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All NHS staff need a pay rise that ’s above inflation, say health unions
NHS unions are today (Friday) breaking with tradition and submitting a pay claim directly to the government on behalf of more than one million health workers across the UK. In a letter to the Chancellor, 14 health unions including UNISON, the Royal College of Nursing, the Royal College of Midwives, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, Unite and the GMB, are asking Philip Hammond to earmark funds in the November Budget for a pay rise in line with inflation (Retail Price Index). The claim also calls for an additional £800 to restore some of the pay lost over the past seven years. Cleaners, nurses, radiographers, pha...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release health inflation NHS nhs pay Sara Gorton Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton Writes the First Draft of Her History
Hillary Clinton has spent 40 years trying to be liked. In her new memoir, What Happened, she describes the myriad ways she has tried to modulate herself to fit our expectations of her, which is a tidy but long list of all the usual impossible standards women face. She changed her name, her clothing and her demeanor in response to criticism and rejection. She spent what adds up to a month of time on the 2016 campaign trail having her hair and makeup done; if she showed up without having those things done, she got slammed. She even hired a linguistics expert so she could learn to rev up a crowd by shouting while not sounding...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Books hillary clinton what happened Source Type: news

Hurricane Irma Regains Strength With St. Petersburg in Its Sights
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Hurricane Irma regained strength as it closed in on the Florida Keys early Sunday as forecasters monitored a crucial shift in its trajectory — just a few more miles to the west — that could keep its ferocious eye off the southwest Florida coast and over warm gulf water. The hurricane re-strengthened to Category 4 status with maximum sustained winds near 130 mph (210 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Irma was expected to gain a little more strength as it moved through the Straits of Florida and remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches Florida. Tens of thousands of pe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tamara Lush and Jay Reeves / AP Tags: Uncategorized hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

NJ EMS Volunteers, Keansburg Officials Plan Sept. 10 WTC Steel Monument Groundbreaking
KEANSBURG, NJ – Officials from the EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) and Keansburg Borough are planning a 1 p.m. Sept. 10 groundbreaking in preparation for a memorial featuring a piece of World Trade Center steel. The monument will be the country’s first dedicated solely to the emergency medical services personnel who responded that day. The 88-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council, doing business as the EMSCNJ, represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 300 EMS agencies throughout the state. It was among 1,132 organizations to be awarded an artifact from the Twin Towers rubble. Si...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - August 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: EMS Council of New Jersey Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

NJ EMS Volunteers, Keansburg Officials Plan Sept. 10 WTC Steel Monument Groundbreaking
KEANSBURG, NJ – Officials from the EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) and Keansburg Borough are planning a 1 p.m. Sept. 10 groundbreaking in preparation for a memorial featuring a piece of World Trade Center steel. The monument will be the country’s first dedicated solely to the emergency medical services personnel who responded that day. The 88-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council, doing business as the EMSCNJ, represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 300 EMS agencies throughout the state. It was among 1,132 organizations to be awarded an artifact from the Twin Towers rubble. Si...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: EMS Council of New Jersey Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

How Slovenia is helping its ‘baby dragons’
The eyeless subterranean salamanders that live in the watery depths of Postojna Cave are under threat – but there’s hope in sightPostojna Cave in Slovenia is one of Europe ’s longest cave networks and one of the world’s most spectacular subterranean tourist sites. Hundreds of thousands of visitors come here every year to gaze at its wonders: its huge stalactites and stalagmites, its curtains of coloured rock and bridges that have been carved out of the local limes tone by the river Pivka over millions of years.Given such glories, it is not surprising that few tourists take note of the two concrete h...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Endangered species Conservation Science Biology Animals Wildlife Environment Slovenia Europe World news Source Type: news

The Beauty and Science of a Total Solar Eclipse
This story originally appeared in the TIME special edition Beautiful Phenomena available now at retail outlets and through the TIME shop and through Amazon The moon was not placed in space for our entertainment. In fact, it was placed there by accident, most astronomers believe, as the product of a nearly mortal blow the Earth sustained more than 4 billion years ago, when our planet was sideswiped by a Mars-size planetesimal speeding through local space. That collision produced a massive debris cloud that eventually coalesced into our moon. The sun didn’t pop into being for our enjoyment either; it spun down out of a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized eclipse space space 2017 Source Type: news

