Sherlock Biosciences licenses Wyss technology to create affordable molecular diagnostics
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Harvard University has granted a worldwide exclusive license to Sherlock Biosciences Inc. to develop and commercialize technology from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering to create a highly sensitive, nucleic acid-based diagnostic platform that can rapidly deliver accurate and inexpensive results for a vast range of needs in virtually any setting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MRC scientists discover unique tau filament structures in head-injury associated dementia
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology researchers reveal atomic structures of the abnormal tau filaments associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a head injury-associated neurodegenerative disease, differ in structure from those seen in Alzheimer’s disease. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - March 20, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Researchers identify potential new combination treatment for pancreatic cancer
FINDINGSResearchers from UCLA ’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a possible new therapeutic strategy using two types of drug inhibitors at once to treat one of the world’s deadliest cancers. The combination approach uses one drug that inhibits the process — known as lysosome — that allows cancer cells to recycle essential nutrients to survive, and another drug that blocks the pathway used to repair DNA. Researchers found the approach to be promising after testing it on pancreatic cancer cells and mice in the laboratory.BACKGROUNDPancreatic cancer, which is the third leading cause...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Computer scientists create reprogrammable molecular computing system
(California Institute of Technology) Caltech researchers have designed self-assembling DNA molecules with unprecedented reprogrammability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ejecting flagella could help microbes save energy during nutrient depletion
(PLOS) In favorable conditions, many bacteria propel themselves to food sources and other sites of interest using whip-like molecular propellers known as flagella. However, according to new research published on March 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Josie Ferreira and colleagues of Imperial College London, members of the bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria eject their flagella when nutrients are scarce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework
(University of Groningen) For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometer-sized motors into a single system, and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists at the University of Groningen have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rotary motors into a metal-organic framework (a solid material with a 3D cage-like structure). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Machine Learning Approach Gives Insight on Toxin Exposure
Harvard Medical School investigators have developed a machine learning approach using high-quality, large-scale animal model data that sheds new light on the biology of the liver and kidneys after toxin exposure. The findings were recently published in Molecular Systems Biology, and reveal new mechanisms of toxin vulnerability and tolerance that may be broadly relevant to studies of human disease, the authors said. Researchers found nine distinct patterns of response to chemical exposure that the authors termed "disease states." These states shed light on the dynamics of toxin-induced liver and kidney injury, inc...
Source: MDDI - March 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

How to catch ovarian cancer earlier
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed too late for effective treatment. Israeli researchers are announcing a liquid biopsy-based diagnostic protocol for ovarian cancer, with higher sensitivity than previous approaches, that may help women in high-risk populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Oxygen sensing revisited
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kiberstis, P. A. Tags: Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Histone demethylase KDM6A directly senses oxygen to control chromatin and cell fate
Oxygen sensing is central to metazoan biology and has implications for human disease. Mammalian cells express multiple oxygen-dependent enzymes called 2-oxoglutarate (OG)-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDDs), but they vary in their oxygen affinities and hence their ability to sense oxygen. The 2-OGDD histone demethylases control histone methylation. Hypoxia increases histone methylation, but whether this reflects direct effects on histone demethylases or indirect effects caused by the hypoxic induction of the HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor) transcription factor or the 2-OG antagonist 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) is unclear. Here, ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Chakraborty, A. A., Laukka, T., Myllykoski, M., Ringel, A. E., Booker, M. A., Tolstorukov, M. Y., Meng, Y. J., Meier, S. R., Jennings, R. B., Creech, A. L., Herbert, Z. T., McBrayer, S. K., Olenchock, B. A., Jaffe, J. D., Haigis, M. C., Beroukhim, R., Sig Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Hypoxia induces rapid changes to histone methylation and reprograms chromatin
