Miniature testing of drug pairs on tumor biopsies
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Combinations of cancer drugs can be quickly and cheaply tested on tumour cells using a novel device developed by EMBL scientists. The research, reported in Nature Communications on June 22, marks the latest advancement in the field of personalised medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

When low batteries are a good thing
(Instituto de Medicina Molecular) A new study led by Marc Veldhoen, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular Jo ã o Lobo Antunes (iMM) shows how these cells are kept under control. The work published now in Science Immunology, reveals that the " batteries " of these cells have a different composition that reduces their capacity of producing energy, keeping them in a controlled activated mode. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Miniature testing of drug pairs on tumour biopsies
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Combinations of cancer drugs can be quickly and cheaply tested on tumour cells using a novel device developed by EMBL scientists. The research, reported in Nature Communications on June 22, marks the latest advancement in the field of personalised medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

News from Molecular & Cellular Proteomics
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) In recent articles, scientists optimize experimental design for understanding potential chemotherapeutic agents, delve into crop responses to salt-water stress, and present a better way to ensure consistency in long-term proteomics studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progression
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes, report researchers at the University of Illinois. It enables researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumor progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Towards personalised medicine: One type of data is not enough
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute) To understand the biology of diseased organs researchers can use different types of molecular data.One of the biggest computational challenges at the moment is integrating these multiple data types.A new computational method jointly analyses different types of molecular data and disentangles the sources of disease variability to guide personalised treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biology
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) A team of researchers at EMBL have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work, which was partly done at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering. Their results have been published on June 20 in Physical Review X. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limit
(University of Nottingham) New University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing.The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tattoo health warning for people with weakened immune systems
A woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants suffered chronic pain for three years after she had a tattoo on her thighGetting a tattoo if you have a weakened immune system could put you at risk of complications, doctors have warned. The caution comes after a woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants developed thigh and knee pain after having body art inked on her leg.Doctors say those taking immunosuppressant drugs should take precautions if considering body art. These medicines are often given after an organ transplant or to treat autoimmune conditions such as Crohn ’s disease, lupus or rheumatoid arthrit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Tattoos Medical research Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health Cystic fibrosis Diabetes Source Type: news

