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Blog Post: Supreme Court makes momentous decision on Minimum Unit pricing in Scotland
Today the Supreme Court has ruled that Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) for alcohol is legal. This is a momentous decision, following five years of legal challenge led by the Scotch Whisky Association. It means that the Scottish Government can now implement MUP and allow a potentially game-changing alcohol policy to finally be introduced. After years of public debate on the merits and politics of MUP, we may lose sight of the basic principle behind it. MUP establishes a minimum price below which a unit of alcohol can be sold. It is not a new tax on alcohol, and – unlike alcohol taxes – it applies equally regardless o...
Source: Alcohol Research UK - November 15, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: Julie Symes Tags: News minimum unit pricing Source Type: news

UCLA helps many to live long and prosper
In Westwood, more than 100 faculty experts from 25 departments have embarked on anall-encompassing push to cut the health and economic impacts of depression in half by the year 2050. The mammoth undertaking will rely on platforms developed by the new Institute for Precision Health, which will harness the power of big data and genomics to move toward individually tailored treatments and health-promotion strategies.On the same 419 acres of land, researchers across the spectrum, from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside, are ushering in a potentially game-changing approach to turning the body ’s immune defenses a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lack of International Action on Rohingya Crisis Called a “Disgrace”
By Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Oct 23 2017 (IPS)As the crisis in Myanmar reaches unprecedented levels, frustration is at its peak as the international community remains slow to respond and act cohesively. Over 600,000 Rohingya refugees have crossed into Bangladesh since the renewal of violence on August 25, making it the fastest-growing refugee emergency in the world.Idriss Jazairy. Credit: UN Photo/Eskinder DebebeThe UN warns that up to one million—representing the entire Muslim population of Rakhine state—could flee to the neighboring nation by the end of the year if the crisis continues.Rohingya ref...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Crime & Justice Gender Gender Violence Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Indigenous Rights Migration & Refugees Religion TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Dreaming of a cure: the battle to beat narcolepsy
A global struggle to find the cause of the rare condition that causes uncontrollable sleepiness has a long and strange history, but there ’s hope of a cure at handOne of my first jobs was to keep a lookout for lions. There are some occupations that are not suitable for someone with untreated narcolepsy and this is probably one of them. I was 22, a recent zoology graduate studying meerkats in the Kalahari desert in South Africa. We worked in pairs, one of us on foot, walking with meerkats, the other in the jeep scanning the horizon for danger. On many occasions, I awoke with the imprint of the steering wheel on my for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Henry Nicholls Tags: Neuroscience Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news

Ethiopia:Make Vision Count - a Call for a Sight
[Ethiopian Herald] Fitsum Tekola, 26, is resident of Jimma Town in Oromia State. She has been suffering from long sightedness that caused vision problem and challenged her not to effectively perform well in schooling and daily activities for over two decades. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 18, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Journal Profile: Meet Sara Chexal, a physician who set her sights on solving vision problems
Sara Chexal hails from a long line of doctors, including her grandfather and her dad. Since moving to Central Texas from Los Angeles with her husband, who oversees real estate investments in Austin for an L.A. firm, she has specialized in helping people with vision problems — and is the first female physician to join Retina Consultants of Austin. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 12, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Jan Buchholz Source Type: news

Sight Sciences raises $10m in Series C
Ophthalmic medical device company Sight Sciences said this week it closed a $10 million oversubscribed Series C round to support expanding manufacturing and its US commercial team and the launch of its devices into the dry eye and microinvasive surgery markets. The round was led by Allegro Investment Fund and was joined with full participation from existing Series A and Series B investors, the Menlo Park, Calif.-based company said. As part of the funding around, Allegro’s chairman Steffan Encrantz will join the company’s board of directors as chair. Funds are also slated to support expanding the compa...
Source: Mass Device - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Optical/Ophthalmic Sight Sciences Source Type: news

