Paclitaxel Controversy Is Causing CE Mark Delays for New Paclitaxel Devices
Tension over stents and balloons that are either coated with or are designed to release paclitaxel has eased up in the United States, but across the pond may be a different story. The meta-analysis published in late 2018 that showed an increased risk of death for patients treated with paclitaxel devices seems to have given European regulators pause with regards to these devices. Eden Prairie, MN-based Surmodics submitted all the required modules for its SurVeil drug-coated balloon (DCB) to the European notified body before the end of the company's fiscal year 2019, but CEO Gary Maharaj said the organization has...
Source: MDDI - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Sensing Changes in Remote and Surgical Devices
The role of sensors in medical devices is becoming increasingly more important, especially when it comes to developing new technologies such as wearable devices that can diagnose and transmit information for long periods of time. Recent developments in sensor technologies are driving the trend toward the decentralization of healthcare by putting diagnostic instruments in the hands (or on the bodies) of patients. The move toward miniaturization in medical devices has also enabled sensors to be placed on laparoscopic instruments, providing surgeons with valuable haptic feedback. Experts will examine sensor advancements in th...
Source: MDDI - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Susan Shepard Tags: Electronics Source Type: news

Choosing Freedom, After Decades of Switching Addictions
This article includes references to self-injury, intravenous drug use and disordered eating.* One in five US high school students have reported being bullied. Approximately 160,000 teenagers have skipped school as a preventative measure. I encountered bullies for the first time in second grade, in the midst of such an innocent time of my youth. I dreaded entering my elementary school classroom, as I was well aware of what my presence would entail. I endured both verbal and physical harassment from my fellow peers for nearly a decade. I was passive, inevitably leading to the acceptance of my “fate,” in addition ...
Source: Psych Central - January 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Megan Lane Tags: Addictions Anorexia Bullying Depression Eating Disorders Personal Stories Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Anorexia Nervosa Drug Use heroin Self Harm Self Injury Source Type: news

Revealed: The trusts where patients lost their sight after follow-up delays
Dozens of patients suffered permanent or long-term harm to their eyes after waiting too long for a follow-up appointment, HSJ can reveal — with thousands more waiting over a year longer than they should have. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - January 17, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Weird wonders of the deep: The coffinfish can hold its breath for up to 4 minutes at a time
(Natural News) It’s not every day you get to see a fish holding its breath, let alone for up to relatively long stretches of time. But this is exactly the sight that greeted researchers Nicholas Long and Stacy Farina while observing footage captured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) remotely operated vehicles (ROV). According... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing in adult mice
(University of Maryland) New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. With further study, cross-modal learning -- the manipulation of one sense to induce change in another sense -- could be used to help people with disabilities. For example, temporary sight deprivation might be used to help deaf and hearing-impaired people adapt to cochlear implants and hearing aids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five Hurdles to Localizing Global Development —and How NGOs Can Help Overcome Them
By Pape Amadou Gaye, President and Chief Executive OfficerNovember 27, 2019Just 20 years ago, we could hardly imagine an AIDS-free generation. And the idea that poor countries would no longer rely on foreign aid to care for their people was inconceivable.But today, I believe both are in sight.The entire field of global health and development is shifting. Major funders, such as the U.S. government, are pushing ahead with an approach called localization, wherein countries manage their own foreign aid, mobilize their own public and private revenues, and eventually become self-reliant.This is what so many of us in nongo...
Source: IntraHealth International - November 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Leadership and Governance Policy & Advocacy Source Type: news

Intimacy Without Intoxication: Is Sober Sex Better?
The sun is streaming through the curtains of a room that you have never seen before. You squint and rub your bloodshot eyes, as your hand reaches out to feel the prone body of the snoring person who a few hours earlier was a stranger. You notice your own naked body and wonder how the two of you spent the interceding time. You look at the floor next to the bed and see your clothes, strewn across the carpet, wine bottles and glasses, a few joints, and a line of cocaine on the dresser across the room. You slide out of bed, gather your belongings, hightail it to the bathroom and quickly get yourself street ready. Wondering ho...
Source: Psych Central - November 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Addictions Sexuality Substance Abuse Drug Abuse Rape Sexual Assault Sober Support Sobriety Trauma Source Type: news

