Biotechnologies cell-killing technology is a smaller example of the type than the approach here, in which sizable DNA containers are constructed. They carry a cargo that will disrupt local blood flow, and are triggered into opening by cancerous cell surface...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Weaponizing the Biochemistry of Huntington's Disease as a General Cancer Therapy
An interesting observation that has arisen over the years of epidemiological study of human age-related disease is that there are a number of distinct inverse relationships between incidence of cancer and incidence of some forms of neurodegeneration. This was in the news a few years ago in the case of Alzheimer's disease for example. Why would people with a higher risk of cancer suffer lower rates of Alzheimer's disease, however? We can only speculate at this point, but the more recent discovery I'll point out here adds fuel for that speculation. The Alzheimer's-cancer relationship is modest in size and somewhat complex in...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

2018 Forecast: Another Theranos, Hospital Hiring Slows & Successful HIT Exits
By BOB KOCHER, MD and BRYAN ROBERTS For what is now an annual tradition, we are once again attempting to be healthcare soothsayers. We are proud to share with you our 10 healthcare predictions for 2018. In 2017, amaz-ingly, eight of our predictions came true. For 2018, we are betting on the following: 1. Another Theranos We think at least one healthcare information technology company with an enterprise value of more than $1 billion (not including Outcome Health, which we could not have predicted tanking so spectacularly quickly) will be exposed as not having product results to support their hype. It will also expose e...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Bob Kocher Bryan Roberts Venrock Capital Source Type: blogs

Intermountain Precision Genomics to Develop Hereditary Cancer Gene Panels
The emerging healthcare model which is dominated by a small number of very large health systems will be characterized, in part, by in-house, sophisticated genomic and molecular lab testing by these systems. This is because these large health systems will have the capital to invest in their own"laboratories of excellence" within their system. Such is the case withIntermountain Healthcare which has its own in-house genomics laboratory called Intermountain Precision Genomics. Intermountain Health is one of the giant health systems with 37,000 employees, 22 hospitals, and more than 185 clinics. Here is the missi...
Source: Lab Soft News - February 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Genomic Testing Healthcare Business Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Consumerism Pathology Informatics Reference Laboratories Test Kits and Source Type: blogs

Managing Chaos: Lessons Learned From the Emergency Department
By: Teresa Chan, MD, FRCPC, MHPE T. Chan is assistant professor, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine & Faculty of Health Sciences, and program director, Clinician Educator Area of Focused Competence Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. “We need a doctor in Resusc 1 STAT!” “I’m worried that my child has an ear infection.” “Dr. Chan, can you take a look at this ECG for Bed 8?” “Doc, do you think I have cancer?” In a single shift, I may hear all of these … and more. As an academic eme...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective emergency department multi-patient environments organizing information patients Source Type: blogs

Doctor Questions
We are always told to write down your list of questions for your doctors and even bring someone to write down the answers. This can be appropriate for when you are first diagnosed with something nasty. But it doesn't hold true for regular follow ups with  your other doctors.Over the years, I have learned not only to bring a list of doctor questions to appointments. But I have also learn to break it down into as few as possible, into two categories.Category one is for the list of issues you have noted since last seeing them. For example you had the flu in November for ten days. Or have been under a lot of stress from w...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: coping doctor appointments doctor questions Source Type: blogs

Inhibition of Wnt Signaling as a Treatment for Osteoarthritis
Researchers here find that inhibition of Wnt signaling can improve the state of cartilage and joint function in a mouse model of osteoathritis. Wnt and its closely related proteins are a complex topic, but the short version is that they are involved in the regulation of growth, regeneration, and embryonic development. They are also significant in cancer, as well as in other, less dramatic ways in which regeneration can run wild or fail, producing fibrosis and functional problems rather than a useful restoration of tissue. Numerous research groups are investigating ways in which Wnt signaling can be adjusted to produce bene...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Eponymythology: Graves orbitopathy
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Having recently reviewed the chronology of diffuse toxic goitre (Parry-Graves-Basedow disease) we tackle the chronological descriptions behind Graves orbitopathy (GO). Why? Well, I’m still working that out. But I think that in our KPI-driven quest for diagnostic certainty, we have forgotten the descriptive pioneers – the clinical diagnosticians. Time to review the descriptions and eponymythology of the forgotten signs associated with Graves orbitopathy&n...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Eponymythology Dalrymple sign Graefe sign Graves Opthalmopathy Graves orbitopathy Joffroy sign Möbius sign stellwag sign Source Type: blogs

