FDA accepts application for Roche ’s faricimab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME)
Basel, 29 July 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company ’s Biologics License Application (BLA), under Priority Review, for faricimab for the treatment of neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME). The FDA has also accepted the company’s submission for diabetic retinopathy.Faricimab will be the first and only bispecific antibody designed for the eye, if approved. It targets two distinct pathways – via angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and vascular endothelial growt...
Source: Roche Media News - July 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA accepts application for Roche ’s faricimab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME)
Basel, 29 July 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company ’s Biologics License Application (BLA), under Priority Review, for faricimab for the treatment of neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME). The FDA has also accepted the company’s submission for diabetic retinopathy.Faricimab will be the first and only bispecific antibody designed for the eye, if approved. It targets two distinct pathways – via angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and vascular endothelial growt...
Source: Roche Investor Update - July 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New device could help visually impaired avoid obstacles, research suggests
Chest-mounted video camera and vibrating wristbands developed by US team reduce collisions by 37% in small studyVibrating wristbands could help visually impaired people to avoid collisions when out and about, a study indicates.According to the NHS, about 360,000 people in the UK alone are registered as blind or partially sighted, with long canes and guide dogs among the methods used to help individuals avoid obstacles.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Blindness and visual impairment Disability Technology Science Source Type: news

Jeff Bezos Blasts Himself Off-Planet, Helping to Usher In a New Era of Space Tourism
Give Jeff Bezos this: When he builds a rocket, he rides the rocket, strapping his own mortal hide into a seat and test-flying what he’s developed before inviting paying passengers aboard to make the same journey. “If it’s not safe for me, it’s not safe for anyone,” Bezos said in a video segment released by Blue Origin, his private rocket company, before Tuesday morning’s first crewed launch of its New Shepard rocket on a suborbital lob shot that soared to an altitude of 106 km (66 mi.). Today, the rocket—which had previously flown 15 uncrewed missions to suborbital space—inde...
Source: TIME: Science - July 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

European Duplicity Undermines Anti-Pandemic Efforts
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Jul 20 2021 (IPS) Despite facing the world’s worst pandemic of the last century, rich countries in the World Trade Organization (WTO) have blocked efforts to enable more affordable access to the means to fight the pandemic. Everyone knows access for all to the means for testing, treatment and prevention – including diagnostic tests, therapeutic medicines, personal protective equipment and vaccines – is crucial. Anis ChowdhuryEuropean deceit In October 2020, South Africa and India requested the WTO to temporarily suspend relevant provisions...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Aid Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions
In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of sp...
Source: TIME: Health - July 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Duggan Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions
In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of sp...
Source: TIME: Science - July 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jennifer Duggan Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

Considerations About Deciding to Send a Child to School
Discussion For parents there can be a lot of pressure to “get it right” when deciding to send their child to school. Positive adult life outcomes such as employment, physical and mental health, and prosocial relationships are associated with higher educational attainment. Higher educational attainment such as finishing high school and potentially an advanced degree is associated with positive school experiences and domain specific skill attainment (e.g. reading, writing, math skills) and is also associated with readiness to begin school. Therefore if a child is “not ready” to start school, then the ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 12, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Jeff Bezos-Richard Branson Space Race Is About More Than Two Billionaires ’ Egos
Nobody is selling Team Bezos or Team Branson t-shirts just yet. The competition between billionaires Jeff Bezos (founder of Blue Origin) and Richard Branson (co-founder of Virgin Galactic) to see who can be first to space may never have the historical cachet of Red Sox versus Yankees, Lincoln versus Douglas, Hamilton versus Burr, but it’s a hot contest all the same. This Sunday, July 11, it could reach its pinnacle, when Branson, along with three other Virgin Galactic corporate officers and two pilots, take off aboard their VSS Unity space plane to attempt a suborbital mission that will earn all six their astronaut w...
Source: TIME: Science - July 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

