Emerging roles of PLC{gamma}1 in endothelial biology
Phospholipase C 1 (PLC1) is a member of the PLC family that functions as signal transducer by hydrolyzing membrane lipid to generate second messengers. The unique protein structure of PLC1 confers a critical role as a direct effector of VEGFR2 and signaling mediated by other receptor tyrosine kinases. The distinct vascular phenotypes in PLC1-deficient animal models and the gain-of-function mutations of PLC1 found in human endothelial cancers point to a major physiological role of PLC1 in the endothelial system. In this review, we discuss aspects of physiological and molecular function centering around PLC1 in the context o...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - August 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Chen, D., Simons, M. Tags: STKE Reviews Source Type: news

FDA accepts application for Roche ’s faricimab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME)
Basel, 29 July 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company ’s Biologics License Application (BLA), under Priority Review, for faricimab for the treatment of neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME). The FDA has also accepted the company’s submission for diabetic retinopathy.Faricimab will be the first and only bispecific antibody designed for the eye, if approved. It targets two distinct pathways – via angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and vascular endothelial growt...
Source: Roche Media News - July 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA accepts application for Roche ’s faricimab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME)
Basel, 29 July 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company ’s Biologics License Application (BLA), under Priority Review, for faricimab for the treatment of neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME). The FDA has also accepted the company’s submission for diabetic retinopathy.Faricimab will be the first and only bispecific antibody designed for the eye, if approved. It targets two distinct pathways – via angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and vascular endothelial growt...
Source: Roche Investor Update - July 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Richard Lewontin obituary
Pioneering biologist and geneticist whose research showed the emptiness of traditional biological concepts of raceThe American scientist Richard Lewontin, who has died aged 92, was intimately involved in some of the most important discoveries, and feuds, of evolutionary biology during the decades in which it passed from knowing that genes existed to specifying them in precise molecular terms.His greatest contribution came in the 1960s, when he demonstrated the existence of very widespread genetic variation within species as well as between them. This research, with John Hubby at the University of Chicago, which had started...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Brown and Steven Rose Tags: Genetics Science Biology US news Harvard University Research Education Source Type: news

Marnie Halpern Named the Andrew Thomson, Jr., MD 1946 Professor
Renowned researcher Marnie Halpern, PhD, chair and professor of molecular and systems biology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, has been named the Andrew Thomson, Jr., MD 1946 Professor. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - July 22, 2021 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: News Marnie Halpern professorship Source Type: news

Early-life social connections influence gene expression, stress resilience
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Having friends may not only be good for the health of your social life, but also for your actual health--if you're a hyena, that is. Strong social connections and greater maternal care early in life can influence molecular markers related to gene expression in DNA and future stress response, suggests a new University of Colorado Boulder study of spotted hyenas in the wild. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SMART breakthrough in detection of SARS-CoV-2 variant in wastewater
(Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART)) Researchers from the Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, alongside collaborators from Biobot Analytics, Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have successfully developed an innovative, open-source molecular detection method that is able to detect and quantify the B.1.1.7 (Alpha) variant of SARS-CoV-2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Zero-dimensional molecular sieve membranes enhance gas separation selectivity
(Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy Sciences) Scientists proposed zero-dimensional molecular sieve membranes that could enhance the separation selectivity of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mycoplasma mobile moves into overdrive: Twin motor modified from ATP synthase discovered
(Osaka City University) Using electron microscopy and high-speed atomic force microscopy, researchers show the internal molecular motor behind the gliding mechanism for Mycoplasma mobile to consist of two ATP synthase-like molecules. Sharing a similar structure with ATP synthase suggests a common evolutionary ancestor. This synthase-like ATPase is challenging the origin of cells and proteins themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New high-tech portal launched to speed hearing loss innovations
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) launched a new online tool that could more quickly advance medical discoveries to reverse progressive hearing loss. The tool enables easy access to genetic and other molecular data from hundreds of technical research studies involving hearing function and the ear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How a butterfly tree becomes a web
(SMBE journals (Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution)) Scientists reveal a key role for interspecific gene flow in the continent-wide adaptive radiation of the Heliconius butterflies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prevention, detection and various approaches on coronaviruses
(Bentham Science Publishers) Coronaviruses presents compilations of reviews which present information about coronaviridae, (virology and molecular biology), on SARS-CoV-2 infection and related topics (COVID-19 epidemiology, economic impact, and so on. The series should prove to be an essential resource on this group of viruses for multidisciplinary researchers and healthcare professionals alike. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Naturally abundant venom peptide from ants can activate a pseudo allergic pathway unravelling a novel immunomodulatory pathway of MRGPRX2
(The University of Hong Kong) Ants are omnipresent, and we often get blisters after an ant bite. But do you know the molecular mechanism behind it? A joint research team have identified and demonstrated a novel small peptide isolated from the ant venom can initiate an immune pathway via a pseudo-allergic receptor MRGPRX2. The study has recently been published in a top journal in Allergy - The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Brain injury lab receives additional federal funding to boost research
(University of California - Riverside) Earlier this year, Viji Santhakumar, an associate professor of molecular, cell and systems biology at UC Riverside, received funding from the National Institute of Neurological Disaster and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health, or NIH, to further pursue research on moderate concussive brain injury. Now three scientists in her lab have received federal funding -- no small achievement for a university research group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Researchers find widespread sex bias in molecular biology tools
Widely used sex-biased maps of molecular biology are holding back individualized medicine, say Mayo Clinic scientists. Maps clarify how places are connected.  In biology, the same is true for databases that map out how aspects of biology are connected. Different biological databases examine genes (genomics), how those gene instructions are read (transcriptomics), what is made from the gene instructions (proteomics), and how that gene product breaks down in the body (metabolomics). Called omics for simplicity,… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - July 10, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