Why People Used to Be Afraid of Solar Eclipses
Americans eagerly anticipating the first total solar eclipse visible in the contiguous U.S. since 1979 — and the first to cross the country from coast to coast in 99 years — may know well know that what they’re watching is the moon simply passing in front of the sun. But even so, as long as eclipses have occurred, humans have interpreted them as a sign of something. As TIME editor-at-large Jeffrey Kluger explains in the above video, the Lydians and the Medes ended a war in 585 B.C. because they took a solar eclipse eclipse as a sign of heavenly disapproval. The Roman author Pliny the elder drew a line fro...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized eclipse Science space space 2017 Source Type: news

Cytology versus HPV testing for cervical cancer screening in the general population: a DTA Review from the Cochrane Gynaecological, Neuro-oncology and Orphan Cancers Group, (CGNOC)
Cochrane Reviews are systematic reviews of research in health care and policy. They are internationally recognized as a high-quality source of evidence for decision-making. They collate and summarize all the best available research evidence on the effects of healthcare interventions or the accuracy of diagnostic tests into a systematic review.Diagnostic Test Accuracy Reviews (DTA) provide essential information regarding the accuracy of the available diagnostic tools for key decision makers, including patients, clinicians, guideline developers and researchers.  The purpose of a Cochrane DTA review is very like the purp...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 14, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Help from the stomach for dry eyes
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) After a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. A team from the Technical University of Munich has now succeeded in demonstrating that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to the eye anymore. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Second Sight Medical enters Russian market
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it entered the Russian market, with the 1st patient treated with its Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System in Moscow. The Argus II induces visual perception in blind patients with retinitis pigmentosa by stimulating of the retina’s remaining cells with electrical pulses, which allows for the perception of light patterns to the brain, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company said. The 1st implant was performed at the Federal State Institution & Clinical Research Center of the Federal Medico-Biological Agency at the end of June 2017 by a team of surgeons, with Dr. Paulo Stanga ...
Source: Mass Device - July 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Optical/Ophthalmic second-sight-medical Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: July 21, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Second Sight’s South Korean market entry to Sanuwave’s Indonesian distribution deal, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Second Sight enters South Korea market Second Sight announced in a July 5 press release that it has entered the market in South Korea with the implantation of two patients with its Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System in Seoul. The implants were made possible by the country’s distribution partner Kisantech Co. 2. K2M touts Japan distribution deal with Mitsubishi K2M signed a new, long-term exclusive a...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Business/Financial News Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Implants Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Robotics Spinal Surgical Alpha Tau Medical Apifix Hill-Rom Holdings Inc. K2M Mitsubishi Reha Source Type: news

Government pledges to cut smoking prevalence to 12% by 2022
Long awaited new tobacco control plan sets sight on pregnant women and teens Related items fromOnMedica Councils plan cuts to public health spending Smoking cessation Cutting smoking rates could save NHS £67m a year Quitting smoking at any age reduces the risk of death after 70 Plain pack regulations for cigarettes and hand-rolled tobacco in force (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 19, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for July 3, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. BD extends Bard note exchange offering again Becton Dickinson said today is once again extending its exchange offering for up to $1.1 billion in outstanding C. R. Bard notes from July 3 to August 1. The company is offering exch...
Source: Mass Device - July 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for June 27, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Senate’s Trumpcare version would cut insurance for 22 million, abolish medical device tax Chances for the repeal and replacement of Obamacare grew even slimmer yesterday after the Congressional Budget Office said the U.S....
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Boston Scientific sets its sights on double-digit earnings growth
Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) today revealed its plan to improve operating margins over the next few years, setting its sights on earnings growth of at least 10%. The Marlborough, Mass.-based medical device giant, ahead of an investor presentation today in New York, said it wants to hit an adjusted operating margin of 25% this year and 28% in 2020. Boston Scientific, which has seen its fortunes turn for the better since CEO Michael Mahoney took over in 2013, also said it’s aiming for “consistent” double-digit growth for adjusted earnings per share and an organic revenue compound annual growth rat...
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat Boston Scientific Source Type: news

Sleep Deprivation Is Killing You (And Making You Fat In The Process)
The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hope for Leonce: Kenyan boy ’s incredible journey with vein of Galen malformation
Boston is a long flight from Kenya — 22 hours long, in fact. That’s enough time to sleep, eat, read, watch countless YouTube videos and do it all over again, an experience that could make adults antsy, let alone two little boys. Yet it was a journey that Jane Nduta and Humphrey Njogu were eager to make. Just a few months earlier, their younger son, Leonce, had been diagnosed with a rare but life-threatening condition called vein of Galen malformation, or VOGM. In this blood vessel abnormality, misshapen arteries in the brain connect directly with veins instead of with capillaries. This causes a rush of high-pre...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 23, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center Dr. Darren Orbach International Health Services vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) Source Type: news