In memoriam: Dr. Gerald S. Levey, 84, oversaw building of Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center
Dr. Gerald Levey, who led the transformation of UCLA ’s hospitals and medical school into a world-class academic health system, died at home of Parkinson’s disease on June 25. He was 84. Levey served the campus as vice chancellor of medical sciences and dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA from 1994 to 2010. During his tenure, Levey amassed an extraordinarily long list of achievements, crowned by the construction of the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and the sealing of a $200 million gift to the UCLA School of Medicine by entertainment executive David Geffen.  “It&rsq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The new wave of gravitational waves
Ripples in spacetime caused by the collision of black holes were first detected in 2015. Now astrophysicists are looking for the waves created by the big bang itselfAbout 10 billion-trillion-trillionths of a second into the start of creation in the big bang, the universe is believed to have had a brief but absurdly fast growth spurt. This episode, called inflation, was so cataclysmic that the very fabric of space and time was set juddering with gravitational waves (GWs). By comparison, the GWs that were first detected six years ago to much fanfare were small-scale affairs caused by black holes colliding. But now scientists...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Space Physics Astronomy Gravity Science Source Type: news

How Can We Escape the COVID-19 Vaccine Culture Wars?
On Friday, March 19, my wife and I got in our cars to drive an hour south of our home in Franklin, Tennessee, a prosperous suburb of Nashville. The purpose of our trip was simple—to drive where it was easier and faster to schedule a COVID-19 vaccination. In Franklin it was hard. Demand was outstripping supply. Drive an hour south—to more rural Tennessee—and it was easy. Supply outstripped demand. When we arrived we were pleasantly surprised to see that the site was at least a little bit busy. The room was social-distanced but reasonably full. The atmosphere was pleasant and maybe even a little festive. Th...
Source: TIME: Health - June 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David French Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The U.S. Government ’s Long-Awaited UFO Report Is Here. Its Findings? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
The U.S. Navy pilots flying maneuvers in their F/A-18 Super Hornets in 2015 did not have to wait for yesterday’s leak of the classified government report on unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP)—better known as UFOs—to know that they were seeing things they could not explain outside their windscreens. The objects were, yes, saucer-shaped, and they were bobbing, darting and changing directions with a speed and nimbleness that no known technology could manage. “Look at that thing, dude!” one pilot shouted. “Oh my gosh. There’s a whole fleet of them. They’re going against the wind...
Source: TIME: Science - June 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Finding New Optimism In Those Pandemic Babies
Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. A version of this article also appeared in theIt’s Not Just You newsletter.Sign up here to receive a new edition every Sunday. As always, you can send comments to me at: Susanna@Time.com. A slew of beloved friends have been having babies lately. I’m embarrassingly emotional about their arrival, or even just the news that they’re on their way. Knowing that this new crop of young ones will uncover delight in this bruised world is one of those ancient wonders. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] It’s been a fractious and scary year, but these p...
Source: TIME: Health - May 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized It's Not Just You Source Type: news

A Blind Patient Regained Partial Sight in a Breakthrough Study, Offering Hope to Millions
The darkness descends slowly for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a degenerative eye disease that affects 2 million people worldwide. The condition is typically diagnosed in childhood or adolescence, but it can take until middle age before a person’s vision has deteriorated severely enough that they are fully or effectively blind. When the lights finally do go out, however, they stay out. Or that’s the way things used to be. In a breakthrough study published today in Nature Medicine, investigators report a relatively simple yet remarkably effective way to restore partial vision to RP patients—one th...
Source: TIME: Health - May 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study Innovation Source Type: news

A Blind Patient Regained Partial Sight in a Breakthrough Study, Offering Hope to Millions
The darkness descends slowly for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a degenerative eye disease that affects 2 million people worldwide. The condition is typically diagnosed in childhood or adolescence, but it can take until middle age before a person’s vision has deteriorated severely enough that they are fully or effectively blind. When the lights finally do go out, however, they stay out. Or that’s the way things used to be. In a breakthrough study published today in Nature Medicine, investigators report a relatively simple yet remarkably effective way to restore partial vision to RP patients—one th...
Source: TIME: Science - May 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study Innovation Source Type: news

