FDA launches new resource to provide easily accessible, more accurate historical drug approval data
FDA is launching a new resource to assist external and agency researchers collecting historical information about FDA ’s drug approvals. The Compilation of Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) New Molecular Entity (NME) Drug and New Biologic Approvals is a .CSV file available on the agency’ (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - February 21, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

On the trail of cancer stem cells
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) What goes on inside and between individual cells during the very earliest stages of tumor development? Single cell sequencing technologies and a mouse model have enabled researchers to comprehensively map the cellular diversity of whole salivary gland tumors and trace the path of cancer stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemistry Through Biology: Translating Molecular Biology Technologies...
In this free webinar, the featured speaker, Peter C. Michels, PhD, Head of Global Fermentation, AMRI, will explore the key advances and critical hurdles for translating emerging molecular biology...(PRWeb February 20, 2020)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/chemistry_through_biology_translating_molecular_biology_technologies_into_practical_processes_for_api_production_upcoming_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb16922679.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Architecture of human BAF complex
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Molecular mechanism of biased signaling in a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor
Biased signaling, in which different ligands that bind to the same G protein–coupled receptor preferentially trigger distinct signaling pathways, holds great promise for the design of safer and more effective drugs. Its structural mechanism remains unclear, however, hampering efforts to design drugs with desired signaling profiles. Here, we use extensive atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations to determine how arrestin bias and G protein bias arise at the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. The receptor adopts two major signaling conformations, one of which couples almost exclusively to arrestin, whereas the other al...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Suomivuori, C.-M., Latorraca, N. R., Wingler, L. M., Eismann, S., King, M. C., Kleinhenz, A. L. W., Skiba, M. A., Staus, D. P., Kruse, A. C., Lefkowitz, R. J., Dror, R. O. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Structure of nucleosome-bound human BAF complex
Mammalian SWI/SNF family chromatin remodelers, BRG1/BRM-associated factor (BAF) and polybromo-associated BAF (PBAF), regulate chromatin structure and transcription, and their mutations are linked to cancers. The 3.7-angstrom-resolution cryo–electron microscopy structure of human BAF bound to the nucleosome reveals that the nucleosome is sandwiched by the base and the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) modules, which are bridged by the actin-related protein (ARP) module. The ATPase motor is positioned proximal to nucleosomal DNA and, upon ATP hydrolysis, engages with and pumps DNA along the nucleosome. The C-terminal &...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: He, S., Wu, Z., Tian, Y., Yu, Z., Yu, J., Wang, X., Li, J., Liu, B., Xu, Y. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

President Proposes Cuts at NSF
The President has proposed a 6.5 percent cut to the National Science Foundation (NSF) in fiscal year (FY) 2021. The science agency is slated to receive $7.7 billion, which is $537 million below the FY 2020 level enacted by Congress. According to the budget proposal, NSF will continue to invest in its Big Ideas and Convergence Accelerator, providing support for “bold inquiries into the frontiers of science and engineering” in order “to break down the silos of conventional scientific research funded by NSF to embrace the cross-disciplinary and dynamic nature of the science of the future.” Among th...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

