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Sleep biology discovery could lead to new insomnia treatments that don ’t target the brain

UCLA scientists report the first evidence that a gene outside the brain controls the ability to rebound from sleep deprivation — a surprising discovery that could eventually lead to greatly improved treatments for insomnia and other sleep disorders that do not involve getting a drug into the brain.The scientists report that increasing the level of Bmal1 — a critical master gene that regulates sleep patterns — in skeletal muscle makes mice resistant to sleep deprivation.“When we first saw the importance of the muscle, we were surprised,” said senior author Ketema Paul, UCLA associate professor of integrative biology and physiology. “At first we didn’t believe it, so we repeated the experiment several times. We finally realized this is not a mistake; this is real.”The research,  published in the journal eLife, is the first evidence that a biological clock in the muscle can communicate with the brain, and is potentially good news for people who lose sleep because of factors including a crying newborn or a job that does not allow for normal sleep cycles, such as active military service.Chronic sleep deprivation increases the risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, infectious diseases and other illnesses, said Paul, a neurobiologist and member of UCLA ’s Brain Research Institute. Having a resistance to sleep loss may reduce the risk of getting these diseases, Paul said, and his team reports evidence that increased Bmal1 ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 -- Getting less than six hours of sleep a night may double the odds of dying from heart disease or stroke for people who already have risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, new research suggests. Known as metabolic...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Note: This post is written by Olympia Powell It is no secret that leading an active lifestyle is great for your overall health. However, you may be interested in the specific mental and physical benefits you receive when you are remaining active. Since physical activity engages your entire mind and body, there are several positive benefits you will notice when you lead an active lifestyle. Mental Health Benefits Once you begin any physical activity, your mind is also getting a great workout so to say. There are several ways your mind will benefit from staying active. Some of the mental health benefits include: 1. Redu...
Source: Life Optimizer - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
When I began writing in this spot three years ago, the headline of my very first entry was, "Getting Enough Sleep Is Smart, Not Selfish." That post went up at a time when Americans were beginning to focus more on a good night's rest. The subject came into a sharper focus, in part, because wearable technology gave us some specifics. Forget the anecdotal evidence of whether we slept well; with the touch of a button, we could know what time we fell asleep, how long we were out and how often our sleep was interrupted. The study of sleep -- and conversations around it -- began gaining traction. Among those paying ke...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion As the researchers say, the WHO definition of health encompasses physical, mental and social wellbeing – not just the presence or absence of disease. But how often are these extra dimensions taken into account when assessing a person's health status? In this sample of older adults, just looking at their disease status puts the majority of them into an apparently "robust" health group. Yet when you consider the additional dimensions of psychological health and wellbeing, you seem to get a much better indication of those who were at higher or lower risk of dying or being incapacitated i...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Medical practice Source Type: news
Early every year, countless Americans embark on a new fitness regime. They go for a physical and maybe for a blood test to measure cholesterol levels. After a clean bill of health, they might train to run a 10K, a marathon or even an Iron man. But what if those tests do not provide a complete picture of your health? What if you are on the verge of a heart attack and have no idea? Before 30, when the human body is at its peak, it can take the strain of being pushed to the limit. As we age, however, cellular changes and the expression of genetic predispositions can dramatically alter our health. Conventional medical tests a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
We spend about one-third of our life doing it, but more than one in three Americans still aren’t getting enough sleep, according to a new government report.  In their first study of self-reported sleep length, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 34.8 percent of American adults are getting less than seven hours of sleep -- the minimum length of time adults should sleep in order to reduce risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, mental distress, coronary heart disease and early death. In total, an estimated 83.6 million adults in the U.S. are sleep deprived, the CDC repor...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
This article originally appeared on the Amerisleep blog. Rosie Osmun is the Creative Content Manager at Amerisleep, a progressive memory foam mattress brand focused on eco-friendly sleep solutions. Rosie writes more posts on the Amerisleep blog about the science of sleep, eco-friendly living, leading a healthy lifestyle and more. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
When Suzette Santos, RN, a behavioral health nurse with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY), was assigned to the case of Grace*, an 89-year-old resident of Nassau County on Long Island, she had some idea what to expect. Suzette had cared for Grace a year earlier, as the elderly woman struggled to cope with depression brought on by the recent loss of her husband and lifelong partner. When Suzette reconnected with her patient this time, she could immediately see that Grace's depression had gotten worse. "She had lost a lot of weight -- about 20 pounds," Suzette recalls. "She had no interest in cook...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Americans have a sleep problem, and that means we have a work problem. We're getting less and less sleep (especially on work nights), to the point that the CDC has declared sleep deprivation a public health epidemic. Entrepreneurs are particularly susceptible to sleep deprivation given the pressures and massive workloads that are common for business owners of all stripes. But insufficient sleep will cost you in just about every way -- physically, mentally, financially, and on the job. In contrast, high-quality sleep can up your game and give you a competitive edge over the caffeine-addicted zombies wandering the office ha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article originally appeared on the Amerisleep blog. Rosie Osmun is the Creative Content Manager at Amerisleep, a progressive memory foam mattress brand focused on eco-friendly sleep solutions. Rosie writes more posts on the Amerisleep blog about the science of sleep, eco-friendly living, leading a healthy lifestyle and more. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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