How to Keep Alzheimer ’s From Bringing About the Zombie Apocalypse
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jay Newton-Small Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news

How to Keep Alzheimer ’s From Bringing About the Zombie Apocalypse
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jay Newton-Small Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news

Wearing goggles in space can help prevent vision problems among astronauts, advise NASA experts
(Natural News) The weightless environment of outer space can degrade the eyesight of an astronaut, especially during long-duration missions. But a new study suggests that wearing protective goggles of any type will help preserve the person’s sight in micro-gravity and zero-gravity conditions. NASA researchers noticed that astronauts who stayed aboard the International Space Station (ISS)... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Health Care Industry Needs to be More Honest About Medical Errors
Twenty years ago this fall, the Institute of Medicine—an U.S.-based independent, nongovernmental organization widely regarded as an authority at the intersection of medicine and society—released a report titled “To Err Is Human.” It announced that up to 98,000 Americans were dying each year from medical errors. Official and popular reaction was swift. Congress mandated the monitoring of progress in efforts to prevent patient harm, and the health care industry set grand goals, such as reducing medical errors by 50% within five years. News outlets reported on the proceedings closely. A remedy for a lo...
Source: TIME: Health - November 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kathleen Sutcliffe Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare public health Source Type: news

International MIGS Study Confirms Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of the OMNI(R) Surgical System Predicate Device (VISCO360(R))
12-Month Clinical Results of Micro-Invasive Canal Viscodilation in Combination with Cataract Surgery on Over 100 Consecutive Eyes Demonstrates Long-Term IOP and Medication Reduction in Mild to Moderate POAG MENLO PARK, Calif., Oct. 22, 2019 -- (Healthca... Devices, Ophthalmology Sight Sciences, ab-interno, microcatheterization, OMNI Surgical System (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Wearing glasses ruined my teens. But wearing them in middle age is worse | Adrian Chiles
My teens were ruined by wearing terrible glasses. And now bad eyesight has crept up on me againMy Mum has got a blurred photograph of me crying. I ’m 13 years old and wearing an England tracksuit of the Ron Greenwood at the 1982 World Cup in Spain vintage. I am crying because I have just been told that I am going to have to wear glasses. The photo was taken by my little brother, because he found my distress amusing and wanted to savour it fo r ever.It had been a long road to this point. A couple of years earlier we had gone to see the World Table Tennis championships at the brand new National Exhibition Centre in Bir...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Adrian Chiles Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Ageing Science Source Type: news

IntraHealth Improves Health Care in 43 Countries, Reaches 341,445 Health Workers in 2018
September 17, 2019 Chapel Hill, NCIn a step toward making high-quality health care available to more people around the world,IntraHealth International reached 341,445 health workers in 43 countries in 2018. These health workers are now making services available to more people in some of the most remote areas, destigmatizing procedures and services, and compiling meaningful and lifesaving data that allow for greater adaptability and long-term solutions.See more results in our full annual report.IntraHealth International reached 341,445 health workers in 43 countries in 2018.The World Health Organization and World Bank pro...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Family Planning & Reproductive Health HIV AIDS Infectious Diseases Maternal, Newborn, Child Health Digital Health Education Performance Health Workforce Systems Source Type: news

Meet 15 Women Leading the Fight Against Climate Change
From sinking islands to drought-ridden savannas, women bear an outsize burden of the global—warming crisis, largely because of gender inequalities. In many parts of the world, women hold traditional roles as the primary caregivers in families and communities, and, as the main providers of food and fuel, are more vulnerable when flooding and drought occur; the U.N. estimates 80% of those who have been displaced by climate change are women. Given their position on the front line of the climate-change battle, women are uniquely situated to be agents of change—to help find ways to mitigate the causes of global warm...
Source: TIME: Science - September 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized Climate 2019 climate change Source Type: news