3 Ways To Fight FOMO
by Elior Moskowitz Social media is a blessing and a curse. It’s great for staying in touch with old friends, finding people with similar interests, and sharing your ideas—but it’s also a breeding ground for self-comparison, like a bully that chips away at your self-esteem. Its weapon of choice? FOMO: The “fear of missing out.” FOMO is defined as a feeling of inferiority and anxiety about missing out on meaningful experiences triggered by self-comparison and prompted by social media. It’s running rampant, with over half of all social media users and nearly two-thirds of Millennials report...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The World Society Needs to Express Greater Solidarity for Refugees Worldwide
By Dr. Hanif Hassan Al QassimGENEVA, Jun 20 2017 (IPS)The world is heading into troubled waters as we are witnessing an unprecedented movement of people – refugees, migrants and internally displaced persons (IDPs) alike – fleeing from misery, poverty and conflicts. The refugee crisis that has swept across Europe and the Middle East is becoming the 21st century’s most protracted crisis with no immediate solution in sight. The world has not witnessed a more complex movement of people since the end of the Second World War; thousands of human beings undertake perilous and treacherous journeys in hope for a be...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Hanif Hassan Al Qassim Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Democracy Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Middle East & North Africa Migration & Refugees Peace Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Medford Man Receives Bionic Eye
MEDFORD (CBS) — After 20 years of darkness, there is light. It seems like science fiction, but a bionic eye implant is bringing a kind of sight to the blind. It’s not what you and I see, but for a small number of people, it’s making all the difference. “It’s not actual vision. It’s what they call artificial vision,” says Anthony Andreotolla, one of the first people to ever receive a bionic eye. Every day he puts on his gear, leaves his Medford home and rides the MBTA to his job in Downtown Crossing. Anthony Andreotolla wearing bionic eye (WBZ-TV) Andreotolla has retinitis pigm...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Bionic Eye Medford Paula Ebben Second Sight Source Type: news

Women Dressed As Handmaids Descend On Ohio Statehouse To Protest Anti-Abortion Law
Women wearing long red cloaks and white bonnets have become an increasingly common sight in government buildings around the country in recent months. The latest state to see a protest inspired by Margaret Atwood’s dystopian feminist classic The Handmaid’s Tale is Ohio. On Tuesday, women filed into the statehouse on Tuesday to protest Senate Bill 145, a proposed ban on the most common method for second-trimester abortions. SB 145 will ban the most commonly used abortion procedure in the 2nd trimester. #OHHandmaids are here to show the impact of abortion bans pic.twitter.com/GxwvM7l24j— NARAL ProChoic...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Ask, Don’t Tell' -- Pulse Victims And Supporting The Loved Ones Left Behind
Last year, 49 people lost their lives in the Orlando massacre at the LGBTQ nightclub Pulse in the worst mass shooting in recent U.S. history. Dozens more were injured. Bars and clubs have long been a place for LGBTQ community members to gather and simply be ourselves, as few other safe spaces exist. As an openly gay Latino myself, I know that this tragedy has been deeply felt by both the LGBTQ and Latinx (a gender-neutral alternative to Latino/a) communities throughout the nation and the world. Perhaps the most affected by this tragedy are the families (both biological and of-choice) and loved ones who were left behind. I ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Culprit hidden in plain sight in Alzheimer disease development
(IOS Press) A new study by researchers at the University of Montana, Universidad del Valle de M é xico, Instituto Nacional de Pediatr í a, Boise State, and Universidad Nacional Aut ó noma de M é xico, heightens concerns over the detrimental short- and long-term impact of airborne iron-rich strongly magnetic combustion-derived nanoparticles present in young urbanites' brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monteris Medical raises $27m Series C for NeuroBlate brain surgery device
Monteris Medical said yesterday that it raised a Series C round worth nearly $27 million it plans to use on R&D, clinical trials and expanding the commercial footprint of its NeuroBlate brain surgery device. Versant Ventures and SightLine Partners led the round, joined by prior backers Birchview Capital and BDC Capital’s Healthcare Venture Fund, Monteris said. The MRI-guided NeuroBlate device is designed to ablate, necrotize or coagulate soft tissue during neurosurgery procedures using laser thermotherapy. “We were very pleased with the level of interest we received through our fund...
Source: Mass Device - June 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Neurological Surgical Monteris Medical Source Type: news