From the archive: How a tax haven is leading the race to privatise space – podcast
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors.This week, from 2017: Luxembourg has shown how far a tiny country can go by serving the needs of global capitalism. Now it has set its sights on outer space. ByAtossa Araxia AbrahamianContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Written by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian, read by Christopher Ragland and produced by Simon Barnardwith additions by Esther Opoku-Gyeni Tags: Space Luxembourg Tax havens Mining Science Source Type: news

Suicide Among Black Girls Is a Mental Health Crisis Hiding in Plain Sight
Discussion and dialogue about historical events such as the civil rights movement or the Holocaust is key; so is making a greater effort to present minority figures as role models and giving positive examples of diversity. “When you encounter someone who is different than you, it’s a pretty normal reaction to have stereotypical thoughts,” Nickerson says. “But how can you consciously think about that and get to know people as individuals and recognize their strengths?” The majority of U.S. primary-school teachers in the country are white and female, according to data from the National Center fo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kyra Aurelia Alessandrini Tags: Uncategorized feature Source Type: news

A Free & Accessible Vaccine is Just out of Reach for Palestinians
Young Palestinians drive their boat along the coast near the Gaza Sea port, selling boat rides as a way to earn a living. Credit: Laila Barhoum/ Oxfam By Laila BarhoumGAZA, Apr 29 2021 (IPS) We were able to keep the coronavirus at bay for five months in Gaza, the densely populated Palestinian strip of land surrounded by Israel that I call home. But the Coronavirus doesn’t respect walls or artificial borders. While preparations were made for the pandemic to inevitably breach a blockade so few Palestinians can, we waited for it to come for us. And it did. In one of the most sealed off places in the world, we knew the ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 29, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Laila Barhoum Tags: Aid Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

India ’s COVID-19 Crisis Is Spiraling Out of Control. It Didn’t Have to Be This Way
Dusk is falling in the Indian capital, and the acrid smell of burning bodies fills the air. It’s the evening of April 26, and at a tiny crematorium in a Delhi suburb, seven funeral pyres are still burning. “I have lived here all my life and pass through this area twice a day,” says local resident Gaurav Singh. “I have never seen so many bodies burning together.” Scenes of mass death are now unavoidable in what’s often called the world’s largest democracy. Social media is filled with images of body bags and urgent requests for medical aid. Indians gasping for breath are being turned...
Source: TIME: Health - April 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Naina Bajekal Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature India Londontime Magazine Source Type: news

‘A fleeting vacation from terrestrial concerns’: readers’ best stargazing photos
Many people have spent more time at home due to the pandemic, creating opportunity for some, to do more stargazing. Readers share their astrophotographyThis photo of the Whirlpool galaxy was taken from my backyard in Commack, New York, over the course of two nights in mid January, 2021. Stargazing has helped me throughout the pandemic because it gave me something to do during the many months I was out of school and home during the summer. I used my Orion 150mm telescope and a dedicated astrophotography camera to take many long exposure images which are stacked together and edited to get the image that you see here. My sigh...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Guardian readers and Alfie Packham Tags: Astronomy Space Science Environment Photography Source Type: news

