Increasing the effectiveness of cancer treatments: Anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy
(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Researh teams of Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have uncovered how to increase the efficacy of anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, and bioinformatics approaches, they discovered that the nuclear localization of PD-L1 is controlled by acetylation at a single, specific, Lys site. In the nucleus, PD-L1 controls the expression of immune related genes. Therefore, targeting PD-L1 nuclear localization could enhance the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade based immunotherapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Human genetics: A look in the mirror
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Genome Biology and Evolution's latest virtual issue highlights recent research published in the journal within the field of human genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MDI Biological Laboratory receives grant to study tendon regeneration
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) Prayag Murawala, Ph.D., of the MDI Biological Laboratory has received a $332,000 grant to study tendon injury. He is seeking to determine if the same cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for regenerating tendons during limb regeneration in salamanders also come into play during tendon regeneration after injury. The knowledge gained could one day be used to develop therapies to trigger tendon regeneration in adult humans, who for the most part are incapable of regeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH funds research into differences in glioblastoma between males and females
(Cleveland Clinic) A team led by researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute has secured $10.4 million over five years from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute to explore at the molecular level the differences in glioblastoma between males and females. The researchers will delve into the genetics, epigenetics and cell biology of glioblastoma - the most common and deadliest brain tumor in adults - to better understand the physiologic processes which may lead to more personalized therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 17, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Insights from big data
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Molecular Biology, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Looking at neurodevelopment through a big data lens
The formation of the human brain, which contains nearly 100 billion neurons making an average of 1000 connections each, represents an astonishing feat of self-organization. Despite impressive progress, our understanding of how neurons form the nervous system and enable function is very fragmentary, especially for the human brain. New technologies that produce large volumes of high-resolution measurements—big data—are now being brought to bear on this problem. Single-cell molecular profiling methods allow the exploration of neural diversity with increasing spatial and temporal resolution. Advances in human genet...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Briscoe, J., Marin, O. Tags: Molecular Biology, Neuroscience, Online Only review Source Type: news

From complexity to clarity in cell and gene therapy
One of the most exciting frontiers in medicine, cell and gene therapies are already offering breakthrough treatments and potential cures in severe genetic diseases and cancer. The innovations continue to advance rapidly, with press releases announcing major breakthroughs on a seemingly monthly basis.  It ’s undoubtedly a good news story but these advances bring with them the challenge of explaining all the exciting, but complex possibilities to patients and caregivers.  The groups that have historically been expected to help keep doctors up to speed cannot be expected to do so in this dynamic environm...
Source: EyeForPharma - September 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

Better communication helps translate molecular tools
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) Multi-stakeholder collaboration is key for the adoption of molecular approaches that can facilitate accurate, cheaper and faster monitoring of marine ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study finds two amino acids are the Marie Kondo of molecular liquid phase separation
(Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY) a team of biologists at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (CUNY ASRC) have identified unique roles for the amino acids arginine and lysine in contributing to molecule liquid phase properties and their regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Feeding off fusion or the immortalization of tumor cells
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Despite all recent progress, cancer remains one of the deadliest human diseases. In a new publication that appeared in the journal Cell, researchers from J ü rgen Knoblich's lab at IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - found a very surprising and unexpected connection between the formation of tumors and mitochondria, the power house of the cells, that allows neural stem cells that normally build our brain to become deadly tumor cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coupling transcription and translation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Keeping rhythm requires communication
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Kiberstis, P. A. Tags: Molecular Biology, Physiology twis Source Type: news

Structural basis of transcription-translation coupling
In bacteria, transcription and translation are coupled processes in which the movement of RNA polymerase (RNAP)–synthesizing messenger RNA (mRNA) is coordinated with the movement of the first ribosome-translating mRNA. Coupling is modulated by the transcription factors NusG (which is thought to bridge RNAP and the ribosome) and NusA. Here, we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of Escherichia coli transcription-translation complexes (TTCs) containing different-length mRNA spacers between RNAP and the ribosome active-center P site. Structures of TTCs containing short spacers show a state incompatible with...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wang, C., Molodtsov, V., Firlar, E., Kaelber, J. T., Blaha, G., Su, M., Ebright, R. H. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

The hepatocyte clock and feeding control chronophysiology of multiple liver cell types
Most cells of the body contain molecular clocks, but the requirement of peripheral clocks for rhythmicity and their effects on physiology are not well understood. We show that deletion of core clock components REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ in adult mouse hepatocytes disrupts diurnal rhythms of a subset of liver genes and alters the diurnal rhythm of de novo lipogenesis. Liver function is also influenced by nonhepatocytic cells, and the loss of hepatocyte REV-ERBs remodels the rhythmic transcriptomes and metabolomes of multiple cell types within the liver. Finally, alteration of food availability demonstrates the hierarc...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Guan, D., Xiong, Y., Trinh, T. M., Xiao, Y., Hu, W., Jiang, C., Dierickx, P., Jang, C., Rabinowitz, J. D., Lazar, M. A. Tags: Molecular Biology, Physiology reports Source Type: news

Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and Stanford University have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy - a leading cause of heart failure - and identified a potential treatment for it: a drug already used to treat acne. The study was published on 8 September in Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new twist on DNA origami
(Arizona State University) A team* of scientists from ASU and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) led by Hao Yan, ASU's Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, and director of the ASU Biodesign Institute's Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and encryption) as well as synthetic biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genome sequencing accelerates cancer detection
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute) Recent cancer studies have shown that genomic mutations leading to cancer can occur years, or even decades, before a patient is diagnosed. Researchers have developed a statistical model that analyses genomic data to predict whether a patient has a high or low risk of developing oesophageal cancer.The results could enable early detection and improve treatment of oesophageal cancer in future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Viruses play critical role in evolution and survival of the species
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) New research in Nature Structural& Molecular Biology shows viruses also play a key evolutionary role in mammals' ability to reproduce and survive, according to scientists in the Cincinnati Children's Perinatal Institute and at Azabu University in Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are aliens hiding in plain sight?
Several missions this year are seeking out life on the red planet. But would we recognise extraterrestrials if we found them?In July, three unmanned missions blasted off to Mars – from China (Tianwen-1), the US (Nasa ’s Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover) and the United Arab Emirates (Hope). The Chinese and American missions have lander craft that will seek signs of current or past life on Mars. Nasa is also planning to send itsEuropa Clipper probe to survey Jupiter ’s moon Europa, and the robotic landerDragonfly to Saturn ’s moon Titan. Both moons are widely thought to be promising hunting grounds for li...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Alien life Science Mars Space Biology Saturn Jupiter Astronomy Biochemistry and molecular biology Zoology Source Type: news

Cell division: Cleaning the nucleus without detergents
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) A team of researchers, spearheaded by the Gerlich lab at IMBA, has uncovered how cells remove unwanted components from the nucleus following mitosis. The results, published in the journal Nature, stem from a fruitful collaboration between the Gerlich lab and former IMBA Postdoc Sara Cuylen-H ä ring, who recently established her own group at EMBL. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cellular roadmaps predict body's coronavirus vulnerability
(Cornell University) New research from Cornell University developed potential roadmaps for how the coronavirus infects organs and identifies what molecular factors could help facilitate or restrict infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Finding the start
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Structure of a human 48S translational initiation complex
A key step in translational initiation is the recruitment of the 43S preinitiation complex by the cap-binding complex [eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F)] at the 5' end of messenger RNA (mRNA) to form the 48S initiation complex (i.e., the 48S). The 48S then scans along the mRNA to locate a start codon. To understand the mechanisms involved, we used cryo–electron microscopy to determine the structure of a reconstituted human 48S. The structure reveals insights into early events of translation initiation complex assembly, as well as how eIF4F interacts with subunits of eIF3 near the mRNA exit channel in the 43S. T...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Brito Querido, J., Sokabe, M., Kraatz, S., Gordiyenko, Y., Skehel, J. M., Fraser, C. S., Ramakrishnan, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Biological signs of disease examined at National Academies event
The workshop focused on biomarkers of effect, which are molecular changes that result from exposure to environmental and social stressors. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - September 2, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

New Understanding of CRISPR-Cas9-Guided Base Editors Could Trigger Development of Gene-Editing Tools Targeting Diseases and New Types of Clinical Laboratory Tests
Being able to study the 3D-structure of a CRISPR base editor could help refine the entire CRISPR system, says lead study author Jennifer Doudna, PhD Molecular biology laboratories engaged in CRISPR gene editing will be interested to note that researchers at the University of California Berkeley (UC Berkeley) have created for the first time a […] The post New Understanding of CRISPR-Cas9-Guided Base Editors Could Trigger Development of Gene-Editing Tools Targeting Diseases and New Types of Clinical Laboratory Tests first appeared on Dark Daily. (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - August 31, 2020 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing ABE ABE8e adenine base editor anatomic pathology Arizona State arizona state university Audr Source Type: news