Stop Doing This to Improve Your Device Manufacturing Process: Part 1
Editor's note: This is Part 1 of a two-part series.  The manufacturing world is full of practices to follow to improve manufacturing processes and reduce associated costs. These practices include, but are not limited to: minimizing the eight wastes of Lean, recognizing and eliminating non-value added work, implementing design for manufacturing and assembly, and using statistical process control (SPC). Unfortunately, as we continually add practices to our tool kit we lose track of the bigger picture. This occurs personally and organizationally, driven by the daily crush of getting stuff done. We do not t...
Source: MDDI - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cushing Hamlen and Bradley Fern Tags: MD & M Minneapolis Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Nixon Lawyer: Donald Trump Abused Pardon Power When He Freed Joe Arpaio
During the last two days of his embattled presidency, Richard Nixon made a rare principled decision. With the Watergate special prosecutor and congressional impeachment proceedings closing in, he rejected last-minute requests for pardons from his two former top aides, the men who could most damagingly testify against him. Unfortunately, while dust is settling on Donald Trump’s pardon of former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio, its message suggests a much cruder view of the pardon power, and sets a dangerous precedent for the months to come. Most pardons attract little attention. Over the course of a presidency, typical pre...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John W. Dean and Ron Fein Tags: Uncategorized Donald Trump Source Type: news

‘Let’s Make a Deal’ Host Monty Hall Dies at 96
(BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.) — Monty Hall, the genial TV game show host whose long-running “Let’s Make a Deal” traded on love of money and merchandise and the mystery of which door had the car behind it, has died. He was 96. Hall, who had been in poor health, died Saturday morning of heart failure at his home in Beverly Hills, said his daughter, Sharon Hall of Los Angeles. “Let’s Make a Deal,” which Hall co-created, debuted as a daytime show on NBC in 1963 and became a TV staple. Through the next four decades, it also aired in prime time, in syndication and, in two brief outings, with h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lynn Elber / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime remembrance Source Type: news

Where You Should Road Trip, Based on Your Zodiac Sign
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karen Ruffini / Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Dirty laundry a powerful magnet for bedbugs, study finds
To sleep tight and dodge the bedbug ’s bite, pack away worn clothes to avoid spreading the insects, which are attracted to human scent, travellers advisedAfter a long day of sightseeing in a foreign city, you might be tempted to kick off your socks, sling your sweaty T-shirt across your hotel room room and flop down on the bed. Think again.Dirty laundry acts as a powerful magnet for bedbugs, a studypublished in the journal Scientific Reports has found. Its authors have warned that a failure to securely pack away clothes while travelling may explain why populations of biting parasites have soared during the past decad...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Insects Science Health Travel Society Source Type: news

The 14 Best Road Trips to Take in the Fall
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire Trageser / Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Victoria and Abdul Author on the Movie ’s Unlikely Story: ‘It Sounds Like a Fantasy’
The first time Shrabani Basu heard of Abdul Karim, she was carrying out research for a book about the history of curry in the late 1990s. A few years later, while on holiday with her family, she came across a painting of Karim in Osborne House, a former private home of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert on the U.K.’s Isle of Wight. Basu was immediately struck by the fact that Karim — whom she thought was a servant — had been painted “beautifully, in red and gold,” with a book in his hand. “I knew that Abdul Karim had come from India to England to serve Queen Victoria in 1887, but the portr...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized movies victoria and abdul Source Type: news

Why Kids Love Being Scared, According to a Famous Children ’s Author
Sandra Boynton, the creator of an empire built on whimsical greeting cards (by some estimates she has sold more than 500 million) and board books, has in more recent years branched out into kids music. She specializes in the type that doesn’t want to make parents shoot their sound systems, and that often features singers that parents are already fans of, including Meryl Streep and Kevin Bacon. Her most recent album Hog Wild!, for example, features Samuel L. Jackson as a Tyrannosaurus Rex. (A video of the song with Boynton’s iconic drawings is above.) All the artists’ and Boynton’s royalties go to Pa...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized Children imagination kid's books Music Parenting video Source Type: news

Rural Uganda Gets a Health Worker Boost
September 21, 2017The sight of serene hills stretching into the horizon calmed my nerves as we snaked our way through steep and narrow dirt roads deep in Buhweju district, in South Western Uganda, 319 kilometers from the capital, Kampala.  Suddenly, it dawned on me why this district is considered “hard to reach” as I imagined what it would be like to traverse the same ground during a rainstorm or at night.It ’s here that I meet Janet Alupo, 20, an operating theatre assistant at Nsika Health Center IV who plans to take this same journey—plus an additional 332 kilometers—every three months ...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: lfreeze Source Type: news

Aung San Suu Kyi: A Leader in Denial?
By Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Sep 20 2017 (IPS)After finally breaking silence with a much anticipated address on the ongoing crisis in Rakhine State, Myanmar’s de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi has disappointed the world as she refuses to acknowledge the plight of her country’s Rohingya community. Aung San Suu KyiIn a 30-minute televised address, Myanmar’s State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi said that her government does not fear “international scrutiny” over its management of the crisis in Rakhine.Suu Kyi, who decided not to attend the ongoing UN General Assembly in New York, said she ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Armed Conflicts Asia-Pacific Crime & Justice Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

