Poxvirus tricks cells into moving to spread infection
Vaccinia virus, a poxvirus closely related to smallpox and monkeypox, tricks cells it has infected into activating their own cell movement mechanism to rapidly spread the virus, according to a new study led by scientists at the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - November 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Cross Section: Sir Venki Ramakrishnan – Science Weekly podcast
Nicola Davis sits down with Nobel prize-winning scientist SirVenki Ramakrishnan to discuss the competition he faced in the race to discover the ribosome – AKA thegene machine. Is competition good for science, or would a collaborative approach be better?Competition, as defined by theOxford living dictionary, is ‘the activity or condition of striving to gain or win something by defeating or establishing superiority over others’. Organisms, including humans, compete all the time – for food, for water, for a mate, for space.But should science also operate in this way?In his new bookThe Gene Machine, Nob...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Genetics Nobel prizes Biology People in science Source Type: news

UMass Amherst study demonstrates 'tunability' of a molecular chaperone
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Lila Gierasch, an expert on Hsp70s at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with her research team, report that Hsp70s from mammalian cells behave quite differently from bacterial Hsp70s. Because of the important roles Hsp70s play in protein misfolding diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the new findings 'will have a major impact on how we think about Hsp70s,' she says. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trying to understand cells' interior design
(Institute for Basic Science) IBS Scientists have explained how liquid-like droplets made of proteins and DNA form in vitro. Currently, there is a huge interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind the creation of such droplets, as it is linked to some human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results showed how much the sequence of DNA matters in the formation of such droplets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Detecting E. coli strains using molecular electronics
(University of California - Davis) Electrical engineers at UC Davis, the University of Washington and TOBB University of Economics and Technology in Ankara, Turkey have adapted a molecular electronic device called a single-molecule break junction to detect RNA from strains of E. coli known for causing illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fire ant colonies could inspire molecular machines, swarming robots
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Researchers at CU Boulder have uncovered the statistical rules that govern how gigantic colonies of fire ants form bridges, ladders and floating rafts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A cure for cancer: how to kill a killer
Revolutionary work on the body ’s immune system and a host of new drug trials mean that beating cancer may be achievableLast month, the Nobel prize in medicine was awarded fortwo breakthrough scientific discoveries heralded as having “revolutionised cancer treatment”, and “fundamentally changed the way we view how cancer can be managed”. One of them went to a charismatic, harmonica-playing Texan namedJim Allison for his breakthrough advances in cancer immunotherapy. His discovery had resulted in transformative outcomes for cancer patients and a radical new direction for cancer research.And yet...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Charles Graeber Tags: Cancer research Medical research Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health Science Source Type: news

What's in the air? There's more to it than we thought
(Yale University) Using high-powered equipment to analyze air samples, Yale researchers were able to get a detailed look at the molecular makeup of organic aerosols, which have a significant presence in the atmosphere. Posing risks to health and climate, these airborne particles generally fall into two categories: Primary organic aerosols that can form during combustion, such as in car and truck exhaust, and secondary organic aerosols that result from oxidation of organic gases and particles in the air. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ring-shaped protein complex wrangles DNA
(Rice University) Rice University scientists determine the whole structure of the condensin protein complex, which helps to organize DNA throughout the life cycle of a cell. By combining sequence and limited structural data, they settle a controversy over whether the condensin protein complex is made of a single ring or a molecular 'handcuff.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molecular biology: Phaser neatly arranges nucleosomes
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) LMU researchers have, for the first time, systematically determined the positioning of the packing units of the fruit fly genome, and discovered a new protein that defines their relationship to the DNA sequence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Congratulations to Marta Korbinits on being selected to deliver the Lady Estelle Wolfson Lecture
Prof Márta Korbonits gave the Lady Estelle Wolfson lecture in translational medicine at the Royal College of Physicians on the 24 October 2018, during the Acute and General Medicine Conference. The lectureship is awarded to applicants who have made a contribution to translational research or medicine that has demonstrable benefit to patients.Prof Korbonits was selected for her translational work on conditions associated with growth hormone excess, starting in childhood and producing pituitary gigantism, and her talk was entitled,“Legends, genetics and molecular biology”. (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 1, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Genetic Neurologist: A Profile of Huda Zoghbi