DOE Science Budget to Shrink by 17 percent
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would receive $35.4 billion in FY 2021, an 8.1 percent decrease from the FY 2020 enacted level of $38.5 billion. Within this request, $5.8 billion (-17 percent) would be directed toward the Office of Science. The Office of Science supports both scientific research and design, development, construction, and operation of scientific user facilities. Approximately 23,000 researchers located at over 300 institutions and the 17 DOE national laboratories are supported by grants from the Office of Science. The budget for the Office of Science includes $475 million for exascale computing, $237 m...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Speakers announced for 2020 Experimental Biology meeting
(Experimental Biology) Renowned scientists including Nobel laureates, research pioneers and celebrated educators will convene at the Experimental Biology (EB) 2020 meeting, to be held April 4-7 in San Diego. Bringing together more than 12,000 life scientists in one interdisciplinary community, EB showcases the latest advances in anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, investigative pathology, pharmacology and physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 18, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tiny, erratic protein motor movements revealed
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) The smallest proteins travel in our cells, completing deeply important tasks to keep our molecular mechanisms moving. They are responsible for transporting cargo, duplicating cells and more. Now, a research team based in Japan has uncovered more about how these proteins move. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lineage tracing on transcriptional landscapes links state to fate during differentiation
A challenge in biology is to associate molecular differences among progenitor cells with their capacity to generate mature cell types. Here, we used expressed DNA barcodes to clonally trace transcriptomes over time and applied this to study fate determination in hematopoiesis. We identified states of primed fate potential and located them on a continuous transcriptional landscape. We identified two routes of monocyte differentiation that leave an imprint on mature cells. Analysis of sister cells also revealed cells to have intrinsic fate biases not detectable by single-cell RNA sequencing. Finally, we benchmarked computati...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Weinreb, C., Rodriguez-Fraticelli, A., Camargo, F. D., Klein, A. M. Tags: Engineering, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Philip Leder, Who Deciphered Amino Acid Sequences, Dies
The Harvard Medical School researcher’s work on the genetic basis of protein coding and production led him to make groundbreaking discoveries in immunology, molecular biology, and cancer... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 12, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Physics of Life -- Lane change in the cytoskeleton
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Munich-based scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lane change in the cytoskeleton
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Munich-based scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biologists reveal cellular architecture of potential fountain of youth
(Louisiana State University) Cellular and molecular biologists have discovered a new class of lysosomes that they refer to as 'tubular lysosomes.' This breakthrough could lead to medical therapies and treatments to slow -- or even reverse -- aging and disease in humans and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Simulations identify missing link to determine carbon in deep Earth reservoirs
(University of Chicago) How much carbon lies deep in the Earth's water reservoirs? Using complex computer simulations, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering researcher Giulia Galli studied what happens when carbon dioxide is dissolved in water. Her work provides a step toward better understanding our planet's carbon cycle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Protocols used in Molecular Biology is now live
(Bentham Science Publishers) A compilation of various techniques in molecular biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Epigenetics: Inheritance of epigenetic markers
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) A study undertaken by an international team led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich molecular biologist Axel Imhof sheds new light on the mechanisms that control the establishment of epigenetic modifications on newly synthesized histones following cell division. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA research could be step toward lab-grown eggs and sperm to treat infertility
A new study on how and when the precursors to eggs and sperm are formed during development could help pave the way for generating egg and sperm cells in the lab to treat infertility.The study, published in the journal Cell Reports, describes the way in which human stem cells evolve into germ cells, the precursors for egg and sperm cells.“Right now, if your body doesn’t make germ cells then there’s no option for having a child that’s biologically related to you,” said Amander Clark, the study’s lead author, a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

After Cancer Took His Mother, James Allison Taught Our Immune Systems How to Fight It
There once was a boy in Alice, Texas, who saw things a little differently from everybody else. Influenced by his father, a “country” doctor, he was drawn to science instead of football and conducted biology experiments in his parents’ garage. When he was 10, someone gave him a harmonica, but he never took a lesson or learned to read music, so he wandered the woods mimicking what he’d heard on the radio. A year after that, his mother died following a long struggle with lymphoma. What he still remembers decades later are her last, bedridden days when he spent hours holding her hand, and the burns sing...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

The biology, function, and biomedical applications of exosomes
The study of extracellular vesicles (EVs) has the potential to identify unknown cellular and molecular mechanisms in intercellular communication and in organ homeostasis and disease. Exosomes, with an average diameter of ~100 nanometers, are a subset of EVs. The biogenesis of exosomes involves their origin in endosomes, and subsequent interactions with other intracellular vesicles and organelles generate the final content of the exosomes. Their diverse constituents include nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, amino acids, and metabolites, which can reflect their cell of origin. In various diseases, exosomes offer a window into...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Kalluri, R., LeBleu, V. S. Tags: Cell Biology, Immunology, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only review Source Type: news

Analysis of human genomes in the cloud
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Scientists from EMBL present a tool for large-scale analysis of genomic data with cloud computing. Main advantages of the new tool, called Butler, are continuous system monitoring and its ability to self-heal in case of failure, allowing for 43% more efficient data processing than previous approaches. The tool was developed for the Pan-Cancer project. The team published the method in Nature Biotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 5, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Finding genetic cancer risks
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) As part of the Pan-Cancer project, EMBL scientists have examined whole patient and cancer genomes in the search for genetic factors that influence cancer development. Their goal was to characterise and study heritable, or germline, genetic variation in genomes of cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chromothripsis in human cancer
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Newly discovered mutational phenomenon chromothripsis is prevalent across more cancers than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists identify new genetic drivers of cancer
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Analysis of whole cancer genomes gives key insights into the role of the non-coding genome in cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Studying DNA rearrangement to understand cancer
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Using the dataset from the Pan-Cancer project, a team including EMBL scientists has developed methods to group, classify, and describe structural variants -- large rearrangements of the genome that are a key driver of cancer. Their findings could help to improve cancer diagnosis and therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer mutations occur decades before diagnosis
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) A large-scale pan-cancer analysis of the evolutionary history of tumours reveals that cancer-causing mutations occur decades before diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Characterizing RNA alterations in cancer
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) The largest and most comprehensive catalogue of cancer-specific RNA alterations reveals new insights into the cancer genome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Parkinson's and the immune system
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Mutations in the Parkin gene are a common cause of hereditary forms of Parkinson's disease. Similar to Parkin, the neighboring Parkin Co-Regulated Gene PACRG regulates a signalling pathway that plays an important role in the innate immune system. This was discovered by a team of researchers led by Professor Konstanze Winklhofer from the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum (RUB). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Director for MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology at UCL
The MRC is pleased to announce Professor Alison Lloyd as the new Director of the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology at UCL. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - February 5, 2020 Category: Research Source Type: news