3 Steps To Running A Half Marathon
Hearing the words one mile left never felt so sweet. I was on the home stretch towards finishing my first half-marathon, and actually replied wow. The training had paid off. After hearing those words, seeing the finish line in sight, and then finally making it across, there are at least 3 steps I’ve learned that can be helpful if you want to run your first half-marathon or just become more athletic: 1. Learn from running experts (or fitness sites), both online and in print. It can be exciting to embark on training that will test you mentally and physically. However, if you want to train cautiously—preventing in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Springs were critical water sources for early humans in East Africa, Rutgers study finds
(Rutgers University) About 1 to 2 million years ago, early humans in East Africa periodically faced very dry conditions, with little or no water in sight. But they likely had access to hundreds of springs that lingered despite long dry spells, allowing our ancestors to head north and out of Africa, according to a groundbreaking study by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other institutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 7 Injuries Doctors See Most On Summer Weekends
Warm weather and longer days will bring many Americans outdoors for cookouts, pool parties and more. But long weekends ― we’re looking at you, Memorial Day ― also lead to more trips to urgent care or even the emergency room, according to experts. In fact, a 2015 study from researchers at Brown University found that heat-related illness alone can ratchet emergency department visits in the summertime.  The risk for issues like drowning and sports injuries go up in the hotter seasons, according to Dr. Christopher M. McStay, chief of clinical operations and associate professor at the University of Colorado ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surfing Great Claims Women's Periods Cause Shark Attacks
Turns out being one of the most admired surfers in the world doesn’t make you immune from promoting bad science. TMZ subjected Laird Hamilton to one of its impromptu TV interviews in Malibu on Wednesday, and it didn’t go well for the surfing great. The interview started off smoothly, with the crew asking Hamilton for his thoughts on the uptick in shark sightings along the California coast in recent weeks and what the odds were of the average beachgoer being attacked. Hamilton debunked the myth that sharks are bloodthirsty for humans ― which is perpetuated by movies like “The Shallows,” &...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Do sea monsters exist? Yes, but they go by another name … | Jules Howard
Nothing fires up a media storm like a sighting of a dead sea monster no one can identify. However much scientists shout ‘It’s a whale!’I don ’t want to spoil it for you, but I guess I’ll have to. It was a whale that washed up on the Indonesian island of Seram late last week. It was never a sea monster, no matter how hard we all tried to believe or hope it might be. Although the species of whale remains unknown (DNA analysis should so lve that problem in time), the big giveaways were the presence of whale jaw-bone, the baleen plates, the vertebrae, the fins, the throat pleats, the whale shape a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Whales Marine life Wildlife Environment Cetaceans Science Source Type: news

What It's Like When A Guinea Worm Living Inside Your Body Suddenly Burrows Out
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. JUBA, South Sudan ― It took days for Maker Achuil and others to slowly pull the arm-length, spaghetti-like worm out of his thigh. After a year with the white parasite inside him, Achuil screamed in pain as the grown Guinea worm emerged. A former soldier in South Sudan, which fought for decades before gaining its independence from Sudan in 2011, Achuil still shudders at the memory of the agony he felt as the worm was gradually wound around a stick. “It was like putting...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The New Aging Dilemma, Growing Older At Home Alone
There’s a hidden segment of the older adult population that the healthcare industry has recently spotted. It’s the aging single group of people 55 and over. They are the aged, community-dwelling individuals who are socially and physically isolated, without an available known family member or designated surrogate. They’ve been in plain sight for decades, but since boomers enter the 60 years, the aging single demographic will intensify, due to their status of having the highest divorce rates and childless marriages. And in a matter of a few years, the prevalence of the generation’s chronic diseases w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

28 Things Anyone With A Feminist Mother Knows To Be True
Anyone with a feminist for a mom knows she’s given you some of the best life advice you’ll ever get.  She’s a strong woman who makes her opinion known and doesn’t take shit from anyone. Whether she’s been working a 9 to 5 her entire life or has stayed at home to raise you ― she’s a role model in every way.  To celebrate Mother’s Day, HuffPost Women asked our readers to share one lesson they’ve learned from their feminist mothers growing up. The responses, paraphrased below, were heart-wrenching, honest and full of love.  So, for my feminist mom &mda...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