There are Many Possible Paths to Immunotherapy for Senescent Cell Destruction
Rising numbers of senescent cells are one of the root causes of aging, a process that arises from the normal operation of youthful metabolism, yet results in accumulated damage and failure over time. Senescent cells generate signaling that degrades tissue function, breaks down and remodels tissue structure, spurs chronic inflammation, and alters the behavior of surrounding cells for the worse. Evidence shows their presence to be a contributing cause of a range of common fatal age-related conditions. In a youthful body, near all cells that become senescent and fail to self-destruct as a result are promptly eliminated by the...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Death by Gardasil? Not so fast … (2018 edition)
There is a type of “vaccine injury” story promoted by the antivaccine movement that is particularly pernicious, a narrative I call “death by Gardasil.” The stories, which use tenuous connections between vaccination against HPV to prevent cervical cancer and the unexpected death of a teen or young adult, are always tragic, and you can’t help but feel incredible empathy for the parents. However, none of these stories constitute compelling evidence that Gardasil kills young people. Basically, antivaxers exploit the grief of these parents and their understandable desire to find a cause for their c...
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 12, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Antivaccine nonsense Cancer Medicine Movies Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking Annabelle Morin Cervarix Chloe Brookes-Holder Christina Tarsell Christopher Shaw Colton Berrett featured Gardasil hpv human pap Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence & How Doctors Think: An Interview with Thomas Jefferson ’ s Stephen Klasko
AJAY KOHLI, MD As I walk into the building, the sheer grandiosity of the room is one to withhold — it’s as if I’m walking into Grand Central station. There’s a small army of people, all busy at their desks, working to carry out the next wave of innovations helping more than a million lives within the Greater Philadelphia region. However, I’m not here to catch a train or enjoy the sights. I’m at the office of the President and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University, Dr. Stephen Klasko, currently at the helm of one of the largest healthcare systems in the U.S. Let me backup a little. The theme...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Ajay Kohli Internet of Things Stephen Klasko Thomas Jefferson University Thomas Klasko Watson Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 318
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 318th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking month. Listen to this insightful podca...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 11, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Brachytherapy for Breast Cancer Follow Up
Back in 2007, when I was diagnosed and treated for my breast cancer, I heard about this new technique for the radiation portion of treatment,brachytherapy. I was jealous. It was not offered at my hospital. The big thing I liked was that it took so much less time for treatment.Breast cancer treatment takes a LONG time. I was diagnosed at the end of May, after two surgeries that went into July, I finished chemo in December, and needed one more surgery (don't ask). I was then facing 7 weeks of radiation. I just wanted to be done. Since brachytherapy wasn't available I had the standard radiation treatment. I couldn't even have...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research radiation Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 12th 2018
In conclusion, most experimental data on immune changes with aging show a decline in many immune parameters when compared to young healthy subjects. The bulk of these changes is termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence has been considered for some time as detrimental because it often leads to subclinical accumulation of pro-inflammatory factors and inflammaging. Together, immunosenescence and inflammaging are suggested to stand at the origin of most of the diseases of the elderly, such as infections, cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, an increasing number of gerontologists have chall...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Genetic Testing and Non-High Risk
A person can be considered medically high risk due to their or a family member's medical history. If you are considered medically as high risk, you get popped into the category of give them lots more medical attention and'lovely'tests.Now withthe progress of genomic testing, its no longer a big expensive, rare proposition. However, why do we only test the high risk people? These are the people who already know they are high risk. But that leaves a lot of people who don't know they are high risk and could be. This doesn't make sense. Some new research asks if it wouldn't it make more sense to test more people who aren'...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer cancer prevention genetic testing ovarian cancer Source Type: blogs

Understanding the Cataract Phenomenon in Radiology Techs
As nuclear medicine (NM) procedures have become more popular in U.S. hospitals, radiology technologists are at increasing risk for developing a cataract. According to anew study published inRadiology, this ionizing radiation technology that ’s used to evaluate organ health and treat disease can cause damage to technologists’ eyes. Between the years 2003 and 2005, and 2012 and 2013, a group of researchers from the National Cancer Institute, the University of Minnesota, and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists surveyed 42,545 radiologic technologists about their work history, eye health, lifestyle, t...
Source: radRounds - February 10, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