Oxygen is essential for the life of most multicellular organisms. Cells possess enzymes called molecular dioxygenases that depend on oxygen for activity. A subclass of molecular dioxygenases is the histone demethylase enzymes, which are characterized by the presence of a Jumanji-C (JmjC) domain. Hypoxia can alter chromatin, but whether this is a direct effect on JmjC-histone demethylases or due to other mechanisms is unknown. Here, we report that hypoxia induces a rapid and hypoxia-inducible factor–independent induction of histone methylation in a range of human cultured cells. Genomic locations of histone-3 lysine-4...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Batie, M., Frost, J., Frost, M., Wilson, J. W., Schofield, P., Rocha, S. Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Columbia Team develops treatments for depression
(Data Science Institute at Columbia) Depression is a debilitating illness that affects more than 350 million people. About half of the people who take antidepressants, however, do not respond to the treatment. This team is thus trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of such treatment resistance. Ultimately, they would like to be able to predict which people will respond to antidepressant drugs before they begin treatment, and to develop treatments that can circumvent antidepressant resistance in the millions of people who do not respond to antidepressants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stress hormones promote breast cancer metastasis
(University of Basel) Scientists from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones. In addition, they found that synthetic derivatives of stress hormones, which are frequently used as anti-inflammatory in cancer therapy, decrease the efficacy of chemotherapy. These results come from patient-derived models of breast cancer in mice and may have implications for the treatment of patients with breast cancer, as reported in Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When a cell's 'fingerprint' can be a weapon against cancer
A research team led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM) in Lisbon, computationally analysed the expression of marker genes that are associated with a "fingerprint" of cancer cells in thousands of tumors and revealed its therapeutic potential in the fight against cancer. The study published in the scientific journal PLoS Computational Biology shows (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Integral Molecular's MAbs against CB1 to treat NASH enter new development phase following $1.4 million award
(Integral Molecular) Integral Molecular, the industry leader in antibody discovery against multipass membrane proteins, was awarded $1.4 million by the NIH to develop its lead antibodies against cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) for treating the liver disease nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and metabolic disorders, including obesity and metabolic syndrome. With this Phase 2 SBIR grant, Integral Molecular builds on its successful Phase 1 SBIR program isolating antibodies with high specificity and high affinity for CB1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When a cell's 'fingerprint' can be a weapon against cancer
(Instituto de Medicina Molecular) A research team led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, group leader at iMM in Lisbon, computationally analyzed the expression of marker genes that are associated with a 'fingerprint' of cancer cells in thousands of tumors and revealed its therapeutic potential in the fight against cancer. The study published today in the scientific journal PLOS Computational Biology shows the types of tumors in which these genes are most active and identifies drugs with the potential to selectively eliminate cells that carry that label. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gene Ontology Consortium turns 20
The Gene Ontology (GO) resource turns 20! Check out the latest paper describing this resource.  WormBase uses GO to describe the molecular function, cellular localization and the biological processes that a gene is involved in.  These annotations are displayed in the Gene Ontology widget on all gene pages in WormBase.  The ontology structure including the number of genes annotated to each term can be viewed via tools such as the Ontology Browser. GO Enrichment Analysis can be performed using tools on the GO website.  Data files (known as gene association files) of all the GO annotations in the latest Wo...