EMTs in Israel In Need of Lifesaving EpiPens Following Worldwide Shortage
Photo provided by United Hatzalah An EMT in Israel administers an EpiPen to a young girl. There is a worldwide shortage of EpiPens, which is affecting individuals who have severe allergies that can cause anaphylactic reactions. The EpiPen is an auto-injection delivery system that administers a dose of adrenaline hormones which increases the heart rate and blood pressure and reverses the swelling of the airways. In cases of severe anaphylactic reactions, it can slow the allergic reaction and reverse its effects long enough to allow first responders to arrive or for a person to get to the hospital to receive f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 5, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International Patient Care Press Releases Source Type: news

The Northern Lights Could Be Visible Across the Northern U.S. This Weekend. Here ’s How to See the Aurora
Parts of the northern United States from Montana to northern New England could get a glimpse of the Northern Lights over Labor Day Weekend, space weather forecasters say. The Northern Lights, or the Aurora Borealis, are a luminous and sometimes colorful display seen in the night sky. They occur when charged particles from the sun interact with gasses in Earth’s atmosphere. Typically, they are only visible in higher-latitude regions, including Alaska, Scandinavia and Iceland, and even then only in the darker winter months. But a geomagnetic storm predicted for this weekend could result in aurora sightings further sout...
Source: TIME: Science - August 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime Science Space Source Type: news

Inside the Race to Build the World ’s First Commercial Octopus Farm
For decades, my father taught biology at Middlebury College in Vermont. One of his signature courses focused on invertebrates and, as a kid, I’d often tag along on class field trips to the Maine coast. Students would fan out across the rocky shore at low tide and count as many spineless creatures as they could—which, as it turns out, was pretty easy. There were dozens of invertebrate species to be found, including snails, crabs, starfish and, of course, lobster. I didn’t lay eyes on an octopus, however, until I was about 8. My dad sporadically hosted a lunch for his class, to which he brought an assortmen...
Source: TIME: Science - August 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tik Root Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

CRISPR Gene Editing Is Being Tested in Human Patients, and the Results Could Revolutionize Health Care
It’s only been seven years since scientists first learned how to precisely and reliably splice the human genome using a tool called CRISPR, making it possible to think about snipping out disease-causing mutations and actually cure, once and for all, genetic diseases ranging from sickle cell anemia to certain types of cancer and even blindness. Doctors are plunging ahead in search of ways to use the relatively new technology to start treating patients. In China last November, scientist Jiankui He stunned—and dismayed—the genetic community when he announced he had already used CRISPR, which many believe sti...
Source: TIME: Health - August 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized crispr Genetics Source Type: news

These Fossils Preserved in Opal Are a Gorgeous, Iridescent Window Into the Past. Scientists Are Fighting to Save Them from the Black Market
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Clare Watson / Undark Tags: Uncategorized archeology syndication Source Type: news

How NASA ’s Chris Kraft Conducted the Symphony That Put Men on the Moon
Chris Kraft scared the hell out of me — in all the right ways, yes, but still. During the Apollo program, Kraft, who died at age 95 on July 22, was NASA’s director of flight operations, and later ran the Johnson Space Center in Houston. I first met him in the early 1990s, when I was writing Apollo 13, and I thought I had a pretty good idea of what to expect. I’d heard he was blunt, profane and brilliant and did not suffer fools easily. What I actually found was that he was, well, blunt, profane and brilliant and did not suffer fools easily. During the course of our conversation, he described someone he h...
Source: TIME: Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized apollo1150 onetime Space Source Type: news

From Waking Up to Planting a Flag on the Moon, Here ’s How the Apollo 11 Astronauts Spent July 20, 1969
The triumph of the astronauts, especially Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, was more than a victory for the United States, but instead a victorious moment for all mankind and no other moment will seem as big until we reach beyond the moon for other planets, other stars. The following is an excerpt from Apollo 11: An AP Special Anniversary Edition, available in paperback and e-book exclusively on Amazon.com. On the eve of history, perhaps men do not sleep well, or perhaps they are not meant to. Before they slept Saturday night, their rest period was delayed an hour-and-a-half because of a pesky communications...
Source: TIME: Science - July 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized apollo1150 Space Source Type: news

