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Medical News Today: Is gene editing ethical?
Advances in molecular biology are bringing the possibility of editing the human genome ever closer. But do we think this is ethical? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

MDC receives funding to collaborate on Human Cell Atlas
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) The Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in Berlin is participating as a research partner in the Human Cell Atlas (HCA). The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative has now announced that it will provide financial support for the HCA's sub-project 'Towards a Human Cardiac Cell Atlas.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Screening for disease or toxins in a drop of blood
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Imagine being able to quickly and accurately screen for diseases or chemical contaminants in a tiny drop of blood. Berkeley Lab scientist Daojing Wang and others have developed a multinozzle emitter array (MEA), a silicon chip that can dramatically shorten the time it takes to identify proteins, peptides, and other molecular components within small volumes of biological samples. This patented technology is now being commercialized by Newomics Inc., a company Wang launched to further develop the product and build a platform for personalized health care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a 'Star Wars' parody turned into a tool for scientific discovery (video)
(American Chemical Society) Science has long inspired the arts, but examples of the reverse scenario are sparse. Now scientists who set out to produce a 'Star Wars' parody have inadvertently created such an example. Incorporating animation techniques from the film industry, the researchers developed a robust new modeling tool that could help spur new molecular discoveries. Their project, reported in ACS Nano, resulted in a short film about fertilization called 'The Beginning.' For a look behind-the-scenes, watch ACS' Headline Science video. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Death by a thousand cuts? Not for small populations
(Michigan State University) In a paper published in Nature Communications, Christoph Adami, professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, and graduate student Thomas LaBar have provided a look at how certain species survive by evolving a greater ability to weed out harmful mutations -- a new concept called 'drift robustness.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Crowdsourced game aims to find solutions to aflatoxin
(University of California - Davis) Mars, Inc., UC Davis and partners have launched a crowdsourcing initiative to solve the problem of aflatoxin contamination of crops. A series of aflatoxin puzzles will go online on Foldit, a platform that allows gamers to explore how amino acids are folded together to create proteins. Successful candidates from the computer game will be tested in the laboratory of Justin Siegel, assistant professor of chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine at UC Davis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New assay may boost targeted treatment of non-hodgkin lymphoma
(Elsevier) Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive cancer and the most frequently diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide (nearly 40 percent of cases). Recent advancements indicate that both the prognosis and choice of treatment of DLBCL may depend on identifying its molecular subtype. In a report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, researchers describe their development of a reliable, accessible, rapid, and cost-effective new gene expression signature assay that can enhance lymphoma management by helping to match tumors with the appropriate targeted therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF Announces Major Changes to Grant Solicitation Process
The National Science Foundation (NSF) will no longer require pre-proposals for certain biology research programs. Instead, the Directorate for Biological Sciences is implementing a no deadline, full-proposal review process for four of its five divisions. The new process starts in January 2018, but does not include the Division of Emerging Frontiers, which runs the MacroSystems Biology and Early NEON Science program and the Origin of Life program. All other biology research programs will be impacted. Consequently, the Division of Environmental Biology and the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems will discontinue thei...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Untangling vitamin D activation pathways in inflammation and bone health
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers have identified a region of the genome that regulates vitamin D activation in the kidneys, opening the door for more sophisticated treatments of diseases, including bone and immune disorders, involving vitamin D. The results of this research will be published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New protein study broadens knowledge of molecular basis for disease
(University of Notre Dame) Scientists at the University of Notre Dame are one step closer to unraveling the mystery of how intrinsically disordered proteins work, according to new research published in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mechanism for precise targeting of the immune response uncovered
(Goethe University Frankfurt) The immune system checks the health of cells of the body by examining a kind of molecular passport. Sometimes cells present the wrong passport, which can lead to autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammations or cancer. Scientists of the Goethe University Frankfurt explain the process how this happens in the new issue of the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA study shows cell diversity of a key brain region
Courtesy of Weizhe HongWeizhe HongUCLA researchers have shown for the first time a comprehensive picture of cell diversity in the amygdala, a vital brain region involved in the regulation of emotions and social behavior, as well as in autism spectrum disorders, depression and other mental disorders. As part of the study, the team also reported on a new method for systematically linking the distinct types of brain cells to specific behavioral functions.“The level of diversity of cells within the brain has not been well understood,” said study senior author Weizhe Hong, assistant professor of biological chemistry...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Danforth Center receives $3.4 million to improve maize architecture
(Donald Danforth Plant Science Center) The collaborative project brings together expertise in molecular genetics, developmental genomics and statistics to meet the food and fuel demands of a growing population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists find evidence our best friends, dogs, similarly adapted to malaria in Africa
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Once domesticated, dogs spread across the globe wherever humans migrated and settled. 'Recently, we have shown the first evidence that dogs can undergo similar adaptations as humans, using the same genes to live in the high altitudes of Tibet,' said Dr. Ya-ping Zhang. Now, the Chinese research team led by Dr. Zhang has successfully identified genes selected in African dogs and functionally verified the action of one of these as the first evidence of dog adaptation to malaria.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A molecular garbage disposal complex has a role in packing the genome
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) New research from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, to be published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry on Oct. 13, has found that the proteasome, an essential protein complex that breaks down proteins in cells, has another unexpected function: directly regulating the packing of DNA in the nucleus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study shows antibody-biogel partnership can be stronger defense than previously thought
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Strong molecular bonds between antibodies and biological gels like mucus aren't necessary to catch pathogens as was previously thought, according to new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In fact, rapid and weak interactions between antibodies and biogels are much better suited to locking down foreign invaders in the body's sticky first line of defense. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plant cells survive but stop dividing upon DNA damage
(Nara Institute of Science and Technology) The cell cycle is how a cell passes its DNA but ceases if the DNA is damaged, as otherwise it risks passing this damage to daughter cells. Scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new molecular mechanism that explains how this cessation occurs. The study shows that the transcription factor family MYB3R is normally degraded, but accumulates upon DNA damage to prevent cell cycle progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Sweet Way to Heal Your Wounds
We enjoy outdoor activities. My family will be coming over this year and I will fire up the grill for a delicious BBQ grass-fed beef. We’ll play games like badminton and horseshoes. Now while these games can be fun, they can lead to cuts and bruises. I want to aim you with an unconventional solution for those wounds.  For years now, sugar’s been a dirty word. It’s been blamed for everything from obesity, heart disease and diabetes to tooth decay and acne. But there’s something they don’t know.  Sugar’s better for you than all those artificial sweeteners and substitutes out th...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