NIST uses method to understand the molecular underpinnings of a disease affecting corals
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) To understand the connection between human activity and a type of tumorlike disease called growth anomalies (GAs), researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have collaborated with the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to use an emerging molecular profiling method to identify 18 small molecules that promise to help them better understand the series of molecular reactions that lead to the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Evolutionary Biologist Richard Lewontin Dies at 92
The Harvard University evolutionary biologist pioneered the use of protein gel electrophoresis to study molecular genetics. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 8, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

STFC technology drives more efficient cryoEM imaging
(The Rosalind Franklin Institute) A new generation of detector, based on technology developed by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), is set to transform the field of electron cryo-microscopy.Technology developed by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) in partnership with the Rosalind Franklin Institute and MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (MRC LMB) is being brought to market by Quantum Detectors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Thomas Rando named director of UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center
Dr. Thomas Rando, a renowned neurologist and stem cell biologist, has been named director of the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of  Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.Rando, who was chosen after an international search, is currently a professor of neurology and neurological sciences at the medical school at Stanford University, where he also serves as director of the Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging and deputy director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. In addition, he is chief of neurology at the  Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System.His appointment is effective Oct. 1.&ldquo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gambia: Upstate Faculty Member Named As a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences
[The Point] Alaji Bah, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Upstate Medical University has been named as a 2021 Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences, the Pew Charitable Trusts announced. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 7, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

How an unfolding protein can induce programmed cell death
(University of Groningen) The death of cells is well regulated. If it occurs too much, it can cause degenerative diseases. Too little, and cells can become tumours. Mitochondria, the power plants of cells, play a role in this programmed cell death. Scientists from the University of Groningen (the Netherlands) and the University of Pittsburgh (U.S.) have obtained new insights in how mitochondria receive the signal to self-destruct. Their results were published in the Journal of Molecular Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Melanoma registry results shine light on rare pediatric cancer
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists created a registry for molecular analysis of pediatric melanoma that provides insight into treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New broadly applicable tool provides insight into fungicide resistance
(American Phytopathological Society) A recent collaboration between scientists in Michigan and Massachusetts as well as South Korea resulted in the development of a novel and broadly applicable molecular assay that used a model fungus to investigate how plant fungal pathogens circumvent the bioactivity of SDHIs. Through this analysis, they were able to successfully validate known mechanisms of fungicide resistance in several agriculturally important fungal pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Problems are Ciliopathies Associated With?
Discussion Nephronophthisis (NPHP) one cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurring before age 30 years. NPHP is a non-motile ciliopathy affecting cellular sensing in the renal tubular epithelium. See To Learn More below. The incidence varies according to location with 1:1 million in the US but 1:50,000 in Finland. There are 3 subtypes: Infantile Occurs usually within 1 year of life Enlarged kidneys and severe hypertension In utero can have oligohydramnios problems such as pulmonary hypoplasia, facial dysmorphisms, limb contractures Extra-renal problems include congenital heart disease, liver fibrosis, recur...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 5, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR to Release Report on Oral Health in America As a 20-year follow-up to the seminal Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, NIDCR will release Oral Health in America: Advances and Challenges in the fall of 2021. The report will illuminate new directions...
Source: NIDCR Science News - July 1, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