Meet the Inspiration4 Team, the World ’s First Non-Astronaut Space Crew
Sian Proctor may owe her life to Apollo 11—literally. Born in Guam—the daughter of an engineer who worked at the local tracking station that helped NASA maintain communications with its lunar crews—she was the fourth child of a couple that she suspects did not plan for so many kids, and came into the world just nine months after Apollo 11 stuck its historic first moon landing. “I think I was a celebration baby,” she says with a laugh. “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for human space flight.” Proctor herself has a lot to celebrate this year. Come September, if all goes t...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Meet the Inspiration4 Team, the World ’s First Non-Professional Astronaut Space Crew
Sian Proctor may owe her life to Apollo 11—literally. Born in Guam—the daughter of an engineer who worked at the local tracking station that helped NASA maintain communications with its lunar crews—she was the fourth child of a couple that she suspects did not plan for so many kids, and came into the world just nine months after Apollo 11 stuck its historic first moon landing. “I think I was a celebration baby,” she says with a laugh. “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for human space flight.” Proctor herself has a lot to celebrate this year. Come September, if all goes t...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Climate Real Estate Bubble: Is the U.S. on the Verge of Another Financial Crisis?
1171 Shoreham looks much like it did when Anna Zimmerman lived there: modest but presentable. A good starter home for Zimmerman and her husband when they bought it in 2005, for a while it provided an idyllic existence in suburban Charleston, S.C., a community of friendly neighbors for their young child, a quaint backyard and even space for Zimmerman’s mother-in-law. Then, in 2015, the first flood hit, taking most of their property with it after a heavy rain. This came as a shock; no flood risk had been disclosed when Zimmerman bought the house. But, determined to turn lemons into lemonade, she used the insurance mo...
Source: TIME: Science - April 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland and Graphics by Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized climate change feature Magazine TIME 2030 Source Type: news

Leaked documents show that Google and the FTC have been engaged in a decades-long criminal cover-up
(Natural News) Google’s team of lawyers made a huge mistake with the release of key documents requested by a group of state attorneys general. Portions of the documents that should have been redacted were left in plain sight, revealing illegal behavior on Google’s part with regards to its massive advertising monopoly. Google’s online advertising marketplace,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The science of hugging, and why we ’re missing it so much during the pandemic | Susannah Walker
To understand why so many are craving human touch we can look to our evolutionary history – and the secrets of our skinDr Susannah Walker is a reader in behavioural neuroscience at Liverpool John Moores University“What I miss,” said one colleague last spring, during one of our weekly online team meetings, “are hugs, great big man-hugs, like I share with my dad and close male friends.” The sense of touch has long been a shared fascination for our research group of neuroscientists and experimental psyc hologists. During the pandemic, everyone else has started to talk about touch too – and ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Walker Tags: Coronavirus Psychology Society Family Science Life and style Source Type: news

PNR Weekly Digest: April 13, 2021
Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an * In the Dragonfly: NLM Awards 2021-2026 Regional Medical Library Cooperative Agreements The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has awarded a new five-year cooperative agreement grant to the University of Washington (UW) Health Sciences Library to lead the NNLM Regional Medical Library (RML) Region 5 serving a six-state region including Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington and U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States. Region 5 is part of the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), which will include 7 Regional Medical Libraries (R...
Source: Dragonfly - April 13, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: PNR Weekly Digest Source Type: news

PNR Weekly Digest: April 13, 2021
Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an * In the Dragonfly: NLM Awards 2021-2026 Regional Medical Library Cooperative Agreements The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has awarded a new five-year cooperative agreement grant to the University of Washington (UW) Health Sciences Library to lead the NNLM Regional Medical Library (RML) Region 5 serving a six-state region including Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington and U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States. Region 5 is part of the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), which will include 7 Regional Medical Libraries (R...
Source: Dragonfly - April 13, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: PNR Weekly Digest Source Type: news

UK Covid: Johnson suggests testing for people returning from ‘green list’ countries could be simplified – as it happened
Prime minister says easyJet boss right to ask whether it would bepossible to use lateral flow tests for some returning travellers. This live blog is now closed -please follow the global coronavirus live blog for updatesEngland ’s Covid vaccine programme could slow sharply, Sage warnsNo 10 refuses to rule out Covid passports being needed to enter shopsUK ’s long Covid patients facing postcode lottery for supportWhat are Covid-status certificates and how might they work?5.32pmBSTMAIL: Call this freedom?#TomorrowsPapersTodaypic.twitter.com/NUI1LWWTiYTELEGRAPH: No end in sight as ⁦@BorisJohnson⁩ says normal is ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Sparrow Tags: Coronavirus Politics UK news Boris Johnson Labour Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases NHS Keir Starmer House of Commons Health Science Medical research Byelections Opinion polls Travel & leisure Cannabis Dru Source Type: news