All NHS staff need a pay rise that ’s above inflation, say health unions
NHS unions are today (Friday) breaking with tradition and submitting a pay claim directly to the government on behalf of more than one million health workers across the UK. In a letter to the Chancellor, 14 health unions including UNISON, the Royal College of Nursing, the Royal College of Midwives, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, Unite and the GMB, are asking Philip Hammond to earmark funds in the November Budget for a pay rise in line with inflation (Retail Price Index). The claim also calls for an additional £800 to restore some of the pay lost over the past seven years. Cleaners, nurses, radiographers, pha...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release health inflation NHS nhs pay Sara Gorton Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton Writes the First Draft of Her History
Hillary Clinton has spent 40 years trying to be liked. In her new memoir, What Happened, she describes the myriad ways she has tried to modulate herself to fit our expectations of her, which is a tidy but long list of all the usual impossible standards women face. She changed her name, her clothing and her demeanor in response to criticism and rejection. She spent what adds up to a month of time on the 2016 campaign trail having her hair and makeup done; if she showed up without having those things done, she got slammed. She even hired a linguistics expert so she could learn to rev up a crowd by shouting while not sounding...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Books hillary clinton what happened Source Type: news

Hurricane Irma Regains Strength With St. Petersburg in Its Sights
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Hurricane Irma regained strength as it closed in on the Florida Keys early Sunday as forecasters monitored a crucial shift in its trajectory — just a few more miles to the west — that could keep its ferocious eye off the southwest Florida coast and over warm gulf water. The hurricane re-strengthened to Category 4 status with maximum sustained winds near 130 mph (210 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Irma was expected to gain a little more strength as it moved through the Straits of Florida and remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches Florida. Tens of thousands of pe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tamara Lush and Jay Reeves / AP Tags: Uncategorized hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

NJ EMS Volunteers, Keansburg Officials Plan Sept. 10 WTC Steel Monument Groundbreaking
KEANSBURG, NJ – Officials from the EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) and Keansburg Borough are planning a 1 p.m. Sept. 10 groundbreaking in preparation for a memorial featuring a piece of World Trade Center steel. The monument will be the country’s first dedicated solely to the emergency medical services personnel who responded that day. The 88-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council, doing business as the EMSCNJ, represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 300 EMS agencies throughout the state. It was among 1,132 organizations to be awarded an artifact from the Twin Towers rubble. Si...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - August 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: EMS Council of New Jersey Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

NJ EMS Volunteers, Keansburg Officials Plan Sept. 10 WTC Steel Monument Groundbreaking
KEANSBURG, NJ – Officials from the EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) and Keansburg Borough are planning a 1 p.m. Sept. 10 groundbreaking in preparation for a memorial featuring a piece of World Trade Center steel. The monument will be the country’s first dedicated solely to the emergency medical services personnel who responded that day. The 88-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council, doing business as the EMSCNJ, represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 300 EMS agencies throughout the state. It was among 1,132 organizations to be awarded an artifact from the Twin Towers rubble. Si...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: EMS Council of New Jersey Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

How Slovenia is helping its ‘baby dragons’
The eyeless subterranean salamanders that live in the watery depths of Postojna Cave are under threat – but there’s hope in sightPostojna Cave in Slovenia is one of Europe ’s longest cave networks and one of the world’s most spectacular subterranean tourist sites. Hundreds of thousands of visitors come here every year to gaze at its wonders: its huge stalactites and stalagmites, its curtains of coloured rock and bridges that have been carved out of the local limes tone by the river Pivka over millions of years.Given such glories, it is not surprising that few tourists take note of the two concrete h...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Endangered species Conservation Science Biology Animals Wildlife Environment Slovenia Europe World news Source Type: news

The Beauty and Science of a Total Solar Eclipse
This story originally appeared in the TIME special edition Beautiful Phenomena available now at retail outlets and through the TIME shop and through Amazon The moon was not placed in space for our entertainment. In fact, it was placed there by accident, most astronomers believe, as the product of a nearly mortal blow the Earth sustained more than 4 billion years ago, when our planet was sideswiped by a Mars-size planetesimal speeding through local space. That collision produced a massive debris cloud that eventually coalesced into our moon. The sun didn’t pop into being for our enjoyment either; it spun down out of a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized eclipse space space 2017 Source Type: news