How plants quickly adapt to shifting environmental conditions
(Salk Institute) Research by Salk Institute scientists offers a new understanding of how gene activity directs plant growth, and how quickly plants respond to their environment -- with shifting light conditions triggering molecular changes in as little as five minutes. The findings provide insights into how to increase yield and safeguard world food production as climate change shrinks the planet's arable land. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 30, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Structural biology reveals new opportunities to combat tuberculosis
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) EMBL Hamburg's Wilmanns and Kosinski groups have determined the detailed structure of a bacterial protein complex critical for tuberculosis infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 25, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Kiwi disease study finds closely related bacterial strains display different behaviors
(American Phytopathological Society) Over the last decade, severe outbreaks of bacterial canker have caused huge economic losses for kiwi growers. Bacterial canker is caused by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) and more recent outbreaks have been particularly devastating due to the emergence of a new, extremely aggressive biovar called Psa3. Due to its recent introduction, the molecular basis of Psa3's virulence is unknown, making it difficult to develop mitigation strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Alzheimer’s disease: Promising new drug shown to reduce molecular markers and symptoms
ALZHEIMER'S disease causes predictable biological changes decades before the onset of clinical symptoms. These early changes in the brain can allow for certain drugs to help reduce the molecular markers which are the hallmarks of the disease. A new drug has shown promising results in the fight against Alzheimer's in the early stages of the disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Distinct Molecular Subtypes of RSV Bronchiolitis Identified
Four biologically and clinically meaningful endotypes identified; asthma risk higher for endotype B compared with endotype A (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - June 21, 2021 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Infections, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pulmonology, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Journal, Source Type: news

Profiling gene expression in plant embryos one nucleus at a time
(GMG Public Relations, Inc.) The first plant embryo gene expression atlas at the single cell level was developed by a team of researchers at GMI - Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The work, published in the journal Development, is a milestone on the way to uncovering the molecular mechanisms that determine how the most fundamental plant cell-types are established at the beginning of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Universal mechanism of regulation in plant cells discovered
(Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin f ü r Materialien und Energie) This involves the DYW deaminase domain of what is referred to as the RNA editosome. The DYW domain alters messenger RNA nucleotides in chloroplasts and mitochondria and contains a zinc ion whose activity is controlled by a very unusual mechanism. The team has now described this mechanism in detail for the first time. Their study is considered a breakthrough in the field of plant molecular biology and has far-reaching implications for bioengineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Breathing new life into existing tech: FT-IR spectrometer shows molecular orientation
(Osaka Prefecture University) Researchers have established an approach to identify the orientation of molecules and chemical bonds in crystalline organic-inorganic hybrid thin films deposited on substrates using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and polarized infrared light with a 3D-printed attenuated total reflectance (ATR) unit. This inexpensive method with laboratory-grade equipment quickly reaches the crystal-structure model of even extremely thin films of less than 10 nm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

For the first time, researchers visualize metabolic process at the single-cell level
(University of Chicago) Researchers at the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering and Biological Sciences Division have developed a combined imaging and machine learning technique that can, for the first time, measure a metabolic process at both the cellular and sub-cellular levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Start-stop system of hunting immune cells
(Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics) Researchers from the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics decipher the basic biology of neutrophil swarming and now show that the cells also evolved an intrinsic molecular program to self-limit their swarming activity. The study elucidates how swarming neutrophils become insensitive to their own secreted signals that brought the swarm together in the first place. This process is crucial for the efficient elimination of bacteria in tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 17, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Upstate faculty member named as a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences
Alaji Bah, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Upstate Medical University was one of only 22 individuals out of 198 nominations to be named a Pew Scholar. (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - June 15, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: News Source Type: news

Aaron McKenna Named a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences
Aaron McKenna, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular and Systems Biology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, has been selected as a Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences by the Pew Charitable Trusts. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - June 15, 2021 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: News Home-feature Pew Scholar Source Type: news

$7 million to advance cardiovascular research
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Diverse messenger RNAs are produced in cells by " alternative splicing. " The Leducq Foundation is now supporting a transatlantic network dedicated to investigating this process in heart muscle cells and how changes in this process contribute to disease. Professor Michael Gotthardt of the MDC and Professor Leslie Leinwand of the University of Colorado Boulder are coordinating the project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