Tiny Robots Tackle Big Problems
New research papers published nearly coincidentally highlight a wide range of emerging uses for nanoscale robots in tackling some of the most vexing problems in medicine, and also might offer clues to common methods of controlling the tiny devices. One of the experiments,conducted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), explored using a microrobot to facilitate precision delivery of drugs to tumor sites. The other,conducted at the University of Pennsylvania, targets hard-to-dislodge biofilms on a wide variety of surfaces, from human teeth to catheters, water lines, and pipes. Simone Schürle, an a...
Source: MDDI - July 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Greg Goth Tags: R & D Source Type: news

With NASA ’s Orion Abort-System Test, Americans Just Took a Small (and Very Big) Step Closer to the Moon
It was a modest little rocket scheduled to make a modest little flight, and yet an awful lot of people showed up at Cape Canaveral before dawn this morning to watch it happen. They had good reason to be there. With the flight, America’s planned return to the moon by 2024 moved a small but critical step closer. Easily the most harrowing part of the next lunar flight will be the first, when astronauts climb into their Orion spacecraft at the top of a rocket 36 stories tall, sloshing with more than 5 million pounds of fuel, and ground controllers effectively set it all on fire. If things work as they should, the fire wi...
Source: TIME: Science - July 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized abort test Artemis Canaveral moon NASA Orion space Source Type: news

3 Critical Considerations for Evaluating Off-the-Shelf Software for Medical Devices
The rapid pace of technology innovation has led to the medical device sector becoming an integral part of the healthcare industry, delivering benefits such as reduced patient recovery time and lower cost of instruments. Unfortunately, the average time-to-market for a medical device still falls between 3-7 years.   In order to speed time-to-market, medical device manufacturers form strategic partnerships to leverage commercially available, off-the shelf components and software from vendors, and manufacturers augment their development teams with third-party professional services. When evaluating software vendors...
Source: MDDI - June 28, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Roger Mazzella Tags: Software & D Source Type: news

New Research Is Focusing on Treating Teens ’ Suicidal Thoughts With Support of Friends, Family
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - June 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jill U. Adams / Undark Tags: Uncategorized mental health onetime syndication Source Type: news

Death Toll Rises to 15 In Danube Tour Boat Crash
BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Hungarian police say two more bodies have been recovered from the Danube River tour boat crash, raising the death toll to 15, with 13 of the 33 South Koreans on board and the two Hungarian crew members still missing. Seven South Korean tourists were rescued after the May 29 collision between the Hableany (Mermaid) sightseeing boat and the Viking Sigyn river cruise ship. A huge floating crane may be able to lift the Hableany out of the water in the coming days. However, the Adam Clark, named after the Scottish engineer who oversaw construction of Budapest's Chain Bridge completed in 1849, was ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 6, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Cochrane's 30 under 30: Anneliese Arno
Cochrane is made up of  13,000 members and over 50,000 supporters come from more than 130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.  Many  of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - June 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Eye warning: Six foods to include in your diet or risk serious problems with your sight
EYE HEALTH is very important and can deteriorate as we get older and there are a number of conditions associated with eye health which can lead to long-term problems with sight. But what you eat can help prevent these problems developing. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seaplanes Collide in Alaska; At Least Four Dead, 10 Hurt
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A team of federal accident investigators is expected to arrive in Alaska Tuesday to try to piece together what caused a deadly midair collision between two sightseeing planes. Four people were killed after the floatplanes carrying cruise ship tourists collided Monday near the southeast Alaska town of Ketchikan, the Coast Guard said. Two others were missing, said Petty Officer Jon-Paul Rios, a Coast Guard spokesman. The Washington, D.C.-based investigative team from the National Transportation Safety Board is expected to arrive in Ketchikan Tuesday afternoon, agency spokesman Peter Knudson sai...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 14, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Will a shower of April wins help us flower in May?
With UNISON’s campaign for Go for Growth in May already underway, it’s time to look back on an April that produced more than a few illustrations of just what the UK’s biggest union can do. It began (as these things do) on the first of the month, when we celebrated 20 years of the national minimum wage – an achievement that UNISON made possible. In 1999, we were told that it would cost millions of jobs – but we know how that turned out. But we’re not resting on our laurels and UNISON is committed to campaigning for a real living wage for all. And that’s why, at a Parliamentary recep...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 30, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News 2019 Health Conference Bring them in environment agency health and safety international workers' memorial day LGPS living wage local government nhs pay OCS one wage any age pensions divestment Source Type: news