Source: WormBase - March 8, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication news gene ontology Source Type: news

The ABS of molecular engines
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Peroxisomes are cell organelles that carry out a number of functions, including the degradation of cytotoxins. For this purpose, they require enzymes that have to be transported into peroxisomes via complicated machinery. The team from Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum has detected an as-yet unknown transport step, thus gaining a better understanding of life-threatening diseases. The group published its report in the renowned journal Biochimica et Biophysica Acta -- Molecular Cell Research in February 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Illuminating the genome
(Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research) Development of a new molecular visualisation method, RNA-guided endonuclease -- in situ labelling (RGEN-ISL) for the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated labelling of genomic sequences in nuclei and chromosomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biologists have studied enzymes that help wheat to fight fungi
(Sechenov University) Scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with their Russian colleagues studied reaction of wheat plants to damage caused by pathogenic fungi. They examined activation of enzymes involved in cell death induced in response to infection. The research results and enzyme classification were published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Michael Whitfield, PhD, Named Chair of the Department of Biomedical Data Science
Michael L. Whitfield, PhD, has been named the chair of the Department of Biomedical Data Science at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. Whitfield, a professor of biomedical data science and molecular and systems biology, has served as the department’s interim chair since November 2017. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - March 7, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Derik Hertel Tags: News Press Release Research Biomedical Data Science Home-feature leadership Michael Whitfield Source Type: news

Brain region plays key role in regulation of parenting behavior, study finds
This study establishes a previously unknown, essential role of the amygdala in regulating parenting behavior. These new findings in mice contribute to scientists ’ understanding of parenting and other social behaviors in humans.Dean IshidaWeizhe HongAUTHORSThe study ’s senior author is Weizhe Hong, an assistant professor of biological chemistry and of neurobiology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The first author is Patrick Chen, a postdoctoral fellow in the Hong lab. The other authors are Rongfeng Hu, Ye Emily Wu, Lin Pan, Shan Huang and Pau l Micevych, all of UCLA.JOURNALThe study&nbs...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New graphene-based device is first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors
(University of Minnesota) Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have developed a unique new device using the wonder material graphene that provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near perfect efficiency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A molecular assembly phase transition and kinetic proofreading modulate Ras activation by SOS
In this study, we designed a single-molecule assay to resolve the time between initial receptor-mediated membrane recruitment and the initiation of GEF activity of individual SOS molecules on microarrays of Ras-functionalized supported membranes. The rise-and-fall shape of the measured SOS activation time distribution and the long mean time scale to activation (~50 seconds) establish a basis for kinetic proofreading in the receptor-mediated activation of Ras. We further demonstrate that this kinetic proofreading is modulated by the LAT (linker for activation of T cells)–Grb2–SOS phosphotyrosine-driven phase tra...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Huang, W. Y. C., Alvarez, S., Kondo, Y., Lee, Y. K., Chung, J. K., Lam, H. Y. M., Biswas, K. H., Kuriyan, J., Groves, J. T. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

How viruses outsmart their host cells
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Viruses depend on host cells for replication, but how does a virus induce its host to transcribe its own genetic information alongside that of the virus, thus producing daughter viruses? For decades, researchers have been studying a type of bacteriophage known as 'lambda' to try and find an answer to this question. Using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, a research group from Charit é -- Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin has now successfully deciphered this process. Their findings have been published in Molecular Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Spinal cord research symposium
(University of Louisville) More than a dozen internationally recognized scientists from across North America and Great Britain working at the forefront of cell and molecular biology of development and disease are scheduled to speak in Louisville at the 25th Annual Kentucky Spinal Cord and Head Injury Research Trust Symposium, May 15-16, 2019. The two-day program will cover the most recent directions and conceptual advances in spinal cord injury research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Getting more mileage from microsatellites
(Botanical Society of America) Researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, are using a next-generation sequencing genotyping approach to find insight into the evolutionary history of the carob tree -- an economically important species with a long history in the Mediterranean. They describe the optimized molecular tools used to identify additional molecular variation in carob DNA markers and investigate the species' genetic diversity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Improving molecular imaging using a deep learning approach
(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) Generating comprehensive molecular images of organs and tumors in living organisms can be performed at ultra-fast speed using a new deep learning approach to image reconstruction developed by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molecular and materials research: sharing data easily
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) 24 hours a day, the Internet offers direct access to the world's knowledge. Especially researchers handling data strive for free information flow. The exchange of raw data is, however, is prevented by obstacles. The 'Science Data Center for Molecular Materials Research' of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology aims to change this in cooperation with the Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences and FIZ Karlsruhe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Towards a blood test for early-stage liver disease
(EMBO) One in four people in Western and Asian societies develop a build-up of fat in the liver as a result of an unhealthy diet. This disease -- non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) -- causes no symptoms initially but can develop into end-stage liver cirrhosis. A discovery, published today in Molecular Systems Biology, paves the way for a simple blood test to detect early stages of NAFLD, opening up the possibility of preventing the development of liver cirrhosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level
(University of Pennsylvania) Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. They found that sugar molecules play a key role in cellular communication, serving as the 'channels' that cells and proteins use to talk to one another. This work also provides researchers with a new tool to study other living systems in incredible detail, enabling future breakthroughs in fields from materials science to nanomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New lipid shape atlas holds key to early disease detection
(Vanderbilt University) A team of Vanderbilt University chemists started decoding the total human molecular picture by examining 456 variations of one class of molecule, lipids, bellwethers of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Using histones as bait: How do cells decide how to repair their DNA?