Why People Used to Be Afraid of Solar Eclipses
Americans eagerly anticipating the first total solar eclipse visible in the contiguous U.S. since 1979 — and the first to cross the country from coast to coast in 99 years — may know well know that what they’re watching is the moon simply passing in front of the sun. But even so, as long as eclipses have occurred, humans have interpreted them as a sign of something. As TIME editor-at-large Jeffrey Kluger explains in the above video, the Lydians and the Medes ended a war in 585 B.C. because they took a solar eclipse eclipse as a sign of heavenly disapproval. The Roman author Pliny the elder drew a line fro...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized eclipse Science space space 2017 Source Type: news

Cytology versus HPV testing for cervical cancer screening in the general population: a DTA Review from the Cochrane Gynaecological, Neuro-oncology and Orphan Cancers Group, (CGNOC)
Cochrane Reviews are systematic reviews of research in health care and policy. They are internationally recognized as a high-quality source of evidence for decision-making. They collate and summarize all the best available research evidence on the effects of healthcare interventions or the accuracy of diagnostic tests into a systematic review.Diagnostic Test Accuracy Reviews (DTA) provide essential information regarding the accuracy of the available diagnostic tools for key decision makers, including patients, clinicians, guideline developers and researchers.  The purpose of a Cochrane DTA review is very like the purp...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 14, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Help from the stomach for dry eyes
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) After a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. A team from the Technical University of Munich has now succeeded in demonstrating that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to the eye anymore. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Second Sight Medical enters Russian market
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it entered the Russian market, with the 1st patient treated with its Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System in Moscow. The Argus II induces visual perception in blind patients with retinitis pigmentosa by stimulating of the retina’s remaining cells with electrical pulses, which allows for the perception of light patterns to the brain, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company said. The 1st implant was performed at the Federal State Institution & Clinical Research Center of the Federal Medico-Biological Agency at the end of June 2017 by a team of surgeons, with Dr. Paulo Stanga ...
Source: Mass Device - July 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Optical/Ophthalmic second-sight-medical Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: July 21, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Second Sight’s South Korean market entry to Sanuwave’s Indonesian distribution deal, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Second Sight enters South Korea market Second Sight announced in a July 5 press release that it has entered the market in South Korea with the implantation of two patients with its Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System in Seoul. The implants were made possible by the country’s distribution partner Kisantech Co. 2. K2M touts Japan distribution deal with Mitsubishi K2M signed a new, long-term exclusive a...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Business/Financial News Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Implants Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Robotics Spinal Surgical Alpha Tau Medical Apifix Hill-Rom Holdings Inc. K2M Mitsubishi Reha Source Type: news

Government pledges to cut smoking prevalence to 12% by 2022
Long awaited new tobacco control plan sets sight on pregnant women and teens Related items fromOnMedica Councils plan cuts to public health spending Smoking cessation Cutting smoking rates could save NHS £67m a year Quitting smoking at any age reduces the risk of death after 70 Plain pack regulations for cigarettes and hand-rolled tobacco in force (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 19, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for July 3, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. BD extends Bard note exchange offering again Becton Dickinson said today is once again extending its exchange offering for up to $1.1 billion in outstanding C. R. Bard notes from July 3 to August 1. The company is offering exch...
Source: Mass Device - July 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for June 27, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Senate’s Trumpcare version would cut insurance for 22 million, abolish medical device tax Chances for the repeal and replacement of Obamacare grew even slimmer yesterday after the Congressional Budget Office said the U.S....
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Boston Scientific sets its sights on double-digit earnings growth
Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) today revealed its plan to improve operating margins over the next few years, setting its sights on earnings growth of at least 10%. The Marlborough, Mass.-based medical device giant, ahead of an investor presentation today in New York, said it wants to hit an adjusted operating margin of 25% this year and 28% in 2020. Boston Scientific, which has seen its fortunes turn for the better since CEO Michael Mahoney took over in 2013, also said it’s aiming for “consistent” double-digit growth for adjusted earnings per share and an organic revenue compound annual growth rat...
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat Boston Scientific Source Type: news

Sleep Deprivation Is Killing You (And Making You Fat In The Process)
The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hope for Leonce: Kenyan boy ’s incredible journey with vein of Galen malformation
Boston is a long flight from Kenya — 22 hours long, in fact. That’s enough time to sleep, eat, read, watch countless YouTube videos and do it all over again, an experience that could make adults antsy, let alone two little boys. Yet it was a journey that Jane Nduta and Humphrey Njogu were eager to make. Just a few months earlier, their younger son, Leonce, had been diagnosed with a rare but life-threatening condition called vein of Galen malformation, or VOGM. In this blood vessel abnormality, misshapen arteries in the brain connect directly with veins instead of with capillaries. This causes a rush of high-pre...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 23, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center Dr. Darren Orbach International Health Services vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) Source Type: news