Should We Keep Wearing Masks Even After the Pandemic Ends?
Riding the New York City subway during cold and flu season used to test your stomach. The woman next to you was coughing. The guy behind her was sneezing. Somebody was always fishing for a tissue. That’s a distant memory now. The subway is far emptier, for one thing—and with the riders onboard almost universally wearing masks, the chorus of sniffles and coughs has been silenced. During the pandemic, the need for that policy is clear. But should the masks stay even after COVID-19 is gone? Before vaccines began rolling out to the general public, masks were among the only tools available for containing SARS-CoV-2,...
Source: TIME: Health - April 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

These Moms Work as Doctors and Scientists. But They ’ve Also Taken On Another Job: Fighting COVID-19 Misinformation Online
Last March, friends and neighbors began stopping Emily Smith in her town outside of Waco, Texas, with questions about the coronavirus. An epidemiologist at Baylor University, Smith knows all too well how viruses are transmitted. But as the wife of a pastor and as a woman of faith, she also holds a trusted position in her community, and she would speak to those who asked about why she personally thought social distancing was a moral choice. As the weeks wore on, the questions kept coming: “What does flatten the curve mean?” “Is it safe for my child to kick a soccer ball outside with a friend?” So she...
Source: TIME: Health - March 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman Tags: Uncategorized feature Magazine Misinformation & Disinformation Source Type: news

‘Right Now Feels So Long and Without Any End in Sight’
More than 700 people have been keeping digital diaries as part of Pandemic Journaling Project. It may be the most complete record of our shifting moods in this isolating year. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Benedict Carey Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Grief (Emotion) Quarantines Anxiety and Stress Psychology and Psychologists Diaries Black Lives Matter Movement University of Connecticut North America your-feed-health your-feed-science Mexico Source Type: news

Remembering LGBT+ history – and those who are struggling today
After a year of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is “more important than ever” to celebrate LGBT+ History month this February, according to Lucy Power, co-chair of UNISON’s national LGBT+ committee. “During the lockdown, people have struggled with social isolation, perhaps not being out at home, or at work, and having no outlet with LGBT+ friends,” Ms Power said. “LGBT+ History month is an opportunity to celebrate our community, our past and our goals for the future. Let February be a commemoration and rejoicing in our diverse community.” Phillippa Scrafton, of the national LGBT+ com...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - February 9, 2021 Category: Food Science Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News Covid-19 LGBT Source Type: news

Water Graves: Nightmare for Mexican Fishermen
By Rosi OrozcoMEXICO CITY, Feb 4 2021 (IPS) All of Erizo’s nightmares are the same. Since his return from the ocean – almost unrecognizable – every bad dream is identical. A wave punches his little boat and throws him into the deep sea where everything is so dark that he can’t even see his own hands. Rosi OrozcoEven when he swam with all his energy, this 31 year old fisherman was never able to set foot on the mainland and to him, the Mexican Pacific ocean slowly became a grave formed only of water. When Erizo dies in his nightmare, he wakes up in real life, opening his mouth like a dying fish that ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Rosi Orozco Tags: Crime & Justice Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Covid pressures triggering mental health issues among health staff
Health staff are suffering severe mental health problems such as panic attacks and having sleepless nights because of the pandemic, according to a survey published today (Thursday) by UNISON. The findings reveal almost half (48%) of health employees​ including nurses, porters, paramedics, healthcare assistants and A&E staff across the UK have struggled to cope. The union says free 24-hour helplines are urgently needed to support those experiencing burnout​, especially as hospital admissions continue to soar. The report Worry in Mind is based on responses from more than 14,000 empl...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - January 28, 2021 Category: Food Science Authors: Garfield Myrie Tags: News Press release Covid-19 mental health Sara Gorton Source Type: news

My Parents Will Be Vaccinated Long Before Me. Can They Come Visit?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, E.B. in New York asks: My parents and in-laws will hopefully be vaccinated soon. My husband and toddler and I don’t expect to be vaccinated for quite some time. How s...
Source: TIME: Health - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