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) When DNA in the cell nucleus gets damaged, our cells can resort to a variety of repair mechanisms. A recent study published in 'Nature Cell Biology', to which scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen made major contributions, elucidates the molecular basis by which a cell makes the choice between these repair mechanisms. The trick the scientists used: they developed a molecular bait to literally fish out the relevant proteins from the cell nucleus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Molecular heaters to boost crop growth thanks to € 4.9 million project
A € 4.9 million EU H2020 grant will enable a consortium of researchers from across Europe, to embark on a project called 'Boostcrop'. They will use state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methodologies to design molecular heaters which will enhance crop growth under cold and freezing stress. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Grants and Awards; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

New clue for cancer treatment could be hiding in microscopic molecular machine
(Florida State University) Researchers have discovered a critical missing step in the production of proteasomes -- tiny structures in a cell that dispose of protein waste -- and found that carefully targeted manipulation of this step could prove an effective recourse for the treatment of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lab-grown mini tumors could help identify personalized treatments for people with rare cancers
UCLA scientists have developed a new method to quickly screen hundreds of drugs in order to identify treatments that can target specific tumors.The approach could help scientists understand how a person ’s tumor would respond to a certain drug or drug combination, and it could help guide treatment decisions for people with rare and hard-to-treat cancers. Apaper detailing the new technique was published in Communications Biology.“We always focus on how we need new and better drugs to treat cancer,” said Alice Soragni, the senior author of the study and a scientist at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Can...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Outfitting T cell receptors to combat a widespread and sometimes deadly virus
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers have engineered 'antibody-like' T cell receptors that can specifically stick to cells infected with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, a virus that causes lifelong infection in more than half of all adults by age 40. These receptors represent a new potential treatment option, could aid the development of CMV vaccines and might also be used to target brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists sharpen their molecular scissors and expand the gene editing toolbox
(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have figured out a better way to deliver a DNA editing tool to shorten the presence of the editor proteins in the cells in what they describe as a 'hit and run' approach. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antarctic flies protect fragile eggs with 'antifreeze'
(University of Cincinnati) A molecular analysis by the University of Cincinnati found that wingless flies protected their eggs with a temperature-resistant gel to help them withstand freezing and thawing in Antarctica. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists discover new type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves. The findings could pave the way for new treatments for heart valve disorders, which can be caused by congenital defects, aging or disease.Their study, led by Dr. Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology and member of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, was published in the journal Developmental Cell.Building on previous research by Nakano, which showed that ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Expanding the genetic code
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

A pharmacological master key mechanism that unlocks the selectivity filter gate in K+ channels
Potassium (K+) channels have been evolutionarily tuned for activation by diverse biological stimuli, and pharmacological activation is thought to target these specific gating mechanisms. Here we report a class of negatively charged activators (NCAs) that bypass the specific mechanisms but act as master keys to open K+ channels gated at their selectivity filter (SF), including many two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels, voltage-gated hERG (human ether-à-go-go–related gene) channels and calcium (Ca2+)–activated big-conductance potassium (BK)–type channels. Functional analysis, x-ray crystallography, and ...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Schewe, M., Sun, H., Mert, U., Mackenzie, A., Pike, A. C. W., Schulz, F., Constantin, C., Vowinkel, K. S., Conrad, L. J., Kiper, A. K., Gonzalez, W., Musinszki, M., Tegtmeier, M., Pryde, D. C., Belabed, H., Nazare, M., de Groot, B. L., Decher, N., Fakler, Tags: Biochemistry reports Source Type: news

Hachimoji DNA and RNA: A genetic system with eight building blocks