3 Ways To Fight FOMO
by Elior Moskowitz Social media is a blessing and a curse. It’s great for staying in touch with old friends, finding people with similar interests, and sharing your ideas—but it’s also a breeding ground for self-comparison, like a bully that chips away at your self-esteem. Its weapon of choice? FOMO: The “fear of missing out.” FOMO is defined as a feeling of inferiority and anxiety about missing out on meaningful experiences triggered by self-comparison and prompted by social media. It’s running rampant, with over half of all social media users and nearly two-thirds of Millennials report...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The World Society Needs to Express Greater Solidarity for Refugees Worldwide
By Dr. Hanif Hassan Al QassimGENEVA, Jun 20 2017 (IPS)The world is heading into troubled waters as we are witnessing an unprecedented movement of people – refugees, migrants and internally displaced persons (IDPs) alike – fleeing from misery, poverty and conflicts. The refugee crisis that has swept across Europe and the Middle East is becoming the 21st century’s most protracted crisis with no immediate solution in sight. The world has not witnessed a more complex movement of people since the end of the Second World War; thousands of human beings undertake perilous and treacherous journeys in hope for a be...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Hanif Hassan Al Qassim Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Democracy Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Middle East & North Africa Migration & Refugees Peace Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Medford Man Receives Bionic Eye
MEDFORD (CBS) — After 20 years of darkness, there is light. It seems like science fiction, but a bionic eye implant is bringing a kind of sight to the blind. It’s not what you and I see, but for a small number of people, it’s making all the difference. “It’s not actual vision. It’s what they call artificial vision,” says Anthony Andreotolla, one of the first people to ever receive a bionic eye. Every day he puts on his gear, leaves his Medford home and rides the MBTA to his job in Downtown Crossing. Anthony Andreotolla wearing bionic eye (WBZ-TV) Andreotolla has retinitis pigm...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Bionic Eye Medford Paula Ebben Second Sight Source Type: news

Women Dressed As Handmaids Descend On Ohio Statehouse To Protest Anti-Abortion Law
Women wearing long red cloaks and white bonnets have become an increasingly common sight in government buildings around the country in recent months. The latest state to see a protest inspired by Margaret Atwood’s dystopian feminist classic The Handmaid’s Tale is Ohio. On Tuesday, women filed into the statehouse on Tuesday to protest Senate Bill 145, a proposed ban on the most common method for second-trimester abortions. SB 145 will ban the most commonly used abortion procedure in the 2nd trimester. #OHHandmaids are here to show the impact of abortion bans pic.twitter.com/GxwvM7l24j— NARAL ProChoic...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Ask, Don’t Tell' -- Pulse Victims And Supporting The Loved Ones Left Behind
Last year, 49 people lost their lives in the Orlando massacre at the LGBTQ nightclub Pulse in the worst mass shooting in recent U.S. history. Dozens more were injured. Bars and clubs have long been a place for LGBTQ community members to gather and simply be ourselves, as few other safe spaces exist. As an openly gay Latino myself, I know that this tragedy has been deeply felt by both the LGBTQ and Latinx (a gender-neutral alternative to Latino/a) communities throughout the nation and the world. Perhaps the most affected by this tragedy are the families (both biological and of-choice) and loved ones who were left behind. I ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Culprit hidden in plain sight in Alzheimer disease development
(IOS Press) A new study by researchers at the University of Montana, Universidad del Valle de M é xico, Instituto Nacional de Pediatr í a, Boise State, and Universidad Nacional Aut ó noma de M é xico, heightens concerns over the detrimental short- and long-term impact of airborne iron-rich strongly magnetic combustion-derived nanoparticles present in young urbanites' brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monteris Medical raises $27m Series C for NeuroBlate brain surgery device
Monteris Medical said yesterday that it raised a Series C round worth nearly $27 million it plans to use on R&D, clinical trials and expanding the commercial footprint of its NeuroBlate brain surgery device. Versant Ventures and SightLine Partners led the round, joined by prior backers Birchview Capital and BDC Capital’s Healthcare Venture Fund, Monteris said. The MRI-guided NeuroBlate device is designed to ablate, necrotize or coagulate soft tissue during neurosurgery procedures using laser thermotherapy. “We were very pleased with the level of interest we received through our fund...
Source: Mass Device - June 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Neurological Surgical Monteris Medical Source Type: news