Brain Sharpens the Hearing of the Blind, Study Finds
WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 -- Researchers have long wondered why blind people seem to have a sharpened sense of hearing. Now a Seattle team has pinpointed specific brain adaptations that occur in folks without sight. " There's this idea that blind... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Building on the success of Grovember
We’re going for growth in May, following on from the success of the Grovember. That month of activity by the whole union made us not only the biggest union in the UK – but a growing one. We’re not resting on our laurels, however. If November showed that by acting together we can push our recruitment into growth, May is about applying what we learned and starting to develop a sustainable union-wide recruitment and retention plan strategy. UNISON is aiming to run two or three month-long campaigns each year where branches, regions and the centre focus on recruitment and retention and make sure our union cont...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - April 16, 2019 Category: Food Science Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: P.S data Go for growth grovember recruiting recruitment Source Type: news

Second Sight Medical releases early feasibility data on Orion cortical implant
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) today announced preliminary results from a small feasibility study of its Orion cortical implant, which is designed to give eyesight to the blind. Sylmar, Calif.-based Second Sight’s Orion is designed to connect the camera in a pair of eyeglasses with an implant that receives the camera signal and translates it to the visual cortex in the brain, bypassing the eye and the optic nerve entirely. The company’s Argus II device, which uses a retinal implant to receive the camera’s signal, is already on the U.S. market. Interim data from a five-year early feasibility study, prese...
Source: Mass Device - April 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Featured Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Source Type: news

Fast Forward: Mozambique in 10 years
Ellen Waters is the Director of Development at Doctors of the World UK. She is passionate about access to healthcare around the world and spent four years in India working for human rights organisations.   On Thursday 14th March, Cyclone Idai swept Mozambique, leaving behind it a trail of destruction and death. Organisations from all around the world mobilised in just a few hours to get help to the population hit. Rapid intervention is key to save lives, but there is an often hidden need to provide healthcare for a long time after the disaster, while reconstruction takes place. On World Health Day, I want to bri...
Source: Doctors of the World News - April 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

IntraHealth to Work with Local African Partners on the Road to Self-Reliance and HIV Epidemic Control
April 04, 2019Through the US Agency for International Development ’s (USAID’s) $38.5 million Accelerating Support to Advanced Local Partners (ASAP) project,IntraHealth International will work with sub-Saharan African countries to rapidly prepare local organizations and government entities to serve as prime partners for USAID and US President ’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programming, including by strengthening their capabilities and resources to address HIV within their populations.The three-year contract, awarded by USAID, is one of four new global projects focused on meeting PEPFAR ’s...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Africa HIV & AIDS Human Resources Management Leadership and Governance Health Workforce Systems Management and Performance Source Type: news

How a Scottish Woman Endured Burns, Broken Bones, Childbirth and Surgeries Without Ever Feeling Pain
A newly discovered genetic mutation caused a Scottish woman to endure cuts, burns, broken bones, childbirth and surgery without feeling any pain, according to a case study published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. About five years ago, Joanne Cameron, now 71, had what should have been a painful hand surgery at Scotland’s Raigmore Hospital, says Dr. Devjit Srivastava, a consultant in anesthesia and pain medicine at the hospital. “She mentioned that she does not feel pain and she did not need any anesthesia, which was not a usual day in the office for me,” Srivastava tells TIME. “I disregarded ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news

