Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Goblet cell diversity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

An intercrypt subpopulation of goblet cells is essential for colonic mucus barrier function
In this study, however, we delineated their specific gene and protein expression profiles and identified several distinct goblet cell populations that form two differentiation trajectories. One distinct subtype, the intercrypt goblet cells (icGCs), located at the colonic luminal surface, produced mucus with properties that differed from the mucus secreted by crypt-residing goblet cells. Mice with defective icGCs had increased sensitivity to chemically induced colitis and manifested spontaneous colitis with age. Furthermore, alterations in mucus and reduced numbers of icGCs were observed in patients with both active and rem...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nyström, E. E. L., Martinez-Abad, B., Arike, L., Birchenough, G. M. H., Nonnecke, E. B., Castillo, P. A., Svensson, F., Bevins, C. L., Hansson, G. C., Johansson, M. E. V. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Comment on "Circadian rhythms in the absence of the clock gene Bmal1"
Ray et al. (Reports, 14 February 2020, p. 800) report apparent transcriptional circadian rhythms in mouse tissues lacking the core clock component BMAL1. To better understand these surprising results, we reanalyzed the associated data. We were unable to reproduce the original findings, nor could we identify reliably cycling genes. We conclude that there is insufficient evidence to support circadian transcriptional rhythms in the absence of Bmal1. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ness-Cohn, E., Allada, R., Braun, R. Tags: Molecular Biology t-comment Source Type: news