Study suggests well-known growth suppressor actually fuels lethal brain cancers
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Scientists report finding a potentially promising treatment target for aggressive and deadly high-grade brain cancers like glioblastoma. Publishing online June 18 in Nature Cell Biology, the study also reports the current lack of a drug that hits the molecular target keeps it from being advanced for testing as a therapeutic strategy for patients with few treatment options. The researchers point to a protein that helps regulate cell metabolism called AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches -- single human cells
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Scientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell -- many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Constructing new tissue shapes with light
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Constructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on June 18. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of 2018 Switzer Prize
Dr. David Sabatini, an MIT biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, will be the 2018 recipient of the Switzer Prize awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Sabatini ’s pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth are propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases.As a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Sabatini identified the central protein, mTOR,  that turns cell growth on and off. At the Whitehead Institute and MIT, his laboratory ’s research&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two UCLA chemists selected as 2018 Pew scholars
UCLA chemistry professors Hosea Nelson and Jose Rodriguez have been selected among 22  Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences for 2018. The honor provides funding to outstanding young researchers whose work is relevant to the advancement of human health. The scholars, who were selected from 184 nominations, will receive four-year, $300,000 grants to advance their explorations of biological mechanisms underpinning human h ealth and disease.UCLA and UC San Diego each has two 2018 Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences; no other university has more than one.“These scientists have shown the boldness and creat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Big data identifies lipids as signatures of health and disease
Biology is swaddled in lipids: fats, oils, and even waxes envelop cells and their organelles, mediate the flow of vast biological information networks, protect fragile tissues, and store essential energy across multiple organisms. But despite their importance, lipids have traditionally been among the hardest biomolecules to study because of the diversity of their molecular structures, which are not determined by the well-defined building blocks and simple rules that govern DNA, RNA, and proteins. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Fat cell filling, ketogenic diet, and the history of biochemistry
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Recent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research investigate how brown fat converts to white, how cells in the liver fill fat droplets, and how eating a ketogenic or calorie-restricted diet may change a mouse's metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fat cell filling, ketogenic diet, and the history of biochemistry:
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Recent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research investigate how brown fat converts to white, how cells in the liver fill fat droplets, and how eating a ketogenic or calorie-restricted diet may change a mouse's metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protective mechanism against atherosclerosis discovered
(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Immune cells promoting inflammation play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. Scientists at CeMM and the Medical University of Vienna in collaboration with the University of Cambridge showed that a survival factor for those cells has also anti-inflammatory functions and a protective role in atherosclerosis. The study, published in Circulation, provides valuable new insight for atherosclerosis research and suggests a hitherto unknown, inherited risk factor for atherosclerosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Queen's Birthday Honours 2018
Dr Richard Henderson, Molecular Biologist and Biophysicist at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology was made a Companion of Honour in the 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honours for services to electron microscopy of biological molecules. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - June 11, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Manipulated enzymes
(Graz University of Technology) TU Graz researchers managed for the first time ever to 'retrain' an enzyme to build ring-shaped molecular structures instead of performing its natural task of reducing double bonds. The work was published in Angewandte Chemie, and is relevant for the production of pharmaceuticals and plant protection products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The criminalization of science whistleblowers: A mind-blowing interview with Judy Mikovits, PhD
(Natural News) In one of the most shocking science videos you’ll see this year, molecular biologist Judy A. Mikovits, PhD, reveals the disturbing true story of how she was thrown in prison for blowing the whistle on deadly viral contamination of human vaccines. With a well established history of working for the National Cancer Institute... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New insight into why Pierce's disease is so deadly to grapevines
(University of California - Davis) Scientists are gaining a better understanding of Pierce's disease and how it affects grapevines. The disease, which annually costs California more than $100 million, comes from a bacterium called Xylella fastidiosa. In a new study, published in Frontiers in Plant Science, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have identified a set of molecular markers that influence the onset of Pierce's disease in grapevines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coral tricks for adapting to ocean acidification
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) A molecular process that signals distress could also help corals adapt to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plants send small RNAs in extracellular vesicles to fungal pathogen to silence virulence genes
Some pathogens and pests deliver small RNAs (sRNAs) into host cells to suppress host immunity. Conversely, hosts also transfer sRNAs into pathogens and pests to inhibit their virulence. Although sRNA trafficking has been observed in a wide variety of interactions, how sRNAs are transferred, especially from hosts to pathogens and pests, is still unknown. Here, we show that host Arabidopsis cells secrete exosome-like extracellular vesicles to deliver sRNAs into fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. These sRNA-containing vesicles accumulate at the infection sites and are taken up by the fungal cells. Transferred host sRNAs induce...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Cai, Q., Qiao, L., Wang, M., He, B., Lin, F.-M., Palmquist, J., Huang, S.-D., Jin, H. Tags: Botany, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Imaging-based molecular barcoding with pixelated dielectric metasurfaces
Metasurfaces provide opportunities for wavefront control, flat optics, and subwavelength light focusing. We developed an imaging-based nanophotonic method for detecting mid-infrared molecular fingerprints and implemented it for the chemical identification and compositional analysis of surface-bound analytes. Our technique features a two-dimensional pixelated dielectric metasurface with a range of ultrasharp resonances, each tuned to a discrete frequency; this enables molecular absorption signatures to be read out at multiple spectral points, and the resulting information is then translated into a barcode-like spatial absor...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tittl, A., Leitis, A., Liu, M., Yesilkoy, F., Choi, D.-Y., Neshev, D. N., Kivshar, Y. S., Altug, H. Tags: Physics, Applied reports Source Type: news