3 Steps To Running A Half Marathon
Hearing the words one mile left never felt so sweet. I was on the home stretch towards finishing my first half-marathon, and actually replied wow. The training had paid off. After hearing those words, seeing the finish line in sight, and then finally making it across, there are at least 3 steps I’ve learned that can be helpful if you want to run your first half-marathon or just become more athletic: 1. Learn from running experts (or fitness sites), both online and in print. It can be exciting to embark on training that will test you mentally and physically. However, if you want to train cautiously—preventing in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Springs were critical water sources for early humans in East Africa, Rutgers study finds
(Rutgers University) About 1 to 2 million years ago, early humans in East Africa periodically faced very dry conditions, with little or no water in sight. But they likely had access to hundreds of springs that lingered despite long dry spells, allowing our ancestors to head north and out of Africa, according to a groundbreaking study by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other institutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 7 Injuries Doctors See Most On Summer Weekends
Warm weather and longer days will bring many Americans outdoors for cookouts, pool parties and more. But long weekends ― we’re looking at you, Memorial Day ― also lead to more trips to urgent care or even the emergency room, according to experts. In fact, a 2015 study from researchers at Brown University found that heat-related illness alone can ratchet emergency department visits in the summertime.  The risk for issues like drowning and sports injuries go up in the hotter seasons, according to Dr. Christopher M. McStay, chief of clinical operations and associate professor at the University of Colorado ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surfing Great Claims Women's Periods Cause Shark Attacks
Turns out being one of the most admired surfers in the world doesn’t make you immune from promoting bad science. TMZ subjected Laird Hamilton to one of its impromptu TV interviews in Malibu on Wednesday, and it didn’t go well for the surfing great. The interview started off smoothly, with the crew asking Hamilton for his thoughts on the uptick in shark sightings along the California coast in recent weeks and what the odds were of the average beachgoer being attacked. Hamilton debunked the myth that sharks are bloodthirsty for humans ― which is perpetuated by movies like “The Shallows,” &...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Do sea monsters exist? Yes, but they go by another name … | Jules Howard
Nothing fires up a media storm like a sighting of a dead sea monster no one can identify. However much scientists shout ‘It’s a whale!’I don ’t want to spoil it for you, but I guess I’ll have to. It was a whale that washed up on the Indonesian island of Seram late last week. It was never a sea monster, no matter how hard we all tried to believe or hope it might be. Although the species of whale remains unknown (DNA analysis should so lve that problem in time), the big giveaways were the presence of whale jaw-bone, the baleen plates, the vertebrae, the fins, the throat pleats, the whale shape a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Whales Marine life Wildlife Environment Cetaceans Science Source Type: news

What It's Like When A Guinea Worm Living Inside Your Body Suddenly Burrows Out
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. JUBA, South Sudan ― It took days for Maker Achuil and others to slowly pull the arm-length, spaghetti-like worm out of his thigh. After a year with the white parasite inside him, Achuil screamed in pain as the grown Guinea worm emerged. A former soldier in South Sudan, which fought for decades before gaining its independence from Sudan in 2011, Achuil still shudders at the memory of the agony he felt as the worm was gradually wound around a stick. “It was like putting...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The New Aging Dilemma, Growing Older At Home Alone
There’s a hidden segment of the older adult population that the healthcare industry has recently spotted. It’s the aging single group of people 55 and over. They are the aged, community-dwelling individuals who are socially and physically isolated, without an available known family member or designated surrogate. They’ve been in plain sight for decades, but since boomers enter the 60 years, the aging single demographic will intensify, due to their status of having the highest divorce rates and childless marriages. And in a matter of a few years, the prevalence of the generation’s chronic diseases w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

28 Things Anyone With A Feminist Mother Knows To Be True
Anyone with a feminist for a mom knows she’s given you some of the best life advice you’ll ever get.  She’s a strong woman who makes her opinion known and doesn’t take shit from anyone. Whether she’s been working a 9 to 5 her entire life or has stayed at home to raise you ― she’s a role model in every way.  To celebrate Mother’s Day, HuffPost Women asked our readers to share one lesson they’ve learned from their feminist mothers growing up. The responses, paraphrased below, were heart-wrenching, honest and full of love.  So, for my feminist mom &mda...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news