Turning to molecular genetics, the Baylor pediatric neurologist and geneticist works to discover the biological basis for the rare neurological diseases she sees in her patients. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Profile Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Don't underestimate the force
(University of Tokyo) Researchers have identified the weak molecular forces that hold together a tiny, self-assembling box with powerful possibilities. The study demonstrates a practical application of a force common in biological systems and advances the pursuit of artificial chemical life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Childhood Abuse, Complex Trauma and Epigenetics
Epigenetics refers to the study of a natural phenomenon and to the phenomenon itself. Epigenetics is the study of the mechanisms that turn on and off the expression of our genes without altering the DNA sequence. Epigenetics is also used to refer to the changes in expression of our genes. Factors such as age, nutritional habits, psychological stress, physical activity, working habits and substance abuse can trigger changes in gene expression (Alegría-Torres, 2011). These changes in gene expression, epigenetics, happen all the time in the natural world. For example, two identical twins, born with the exact same DNA s...
Source: Psych Central - October 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse Children and Teens Genetics Neuroscience PTSD Trauma Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma epigenetics gene expression Transgenerational trauma Source Type: news

Clodagh O'Shea receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to study genome
(Salk Institute) Clodagh O'Shea, a professor in Salk's Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Faculty Scholar, has been selected as a recipient of The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group's Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) program. She will be awarded $1.5 million over three years to conduct research into how DNA and its associated proteins (known collectively as chromatin) are packaged in the nucleus of cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Will Be Your Next Move in the In Vitro Diagnostic Space?
When it comes to in vitro diagnostic (IVD) technologies, medical device and diagnostic companies have been chomping at the bit to produce the next big innovation. The last few years have seen a surge in IVD technologies in the market, as device makers expand their knowledge and resources surrounding IVD technologies. With new products in the marketplace for direct-to-consumer tests (DTC), point-of-care diagnostics, and next-generation sequencing, we may be on the threshold of a new wave of diagnostic technologies that could have an impact on other diagnostic areas as well, such as gene sequencing and editing. These new IVD...
Source: MDDI - October 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: BIOMEDevice San Jose IVD Source Type: news

AIBS Past-President Appointed Editor-in-Chief of PNAS
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has announced the appointment of May R. Berenbaum as Editor-in-Chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the official journal of the Academy. Berenbaum will begin the editorship on January 1, 2019. A Past-President of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), Berenbaum is Professor and Swanlund Chair of Entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1994 and has served on the PNAS Editorial Board since 1998. Berenbaum is also a Past-President of the Entomological Society of Am...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler has disbanded a 24-member panel affiliated with the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) that had been working on an assessment of the current limits on airborne particulate matter (PM). Although CASAC is leading this review, the panel provided added expertise in determining whether the standards for PM and other air pollutants are sufficient to protect public health. The responsibility for the PM review will now solely fall on CASAC. Prior to this announcement, Wheeler had also replaced five out of the seven members on CASAC, with most of the ne...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Deconstructing the superfood that determines honeybee hierarchy
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) All bee larvae eat royal jelly when they're new, but only future queens continue to eat it. To figure out why, researchers in Austria are taking a close look at the molecular ingredients of the fancy fare. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mycoplasma genitalium's cell adhesion mechanism revealed
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Researchers from the Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC) and the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB-UAB) have discovered the mechanism by which the bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (Mgen) adheres to human cells. This adhesion is essential for the onset of bacterial infection and subsequent disease development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 29, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SibFU scientists simulated the intracellular environment of a luminescent bacteria cell
(Siberian Federal University) A team from the Institute of Fundamental Biology and Biotechnology of SFU used glycerol and sucrose to simulate the intracellular environment of luminescent bacteria and carried out a number of enzymatic reactions in it. The work will help develop fragments of metabolic chains with different lengths and study fermentative reactions in the conditions close to intracellular. The article of the scientists was published in the Molecular Catalysis journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Evolutionary shift toward protein-based architecture in trypanosomal mitochondrial ribosomes
Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) plays key functional and architectural roles in ribosomes. Using electron microscopy, we determined the atomic structure of a highly divergent ribosome found in mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans. The trypanosomal mitoribosome features the smallest rRNAs and contains more proteins than all known ribosomes. The structure shows how the proteins have taken over the role of architectural scaffold from the rRNA: They form an autonomous outer shell that surrounds the entire particle and stabilizes and positions the functionally important regions...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ramrath, D. J. F., Niemann, M., Leibundgut, M., Bieri, P., Prange, C., Horn, E. K., Leitner, A., Boehringer, D., Schneider, A., Ban, N. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Structure of the largest, most complex ribosome
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Molecular Devices Announces Brand Identity for Its Newly-Formed...
Industry-leading ForteBio brand repositioned to focus on delivering breakthroughs in early stage biologic drug development.(PRWeb October 23, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/molecular_devices_announces_brand_identity_for_its_newly_formed_biologics_business_unit/prweb15860484.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers discover drug that could combat brain cell death in those with Alzheimer ’s disease
This study was funded by the Turken Research Award and departmental recruitment funds to Jiang; as well as grants from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy and Howard Hughes Medical Institute to Eisenberg. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ancient enzymes the catalysts for new discoveries
(University of Queensland) University of Queensland-led research recreating 450 million-year-old enzymes has resulted in a biochemical engineering 'hack' which could lead to new drugs, flavours, fragrances and biofuels.Professor Elizabeth Gillam from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences said the study showed ancient enzymes could survive high temperatures and that this could help create chemicals cheaply and at scale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The science of infectious disease is BANNED by Twitter... LGBT thought police are now causing the spread of anal cancer and AIDS
(Natural News) The Twitter thought police recently blocked a widely-respected, pro-life news outlet from accessing its account over a four-year-old tweet that contained facts about how homosexual men are prominent carriers of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). Dr. Gerard M. Nadal, a molecular biologist and microbiologist who also serves as president and CEO of the Coalition on... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Frances Arnold: ‘To expect a Nobel prize is rather silly’
The joint winner of this year ’s Nobel prize in chemistry talks about her pioneering work on enzymes and the realities of sexism in the sciencesThismonth,Frances Arnold, professor of chemical engineering atCaltech in California, was awarded the 2018Nobel prize in chemistry, shared with two others. She ’s the fifthfemale chemistry laureatesince the prizes first began in 1901, and the only ever American woman to win in the subject.Where were you when you got the news you had won the Nobel prize?I was in deep sleep in a Dallas hotel room having arrived at midnight to give a lecture the next day. The phone rang at ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Biochemistry and molecular biology Nobel prizes Science prizes People in science Source Type: news

Infection biology: Staying a step ahead of the game
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness, evades the immune system by repeatedly altering the structure of its surface coat. Sequencing of its genome and studies of its 3D genome architecture have now revealed crucial molecular aspects of this strategy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Structure of the human voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.4 in complex with {beta}1
Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, which are responsible for action potential generation, are implicated in many human diseases. Despite decades of rigorous characterization, the lack of a structure of any human Nav channel has hampered mechanistic understanding. Here, we report the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the human Nav1.4-β1 complex at 3.2-Å resolution. Accurate model building was made for the pore domain, the voltage-sensing domains, and the β1 subunit, providing insight into the molecular basis for Na+ permeation and kinetic asymmetry of the four repeats. Structural analysis of repo...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Pan, X., Li, Z., Zhou, Q., Shen, H., Wu, K., Huang, X., Chen, J., Zhang, J., Zhu, X., Lei, J., Xiong, W., Gong, H., Xiao, B., Yan, N. Tags: Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Teleflex, Arcis enter agreement for cancer diagnostics
Cancer-detection company Arcis Biotechnology said today it has signed an agreement allowing Teleflex (NYSE:TFX) to use Arcis’ advanced nucleic acid sample preparation chemistry in the development of a novel technology. Daresbury, England-based Arcis’ diagnostics use a two-step nucleic acid extraction and preservation technology. The company said it has an extensive patent portfolio covering DNA and RNA extraction and preservation for downstream processing by qPCR, RT-qPCR and sequencing in under three minutes. The platform may be used for point-of-care, microfluidics or field-based testing, and supports both co...