Air pollution linked to higher risk of sight loss from AMD
(University College London) Air pollution is linked to a heightened risk of progressive and irreversible sight loss, known as age related macular degeneration (AMD), reveals a large long term study led by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The U.S. Fumbled Its Early Vaccine Rollout. Will the Biden Administration Put America Back on Track?
On a frigid morning in January, Trudy Ronnel settled into her favorite sofa chair at the Westminster Place senior-living community in Evanston, Ill., pulled down the neckline on her red blouse and braced herself for a shot she’d anticipated for almost a year. At 92 years old, with multiple medical conditions, she spent most of 2020 fearful of contracting the COVID-19 plague that ravaged the world outside her first-floor window. To protect herself, for the past few months she’d avoided Westminster’s communal rooms, which had provided a means to stay active and engaged but risked becoming a pathogenic petri...
Source: TIME: Health - January 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: W.J. Hennigan, Alice Park and Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Shots Begin at Disneyland (CA) Parking Lot
Ian Wheeler and Dan Albano The Orange County Register (MCT) Cars and socially spaced crowds amassed at Disneyland’s Toy Story parking lot Wednesday, Jan. 13, as hundreds queued for coronavirus vaccines at Orange County’s first mass-vaccination site, a pivotal step toward county leaders’ new goal of delivering 1.5 million shots per month. The tented site’s opening marks a new chapter in Orange County’s battle against the coronavirus as people age 65 and older, especially those who have underlying health conditions that might make them more susceptible to a bad case of COVID-19, can ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed California Medicine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Shots Begin at Disneyland (CA) Parking Lot
Ian Wheeler and Dan Albano The Orange County Register (MCT) Cars and socially spaced crowds amassed at Disneyland’s Toy Story parking lot Wednesday, Jan. 13, as hundreds queued for coronavirus vaccines at Orange County’s first mass-vaccination site, a pivotal step toward county leaders’ new goal of delivering 1.5 million shots per month. The tented site’s opening marks a new chapter in Orange County’s battle against the coronavirus as people age 65 and older, especially those who have underlying health conditions that might make them more susceptible to a bad case of COVID-19, can ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed California Medicine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Shots Begin at Disneyland (CA) Parking Lot
Ian Wheeler and Dan Albano The Orange County Register (MCT) Cars and socially spaced crowds amassed at Disneyland’s Toy Story parking lot Wednesday, Jan. 13, as hundreds queued for coronavirus vaccines at Orange County’s first mass-vaccination site, a pivotal step toward county leaders’ new goal of delivering 1.5 million shots per month. The tented site’s opening marks a new chapter in Orange County’s battle against the coronavirus as people age 65 and older, especially those who have underlying health conditions that might make them more susceptible to a bad case of COVID-19, can ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed California Medicine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Shots Begin at Disneyland (CA) Parking Lot
Ian Wheeler and Dan Albano The Orange County Register (MCT) Cars and socially spaced crowds amassed at Disneyland’s Toy Story parking lot Wednesday, Jan. 13, as hundreds queued for coronavirus vaccines at Orange County’s first mass-vaccination site, a pivotal step toward county leaders’ new goal of delivering 1.5 million shots per month. The tented site’s opening marks a new chapter in Orange County’s battle against the coronavirus as people age 65 and older, especially those who have underlying health conditions that might make them more susceptible to a bad case of COVID-19, can ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed California Medicine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Shots Begin at Disneyland (CA) Parking Lot
Ian Wheeler and Dan Albano The Orange County Register (MCT) Cars and socially spaced crowds amassed at Disneyland’s Toy Story parking lot Wednesday, Jan. 13, as hundreds queued for coronavirus vaccines at Orange County’s first mass-vaccination site, a pivotal step toward county leaders’ new goal of delivering 1.5 million shots per month. The tented site’s opening marks a new chapter in Orange County’s battle against the coronavirus as people age 65 and older, especially those who have underlying health conditions that might make them more susceptible to a bad case of COVID-19, can ...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed California Medicine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Shots Begin at Disneyland (CA) Parking Lot
Ian Wheeler and Dan Albano The Orange County Register (MCT) Cars and socially spaced crowds amassed at Disneyland’s Toy Story parking lot Wednesday, Jan. 13, as hundreds queued for coronavirus vaccines at Orange County’s first mass-vaccination site, a pivotal step toward county leaders’ new goal of delivering 1.5 million shots per month. The tented site’s opening marks a new chapter in Orange County’s battle against the coronavirus as people age 65 and older, especially those who have underlying health conditions that might make them more susceptible to a bad case of COVID-19, can ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed California Medicine Source Type: news