Intelligent software tackles plant cell jigsaw puzzle
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) German researchers, including scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg (EMBL), developed a machine learning-based algorithm to study the morphogenesis of plants at a cellular level. So far it was impossible to solve this evolving and changing puzzle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Drug that 'repairs damage to the brain and spinal cord' has been created by British scientists
Scientists led by the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge created a synthetic version of a protein known as Cerebellin-1, called CPTX, that links brain messaging neurons together. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
(University of Basel) Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body. Scientists of the University of Basel and ETH Zurich published their results in the journal " Nature Communications " . (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A synthetic synaptic organizer protein restores glutamatergic neuronal circuits
Neuronal synapses undergo structural and functional changes throughout life, which are essential for nervous system physiology. However, these changes may also perturb the excitatory–inhibitory neurotransmission balance and trigger neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. Molecular tools to restore this balance are highly desirable. Here, we designed and characterized CPTX, a synthetic synaptic organizer combining structural elements from cerebellin-1 and neuronal pentraxin-1. CPTX can interact with presynaptic neurexins and postsynaptic AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors and induced the formation of excita...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Suzuki, K., Elegheert, J., Song, I., Sasakura, H., Senkov, O., Matsuda, K., Kakegawa, W., Clayton, A. J., Chang, V. T., Ferrer-Ferrer, M., Miura, E., Kaushik, R., Ikeno, M., Morioka, Y., Takeuchi, Y., Shimada, T., Otsuka, S., Stoyanov, S., Watanabe, M., T Tags: Biochemistry, Neuroscience, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Diverse enzymatic activities mediate antiviral immunity in prokaryotes
Bacteria and archaea are frequently attacked by viruses and other mobile genetic elements and rely on dedicated antiviral defense systems, such as restriction endonucleases and CRISPR, to survive. The enormous diversity of viruses suggests that more types of defense systems exist than are currently known. By systematic defense gene prediction and heterologous reconstitution, here we discover 29 widespread antiviral gene cassettes, collectively present in 32% of all sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes, that mediate protection against specific bacteriophages. These systems incorporate enzymatic activities not previously...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Gao, L., Altae-Tran, H., Böhning, F., Makarova, K. S., Segel, M., Schmid-Burgk, J. L., Koob, J., Wolf, Y. I., Koonin, E. V., Zhang, F. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Prokaryotic enzymes for viral defense
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Has England learned any lessons from the first wave of coronavirus? | Philip Ball
There ’s still a long way to go to prepare for a winter surge. But the country is no longer as vulnerable as it was in MarchNo one knows what the next months hold, butsuggestions that Britain will be back to normal by Christmas seem unlikely. Already,Leicester,Greater Manchester andPreston have enforced local lockdowns after registering risesin Covid-19 cases, while increases in Spain and Germany are an alarming reminder of the difficulty of controlling this virus. Cold weather could potentially boost the spread of coronavirus and make social distancing outdoors more difficult. The dangers are clear – so is Eng...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science UK news NHS Health Source Type: news

UC Davis researchers reveal molecular structures involved in plant respiration
(University of California - Davis) A study published today (Aug. 25, 2020) in eLife provides the first-ever, atomic-level, 3D structure of the largest protein complex (complex I) involved in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. The results could unlock new advances in agriculture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Enzyme prisons
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) A team at the MDC has answered a question that has puzzled scientists for some 40 years. In the journal Cell, the group explains how cells are able to switch on completely different signaling pathways using only one signaling molecule: the nucleotide cAMP. To achieve this, the molecule is virtually imprisoned in nanometer-sized spaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study offers new insights for sun-gathering technologies
(Arizona State University) In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery (CASD) and ASU's School of Molecular Sciences take a page from Nature's lesson book. Inspired by the way plants and other photosynthetic organisms collect and use the sun's radiant energy, they hope to develop technologies that harvest sunlight and store it as carbon-free or carbon-neutral fuels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FDA Authorizes Use of Plasma From Recovered Patients to Treat COVID-19
(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump on Sunday announced emergency authorization to treat COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma — a move he called “a breakthrough,” one of his top health officials called “promising” and other health experts said needs more study before it’s celebrated. The announcement came after White House officials complained there were politically motivated delays by the Food and Drug Administration in approving a vaccine and therapeutics for the disease that has upended Trump’s reelection chances. On the eve of the Republican National Convention, T...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lemire an Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