Manufacturing Effects on Material Properties
Conclusion Being a part of the 30% - 40% of companies with materials-related recalls can be a detriment to your business. Consider incorporating materials science into your development capabilities and reach out to experts to understand what manufacturing variation could cause material property changes. Assess materials in your risk analysis and especially test for potential variation factors having a direct or confounding effect on your product’s performance. Editor's Note: Stacie Depner will be moderating "Tech Talk Panel: Criteria for Choosing the Right Material for Your Device," ...
Source: MDDI - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Stacie Depner Tags: Materials Source Type: news

Pinpointing rare disease mutations
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute) Scientists have compiled mouse and human cell knockout data to categorise genes based on how essential they are for survival and organism development. The research creates a resource that can be used by other scientists to further investigate candidate genes potentially involved in developmental disorders. The work could help identify new mutations causing rare genetic diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physics of giant bubbles bursts secret of fluid mechanics
(Emory Health Sciences) A study inspired by street performers making gigantic soap bubbles led to a discovery in fluid mechanics: Mixing different molecular sizes of polymers within a solution increases the ability of a thin film to stretch without breaking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Endoplasmic reticulum contact sites regulate the dynamics of membraneless organelles
Tethered interactions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other membrane-bound organelles allow for efficient transfer of ions and/or macromolecules and provide a platform for organelle fission. Here, we describe an unconventional interface between membraneless ribonucleoprotein granules, such as processing bodies (P-bodies, or PBs) and stress granules, and the ER membrane. We found that PBs are tethered at molecular distances to the ER in human cells in a tunable fashion. ER-PB contact and PB biogenesis were modulated by altering PB composition, ER shape, or ER translational capacity. Furthermore, ER contact sites ...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lee, J. E., Cathey, P. I., Wu, H., Parker, R., Voeltz, G. K. Tags: Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

N6-methyladenosine of chromosome-associated regulatory RNA regulates chromatin state and transcription
N6-methyladenosine (m6A) regulates stability and translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) in various biological processes. In this work, we show that knockout of the m6A writer Mettl3 or the nuclear reader Ythdc1 in mouse embryonic stem cells increases chromatin accessibility and activates transcription in an m6A-dependent manner. We found that METTL3 deposits m6A modifications on chromosome-associated regulatory RNAs (carRNAs), including promoter-associated RNAs, enhancer RNAs, and repeat RNAs. YTHDC1 facilitates the decay of a subset of these m6A-modified RNAs, especially elements of the long interspersed element-1 family, th...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Liu, J., Dou, X., Chen, C., Chen, C., Liu, C., Xu, M. M., Zhao, S., Shen, B., Gao, Y., Han, D., He, C. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Engineered symbionts activate honey bee immunity and limit pathogens
Honey bees are essential pollinators threatened by colony losses linked to the spread of parasites and pathogens. Here, we report a new approach for manipulating bee gene expression and protecting bee health. We engineered a symbiotic bee gut bacterium, Snodgrassella alvi, to induce eukaryotic RNA interference (RNAi) immune responses. We show that engineered S. alvi can stably recolonize bees and produce double-stranded RNA to activate RNAi and repress host gene expression, thereby altering bee physiology, behavior, and growth. We used this approach to improve bee survival after a viral challenge, and we show that engineer...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Leonard, S. P., Powell, J. E., Perutka, J., Geng, P., Heckmann, L. C., Horak, R. D., Davies, B. W., Ellington, A. D., Barrick, J. E., Moran, N. A. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