Source: Mass Device - October 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Featured Oncology arcisbiotechnology Teleflex Source Type: news

Just how blind are bats? Color vision gene study examines key sensory tradeoffs
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Could bats' cave-dwelling nocturnal habits over eons enhanced their echolocation acoustic abilities, but also spurred their loss of vision?A new study led by Bruno Sim õ es, Emma Teeling and colleagues has examined this question in the evolution of color vision genes across a large and diverse group of bat species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UK Study Matches Mesothelioma Treatments to Genetic Profile
University of Leicester researchers soon will open the first molecularly stratified clinical trial for malignant mesothelioma with the hope of moving the future of treatment toward more personalization. The phase II trial in the United Kingdom is designed to match therapy with a patient’s specific genetic profile. “We’re trying to bring the right drug to the right patient at the right time,” Professor Dean Fennell, chair of thoracic medical oncology at Leicester and chief trial investigator, told Asbestos.com. “We need to find different treatments that work for different people. This is a step...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Same-Sex Mice Can Now Have Kids. Are We Next?
Same-sex biological children were once a thing of fiction, until know. As scientists have grappled to make a viable mouse pup from two moms or dads, they have also further elucidated a molecular tug-of-war between mom and dad's genes that is behind many deadly diseases. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Adam Barsouk, Contributor Source Type: news

Thank To Gene Editing, Same-Sex Mice Can Now Have Kids. Are We Next?
Same-sex biological children were once a thing of fiction, until know. As scientists have grappled to make a viable mouse pup from two moms or dads, they have also further elucidated a molecular tug-of-war between mom and dad's genes that is behind many deadly diseases. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Adam Barsouk, Contributor Source Type: news

An RNA key that unlocks innate immunity
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) New research from Emory University, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a versatile RNA molecule may be a key player in human cells' frontline defenses against viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers discover what pneumococcus says to make you sick
(Carnegie Mellon University) Carnegie Mellon University researchers have identified a molecule that plays a key role in bacterial communication and infection. Their findings add a new word to pneumococcus' molecular dictionary and may lead to novel ways to manipulate the bacteria and prevent infection. The findings are published in the Oct. 11 issue of PLOS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How a common drug causes liver failure
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) A study of liver cells exposed to the common painkiller acetaminophen found a novel mechanism for the drug's toxicity at high doses. Researchers say a protein modification called glutathionylation, kicked off by acetaminophen treatment, impairs liver cell mitochondria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery of widespread type I and type V CRISPR-Cas inhibitors
Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems protect their host from bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements. Mobile elements, in turn, encode various anti-CRISPR (Acr) proteins to inhibit the immune function of CRISPR-Cas. To date, Acr proteins have been discovered for type I (subtypes I-D, I-E, and I-F) and type II (II-A and II-C) but not other CRISPR systems. Here, we report the discovery of 12 acr genes, including inhibitors of type V-A and I-C CRISPR systems. AcrVA1 inhibits a broad spectrum of Cas12a (Cpf1) orthologs—including MbCas12a, Mb3Cas12a, AsCas12a, and LbCas12a—when assayed in human cells. The acr genes...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marino, N. D., Zhang, J. Y., Borges, A. L., Sousa, A. A., Leon, L. M., Rauch, B. J., Walton, R. T., Berry, J. D., Joung, J. K., Kleinstiver, B. P., Bondy-Denomy, J. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Cas12 inhibitors join the anti-CRISPR family
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches
(Dartmouth College) A newly-developed molecule is easy to make, simple to work with and may potentially be used for the development of targeted medications and high-density memory devices with the volume of a speck of a dust. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Advances in deep learning for drug discovery and biomarker development published in top journal