‘It’s Unimaginably Bad.’ How Government Failures and the New COVID-19 Variant Are Pushing the U.K.’s Health System Into Crisis
Dr Rachel Clarke never dreamed that in her medical career, she would say out loud that hospitals in Britain are running out of oxygen. Yet some hospitals in the U.K. are now in that critical situation, as doctors say the U.K.’s third wave of the coronavirus pandemic is pushing the country’s National Health Service to its limits. “We’re seeing younger patients, we’re seeing sicker patients, and we’ve never really recovered from the first wave,” says Clarke, who works on an acute medical ward in a hospital in Oxfordshire, England, and also in an in-patient hospice setting. “You...
Source: TIME: Health - January 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ciara Nugent and Suyin Haynes Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Second click United Kingdom Source Type: news

2021: Year of Living Dangerously?
By Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 5 2021 (IPS) Goodbye 2020, but unfortunately, not good riddance, as we all have to live with its legacy. It has been a disastrous year for much of the world for various reasons, Elizabeth II’s annus horribilis. The crisis has exposed previously unacknowledged realities, including frailties and vulnerabilities. Jomo Kwame SundaramFor many countries, the tragedy is all the greater as some leaders had set national aspirations for 2020, suggested by the number’s association with perfect vision. But their failures are no reason to reject national projects. As Helen ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Financial Crisis Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Refugee radicalization/militarization in the age of the European refugee crisis: a composite model - Eleftheriadou M.
This article constitutes an effort to examine the prospect of long-term refugee radicalization, beyond the dominant "short-sighted" debate on the possibility of radical Islamist militants posing as refugees. The main argument of the article is that refugee... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Why Do We Dream? A New Theory on How It Protects Our Brains
When he was two years old, Ben stopped seeing out of his left eye. His mother took him to the doctor and soon discovered he had retinal cancer in both eyes. After chemotherapy and radiation failed, surgeons removed both his eyes. For Ben, vision was gone forever. But by the time he was seven years old, he had devised a technique for decoding the world around him: he clicked with his mouth and listened for the returning echoes. This method enabled Ben to determine the locations of open doorways, people, parked cars, garbage cans, and so on. He was echolocating: bouncing his sound waves off objects in the environment and cat...
Source: TIME: Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Eagleman and Don Vaughn Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Roche ’s faricimab meets primary endpoint and shows strong durability across two global phase III studies for diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of blindness
Basel, 21 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from two identically designed global phase III studies, YOSEMITE and RHINE, evaluating its investigational bispecific antibody, faricimab, in people living with diabetic macular edema (DME). Both studies met their primary endpoint and showed that faricimab given every eight weeks and at personalised dosing intervals of up to 16 weeks demonstrated non-inferior visual acuity gains compared to aflibercept given every eight weeks. Faricimab was generally well-tolerated, with no new safety signals identified. The studies each h...
Source: Roche Media News - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s faricimab meets primary endpoint and shows strong durability across two global phase III studies for diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of blindness
Basel, 21 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from two identically designed global phase III studies, YOSEMITE and RHINE, evaluating its investigational bispecific antibody, faricimab, in people living with diabetic macular edema (DME). Both studies met their primary endpoint and showed that faricimab given every eight weeks and at personalised dosing intervals of up to 16 weeks demonstrated non-inferior visual acuity gains compared to aflibercept given every eight weeks. Faricimab was generally well-tolerated, with no new safety signals identified. The studies each h...
Source: Roche Investor Update - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news