Forging molecular bonds with green light
(Queensland University of Technology) Scientists at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, have created a new molecular coupling tool employing both green light and pH triggers that has potential for use in applications such as drug delivery and 3D cell culture platforms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new molecular guardian of intestinal stem cells
(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) investigated how intestinal stem cells are controlled at the molecular level to remain stem cells or to develop into one of various intestinal cells. By studying mice lacking the protein IRF2, the researchers found a blunted regenerative response and an increased development of immature Paneth cells upon intestinal inflammation and infection. These findings help clarify the molecular biology of intestinal stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How UCLA scientists are using stem cells to take on COVID-19
As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, UCLA researchers are rising to the occasion by channeling their specialized expertise to seek new and creative ways to reduce the spread of the virus and save lives. Using years ’ — or even decades’ — worth of knowledge they’ve acquired studying other diseases and biological processes, many of them have shifted their focus to the novel coronavirus, and they’re collaborating across disciplines as they work toward new diagnostic tests, treatments and vaccines.At UCLA, more than 230 research projects, including several being led by members of theEli and Ed...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 20, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Organoids and sequencing team up for ALS research
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) MDC researchers received a $150,000 pilot project grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative's Neurodegeneration Challenge Network to investigate a defining feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Light harvesting in oxygenic photosynthesis: Structural biology meets spectroscopy
Oxygenic photosynthesis is the main process that drives life on earth. It starts with the harvesting of solar photons that, after transformation into electronic excitations, lead to charge separation in the reaction centers of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII). These photosystems are large, modular pigment-protein complexes that work in series to fuel the formation of carbohydrates, concomitantly producing molecular oxygen. Recent advances in cryo–electron microscopy have enabled the determination of PSI and PSII structures in complex with light-harvesting components called "supercomplexes" from differen...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Croce, R., van Amerongen, H. Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only review Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson to Acquire Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Expanding Janssen ’s Leadership in Novel Treatments for Autoimmune Diseases
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., August 19, 2020 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Momenta), a company that discovers and develops novel therapies for immune-mediated diseases, in an all cash transaction for approximately $6.5 billion. This acquisition provides an opportunity for the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson to broaden its leadership in immune-mediated diseases and drive further growth through expansion into autoantibody-driven disease. The transaction will include full global rights to nipocalim...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - August 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Unlocking the cell enhances student learning of the genetic code
(California Polytechnic State University) An open-source educational biotechnology called the 'Genetic Code Kit' allows students to interact with the molecular process inside cells in new ways. Researchers show that adapting state-of-the-art biotechnology for the classroom could transform how biology and biochemistry are taught to high school and undergraduate students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New clues to a 500-year old mystery about the human heart
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute) Researchers used artificial intelligence and genetic analyses to examine the structure of the inner surface of the heart using 25 000 MRI scans. They found that the complex network of muscle fibres lining the inside of the heart, called trabeculae, allows blood to flow more efficiently and can influence the risk of heart failure. The study answers old questions in human physiology and leads to new directions for understanding heart diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flexible and protected
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) In the fight against the coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 researchers from multiple research institutions in Germany have combined their resources to study the spike protein on the surface of the virus. With its spikes, the virus binds to human cells and infects them. The study gave surprising insights into the spike protein, including an unexpected freedom of movement and a protective coat to hide it from antibodies. The results are published in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Coronavirus Contact Tracers Remain Critical In Stemming The Spread, Lending A Helping Hand
BOSTON (CBS) – Three months into Massachusetts’ phased re-opening, warnings from coronavirus hot spots continue. “We’re starting to see an uptick, we’re right on the cusp of turning red,” said Brockton Mayor Robert Sullivan, during his latest coronavirus briefing. “So, house parties, parties at playgrounds, are just not acceptable right now.” Sullivan is now doubling down on efforts to keep people from gathering and directing the parks commissioner to not give out any permits for events. Brockton’s percentage of positive cases is nearly triple the state average. The P...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Anaridis Rodriguez Brockton News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Naturally occurring antibodies against prion proteins found in humans
(EMBO) Antibodies targeting the normal PrP version of the prion protein have been found in humans selected at random with no history of any associated transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In EMBO Molecular Medicine, researchers at the University of Zurich and Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Switzerland report on active antibodies against PrP at high levels in a small proportion of individuals, 21 of 37,894 hospital patients screened for presence of anti-PrP IgGs, the most common form of immunoglobulin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sir Paul Nurse: 'The UK has taken a leap several decades into the past'
The Nobel prize-winning scientist on Covid-19, the burden of Brexit, his astonishing upbringing and terrible failures at FrenchSir Paul Nurse is a geneticist who won the Nobel prize in 2001 for his work on the cell cycle. He is director of the Francis Crick Institute and was head of Cancer Research UK. He has also been president of the Royal Society.What Is Life? is his first book and it seeks to explain biology in five steps.Your book is a reminder of the fundamental importance of cells. Do you think cells have been overshadowed by genes in the public imagination?I ’m a geneticist, so I’ve lived through molecu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Biology Science Science and nature books Nobel prizes Cancer Health People in science Science prizes Society Genetics Coronavirus outbreak Brexit Source Type: news

The flax wilt agent has been sequenced
(Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University) Researchers teamed up to sequence and assemble genome of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lini, a highly destructive fungal parasite infecting flax. The results of the study were published in the Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news