David Attenborough Isn ’t Sure We Can Save the Natural World. But at 92, He’s Not Giving Up Trying
It’s the voice you notice first. In person, David Attenborough speaks in the same awestruck hush he has used in dozens of nature documentaries, a crisp half whisper that is often mimicked but seldom matched. Ninety-two years of use may have softened its edges, but still it carries the command of authority. Sitting in his home in the Richmond neighborhood of west London for one in a series of conversations, I feel compelled to drink a second cup of tea when he offers. It somehow seems wrong to say no. In his native U.K., Attenborough is held in the kind of esteem usually reserved for royalty. Over decades–first ...
Source: TIME: Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dan Stewart Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

Sight Sciences launches Omni eye surgery study
Sight Sciences said today that it launched a clinical trial of its Omni eye surgery device in sequential, minimally invasive glaucoma procedures. Menlo Park, Calif.-based Sight Sciences said the 130-patient Gemini study is designed to evaluate the use of Omni in consecutive MIGS procedures involving transluminal viscoelastic delivery and trabeculotomy at 12 months. The single-arm trial’s primary outcomes are change in mean unmedicated diurnal intraocular pressure and change in mean number of IOP-lowering drugs. Secondary outcomes include percent of eyes with a more than 20% reduction in unmedicated diurnal IOP and pe...
Source: Mass Device - March 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Featured Optical/Ophthalmic Sight Sciences Source Type: news

Clinical Study Demonstrates Long Term IOP Reduction with the OMNI(R) Surgical System Predicate Device (TRAB(R)360) in Micro-Invasive Glaucoma Surgery
MENLO PARK, Calif., March 14, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- A new, single center retrospective study of glaucoma surgery patients published in the January 2019 issue of Clinical Ophthalmology shows that ab-interno trabeculotomy using o... Devices, Ophthalmology Sight Sciences, OMNI Surgical System, TRAB360, trabeculotomy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 14, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The journey toward the Equal Rights Amendment began decades ago, but activists say the finish line is in sight
Riding the wave that brought us the #MeToo movement, a growing field of women seeking a presidential nomination and more women in Congress than ever before, momentum for a long-sought-after milestone is rippling across the United States. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adroit Surgical Is Pleased to Announce as of Today the Following Distributor Partners Are Offering Adroit Surgical ’s New Vie Scope Product to the EMS Market
OKLAHOMA CITY, OK – Adroit Surgical is pleased to announce the following Distributor Partners now offer the full line of Adroit Surgical products to the North American EMS Market. Distributors are listed in alphabetical order: Dixie EMS E. Pickering Guardian EMS Supply J&B Medical Live Action Safety Medline Industries The EMS Stoeighre The Fire Store Kris Bordnick, Director of EMS Sales issued the following statement regarding the announcement – “We are looking forward to partnering with these premier EMS Distributors to offer Adroit Surgical’s product line to EMS Professionals throughout Nort...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 27, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Adroit Surgical (press release) Tags: Airway & Respiratory Press Releases Source Type: news

A Tortoise Species That Was Feared Extinct Was Found in the Galapagos
(LIMA) — A living member of species of tortoise not seen in more than 110 years and feared to be extinct has been found in a remote part of the Galapagos island of Fernandina. An adult female Chelonoidis phantasticus, also known as the Fernandina Giant Tortoise, was spotted Sunday by a joint expedition of the Galapagos National Park and the U.S.-based Galapagos Conservancy, Ecuador’s Environment Ministry said in a statement. Investigators think there may be more members of the species on the island because of tracks and scat they found. The team took the tortoise, likely more than 100 years old, to a breeding c...
Source: TIME: Science - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Ecuador onetime overnight Source Type: news