UVA, Carestream Health, and Epic Are Adding Charts, Graphs, and Voice Recognition to Radiology Reports
The University of Virginia Health System (UVA) is partnering with Epic and Carestream Health to develop a multimedia radiology reporting application that utilizes artificial intelligence (AI) and voice recognition systems. The reports feature a versatile set of components including electronic health records (EHRs) software, comprehensive and interactive images, charts, graphs, and hyperlinks that makes toggling between report text and PACS images fast and easy. One study at the National Institutes of Health found that by having radiology reports with hyperlinks and visual data, oncologists were able to assess tumor treatme...
Source: radRounds - February 10, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Up and Down, Again
Everyone has ups and downs in their life, especially with their health. Or maybe I have more ups and downs than the average person.  Okay, maybe my health has been on a downward slide for awhile few years now.However, I realized the other day that I was actually feeling pretty well for the first time in quite a while. I mean my back has been sore but the rest of me has actually been doing okay. Its kind of nice actually. And it makes me think how long its been since I felt that well.I had been feeling as if I was over-medicated in some ways for the past few years. I changed my pain management doctor and had reduced so...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being healthy healthiness tired unhealthiness Source Type: blogs

James Lyons-Weiler and Leslie Manookian are still battling for the title of Most Antivaccine Crank
Yesterday's crank fight continues, as James Lyons-Weiler, antivax warrior and founder of the Institute for Pure and Applied Knowledge, stung by Leslie Manookian's attack painting him as insufficiently antivaccine and even a tool of the vaccine-industrial complex, strikes back. Hilarity ensues as he battles Manookian for the title of Most Antivaccine Crank in the World. The post James Lyons-Weiler and Leslie Manookian are still battling for the title of Most Antivaccine Crank appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 9, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Antivaccine nonsense Bad science Cancer Medicine Pseudoscience Quackery biomarkers computational biology crankfest featured genomics Institute for Pure and Applied Knowledge James Lyons-Weiler Leslie Manookian vaccines Source Type: blogs

MDM2 Antagonists Attenuate Harmful Signaling from Senescent Cells
A fair number of the scientists working towards therapies to address cellular senescence, one of the causes of aging, are more interested in suppressing signaling from these cells than in destroying them. Cynically, a treatment one has to keep using consistently is much more interesting to pharmaceutical companies than a treatment that only has to be applied once every few years at most. Until researchers encounter a population of senescent cells that cannot be safely removed, destruction continues to look like the far better option. Senescent cells are harmful because of the mix of signals they generate, a mix that is sti...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 9, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Radiology Centers Poised To Adopt Machine Learning
As with most other sectors of the healthcare industry, it seems likely that radiology will be transformed by the application of AI technologies. Of course, given the euphoric buzz around AI it’s hard to separate talk from concrete results. Also, it’s not clear who’s going to pay for AI adoption in radiology and where it is best used. But clearly, AI use in healthcare isn’t going away. This notion is underscored by a new study by Reaction Data suggesting that both technology vendors and radiology leaders believe that widespread use of AI in radiology is imminent. The researchers argue that radiology ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - February 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: Digital Health EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR Health Care Healthcare Healthcare AI HealthCare IT Hospitals Radiology Chief of Radiology Director of Radiology Freestanding Radiology Center Hospital Ra Source Type: blogs

U.S. to Get Its Own Supply of Radioisotopes Thanks to Approval of RadioGenix System
A good deal of advanced medical imaging to spot cancer tumors, and help to diagnose coronary artery disease and other conditions, relies on injecting radioisotopes into the body whose location can be tracked. The most common is technetium-99m (Tc-99m), but it has been in short supply because there are only a few nuclear power stations around the world making it as a byproduct of highly-enriched uranium, but new technologies are maturing that can help avoid many of the radioisotope sourcing issues that exist to prevent nuclear weapon proliferation and guarantee safety. The FDA and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of ...
Source: Medgadget - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Nuclear Medicine Oncology Radiation Oncology Source Type: blogs

Is “doing everything we can” at the end of life doing too much?
In his soulful book, How We Die: Reflections on Life’s Final Chapter, the late surgeon and author Sherwin Nuland describes one of his patient encounters as a medical student. The patient, a 50-year-old man, presented to the hospital after a heart attack. A few hours later, the patient suddenly collapsed pulseless and unconscious. Training in an era when there was no defibrillator or CPR, the author notes: For reasons I cannot explain to this day … I decided to act … What I was about to attempt seemed a great deal less risky than letting a man die without at least trying to save him. There was no choice....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jason-j-han" rel="tag" > Jason J. Han, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