'Smart' immune cells: Emerging cancer therapy research boosted with NIH award
(University of California - Davis) Assistant Professor Sean Collins, Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics in the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences, has received a $1.5 million award from the National Institutes of Health to advance the development of 'smart' immune cells for therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. The five-year NIH Director's New Innovator Award aims to provide new insight into how to engineer immune cells to control their recruitment and response to tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Webinar | Overcoming the evils of fixation and storage: Getting the most out of your FFPE samples
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gupta, M., (Zhihong) Zhang, J., Strengman, E. E. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Development, Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology opms-sups Source Type: news

Statement on the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017
The Nobel Assembly has awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, Joachim Frank of Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, United Kingdom "for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution." The National Science Foundation (NSF) supported Frank through several awards over the course of three decades. NSF also provided ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243292&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF N...
Source: NSF News - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Outfox Your “ Aging ” Gene
Some people just seem to have all the luck when it comes to getting old. Like my 83-year-old patient who drinks a little too much Scotch, but still has a 3-handicap in golf. Or the 108-year-old who goes through a gallon of ice cream every week. If you ask them how they do it, they’ll give credit to their good genes… and there is some truth to it. We all have something called a FOXO3 gene. It helps protect us against aging. German researchers at the Christian-Albrechts University studied the FOXO3 gene in 380-plus centenarians, more than 600 people in their 90s, and more than 700 people between the ages of...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Health Nutrition longevity Source Type: news

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry Has Been Awarded to Three Scientists For Developments in Electron Microscopy
Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developments in electron microscopy. The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York’s Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain. The Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences said Wednesday their method, called cryo-electron microscopy, allows researchers to “freeze biomolecules” mid-movement and visualize processes they have never previously seen.” The development, it...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Chemistry nobel prize onetime Source Type: news

New method to measure cell stiffness could lead to improved cancer treatments
Todd Cheney/UCLAIn the future, doctors could use the method the researchers developed to track a patient over time to see how a drug is affecting the patient ’s cancer cells, senior author Amy Rowat said. UCLA biophysicists have developed a new method to rapidly determine a single cell ’s stiffness and size — which could ultimately lead to improved treatments for cancer and other diseases.The method allows researchers to make standardized measurements of single cells, determine each cell ’s stiffness and assign it a number, generally between 10 and 20,000, in a unit of measurement called pascal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 4, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Visualizing life in silico
(University of Connecticut) Programming a molecular biology experiment can be similar to playing Sudoku; both are simple if you're working with only a few molecules or a small grid, but explode in complexity as they grow. Now, researchers at UConn Health have made it far easier for molecular biologists to make complex biological models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Q & amp;A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash
A basic curiosity about how life works led the Brandeis University molecular biologist to discover how our bodies keep time. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Nobel prizes 2017: everything you need to know about circadian rhythms
The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology was awarded for research on the body ’s clock, which is at work in all multicellular life. But what exactly is it?In the age ofinternational travel, shift work andpersonal gadgets that stave off sleep, the award of the Nobel prize for research on the body ’s clock, or circadian rhythms, could hardly be more timely.First identified in fruit flies, the tiny molecular components of the clock are at work in all multicellular life, humans included. The internal clock is now regarded as a key feature of life on Earth, one that wired the rotation of the planet into the fabric...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Nobel prizes Science People in science Science prizes Medical research Biology Source Type: news

US scientists awarded Nobel in medicine
Three US scientists have won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm," otherwise known as our biological clock, the Nobel committee said. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

US scientists awarded Nobel in medicine for body clock insights
Three US scientists have won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm," otherwise known as our biological clock, the Nobel committee said. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nobel prize for medicine awarded for insights into internal biological clock
£825,000 prize shared between American scientists Jeffrey C Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W Young for work on the internal clock of living organismsThe Nobel prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded to a trio of American scientists for their discoveries on the molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms – in other words, the 24-hour body clock.According to the Nobel committee ’s citation, Jeffrey C Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W Young were recognised for their discoveries explaining “how plants, animals and humans adapt their biological rhythm so that it is synchronised with ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis and Ian Sample Tags: Nobel prizes Medical research Science prizes World news People in science Biology Health Source Type: news

Jeffrey C Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W Young win 2017 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine – as it happened
Scientists share prize awarded for discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms – the body’s inner clock – fundamental to human health12.07pmBSTOne down and two to go – for the sciences at least. Today we saw the 2017 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine go to three American researchers, Jeffrey Hall at the University of Maine, Michael Rosbash at Brandeis University, and Michael Young at the Rockefeller University, for their decades-long work on the circadian clock. Given the 5am calls they had from Stockholm, I suspect they are experiencing firsthand what happens when that clo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Nobel prizes Science Science prizes People in science Biology Source Type: news

'Biological clock' scientists win 2017 Nobel Medicine Prize
STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - U.S.-born scientists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling our biological clocks, the award-giving body said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Three U.S.-born scientists win 2017 Nobel Medicine Prize
STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Scientists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling our biological clocks, the award-giving body said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

3 U.S.-born scientists win Nobel Prize for Medicine
Scientists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling our biological clocks, the award-giving body said on Monday. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

What a rare blood disease can teach us about blood clotting
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) New research in the Journal of Biological Chemistry yields insight into how antithrombin works, which could lead to treatments not only for patients with antithrombin deficiency, but also to better-designed drugs for other blood disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Statement on the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2017
(National Science Foundation) The Nobel Assembly has awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Jeffrey C. Hall and Michael Rosbash of Brandeis University and Michael W. Young of Rockefeller University in New York for 'their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When HIV drugs don't cooperate
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University studying combinations of drugs against HIV have discovered why some drugs sometimes act synergistically but sometimes do not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study published in Nature reveals molecular pathway of weight-controlling hormone
(Canale Communications) Scientists at NGM Bio have revealed deep insights into the role that a little-understood human hormone plays in regulating body weight. Named Growth and Differentiation Factor 15 (GDF15), this hormone is typically active only when the body experiences acute or prolonged stress, including following exposure to tissue-damaging toxins, such as chemotherapy, or during chronic disease, such as obesity or cancer. As a result, the GDF15 pathway holds promise for the development of potential therapeutics for diseases of both excess and insufficient body weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molecular fingerprint of breast tumors linked to immune response in bloodstream
(PLOS) Using newly developed software, researchers have shown that genes and molecular processes in breast cancer tumor cells are tightly linked to genes and processes in blood cells, including immune system cells. The findings are published in PLOS Computational Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How molecular scissors cut in the right place
(Uppsala University) A research group at Uppsala University has found out how CRISPR-Cas9 -- also known as 'molecular scissors' -- can search the genome for a specific DNA sequence. Cas9 already has many applications in biotechnology and is also expected to revolutionise medicine. The new research findings show how Cas9 can be improved to make the molecular scissors faster and more reliable. The study is being published in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study explores the biology of mending a broken heart
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Early research results suggest scientists might be on to a way to preserve heart function after heart attacks or for people with inherited heart defects called congenital cardiomyopathies. Researchers at the Cincinnati Children's Heart Institute report Sept. 28 in Nature Communications that after simulating heart injury in laboratory mouse models, they stopped or slowed cardiac fibrosis, organ enlargement and preserved heart function by blocking a well-known molecular pathway. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Resolving a DNA-protein cross-link
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

ZATT (ZNF451)-mediated resolution of topoisomerase 2 DNA-protein cross-links
Topoisomerase 2 (TOP2) DNA transactions proceed via formation of the TOP2 cleavage complex (TOP2cc), a covalent enzyme-DNA reaction intermediate that is vulnerable to trapping by potent anticancer TOP2 drugs. How genotoxic TOP2 DNA-protein cross-links are resolved is unclear. We found that the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) ligase ZATT (ZNF451) is a multifunctional DNA repair factor that controls cellular responses to TOP2 damage. ZATT binding to TOP2cc facilitates a proteasome-independent tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) hydrolase activity on stalled TOP2cc. The ZATT SUMO ligase activity further promotes TD...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Schellenberg, M. J., Lieberman, J. A., Herrero-Ruiz, A., Butler, L. R., Williams, J. G., Munoz-Cabello, A. M., Mueller, G. A., London, R. E., Cortes-Ledesma, F., Williams, R. S. Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Webinar | The rise of whole genome microbial sequencing: A new era for human microbiome analysis
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Segre, J., Pollard, K. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Development, Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology opms-sups Source Type: news

Assistant Professor of Biology
Penn State Hazleton invites applications for a faculty position, Assistant Professor of Biology, (Tenure-Track, 36 weeks) to begin August 2018, or as negotiated. Responsibilities: Teach two to three courses (9 contact hours) each semester using traditional, hybrid and/or online delivery methods. Teaching assignments would consist primarily of introductory, lab-based courses in biology for science majors, and general education courses in the successful applicant’s area of expertise. Teaching assignments may require teaching day, evening and/or Saturday classes as needed. Publish in refereed journals. Support undergra...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - September 27, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

Back from the brink
(University of California - Santa Barbara) UCSB biologists explore the molecular underpinnings of cells that recover from the verge of programmed death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How forest fires spoil wine
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) If wine is cultivated where forest fires occur more often, such as in Australia or Italy, aromas that make the alcoholic drink unpalatable can develop in the finished product. Until now, it wasn't known why this is so and what happens at the molecular level. A team at Technical University Munich is describing why the smoke aromas are stored in grapes and is thus showing the way for growers to eliminate this degradation in quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW to host $15.6 million NSF-funded center for innovation, education in materials science
(University of Washington) The University of Washington is home to a new national center of excellence for research, education and training in materials science. The Molecular Engineering Materials Center is funded by a $15.6 million, six-year grant from the National Science Foundation as part of its highly competitive Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Discovering what makes organelles connect could help understand neurodegenerative diseases
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Organelles must exchange signals and materials to make the cell operate correctly. New technologies are allowing researchers to see and understand the networks that connect these organelles, allowing them to build maps of the trade routes that exist within a cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High-fidelity recording of molecular geometry with DNA 'nanoscopy'
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A team at Harvard's Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering led by core faculty member Peng Yin, Ph.D., has now developed a DNA nanotechnology-based method that allows for repeated, non-destructive recording of uniquely barcoded molecular pairings, rendering a detailed view of their components and geometries. In the future, the approach could help researchers understand how changes in molecular complexes control biological processes in living cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news