Defense cargo shuttles in vesicles
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Botany, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Scientists see inner workings of enzyme telomerase, which plays key roles in aging, cancer
Cancer, aging-related diseases and other illnesses are closely tied to an important enzyme called “telomerase.” UCLA researchersreport in the journal  Cell the deepest scientific understanding yet of this once-mysterious enzyme, whose catalytic core — where most of its activity occurs — can now be seen in near atomic resolution.“We’re now seeing not just the face of the clock, we’re seeing how the components inside interact to make it work,” said Juli Feigon, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry in the UCLA College and a senior author of the study. “At ea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UC Riverside neuroscientist receives Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award in neuroscience
(University of California - Riverside) Hongdian Yang, whose research focuses on neural circuit mechanisms underlying sensory perception, has received a Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award in Neuroscience, a joint project of The Esther A.& Joseph Klingenstein Fund and the Simons Foundation. This year, only 13 researchers were awarded the fellowship. Yang, an assistant professor of molecular, cell, and systems biology, is the first researcher at the University of California, Riverside, to receive the three-year $225,000 prestigious fellowship. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Simpler model gets to the point with proteins
(Rice University) Rice University researchers introduce a new computational framework to predict the details of protein folding and other dynamic molecular processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists reveal structure of amino acid transporter involved in cancer
(University of Groningen) The human glutamine transporter ASCT2 is upregulated in several forms of cancer. It is also the docking platform for a wide range of pathogenic retroviruses. A team of University of Groningen scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the structure of the protein, which may generate leads for drug development. The results were published in Nature Structural& Molecular Biology on 5 June. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Fibrillarin Antibody
Potent Nucleoli MarkerGiven the importance ofNucleus and Related Markers to all branches of cell/molecular biology, we are dedicated to having the best.We have just added a newFibrillarin Antibody.Images: Immunofluorescent analysis of (A) C6 rat glioma cells and (B) Human embryonic kidney cells stained with mouse mAb to fibrillarin, MO22169, dilution 1:1,000 in red, in both cases costained with chicken pAb to vimentin, CPCA-Vim, dilution 1:10,000 in green. The blue is DAPI staining of nuclear DNA.Nop1p/Fibrillarin was originally identified as a nucleolar protein of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (accession P15646)....
Source: Neuromics - June 4, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Fibrillarin Antibody Nuclear Staining Nucleoli Source Type: news

Doctors hail world first as woman ’s advanced breast cancer is eradicated
Immune cells from the woman ’s own body used to wipe out tumoursA woman with advanced breast cancer which had spread around her body has been completely cleared of the disease by a groundbreaking therapy that harnessed the power of her immune system to fight the tumours.It is the first time that a patient with late-stage breast cancer has been successfully treated by a form of immunotherapy that uses the patient ’s own immune cells to find and destroy cancer cells that have formed in the body.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample and Jessica Glenza Tags: Cancer research Breast cancer Immunology Health Medical research Science Biochemistry and molecular biology Source Type: news

On the search for new approaches to cure lung cancer
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Protein kinases regulate nearly all processes in cells. If the function of these enzymes is disrupted, often cancer will develop. In particular certain types of deregulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are believed to be the cause of various types of cancer. In his new research project, cellular biologist Professor Krishnaraj Rajalingam of the Mainz University Medical Center intends to dissect on the molecular level how disturbed MAPKs lead to the generation of tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How just drops of viper venom pack a deadly punch
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at Brazil's largest producer of antivenoms report a structural analysis of glycans modifying venom proteins in several species of lancehead viper. The snakes are among the most dangerous in South America. The report offers insight into the solubility and stability of toxic proteins from venom, and into how venoms from different species vary. Scientists are now working to map glycan structures back onto the proteins they modify. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Direct visualization of dynamic structures of protein disaggregation molecular machines
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) ClpB, an ATP-fueled protein molecular machine, disentangles and reactivates aggregated proteins. By using high-speed atomic force microscopy, conformational dynamics of ClpB was visualized for the first time. ClpB forms open- and closed-ring, and the closed-ring was further classified into three forms; round, spiral, and twisted-half-spiral. These structures transformed each other during ATPase-cycle to perform protein disaggregation. This research will help to treat protein aggregations, which are related to various diseases and cause problems in industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cocaine use alters gene expression in brain reward circuits
(Elsevier) A study in Biological Psychiatry has identified unique genetic changes in the brain's reward circuitry that are associated with cocaine use, including first-time use, withdrawal, and re-exposure to the drug after prolonged withdrawal. The findings reveal important information on how cocaine addiction reprograms gene expression and provide insight into the molecular basis of cocaine addiction in unprecedented detail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New copies of old gene drove brain expansion
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Pennisi, E. Tags: Evolution, Genetics, Molecular Biology In Depth Source Type: news

Iron-sulfur cluster research offers new avenues of investigating disease
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the University of Kentucky have discovered that disruptions in the construction of iron-sulfur clusters can lead to the buildup of fat droplets in certain cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