MyoKardia Develops Machine Learning Algorithm For Prediction of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Using Wearable Biosensor: Interview
In this study, we collected PPG pulse wave traces from patients with oHCM and healthy volunteers. Using automated analyses, we extracted details about the shape and pattern of the tracings and applied machine learning to identify differences in these features between oHCM patients and healthy volunteers. We found that a sensitive and specific signature of arterial blood flow in oHCM could be identified with the combination of a wrist-worn PPG biosensor and machine learning algorithms.   Medgadget: Have you compared the results of the biosensor created by Wavelet Health with results collected from another similar PPG d...
Source: Medgadget - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Expert advice on how to quit smoking
Okay, everyone knows smoking is bad for you, the number one cause of preventable death in the US and the world, a direct cause of lung and heart disease and cancer… et cetera. So let’s get right down to the nitty-gritty: quitting smoking is tough. What can people do to quit? To answer this question, I spoke with my colleague Nancy Rigotti, MD. Dr. Rigotti is director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Tobacco Research and Treatment Center. She has extensively researched nicotine and tobacco, evaluated public policies on tobacco, contributed to US Surgeon General’s Reports, and authored clinical guidel...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs

Should doctors be required to inform patients of their palliative care rights?
I overheard a colleague admit an 84-year-old woman to the hospital from the emergency department for a sizable mass in her uterus — no doubt, cancerous. I pictured a frail woman who’d been suffering for a while and was afraid to tell anyone about it, fearing the worst.  Like most, she preferred to ignore it rather than have others tell her what to do. Having fallen ill, she risked losing the ability to make her own medical decisions.  Medical specialists will now decide what her options are and default to the best interest of saving her life. Sadly, she’ll likely become another victim maligned b...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kevin-haselhorst" rel="tag" > Kevin Haselhorst, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Overloaded with Instructions
I get it. I have a lot of ailments so I am in a lot of groups and follow a lot of organizations for their health tips. So I get lots of email. Tons of email to be precise. Some of it gets the delete button right away - especially if the subject line doesn't tell me anything.But then Iread glance at a lot of them before deleting. But often they provide suggestions or instructions how to be healthier for whichever ailment. But now I am overloaded with instructions/suggestions this week:No more asparagus for me because itcan lead to breast cancer spread. I like asparagus. Damn.Exercise can reducebreast cancer recurrence. I'm ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer confusion fibromyalgia instructions rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

Together, We Can Win Cancer
People all over the world gathered and pledged loud and clear on the eve of the world cancer that ‘We can Win Cancer’! World cancer day is observed on 4th February Every year  and the theme for this year says, ‘We can. I can’. The main objective was to create awareness and reduce the occurrence and deaths due to cancer globally by 2020. Many people joined together around the world to ensure optimal awareness. The empire state building in USA was lit blue and orange after the colors of Union for International Cancer Control. WHO highlighted that, cancer is no longer a deadly disease as the poten...
Source: Sciences Blog - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: srinivas_s at omicsgroup.co.in (OMICS Publishing Group) Tags: Cancer Cancer Science & Therapy cancer control cancer patients HPV vaccine world cancer day Source Type: blogs

The Longest-Lived Bats Have Unusual Telomere Biology
Researchers here find that the longest lived bats have unusual telomere biochemistry, and in fact unusual enough that the new knowledge may turn out to be of little relevance to the understanding of telomeres, telomerase, and aging in other mammals. It appears that they rely upon alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to maintain telomere length, a process that doesn't operate in any normal adult human cell. Given that loss of telomere length appears to be a marker of aging rather than a cause, and a fairly loosely coupled marker at that, the real relevance of this area of biochemistry probably lies in the relationship...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Naked Mole-Rats Experience Cellular Senescence, but Seem Largely Unaffected by It
Naked mole-rats are distinguished by an exceptionally long life span in comparison to similarly sized rodents, and a near immunity to cancer. Unlike other mammals, their mortality rates stay fairly constant until very late life. They accumulate all the signs of significant oxidative damage in cells and tissues, but seem resilient to it. Similarly, researchers here note that naked mole-rats do in fact accumulate senescent cells, one of the root causes of aging, but appear resilient to the harmful presence and activities of these cells. Exactly why this is the case has yet to be determined. Cells become senescent in r...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs