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Supercoiling pushes molecular handcuffs along chromatin fibers
(Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics) As it squeezes down the chromatin fiber, the cohesin protein complex extrudes a growing loop of DNA -- a bit like the quick-lacing system of trail-running shoes. But what is powering the movement of the protein? A team of SIB scientists has found that the driving force could be the supercoiling of upstream DNA. Their research, published in Nucleic Acids Research, is thereby adding a key piece to the puzzle of gene expression regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Structure of channelrhodopsin determined
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Researchers discover structure and mechanism of action of molecular light switch, paving the way for new applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby ’s heart
Researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels — whether caused by diabetes or other factors — keep heart cells from maturing normally. Their findings help explain why babies born to women with diabetes are more likely to develop congenital heart disease.The study, which was led by Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell, and developmental biology and member of the Broad Stem Cell Research Center, was published today in the journal eLife.When developing heart cell...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Perking up and crimping the 'bristles' of polyelectrolyte brushes
(Georgia Institute of Technology) A molecular-sized brush that looks like a shoe brush has properties with great potential for the materials industry and medicine, but polyelectrolyte brushes can be sensitive, and getting them to work right tricky. New research shows what can make them break down, but also what can get them to systematically recover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Important new aspects are revealed about the control of cell division
(University of Seville) University of Seville researchers from the Andalusian Centre for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (Centro Andaluz de Biolog í a Molecular y Medicina Regenerativa - Cabimer) have published a study on the fundamental role that the nucleus plays in the coordination of these processes (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

$5 million grant from NIH will enable UCLA to develop new models for autism
Many genes that increase the risk of autism spectrum disorders have been identified, but their mechanisms remain largely unknown. Now a team of UCLA researchers has received a five-year grant of more than $5 million from the National Institutes of Health to support its work to identify those mechanisms.Led by Dr. Daniel Geschwind at UCLA, researchers will work with counterparts at Stanford University to assess the specific impact of genetic mutations on alterations in molecular, cellular and neural circuitry. Geschwind is the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Chair in Human Genetics and a professor of neurology a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Blood flow –sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have found that a protein known as NOTCH1 helps ward off inflammation in the walls of blood vessels, preventing atherosclerosis — the narrowing and hardening of arteries that can cause heart attacks and strokes.The new finding, from research conducted on mice, also explains why areas of smooth, fast blood flow are less prone to inflammation: levels of NOTCH1 are higher in these vessels.BACKGROUNDNOTCH1 was already known to be a key player in the development of blood vessels in embryos, but researchers weren ’t sure whether it was also critical to adults’ health. In a 2015 study, Lu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Searching for the CRISPR Swiss Army knife
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss Army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has visualized the atomic structures of the Cpf1 and Cas9 proteins to analyze each of their properties and peculiarities that make them ideal for different applications in gene modification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Typhoid fever toxin has a sweet tooth
(Cornell University) Although the insidious bacterium Salmonella typhi   has been around for centuries, very little is actually known about its molecular mechanisms. A new study from researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine addresses this knowledge gap and may lead to novel, targeted treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Advancing Evaluation: Moving Forward with DORA
“The declaration itself remains unchanged, but our aim is to spread the word much more effectively—about DORA and, especially, about the good practices it has already helped to establish in many institutions.” – Stephen Curry Five years ago at the American Society of Cell Biology (ASCB) Annual Meeting in San Francisco, leading cell biologists, editors and publishers dissatisfied with the near exclusive reliance on journal impact factor as the primary means of measuring success in academia began creation of what would several months later become known as the San Francisco Declaration of Research Asse...
Source: News from STM - December 8, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

A spring-loaded sensor for cholesterol in cells
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) New research from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, to be published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry on Dec. 8, explains how an enzyme acts as a kind of thermostat that responds to and adjusts levels of cholesterol in the cell. This insight could lead to new strategies for combating high cholesterol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The molecular structure of a forest aroma deconstructed
(American Institute of Physics) The fresh, unmistakable scent of a pine forest comes from a medley of chemicals produced by its trees. Researchers have now accurately determined the chemical structure of one compound in its gas phase, a molecule called alpha-pinene. The analysis can help scientists better detect and understand how alpha-pinene reacts with other gases in the atmosphere, a process that can affect health and climate. The researchers describe their analysis in this week's Journal of Chemical Physics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CMU receives $7.5m in federal BRAIN initiative funding
(Carnegie Mellon University) Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Departments of Biological Sciences and Chemistry, Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center (MBIC) and Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) have received close to $7.5 million in new funding from the National Institutes of Health through the federal BRAIN Initiative to support innovative research and develop tools that will rapidly advance brain research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Postcatalytic spliceosome structure reveals mechanism of 3'-splice site selection
Introns are removed from eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors by the spliceosome in two transesterification reactions—branching and exon ligation. The mechanism of 3'–splice site recognition during exon ligation has remained unclear. Here we present the 3.7-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure of the yeast P-complex spliceosome immediately after exon ligation. The 3'–splice site AG dinucleotide is recognized through non–Watson-Crick pairing with the 5' splice site and the branch-point adenosine. After the branching reaction, protein factors work together to remodel the spliceosome and st...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wilkinson, M. E., Fica, S. M., Galej, W. P., Norman, C. M., Newman, A. J., Nagai, K. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Understanding splicing from the 3' end
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Scientists find potential weapons for the battle against antibiotic resistance
(University of North Carolina Health Care) UNC School of Medicine scientists found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce specific molecular factors that dramatically increase or decrease an antibiotic's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus, another bacterium that often co-infects with P. aeruginosa. The findings, published in PLoS Biology, point to the possibility of new antibiotics employing these factors to enhance antibiotic susceptibility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMMS scientists identify gene associated with metastatic melanoma
(University of Massachusetts Medical School) A study by Craig J. Ceol, Ph.D., assistant professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has revealed a protein active during early embryo development called GDF6 plays a primary role in metastatic melanoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

These 12 People Are Changing Science
On Sunday, some of the smartest minds in science and math will gather at the NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley for the Breakthrough Prize, one of the biggest prizes in science. Several scientists will be recognized for their research, with 12 individuals receiving substantial funding for their work in advancing life sciences, physics and mathematics. Founded in 2012 by Sergey Brin, Mark Zuckerberg & Priscilla Chan, Yuri & Julia Milner, and Anne Wojcicki, this year the annual prize provided $22 million in awards. Here are some of the winners whose work may be changing your life soon: PHYSICS Wilkinson Mi...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park, Alexandra Sifferlin and Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anne wojcicki Breakthrough Prize healthytime Mark Zuckerberg Math onetime Physics priscilla chan Science sergey brin Silicon Valley Yuri Milner Source Type: news

Language patterns reveal the body ’s biological response to stress
FINDINGSCertain language patterns track the body ’s molecular response to stress more closely than a person’s own description of the stress, anxiety or depression that they are experiencing.BACKGROUNDPoverty, loneliness or post-traumatic stress disorder can have serious consequences on health, increasing the risk of cancer, Alzheimer ’s disease and heart disease, among other health problems. Previous research has shown that our genes respond to psychological adversity by increasing inflammation and reducing virus-fighting activity. These factors may contribute to social disparities in health.Steve Cole, a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists Are Using a Particle Accelerator to Unwrap a Mummy ’s Secrets
Scientists are using highly powerful X-rays to examine a mummy from ancient Egypt, hoping to find secrets about the nanostructure of Ancient Egyptian bones that might benefit modern medicine. A team at Northwestern University in Chicago is conducting the experiments, which allow researchers to see details of the mummy’s insides without removing its delicate wrappings. The team is hopeful that the results could help to predict bone fractures before they happen. “We have some preliminary findings about the various materials, but it will take days before we tighten down the precise answers to our questions,”...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized ancient egypt medicine onetime osteoporosis Source Type: news

3.9 A structure of the yeast Mec1-Ddc2 complex, a homolog of human ATR-ATRIP
The ataxia telangiectasia–mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase is a master regulator of DNA damage response and replication stress in humans, but the mechanism of its activation remains unclear. ATR acts together with its partner ATRIP. Using cryo–electron microscopy, we determined the structure of intact Mec1-Ddc2 (the yeast homolog of ATR-ATRIP), which is poised for catalysis, at a resolution of 3.9 angstroms. Mec1-Ddc2 forms a dimer of heterodimers through the PRD and FAT domains of Mec1 and the coiled-coil domain of Ddc2. The PRD and Bridge domains in Mec1 constitute critical regulatory sites. The activati...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wang, X., Ran, T., Zhang, X., Xin, J., Zhang, Z., Wu, T., Wang, W., Cai, G. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Holding a master regulator in check
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Alan Eddy obituary
My father, Alan Eddy, who has died aged 90, was the founding professor of biochemistry at Umist - the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology – where he carried out groundbreaking work with yeast. He was appointed professor and head of the department of biochemistry in 1959, and was in the vanguard of Umist’s transformation into a leading university.Born in St Just, Cornwall, Alan was the son of Ellen (nee Berryman) and Alfred Eddy. His mother was a teacher; his father worked as an assayer (working out how much metal there was in rocks) in the local tin mines and later, after qualifying as ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dan Eddy Tags: Biochemistry and molecular biology Source Type: news

How a biophysical simulation method might accelerate drug target discovery
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have developed an approach to overcome a major stumbling block in testing new drug targets. The research is reported in a Nov. 24 paper in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ERC Consolidator Grant for spectroscopy research at the University of Konstanz
(University of Konstanz) 'Spectroscopy of Complex Systems' research team honoured with EU research award -- 2 million euros in funding for new approach to determining the structure of molecules in biological cells - development of molecular probes for use with different spectroscopy techniques - relevant for research into neuro-degenerative diseases (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Largest conference of cell biologists convenes in Philadelphia December 2-6
(American Society for Cell Biology) The largest gathering of cell scientists will convene at the Pennsylvania Convention Center from Dec 2 to Dec 6. The 2017 ASCB| EMBO Meeting, hosted by the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), together for the first time with the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), is expected to draw 6,000 attendees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers conduct novel wheat microbiome analysis under four management strategies
(American Phytopathological Society) Molecular biologists Gdanetz and Trail of Michigan State University conducted a novel study on the microbial composition of wheat leaves, stems, and roots under four management strategies: conventional, no-till, organic, and reduced chemical inputs. They took 200-plus samples from each of 24 test plots, using DNA sequencing and culture collections to identify microbial communities, isolate potential strains of pathogen-resistant fungi, and ascertain the influence of management strategies on these communities. Learn more about their findings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Webinar | CRISPR unleashed: New tools and applications in live-cell imaging
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Grunwald, D., Yildiz, A., Barszczewski, M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Development, Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology opms-sups Source Type: news

Architecture of eukaryotic mRNA 3'-end processing machinery
Newly transcribed eukaryotic precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) are processed at their 3' ends by the ~1-megadalton multiprotein cleavage and polyadenylation factor (CPF). CPF cleaves pre-mRNAs, adds a polyadenylate tail, and triggers transcription termination, but it is unclear how its various enzymes are coordinated and assembled. Here, we show that the nuclease, polymerase, and phosphatase activities of yeast CPF are organized into three modules. Using electron cryomicroscopy, we determined a 3.5-angstrom-resolution structure of the ~200-kilodalton polymerase module. This revealed four β propellers, in an assembl...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Casanal, A., Kumar, A., Hill, C. H., Easter, A. D., Emsley, P., Degliesposti, G., Gordiyenko, Y., Santhanam, B., Wolf, J., Wiederhold, K., Dornan, G. L., Skehel, M., Robinson, C. V., Passmore, L. A. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

An interferon-independent lncRNA promotes viral replication by modulating cellular metabolism
Viruses regulate host metabolic networks to improve their survival. The molecules that are responsive to viral infection and regulate such metabolic changes are hardly known, but are essential for understanding viral infection. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is induced by multiple viruses, but not by type I interferon (IFN-I), and facilitates viral replication in mouse and human cells. In vivo deficiency of lncRNA-ACOD1 (a lncRNA identified by its nearest coding gene Acod1, aconitate decarboxylase 1) significantly attenuates viral infection through IFN-I–IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3)&ndas...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wang, P., Xu, J., Wang, Y., Cao, X. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

RNA editing with CRISPR-Cas13
Nucleic acid editing holds promise for treating genetic disease, particularly at the RNA level, where disease-relevant sequences can be rescued to yield functional protein products. Type VI CRISPR-Cas systems contain the programmable single-effector RNA-guided ribonuclease Cas13. We profiled type VI systems in order to engineer a Cas13 ortholog capable of robust knockdown and demonstrated RNA editing by using catalytically inactive Cas13 (dCas13) to direct adenosine-to-inosine deaminase activity by ADAR2 (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA type 2) to transcripts in mammalian cells. This system, referred to as RNA Editing fo...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Cox, D. B. T., Gootenberg, J. S., Abudayyeh, O. O., Franklin, B., Kellner, M. J., Joung, J., Zhang, F. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Host RNA helps promote viral replication
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Structural basis for mRNA 3'-end processing
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Precise transcriptome engineering
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Enhancing the RNA engineering toolkit
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Yang, L., Chen, L.-L. Tags: Molecular Biology perspective Source Type: news

Viruses hijack a host lncRNA to replicate
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kotzin, J. J., Mowel, W. K., Henao-Mejia, J. Tags: Molecular Biology perspective Source Type: news

Refining pesticides to kill pests, not bees
(Michigan State University) Researchers at Michigan State University's entomology department have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide's effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. The study, featured in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that molecular tweaks can make the difference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A model by which plants adapt their photosynthetic metabolism to light intensity
(University of Seville) A new model explains the molecular mechanism used by plants to adapt their photosynthetic mechanism to light intensity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Forsyth Institute researcher Floyd Dewhirst named as AAAS Fellow
(Forsyth Institute) The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today announced Forsyth Institute senior member of the staff, Floyd Dewhirst, DDS, PhD, as an AAAS Fellow in the Dentistry and Oral Health Sciences field. Dewhirst was elected a Fellow by his peers for his distinguished contributions in the field of molecular microbiology, particularly using molecular methods for the identification and classification of the human oral microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FDA releases framework guidelines for regenerative med development
The FDA this week laid out guidelines for a new framework it’s implementing for the development and oversight of regenerative medicine products including novel cellular therapies. The framework is laid out through four guidance documents which build on the FDA’s existing regulatory approach and describe more clearly which products are regulated as drugs, devices and biological products, according to a new FDA release. The documents include new science-based processes for ensuring the safety and effectiveness of such products and a risk-based framework for how it plans to enforce actions against potentially harm...
Source: Mass Device - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

Two sides of the same coin: High fat diets cause anxiety and stress causes digestion problems
(Natural News) A new study from Brigham Young University (BYU) reveals that digestive microorganisms change behavior when the host is under stress. BYU professor of microbiology and molecular biology Laura Bridgewater used male and female mice for the study experiment. She found that when the female mice were exposed to mild stress, their gut microbiota... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From southeast Asia to the sewers: Study determines new geographical origins of brown rats
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) an international research team of more than 20 institutions has performed the largest, whole genome DNA sequencing of 110 wild brown rats from across the world. The new study, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, has revealed that brown rats originally migrated 'Out of Asia' from southern East Asia about 3,600 years ago, rapidly spreading, first into the Middle East, and then to Europe and Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds 'black box' methods used by biologists probably overestimate number of new species
(University of Kansas) A study published in the journal Molecular Ecology demonstrates the misuse and abuse of methods scientists commonly use to place boundaries between different species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Risk perception of genome editing: Reservations and a great demand for information
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) For decades now, humans have been altering the genetic information of plants and animals in order to produce new varieties or strains. Some more recent molecular biological methods known under the generic term 'genome editing' enable targeted intervention into the genetic material. The CRISPR/Cas9 method, which could be used in agriculture and medicine, for example, promises to be particularly successful. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Generation of specific inhibitors of SUMO-1- and SUMO-2/3-mediated protein-protein interactions using Affimer (Adhiron) technology
We describe the use of the Affimer system of peptide display for the rapid isolation of synthetic binding proteins that inhibit SUMO-dependent protein-protein interactions mediated by SIMs both in vitro and in cells. Crucially, these synthetic proteins did not prevent SUMO conjugation either in vitro or in cell-based systems, enabling the specific analysis of SUMO-mediated protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, through structural analysis and molecular modeling, we explored the molecular mechanisms that may underlie their specificity in interfering with either SUMO-1–mediated interactions or interactions mediated...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hughes, D. J., Tiede, C., Penswick, N., Tang, A. A.-S., Trinh, C. H., Mandal, U., Zajac, K. Z., Gaule, T., Howell, G., Edwards, T. A., Duan, J., Feyfant, E., McPherson, M. J., Tomlinson, D. C., Whitehouse, A. Tags: STKE Research Resources Source Type: news

Lifestyle choices affect multiple generations: Studies show that environmental memories are stored at a cellular level
(Natural News) A recent animal study published in the Science journal has revealed that genetic changes caused by environmental factors may be passed down from one generation to another. According to a team of researchers at the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) in Spain, the genetic changes may even be inherited by up to 14 generations thereafter. The experts... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don't get injured at night... Researchers discover cell repair driven by circadian rhythm; wounds heal 60% faster during the day
(Natural News) Are you scheduled for some kind of surgery in the near future? You might want to request that it take place in the daytime. A recent study by researchers from the U.K.’s Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology, published in the journal Translational Medicine, has found that wounds inflicted during the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Senior Research Laboratory Technician – full-time (Fixed Term)
Location  Department of Physiology, Development and NeuroscienceSalary:£22,214 -£25,728Reference:  PM13702Closing Date: 30 November 2017 We are looking for an experienced and enthusiastic individual to join the groups ofProfessor Abigail Fowden andDr Andrew Murray.  Collectively, their research focuses on mitochondrial function during development and ageing, and how conditions during early life programme development and increase susceptibility to adult-onset degenerative diseases. They will provide mainly molecular biology support as well as some ass...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 10, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Mutant gene network in colon cancer identified
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) The principles of the gene network for colon tumorigenesis have been identified by a KAIST research team. The principles will be used to find the molecular target for effective anti-cancer drugs in the future. Further, this research gained attention for using a systems biology approach, which is an integrated research area of IT and BT. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fueling the future: ASU scientists promote new method of algal hydrogen production
(Arizona State University) Changing the way the nation generates and consumes energy is at the heart of a new NSF grant awarded to Arizona State University and Kevin Redding, professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and director of the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news