From Haifa to Tokyo: Medical detectives team up on selenoprotein1/EPT1
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Ordinary tests couldn't diagnose an Israeli infant's developmental disorder. Until they completed whole-exome sequencing, his doctors were stumped. After finding a homozygous rare allele, they teamed up with Japanese experts on the affected enzyme to describe its hitherto unknown role in myelination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to code a functional molecular machine?
(Institute for Basic Science) An international team has developed a model that simulates protein evolution. Starting from stiff, unfunctional proteins, the computer model shows how evolving protein components can work together to give rise to dynamic and efficient molecular machines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What happens to plasmalogens, the phospholipids nobody likes to think about
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) In a paper to be published in the June 2 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis provide the first report of an enzyme that breaks down plasmalogens, a breakthrough in understanding the molecular processes that occur during Alzheimer's and other diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

VTCRI scientists identify novel cellular mechanism that can lead to cancer metastasis
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have added a new dimension to the understanding of how cells alter their communication with one another during development, wound healing, and the spread of cancer. The researchers published their results in Molecular Biology of the Cell, a journal published by the American Society for Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MSU-based molecular biologists compared human and yeast FACT
(Lomonosov Moscow State University) Today, scientists extensively study FACT -- a protein complex that plays a role in DNA packing within a nucleus, as well as in oncogenesis. A team of scientists from MSU working in cooperation with foreign colleagues found out similarities between the work of this complex in humans and yeast. This discovery helped predict the existence of a new protein that assists the FACT complex in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientific 'dream team' shed light on motor neuron death
(The Francis Crick Institute) A group of clinical neurologists, molecular biologists and computer scientists have worked together to solve the mystery of why motor neurons die in patients with motor neuron disease, published in Nature Communications this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Programming synthetic molecular codes to turn genes 'on'
(Kyoto University) A team of researchers in Japan developed a synthetic molecular code to script gene activation. The process, described in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, could help lead to future gene-based therapies for a wide array of diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Evolution of the brain
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Evolution, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Using bugs in the gut to detect blood
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Engineering, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Evolution of pallium, hippocampus, and cortical cell types revealed by single-cell transcriptomics in reptiles
Computations in the mammalian cortex are carried out by glutamatergic and -aminobutyric acid–releasing (GABAergic) neurons forming specialized circuits and areas. Here we asked how these neurons and areas evolved in amniotes. We built a gene expression atlas of the pallium of two reptilian species using large-scale single-cell messenger RNA sequencing. The transcriptomic signature of glutamatergic neurons in reptilian cortex suggests that mammalian neocortical layers are made of new cell types generated by diversification of ancestral gene-regulatory programs. By contrast, the diversity of reptilian cortical GABAergi...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tosches, M. A., Yamawaki, T. M., Naumann, R. K., Jacobi, A. A., Tushev, G., Laurent, G. Tags: Evolution, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

An ingestible bacterial-electronic system to monitor gastrointestinal health
Biomolecular monitoring in the gastrointestinal tract could offer rapid, precise disease detection and management but is impeded by access to the remote and complex environment. Here, we present an ingestible micro-bio-electronic device (IMBED) for in situ biomolecular detection based on environmentally resilient biosensor bacteria and miniaturized luminescence readout electronics that wirelessly communicate with an external device. As a proof of concept, we engineer heme-sensitive probiotic biosensors and demonstrate accurate diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in swine. Additionally, we integrate alternative biosensor...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mimee, M., Nadeau, P., Hayward, A., Carim, S., Flanagan, S., Jerger, L., Collins, J., McDonnell, S., Swartwout, R., Citorik, R. J., Bulovic, V., Langer, R., Traverso, G., Chandrakasan, A. P., Lu, T. K. Tags: Engineering, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

mRNA structure determines specificity of a polyQ-driven phase separation
RNA promotes liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) to build membraneless compartments in cells. How distinct molecular compositions are established and maintained in these liquid compartments is unknown. Here, we report that secondary structure allows messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to self-associate and determines whether an mRNA is recruited to or excluded from liquid compartments. The polyQ-protein Whi3 induces conformational changes in RNA structure and generates distinct molecular fluctuations depending on the RNA sequence. These data support a model in which structure-based, RNA-RNA interactions promote assembly of distinct d...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Langdon, E. M., Qiu, Y., Ghanbari Niaki, A., McLaughlin, G. A., Weidmann, C. A., Gerbich, T. M., Smith, J. A., Crutchley, J. M., Termini, C. M., Weeks, K. M., Myong, S., Gladfelter, A. S. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news