Silk moth's diapause reverts back to ancestors' through gene editing!?
(Shinshu University) Diapause is a phenomenon in which animals and insects foresee changes in the environment and actively reduce metabolism, or halt regular differentiation and development. By knocking out genes that allow the silkworm to detect temperature, researchers found that the silk moth diapause changes from temperature to day length. This is not only valuable for the molecular mechanism in the environmental response, but also an important finding in exploring the process of domestication of silk moths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lighting the way to folding next-level origami
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Synthetic biologists from the National Institute of Chemistry in Ljubljana, Slovenia in collaboration with structural biologists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Hamburg, Germany explored ways to fold artificial proteins into diverse shapes like origamis. They constructed diamond-shaped protein cages, and managed to transform them to different shapes. Similar technology exists for DNA, but origami proteins could have more applications, e.g. in making new materials, delivering drugs and vaccines, and more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Are Toxin-Mediated Diseases?
Discussion A poison is a generic term for “a substance with an inherent property that tends to destroy life or impair health.” A toxin is more specific and is “any poison produced by an organism, characterized by antigenicity in certain animals and high molecular weight, and including the bacterial toxins that are the causative agents of tetanus, diphtheria, etc., and such plant and animal toxins as ricin and snake venom.” A toxin does not include those substances that are made synthetically produced. Venom is also a toxin that is used by animals and insects for predation or defense which can cause ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 12, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Brain organoids uncover various mechanisms of virus-induced microcephaly
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Researchers at IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - demonstrate that different viruses can lead to brain malformations through diverse mechanisms by using human brain organoid models. The results are published in the journal Cell Stem Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Balancing between build-up and break-down of bone
(Osaka University) Researchers at Osaka University have shown that SLPI, a secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, coordinates the mutually contradictory actions of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on bone. They revealed the genetic mechanisms and molecular pathways whereby SLPI promotes osteoblast activity to augment bone mass and showed how osteoblasts interact with osteoclasts to subdue bone resorption. This knowledge will inform clinical usage of anabolic PTH in osteoporosis as well as promote development of innovative drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lockdown for genome parasites
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Researchers at GMI - Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - uncover an ingenious mechanism by which Arabidopsis safeguards the integrity of its genome. The paper is published in the journal Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How did 500 species of a fish form in a lake? Dramatically different body clocks
(Florida Atlantic University) Despite the dramatic difference between day and nightlife, how fish exploit different times of day has not been studied systematically. Scientists explored alterations in the circadian timing of activity and the duration of rest-wake cycles in Lake Malawi's cichlids and identified the first single nocturnal species. Timing and duration of rest and activity varies dramatically, and continuously, between populations of Lake Malawi cichlids, providing a system for exploring the molecular and neural basis underlying variation in nocturnal activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Imaging cell lineage with a synthetic digital recording system
During multicellular development, spatial position and lineage history play powerful roles in controlling cell fate decisions. Using a serine integrase–based recording system, we engineered cells to record lineage information in a format that can be read out in situ. The system, termed integrase-editable memory by engineered mutagenesis with optical in situ readout (intMEMOIR), allowed in situ reconstruction of lineage relationships in cultured mouse cells and flies. intMEMOIR uses an array of independent three-state genetic memory elements that can recombine stochastically and irreversibly, allowing up to 59,049 dis...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Chow, K.-H. K., Budde, M. W., Granados, A. A., Cabrera, M., Yoon, S., Cho, S., Huang, T.-h., Koulena, N., Frieda, K. L., Cai, L., Lois, C., Elowitz, M. B. Tags: Development, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Pollen PCP-B peptides unlock a stigma peptide-receptor kinase gating mechanism for pollination
Sexual reproduction in angiosperms relies on precise communications between the pollen and pistil. The molecular mechanisms underlying these communications remain elusive. We established that in Arabidopsis, a stigmatic gatekeeper, the ANJEA–FERONIA (ANJ–FER) receptor kinase complex, perceives the RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR peptides RALF23 and RALF33 to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the stigma papillae, whereas pollination reduces stigmatic ROS, allowing pollen hydration. Upon pollination, the POLLEN COAT PROTEIN B-class peptides (PCP-Bs) compete with RALF23/33 for binding to the ANJ&ndash...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Liu, C., Shen, L., Xiao, Y., Vyshedsky, D., Peng, C., Sun, X., Liu, Z., Cheng, L., Zhang, H., Han, Z., Chai, J., Wu, H.-M., Cheung, A. Y., Li, C. Tags: Botany, Cell Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Targeting the nucleotide salvage factor DNPH1 sensitizes BRCA-deficient cells to PARP inhibitors
Mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes predispose individuals to breast and ovarian cancer. In the clinic, these cancers are treated with inhibitors that target poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We show that inhibition of DNPH1, a protein that eliminates cytotoxic nucleotide 5-hydroxymethyl-deoxyuridine (hmdU) monophosphate, potentiates the sensitivity of BRCA-deficient cells to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Synthetic lethality was mediated by the action of SMUG1 glycosylase on genomic hmdU, leading to PARP trapping, replication fork collapse, DNA break formation, and apoptosis. BRCA1-deficient cells that acqu...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Fugger, K., Bajrami, I., Silva Dos Santos, M., Young, S. J., Kunzelmann, S., Kelly, G., Hewitt, G., Patel, H., Goldstone, R., Carell, T., Boulton, S. J., MacRae, J., Taylor, I. A., West, S. C. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR & NIH Stand Against Structural Racism NIDCR Director Rena D’Souza, DDS, MS, PhD, said in a statement that there is no place for structural racism in biomedical research, echoing remarks from NIH Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, in his announcement of a new NIH ...
Source: NIDCR Science News - April 7, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Genome sequencing reveals a new species of bumblebee
(Uppsala University) While studying genetic diversity in bumblebees in the Rocky Mountains, USA, researchers from Uppsala University discovered a new species. They named it Bombus incognitus and present their findings in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

LSU Health New Orleans study discovers source of Zika neurodevelopmental defects
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) A study led by Edward Wojcik, PhD, Associate Professor of Biochemistry& Molecular Biology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, identified how microcephaly (abnormally small heads) and blindness may develop in Zika-infected fetuses, as well as a new way to potentially prevent these neurodevelopmental defects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 6, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Structural biology opens new perspectives for treating psychiatric disorders
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Employing innovative technologies for combining data from hundreds of crystals, scientists determined the molecular structure of Glycine Transporter 1, a protein that modulates neuronal activity in the brain. The revealed binding sites through which the transporter can be inhibited by drugs. This could open new avenues for developing psychiatric drugs. The study was conducted by researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Hamburg, Aarhus University, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Linkster Therapeutics, and University of Zurich. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Committee with no domain expertise approved indigenously manufactured Covaxin: Health experts
“The committee is Delhi centric and dominated by disciplines not connected to vaccines and clinical research. Like in the US such important committees should be multidisciplinary with virologist, persons having a background in cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, public health and experie nce of conducting clinical research,” former health secretary Sujatha Rao said. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Committee with no domain expertise approved indigenously manufactured Covaxin, say health experts
“The committee is Delhi centric and dominated by disciplines not connected to vaccines and clinical research. Like in the US such important committees should be multidisciplinary with virologist, persons having a background in cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, public health and experie nce of conducting clinical research,” former health secretary Sujatha Rao said. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

USC Stem Cell study identifies molecular 'switch' that turns precursors into kidney cells
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) Kidney development is a balancing act between the self-renewal of stem and progenitor cells to maintain and expand their numbers, and the differentiation of these cells into more specialized cell types. In a new study from the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, a team of scientists demonstrates the importance of a molecule calledβ-catenin in striking this balance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The IASLC Molecular Database Project: Objectives, challenges and opportunities
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) A new Molecular Database Project initiated by the International Association for the Study of Lung (IASLC) will accelerate the understanding of lung cancer biology, clinical care and care delivery on a global scale and will improve the prognosis and optimal treatment of lung cancer across time and space, according to an editorial in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, an official journal of the IASLC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In search of the first bacterium
(Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf) What did the ancestor of all bacteria look like, where did it live and what did it feed on? A team of researchers from the Institute of Molecular Evolution at Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (HHU) has now found answers to these questions by analysing biochemical metabolic networks and evolutionary trees. In the journal Communications Biology, they report on how they can now even infer the shape of the first bacterium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 31, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting to the core of HIV replication
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Mechanism found for how HIV-1 virus imports nucleotides into its core that fuel DNA synthesis, a key step in its replication. Supercomputer molecular dynamics simulations helped test translocation and free energy calculations. Research supported by the NSF-funded XSEDE through TACC Stampede2 and PSC Bridges. HIV-1 capsid research provides potential for new drug targets for therapeutic development such as improved anti-retroviral drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 31, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cold Tooth Pain's Mysterious Molecular Culprit
Researchers figured out how a jolt of discomfort gets from the damaged outside of your tooth to the nerves inside it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Veronique Greenwood Tags: Teeth and Dentistry Temperature Biology and Biochemistry Proteins Mice Science Advances (Journal) Research your-feed-science your-feed-health Source Type: news

UCLA researchers receive $6 million from NIH to explore new pancreatic cancer therapies
A team of researchers from theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has been awarded two research grants totaling $6 million from the National Institutes of Health to identify new ways to treat pancreatic cancer.Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States, accounting for more than 47,000 deaths annually. Only 1 in 10 people diagnosed with this particularly aggressive disease live beyond five years, and most therapies — including conventional chemotherapies, targeted therapies and immunotherapies — are unsuccessful in treating it.“Pancreatic cancer is on...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 25, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

When synthetic evolution rhymes with natural diversity
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Researchers at GMI, UNC-Chapel Hill and HHMI use two complementary approaches to unveil a co-evolutionary mechanism between bacteria and plants and also explain complex immune response patterns observed in the wild. Together the papers change the way scientists have been thinking about the relationship of a bacterial antigenic component with its plant immune receptor. The two papers are published back to back in the journal Cell Host& Microbe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fast-acting, color-changing molecular probe senses when a material is about to fail
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Materials that contain special polymer molecules may someday be able to warn us when they are about to fail, researchers said. Engineers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign have improved their previously developed force-sensitive molecules, called mechanophores, to produce reversible, rapid and vibrant color change when a force is applied. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molecular mechanism of cytokinin-activated cell division in Arabidopsis
Mitogens trigger cell division in animals. In plants, cytokinins, a group of phytohormones derived from adenine, stimulate cell proliferation. Cytokinin signaling is initiated by membrane-associated histidine kinase receptors and transduced through a phosphorelay system. We show that in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem (SAM), cytokinin regulates cell division by promoting nuclear shuttling of Myb-domain protein 3R4 (MYB3R4), a transcription factor that activates mitotic gene expression. Newly synthesized MYB3R4 protein resides predominantly in the cytoplasm. At the G2-to-M transition, rapid nuclear accumulation of MYB...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Yang, W., Cortijo, S., Korsbo, N., Roszak, P., Schiessl, K., Gurzadyan, A., Wightman, R., Jönsson, H., Meyerowitz, E. Tags: Botany, Cell Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Zooming in on muscle cells
(Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology) An international team, led by Stefan Raunser, Director at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund, in collaboration with Mathias Gautel at the King's College in London, has produced the first high-resolution 3D image of the sarcomere, the basic contractile unit of skeletal and heart muscle cells, by using electron cryo-tomography. Electron cryo-tomography capability of imaging structures directly in frozen muscle cells could translate into future medical treatments for muscle diseases and a better understanding of the aging process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Deactivating cancer cell gene boosts immunotherapy for head and neck cancers
By targeting an enzyme that plays a key role in head and neck cancer cells, researchers from theUCLA School of Dentistry were able to significantly slow the growth and spread of tumors in mice and enhance the effectiveness of an immunotherapy to which these types of cancers often become resistant.Their findings,  published online in the journal Molecular Cell, could help researchers develop more refined approaches to combatting highly invasive head and neck squamous cell cancers, which primarily affect the mouth, nose and throat.Immunotherapy, which is used as a clinical treatment for various cancers, harnesses t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

BMI1, a promising gene to protect against Alzheimer's disease
(University of Montreal) A Canadian molecular biologist at University of Montreal discovers a new function for BMI1, which is known to counteract brain aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Viruses: Evolution on the outskirts
(SMBE journals (Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution)) Genome Biology and Evolution's latest virtual issue on viral evolution provides new insight into the evolutionary mechanisms that influence viruses, their genomes, and their hosts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate as a biomarker of aggression - Whipp AM, Vuoksimaa E, Korhonen T, Pool R, But A, Ligthart L, Hagenbeek FA, Bartels M, Bogl LH, Pulkkinen L, Rose RJ, Boomsma DI, Kaprio J.
Human aggression is a complex behaviour, the biological underpinnings of which remain poorly known. To gain insights into aggression biology, we studied relationships with aggression of 11 low-molecular-weight metabolites (amino acids, ketone bodies), proc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Salk scientist Ronald Evans receives 2021 Asan Award in Basic Medicine
(Salk Institute) Salk Professor Ronald Evans, director of Salk's Gene Expression Laboratory and March of Dimes Chair in Molecular and Developmental Biology, has been awarded the 2021 Asan Award in Basic Medicine by the Asan Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ATRT molecular groups: looking at the biology from the clinic
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital are learning more about what the molecular groups of a rare pediatric brain tumor mean for clinical care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Atomic structure of the minor spliceosome
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Processive RNA polymerization and promoter recognition in an RNA World
Early life is thought to have required the self-replication of RNA by RNA replicases. However, how such replicases evolved and subsequently enabled gene expression remains largely unexplored. We engineered and selected a holopolymerase ribozyme that uses a sigma factor–like specificity primer to first recognize an RNA promoter sequence and then, in a second step, rearrange to a processive elongation form. Using its own sequence, the polymerase can also program itself to polymerize from certain RNA promoters and not others. This selective promoter–based polymerization could allow an RNA replicase ribozyme to def...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Cojocaru, R., Unrau, P. J. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

