What Your Favorite Exercise Teachers Eat Every Day

After a tough exercise class, many people find themselves crawling toward the nearest source of food and hoovering up anything in sight. But imagine doing that exhausting exercise class two, three or four more times in one day. That’s what your favorite teachers and trainers do to help keep you motivated. Not only do they have to show you proper moves, but they also sweat (and even suffer) alongside you to inspire you to give it everything you’ve got, just like they do. Of course, it takes a lot of food to fuel all of that activity. HuffPost Lifestyle asked master trainers from five major gyms and boutique exercise studios what they eat to make sure they’re bringing their A-game to work. There were a lot of similarities among all six of the trainers, including an emphasis on whole foods, protein and healthy fats from nuts, fish and olive oil. And while they mostly eat a nutrient-dense diet, they’re also very comfortable treating themselves to alcohol, chocolate and (gasp!) baked goods and sweet treats. Adam Friedman  Fitness Institute Expert at Gold's Gym, Los Angeles On a typical day, Friedman trains six clients for sessions of 60 to 90 minutes at a time. After his workday is over, he launches into his own 90-minute exercise program that includes kettlebell swing snatches, Bulgarian split squats and other tough, exotic-sounding exercises that few people have heard of, but should probably Google later.  It’s a jam-packed, highly active...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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