15 Great White Sharks Off California Beaches Trigger Warnings
After a chilling sighting Wednesday, a Southern California sheriff’s deputy warned people from a helicopter to get out of the water because “you are paddleboarding next to approximately 15 great white sharks.” The lurking shadows of the big fish were spotted close to the surf line from Capistrano Beach in Dana Point to San Onofre State Beach, south of Los Angeles along the Orange County coast. Paddleboarders and swimmers were told to “exit the water in a calm manner.” The deputy added: “Please do not enter the water.” A swimmer reported a close encounter with one of the sharks, whi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 12, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study of worms reveals ‘selfish genes’ that encode a toxin – and its antidote
FINDINGSA UCLA study has found that a common strain of  Caenorhabditis elegans — a type of roundworm frequently used in laboratory research on neural development — has a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The new research also revealed that if worms with the two genes mate with wild strains of C. elegans that don’t have b oth genes, their offspring who don’t inherit the antidote can’t protect themselves from the toxin — which is produced by mother worms — and die while they are still embryos.The pair of genes represents one of the clearest exam...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How Smart Is a Dog Really? The Secrets of a Canine Mind
Odds are you don’t look forward to spending time in a magnetic resonance imager–and with good reason. The clanging, coffin-like machine seems purpose-built for sensory assault. But you’re not Ninja, a 3-year-old pit-bull mix, who trots into a lab at Emory University in Atlanta, catches a glimpse of the MRI in which she’ll spend her morning and leaps happily onto the table. Ninja is one of the few dogs in the world that have been trained to sit utterly still in an MRI (the little bits of hot dog she gets as rewards help) so that neuroscientist Gregory Berns can peer into her brain as it works. &ldquo...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized animals Dogs Pets Source Type: news

A dream deferred but not denied by ACL tear
The dream of playing college soccer was within reach. Emily had been working on her game since she was four years old, and at 16 was now co-captain of both her high school and club teams. Colleges were taking note. Just three games into club season, Emily was on the field in North Carolina, running back to her net when she tore her left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). She heard her knee pop, and knew immediately what had happened. “I’ve always had a high tolerance for pain, but that definitely raised the bar,” she says. Her mother Lauri can still hear her daughter’s screams from that day as s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Our Patients’ Stories ACL surgery ACL tear Division of Sports Medicine Dr. Benton Heyworth Micheli Center Source Type: news

Mother-of two on losing her sight due to Devic’s disease: I went blind overnight
IN just a matter of hours, mum-of-two Vanessa Potter lost her sight and the ability to walk, to the bafflement of medical experts. Here she charts her long road to recovery and what she learnt from the terrifying experience. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What to Know About the Eta Aquarid Meteor Shower
The Eta Aquarid meteor shower will be a sight to see on Friday night (and early Saturday morning) for anyone willing to stay up late enough. The meteor shower, which was created by debris from Halley’s Comet, will travel across Earth in April and May, according to Quartz, but will be most visible this weekend. Here’s what you need to know about how and where to see the shower. When is the best time to watch the meteor shower? The annual, week-long meteor shower is expected to be at its most visible during early Saturday morning, according to Earth Sky. Conditions will be best when the moon sets just before 4 a....
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - May 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Step by step: Sloane ’s incredible journey with laryngeal cleft
Like most first graders, Sloane has a jam-packed schedule, filled with fun activities such as dancing, ice skating and playing tennis. But every now and then, this busy girl needs to take a break, even if that simply means taking her time to sip a glass of water. “I remind her that, sometimes, she needs to slow down,” says her mom, Tarra.Resisting the urge to rush has been a familiar theme for Sloane and her parents ever since she was born — although, ironically, she arrived in a hurry. Tarra had experienced a placental abruption, requiring an emergency C-section. Things only got more complicated. After T...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 4, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders Dr. Reza Rahbar laryngeal cleft Source Type: news