A new layer of transcriptional control
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Inducing immune bee genes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Biophysicists find 'extra' component in molecular motor
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Researchers discovered an additional component in ATP synthase, a molecular machine that produces the energy-conserving compound. They obtained a first-ever high-resolution structure of the C ring from spinach chloroplasts. As the 3D computer model of it was taking shape, the biophysicists spotted additional circle-shaped elements inside the C ring.While the discovery is interesting in and of itself, researchers have yet to determine why the C ring hosts quinones and how they get there. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The 'place' of emotions
(IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca) The entire set of our emotions is mapped in a small region of the brain, a 3 centimeters area of the cortex, according to a study conducted at the IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca, Italy. The discovery of this 'map' of emotions comes from a work conducted by the Molecular Mind Laboratory (MoMiLab) directed by Professor Pietro Pietrini, and recently published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study reveals missing link in mechanisms underlying fight-or-flight response
(Harvard Medical School) Scientists map the molecular cascade behind heart function during fight-or-flight state.Findings solve longstanding biological puzzle.Results yield critical insights in adrenaline physiology that may inform other fields.Newly identified pathway can set stage for better targeted therapies to regulate heart muscle function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers uncover mechanism for how common gene therapy vectors enter cells
(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) Researchers have identified a novel cellular entry factor for adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) types -- the most commonly used viral vectors for in vivo gene therapy. The researchers identified that GPR108, a G protein-coupled receptor, served as a molecular 'lock' to the cell. The discovery could one day enable scientists to better direct AAV gene transfers to specific tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A two-way molecular dialogue between embryo and endosperm is required for seed development
The plant embryonic cuticle is a hydrophobic barrier deposited de novo by the embryo during seed development. At germination, it protects the seedling from water loss and is, thus, critical for survival. Embryonic cuticle formation is controlled by a signaling pathway involving the ABNORMAL LEAF SHAPE1 subtilase and the two GASSHO receptor-like kinases. We show that a sulfated peptide, TWISTED SEED1 (TWS1), acts as a GASSHO ligand. Cuticle surveillance depends on the action of the subtilase, which, unlike the TWS1 precursor and the GASSHO receptors, is not produced in the embryo but in the neighboring endosperm. Subtilase-...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Doll, N. M., Royek, S., Fujita, S., Okuda, S., Chamot, S., Stintzi, A., Widiez, T., Hothorn, M., Schaller, A., Geldner, N., Ingram, G. Tags: Botany, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Total synthesis reveals atypical atropisomerism in a small-molecule natural product, tryptorubin A
Molecular shape defines function in both biological and material settings, and chemists have developed an ever-increasing vernacular to describe these shapes. Noncanonical atropisomers—shape-defined molecules that are formally topologically trivial but are interconvertible only by complex, nonphysical multibond torsions—form a unique subset of atropisomers that differ from both canonical atropisomers (e.g., binaphthyls) and topoisomers (i.e., molecules that have identical connectivity but nonidentical molecular graphs). Small molecules, in contrast to biomacromolecules, are not expected to exhibit such ambiguou...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Reisberg, S. H., Gao, Y., Walker, A. S., Helfrich, E. J. N., Clardy, J., Baran, P. S. Tags: Biochemistry, Chemistry reports Source Type: news

A new approach to reveal the multiple structures of RNA
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) The key of the extraordinary functionality of ribonucleic acid, better known as RNA, is a highly flexible and dynamic structure. Yet, the experimental characterisation of its different configurations is rather complex. A study conducted by SISSA and published on Nucleic Acids Research combines experimental data and molecular dynamics simulations to reconstruct the different dominant and minority structures of a single RNA fragment, providing an innovative method to study highly dynamic molecular systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists identify gene that puts brakes on tissue growth
(Northwestern University) The planarian flatworm is a simple animal with a mighty ability: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation. Scientists have studied these worms for decades to better understand fundamental principles of natural regeneration and repair. One mechanism that is yet unknown is how organisms like these control the proportional scaling of tissue during regeneration. Now, Northwestern University molecular biologists have identified the beginnings of a genetic signaling pathway that puts the brakes on the animal's tissue growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals pre-Hispanic history, genetic changes among indigenous Mexican populations
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) To better understand the broad demographic history of pre-Hispanic Mexico and to search for signatures of adaptive evolution, scientists have sequenced the complete protein-coding regions of the genome, or exomes, of 78 individuals from five different indigenous groups from Northern (Rara?muri or Tarahumara, and Huichol), Central (Nahua), South (Triqui, or TRQ) and Southeast (Maya, or MYA) Mexico. The genomic study is the largest of its kind for indigenous populations from the Americas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Love hormone' improves attachment issues in people with autism
(KU Leuven) Oxytocin, often dubbed the 'love hormone', is known to promote social bonding. Researchers at KU Leuven have now discovered that administering oxytocin to adult men with autism makes them more open to close emotional bonds with others. The hormone has positive long-term effects as well. The researchers published their findings in the journals Molecular Autism and Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify a possible cause and treatment for inflammatory bowel disease
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) In a study published online in PNAS on Jan. 20, 2020, Prof. SUN Bing's team from the Center for Excellence in Molecular and Cellular Science, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. LIU Jie from Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, revealed a new mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of IBD and suggested therapeutic targets for clinical trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Hogness, Revolutionary of 20th Century Genetics, Dies
The Stanford University researcher ’s groundbreaking work connected the fields of molecular biology and genetics, paving the way for the foundation of genomics. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 20, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news