RNA: A new method to discover its high-resolution structure
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) The structure of a biomolecule can reveal much about its functioning and interaction with the surrounding environment. In a new study by SISSA experimental data were combined with computer simulations of molecular dynamics to examine the conformation of an RNA fragment involved in protein synthesis and its dependence on the salts present in the solution. The research has led to a new method for high-resolution definition of the structures of biomolecules in their physiological environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What We Learned About Genetic Sequencing During COVID-19 Could Revolutionize Public Health
You don’t want to be a virus in Dr. David Ho’s lab. Pretty much every day since the COVID-19 pandemic began, Ho and his team have done nothing but find ways to stress SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease. His goal: pressure the virus relentlessly enough that it mutates to survive, so drug developers can understand how the virus might respond to new treatments. As a virologist with decades of experience learning about another obstinate virus, HIV, Ho knows just how to apply that mutation-generating stress, whether by starving the virus, bathing it in antibodies that disrupt its ability to infect cells, ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Genetics Magazine Source Type: news

No link between genetic risk factor and severe COVID-19 among South Asians, say study
A team of scientists, led by Kumarasamy Thangaraj, from CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), Hyderabad and Professor Gyaneshwer Chaubey, from Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Varanasi, analysed the role of this DNA segment in determining COVID-19 outcomes among the South Asian population. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

LIM domain only 1: One gene, many roles in cancer
(Cactus Communications) The scientific world has been delving ever deeper into cancer, scourging for even the tiniest biomolecule that could amp up the cure for the deadly disease. A recent discovery in this regard is the gene LIM domain only 1, whose coded protein has a role in tumor formation. In a new article in Chinese Medical Journal, researchers have reviewed studies detailing molecular features of this gene for potential practical applications in cancer cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 10, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) A single-molecule layer that helps to channel electrical charge into an electrode can outperform the best conventional material. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 10, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Estimates of gene ensemble noise highlight critical pathways and predict disease severity in H1N1, COVID-19 and mortality in sepsis patients
Finding novel biomarkers for human pathologies and predicting clinical outcomes for patients is challenging. This stems from the heterogeneous response of individuals to disease and is reflected in the inter-individual variability of gene expression responses that obscures differential gene expression analysis. Here, we developed an alternative approach that could be applied to dissect the disease-associated molecular changes. We define gene ensemble noise as a measure that represents a variance for a collection of genes encoding for either members of known biological pathways or subunits of annotated protein complexes and...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Localized the gene for blue plum skin
(Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG)) A new study published at the scientific journal Frontiers in Plant Science by CRAG and IRTA researchers reveals the gene that determines Japanese plum skin colour due to the presence or absence of antioxidant pigment anthocyanin. This work provides a highly efficient molecular marker for early selection of coloured and non-coloured fruits in plum breeding programmes, with potential applications in other Rosaceae species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Engineers apply physics-informed machine learning to solar cell production
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Organic photovoltaics max out at 15%-20% efficiency. Lehigh University researchers are using physics-informed machine learning to improve this efficiency. Their findings suggest a machine learning model, trained on coarse grained molecular models, can identify the optimal parameters for manufacturing in much less time than traditional methods. The researchers are currently exploring alternative materials for solar cells and will use their machine learning framework to optimize the production of such materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Control over water friction with 2D materials points to 'smart membranes'
(University of Manchester) The speed of water flow is a limiting factor in many membrane-based industrial processes, including desalination, molecular separation and osmotic power generation. Researchers at The University of Manchester have published a study revealing a dramatic decrease in friction when water is passed through nanoscale capillaries made of graphene. In contrast, capillaries made from hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) - which has a similar surface topography and crystal structure as graphene - display high friction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How STEM Can Be More Inclusive of Scientists with Disabilities
The culture of academia can make disabled scientists wary of disclosing their conditions or needs. Molecular biologist Justin Yerbury suggests how the system might become more inclusive. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 7, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Temple scientists take deep dive into molecular causes of abnormal clotting in CV disease
(Temple University Health System) Dr. Satya P. Kunapuli's research has given him extensive insight into the role of abnormal clot formation in cardiovascular disease. But the answer to one question has remained elusive: how do platelets become activated to form clots that ultimately lead to cardiovascular diseases like stroke and heart attack? Now, thanks to a new NIH grant, Dr. Kunapuli will be able to focus his research on this fundamental question. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Clever biomolecular labelling enables identification of immune cells
(University of G ö ttingen) Biomolecules regulate the biological functions inside every living cell. If scientists can understand the molecular mechanisms, then it is possible to detect severe dysfunction. At a molecular level, this can be achieved with fluorescent markers that are incorporated into the respective biomolecules. Researchers at the Universities of G ö ttingen and Edinburgh are now able to show that a complex of manganese makes it possible to conveniently label certain biomolecules. Results were published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news