We report DNA- and RNA-like systems built from eight nucleotide "letters" (hence the name "hachimoji") that form four orthogonal pairs. These synthetic systems meet the structural requirements needed to support Darwinian evolution, including a polyelectrolyte backbone, predictable thermodynamic stability, and stereoregular building blocks that fit a Schrödinger aperiodic crystal. Measured thermodynamic parameters predict the stability of hachimoji duplexes, allowing hachimoji DNA to increase the information density of natural terran DNA. Three crystal structures show that the synthetic building blocks...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hoshika, S., Leal, N. A., Kim, M.-J., Kim, M.-S., Karalkar, N. B., Kim, H.-J., Bates, A. M., Watkins, N. E., SantaLucia, H. A., Meyer, A. J., DasGupta, S., Piccirilli, J. A., Ellington, A. D., SantaLucia, J., Georgiadis, M. M., Benner, S. A. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Sue Povey obituary
Molecular geneticist who was a leading contributor to the Human Genome ProjectIn 2003the Human Genome Project (HGP) published the complete sequence of human DNA. Sue Povey, who has died aged 76, contributed greatly to this international collaborative project with her team at University College London, her work as a molecular geneticist having started much earlier, in the late 1960s. She was motivated throughout by a strong interest in people and disease.At the outset she exploited newly developed enzyme detection systems that revealed differences between individuals and among species, allowing her to solve a number of long...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dallas Swallow and Veronica van Heyningen Tags: Human Genome Project Genetics People in science Biology Source Type: news

NSF Announces New BIO Director
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced that Dr. Joanne Tornow will serve as the next Director of the Biological Sciences Directorate (BIO). Dr. Tornow has worked in program management, leadership, and strategic development roles at NSF for nearly two decades. Tornow has previously served as Senior Adviser for strategic planning in BIO, head of BIO’s Molecular and Cellular Biosciences division, Deputy Assistant Director for NSF’s Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Directorate (SBE), Acting head of SBE, and Head of NSF’s Office of Information and Resource Management. Prior to joining NSF...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Speakers announced for 2019 Experimental Biology Meeting
(Experimental Biology) Renowned scientists including Nobel laureates, research pioneers and celebrated educators will convene at the Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting, to be held April 6-9 in Orlando. Bringing together more than 12,000 life scientists in one interdisciplinary community, EB showcases the latest advances in anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, investigative pathology, pharmacology and physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tuberculosis: Commandeering a bacterial 'suicide' mechanism
(CNRS) The bacteria responsible for tuberculosis can be killed by a toxin they produce unless it is neutralized by an antidote protein. The European team of scientists behind this discovery is coordinated by researchers from the Institute of Pharmacology and Structural Biology (IPBS--CNRS/UPS) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). Their findings are published in Molecular Cell. The team is now seeking to appropriate this 'suicide' mechanism for therapeutic purposes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suicide system in tuberculosis bacteria might hold key to treatment
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. The genome of the bacterium that causes TB holds a special toxin-antitoxin system with spectacular action: once the toxin is activated, all bacterial cells die, stopping the disease. An international research team co-led by the Wilmanns group at EMBL in Hamburg investigated this promising feature for therapeutic targets. They now share the first high-resolution details of the system in Molecular Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 18, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Virus promoting love and kindness created for Valentine's day
(Integral Molecular) What if love and kindness could spread like a virus? As part of the University City Science Center's BioArt Residency, artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg created a custom virus able to increase the production of oxytocin, a hormone that induces feelings of love, kindness, and empathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 14, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lipoproteins behave 'almost like a tiny Velcro ball'
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Setbacks in drug trials aiming to raise HDL have led researchers to reassess the particle's effects on heart health. A study in the Journal of Lipid Research combining proteomics and mouse genetics may help researchers understand researchers understand the proteins in the particle, how they get there and how they determine HDL function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news