Mammalian photoreceptors use sunlight to rapidly regenerate visual pigments
FINDINGSMammals see when light reflected from an object strikes a visual pigment in the eye, which sends a signal to the brain and simultaneously consumes the light-sensitive pigment in retinal photoreceptor cells. In theory, this could present a problem because mammals cannot see if the light-sensitive pigments are depleted. But now UCLA researchers have learned why that never happens. They observed that in bright light mammals rapidly recycle spent pigments, ensuring that photoreceptors retain levels of light-sensitive pigments sufficient for uninterrupted sight.  BACKGROUNDWhen stimulated, the light-sensitive pigme...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 4, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Finding zombies, ghosts and Elvis in the fossil record
When there ’s no more room in fossil hell, do the dead walk the earth again?Now that Easter is over, we ’re firmly in Halloween now right through until the end of October. So what better time to tenuously justify taking a look at some paranormal concepts in palaeontology and biology such as ghosts, zombies and, err ... Elvis. Not actual ghosts, you understand, although there is much research needed into why we don’t see ghosts of graptolites andSinotubulitesmore often*.Recently, there have been a number of high-profile discoveries of species known better from fossil relative remains than living animals, a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mark Carnall Tags: Fossils Science Evolution Biology Source Type: news

Swimmer Injured in Shark Attack at Southern California Beach
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. (AP) — A shark attacked a woman wading in the ocean with friends, tearing away part of her upper thigh off a popular Southern California beach, authorities and witnesses said Sunday. The attack occurred Saturday near San Onofre State Beach in northern San Diego County. "All of the back of her leg was kind of missing," Thomas Williams, one of several witnesses who pulled the woman ashore, told the Orange County Register. "If she didn't receive immediate care, it was life-threatening." Williams said the woman was conscious and talking while onlookers used a rubber surfboard le...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

UNISON responds to Labour ’s pledge for NHS staff
Responding to Labour’s NHS election pledge, to be announced by shadow health secretary Jon Ashworth tomorrow (Wednesday) in Liverpool -at UNISON’s annual health conference – UNISON general secretary Dave Prentis said: “NHS staff give one hundred per cent day in, day out with many doing life-saving work. Yet they’re struggling to get by on below-inflation wages. “Lifting the one per cent pay cap would give health employees a long overdue pay rise – and show them just how much they’re valued. “A decent wages increase would also help ease the crisis in staff recruitme...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - April 25, 2017 Category: Food Science Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release dave prentis labour NHS Source Type: news

Snow Leopard Triple Sighting A Treat For Viewers, And Even Better For Science
Three snow leopards surprised wildlife researchers in China by snuggling in front of a monitoring camera ― a rare sighting they say will help us better understand and protect the big cats.  And they hope it’ll help scientists estimate just how many of these elusive animals are left in the wild. The big cat conservation group Panthera released a stop-motion video of the felines last week, captured in the highlands of China’s Qinghai province, near a monastery where the agency is working alongside the Snow Leopard Trust and a local nonprofit named Shan Shui. In the minute-long clip, a s...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

He Was Searching For Intersexual Pigs And Ended Up Finding The World's Rarest Dog
Twenty years after beginning his quest to find what’s been called the world’s rarest canine species, James “Mac” McIntyre was vindicated. There on his camera screen were the images he’d been waiting years for. The New Guinea highland wild dog — an animal once feared extinct — was alive and well, his pictures showed. “I squealed like a girl,” the 62-year-old said earlier this month, speaking from his Florida home. “It was emotionally such a tremendous moment. It was justification for all the work I’ve done.” How McIntyre ended up finding the New Guinea ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Poor Sleep Hygiene Is Killing You And Your Career
The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Story Behind These Viral Photos Of A Starstruck 7-Year-Old Meeting Belle
April 14 marked the first day of a week-long magical adventure for 7-year-old Daisy Perez, and the highlight of her trip was the day she met Belle from “Beauty and the Beast” at Walt Disney World. Daisy, her mother, her aunt, her brother and her sister traveled from Dallas to Orlando, Florida, last week with help from the Make-A-Wish Foundation, an organization that grants “wishes” to kids with life-threatening illnesses. Daisy’s aunt, Patricia Chavez, told The Huffington Post that her niece has achondroplasia (a form of dwarfism), which has forced her to have many surgeries since she wa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He lost his sight to cancer, but not his vision of a full life
When Tim Conners collected his wish from the Make-A-Wish Foundation in 2012 at the age of 18, he was blind from childhood leukemia that had spread to his optic nerve and craving inspiration to transcend his disability. A football player and wrestler who’d never been an outdoorsman, he asked to meet Erik Weihenmayer, the first blind person to climb the Seven Summits, the highest mountains on seven continents. Tim’s wish came true. He had 2½ terrifying but transformative days of outdoor adventures in Colorado with Erik, who lost his sight to a degenerative eye disorder at 13. Now Tim is training to cl...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center stem cell transplant Source Type: news

America's First Addiction Crisis Had Some Striking Parallels To Today
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news