A processive RNA replicator
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Structure of the activated human minor spliceosome
The minor spliceosome mediates splicing of the rare but essential U12-type precursor messenger RNA. Here, we report the atomic features of the activated human minor spliceosome determined by cryo–electron microscopy at 2.9-angstrom resolution. The 5' splice site and branch point sequence of the U12-type intron are recognized by the U6atac and U12 small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), respectively. Five newly identified proteins stabilize the conformation of the catalytic center: The zinc finger protein SCNM1 functionally mimics the SF3a complex of the major spliceosome, the RBM48-ARMC7 complex binds the -monomethyl phosphate ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Bai, R., Wan, R., Wang, L., Xu, K., Zhang, Q., Lei, J., Shi, Y. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

FAU researchers break bonds in molecular nitrogen with calcium
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) A research team at FAU has demonstrated that calcium, a metal commonly found in nature is able to break the highly-stable nitrogen bond and can do so at minus 60 ° C which is a significant discovery in terms of the bond-breaking capabilities of calcium, which had been largely disregarded in the past. But their findings could also form the basis for developing industrial processes in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A promising breakthrough for a better design of electronic materials
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) Professor Emanuele Orgiu of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has demonstrated the role played by molecular vibrations on electron conductivity on crystals of such materials. This finding is important for applications of these molecular materials in electronics, energy and information storage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FSU researchers discover how 'cryptic species' respond differently to coral bleaching
(Florida State University) Florida State University researchers used molecular genetics to differentiate among corals that look nearly identical and to understand which species best coped with thermal stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

May not be new wave yet, vaccination plus Covid protocol key to quell surge in cases: Scientists
Rakesh Mishra, director of the CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CSIR-CCMB), warned that there could be a new wave if the current trends continue and new homegrown variants of the virus may emerge. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - March 13, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Revealing the way a critical enzyme works in the cell
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Combining structural biology, molecular simulations, mutagenesis, and in vivo assays, EPFL scientists have made the first extensive study of the mode of action of the enzyme acyl thioesterase, which regulates deacylation, one of the most critical functions of the cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Singapore scientists develop novel gene editor to correct disease-causing mutations
(Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore) The Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) has developed a CRISPR-based gene editor to correct mutations that cause genetic disorders. The C-to-G Base Editor (CGBE) by GIS advances the widely adopted CRISPR-Cas9 technology to enable molecular surgery on the human genome. This invention opens up treatment options for approximately 40 per cent of single-base substitutions associated with human diseases - including cystic fibrosis, cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, and neurological disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

T cell circuits that sense antigen density with an ultrasensitive threshold
Overexpressed tumor-associated antigens [for example, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] are attractive targets for therapeutic T cells, but toxic "off-tumor" cross-reaction with normal tissues that express low levels of target antigen can occur with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)–T cells. Inspired by natural ultrasensitive response circuits, we engineered a two-step positive-feedback circuit that allows human cytotoxic T cells to discriminate targets on the basis of a sigmoidal antigen-density threshold. In this circuit, a low-affinity synthetic No...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hernandez-Lopez, R. A., Yu, W., Cabral, K. A., Creasey, O. A., Lopez Pazmino, M. d. P., Tonai, Y., De Guzman, A., Mäkelä, A., Saksela, K., Gartner, Z. J., Lim, W. A. Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Designing smarter anticancer T cells
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ray, L. B. Tags: Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Molecular biologist Mohamed Abou featured in new video and article from the Vilcek Foundation
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation recognizes the research contributions and work of Princeton University faculty member Mohamed Abou Donia in a new article and video. Abou Donia is the recipient of a 2021 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science. He receives the award for his rigorous work on the impact of the microbiome of humans and other organisms on host health, disease, and the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aging-US: DNA- and telomere-damage does not limit lifespan: evidence from rapamycin
(Impact Journals LLC) @Blagosklonny concluded in his www.Aging-US.com Research Output that here he discussed new evidence that normal aging is not caused by accumulation of molecular damage or telomere shortening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news