Edwards Set to Acquire Cas Medical Systems for $100M
Edwards Lifesciences is making a move to acquire Cas Medical Systems for about $100 million. Branford, CT-based Cas Medical specializes in the non-invasive monitoring of tissue oxygenation in the brain. Edwards said it has a pending 510(k) clearance in the U.S. for a smart cable and software module, which enables compatibility between Cas Medical’s FORE-SIGHT sensor and the HemoSphere advanced hemodynamic monitoring platform. This technology was developed as a result of a collaboration between Edwards and Cas Medical, and received a CE Mark. Cas Medical’s FORE-SIGHT could continue to boo...
Source: MDDI - February 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences to acquire Casmed for $100m
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said today that it inked a deal to acquire CAS Medical System (NSDQ:CASM) and its non-invasive brain tissue oxygenation monitoring tech for approximately $100 million. Irvine, Calif.-based Edwards said that it will pay $2.45 per share of common stock of Branford, Conn.-based Casmed in the all-cash deal. Edwards said that it currently has a pending FDA 510(k) clearance submission for a smart cable and software module that will allow for compatibility between Casmed’s Fore-sight cerebral oximeter, intended to provide non-invasive tissue oxygenation measurements, and Ed...
Source: Mass Device - February 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat CAS Medical Systems Inc. Edwards Lifesciences Source Type: news

Back to the Future: Vietnam Now and Then
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Jan 28 2019 (IPS)In 1989 I watched Back to the Future, Part II by Robert Zemickis, a complicated story about a youngster who from 1985 time travelled to 2015. Within the movie I spotted a poster from the imaginary 2015: US AIR Surf Vietnam. Back in 1989 I associated Vietnam with the war that lasted from 1955 to the fall of Saigon in 1975 and by different media was brought into the homes of millions, radicalizing and engaging youngsters, not the least me. Catching sight of the poster I associated it with a scene in Francis Ford Coppola´s masterpiece Apocalypse Now, where a gung-ho US Co...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Armed Conflicts Asia-Pacific Crime & Justice Democracy Economy & Trade Education Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Abiomed jumps on fiscal Q3 prelims, raised outlook | Wall Street Beat
Abiomed (NSDQ:ABMD) shares got a jump today from its preliminary fiscal third-quarter numbers and an improved outlook for the rest of its fiscal year. The Danvers, Mass.-based heart pump maker said it expects to post fiscal Q3 sales of roughly $200.6 million, representing a 30.3% increase over its fiscal Q3 top line. Abiomed also raised its revenues guidance for fiscal 2019, saying it now expects full-year sales of about $780 million, up from $765 million to $770 million previously. The news sent ABMD shares, which closed up 3.7% at $313.44 apiece Jan. 4, up some 2.1% to $320 even today in pre-market trading. The company s...
Source: Mass Device - January 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Featured MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat Abiomed Cardiovascular Systems Inc. CAS Medical Systems Inc. Nuvasive wrightmedical Source Type: news

What Can Pharma Expect in 2019?
For those of us that use the Gregorian calendar, this time of year is one for reflection. We look back at the year just gone and forward to the year to come and, armed with a list of best-self resolutions, we step into January full of hope and intention.Like most years, 2018 was a busy one for the pharmaceutical industry – best characterized perhaps not as a year of radical change but as 12 months of under-the-surface action. (But if you disagree,please do let me know).To this editorial team it appears that companies are starting to get to grips with some of the big trends that have swept the industry over the past f...
Source: EyeForPharma - January 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: The eyeforpharma Editorial Team Source Type: news

What Can Pharma Expect in 2019?
For those of us that use the Gregorian calendar, this time of year is one for reflection. We look back at the year just gone and forward to the year to come and, armed with a list of best-self resolutions, we step into January full of hope and intention.Like most years, 2018 was a busy one for the pharmaceutical industry – best characterized perhaps not as a year of radical change but as 12 months of under-the-surface action. (But if you disagree,please do let me know).To this editorial team it appears that companies are starting to get to grips with some of the big trends that have swept the industry over the past f...
Source: EyeForPharma - January 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: The eyeforpharma Editorial Team Source Type: news