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine, one of the industry leaders bridging deep learning for biology, chemistry and digital medicine, announced the publication of a special issue dedicated to 'Deep Learing for Drug Discovery and Biomarker Development' in one of the top industry journals celebrating its 15th anniversary published by the American Chemical Society, Molecular Pharmaceutics. The special issue starts with an article by the founder and CEO of Insilico Medicine, Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, titled " Artificial Intelligence for Drug Discovery, Biomarker Development, and Generation of Novel Chemistry " . ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seed oils are best for LDL cholesterol
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Using a statistical technique called network meta-analysis, researchers have combined the results of dozens of studies of dietary oils to identify those with the best effect on patients' LDL cholesterol and other blood lipids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA is awarded $5 million to develop tools to detect lung cancer earlier
Researchers from the UCLA School of Dentistry and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have been awarded $5 million over five years from the National Cancer Institute to develop liquid biopsy tools for testing individuals who could have lung cancer — the leading cause of cancer death in both U.S. men and women. The award, one of only six given in the nation, will support further development of the tools to improve methods for early detection of lung cancer.Today ’s standard of care in diagnosing lung cancer involves a low-dose computed tomography scan of the lungs, evaluating whether there are what are c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nanoplatform developed with three molecular imaging modalities for tumor diagnosis
(Universidad Complutense de Madrid) Nanotechnology and biotechnology are bringing us increasingly closer to personalised cancer treatment. With proven effectiveness in mice, the JANUS hybrid nanoplatform developed by a team of researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) incorporates three types of molecular medical imaging to locate and diagnose solid tumours, thereby increasing the sensitivity, resolution and specificity of these tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Protein dynamics: Molecular machines at work
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a special fluorescence-based imaging technique to track the shape changes that occur when pore proteins in the cell membrane export molecules into the extracellular medium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ASU research graces cover of ACS journal
(Arizona State University) Gary Moore, an assistant professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and a researcher with the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, and his team won the coveted honor when their research article, " Electrocatalytic Properties of Binuclear Cu(II) Fused Porphyrins for Hydrogen Evolution, " was selected for the cover of the October edition of ACS Catalysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Review Highlights Better Targets for Mesothelioma Therapy
A review on targeted therapies for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) provides fresh insight into why this cancer is so difficult to treat and ideas for improving outcomes. “Despite more than two decades of intensive research on the possible treatments for MPM, the results have so far been disappointing,” the authors wrote. According to the in-depth review, published in Critical Reviews in Hematology/Oncology, the next steps toward more tailored mesothelioma treatment will come from learning more about the changes driving abnormal cell communication. Researchers will use this information to personalize treatm...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 4, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Enhancement of piezoelectric properties in organic polymers all in the molecules
(Penn State) The inability to alter intrinsic piezoelectric behavior in organic polymers hampers their application in flexible, wearable and biocompatible devices, according to researchers at Penn State and North Carolina State University, but now a molecular approach can improve those piezoelectric properties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists find old antibiotic may selectively kill dangerous skin cancer cells
(Medical Research Council) An old antibiotic, called nifuroxazide, could selectively kill dangerous cells within melanomas -- the deadliest type of skin cancer -- scientists from the MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh have found. The study, published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology, found the drug showed promise for complementing existing melanoma therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news