‘It’s Unimaginably Bad.’ How Government Failures and the New COVID-19 Variant Are Pushing the U.K.’s Health System Into Crisis
Dr Rachel Clarke never dreamed that in her medical career, she would say out loud that hospitals in Britain are running out of oxygen. Yet some hospitals in the U.K. are now in that critical situation, as doctors say the U.K.’s third wave of the coronavirus pandemic is pushing the country’s National Health Service to its limits. “We’re seeing younger patients, we’re seeing sicker patients, and we’ve never really recovered from the first wave,” says Clarke, who works on an acute medical ward in a hospital in Oxfordshire, England, and also in an in-patient hospice setting. “You...
Source: TIME: Health - January 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ciara Nugent and Suyin Haynes Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Second click United Kingdom Source Type: news

2021: Year of Living Dangerously?
By Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 5 2021 (IPS) Goodbye 2020, but unfortunately, not good riddance, as we all have to live with its legacy. It has been a disastrous year for much of the world for various reasons, Elizabeth II’s annus horribilis. The crisis has exposed previously unacknowledged realities, including frailties and vulnerabilities. Jomo Kwame SundaramFor many countries, the tragedy is all the greater as some leaders had set national aspirations for 2020, suggested by the number’s association with perfect vision. But their failures are no reason to reject national projects. As Helen ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Financial Crisis Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Refugee radicalization/militarization in the age of the European refugee crisis: a composite model - Eleftheriadou M.
This article constitutes an effort to examine the prospect of long-term refugee radicalization, beyond the dominant "short-sighted" debate on the possibility of radical Islamist militants posing as refugees. The main argument of the article is that refugee... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Why Do We Dream? A New Theory on How It Protects Our Brains
When he was two years old, Ben stopped seeing out of his left eye. His mother took him to the doctor and soon discovered he had retinal cancer in both eyes. After chemotherapy and radiation failed, surgeons removed both his eyes. For Ben, vision was gone forever. But by the time he was seven years old, he had devised a technique for decoding the world around him: he clicked with his mouth and listened for the returning echoes. This method enabled Ben to determine the locations of open doorways, people, parked cars, garbage cans, and so on. He was echolocating: bouncing his sound waves off objects in the environment and cat...
Source: TIME: Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Eagleman and Don Vaughn Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Roche ’s faricimab meets primary endpoint and shows strong durability across two global phase III studies for diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of blindness
Basel, 21 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from two identically designed global phase III studies, YOSEMITE and RHINE, evaluating its investigational bispecific antibody, faricimab, in people living with diabetic macular edema (DME). Both studies met their primary endpoint and showed that faricimab given every eight weeks and at personalised dosing intervals of up to 16 weeks demonstrated non-inferior visual acuity gains compared to aflibercept given every eight weeks. Faricimab was generally well-tolerated, with no new safety signals identified. The studies each h...
Source: Roche Media News - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s faricimab meets primary endpoint and shows strong durability across two global phase III studies for diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of blindness
Basel, 21 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from two identically designed global phase III studies, YOSEMITE and RHINE, evaluating its investigational bispecific antibody, faricimab, in people living with diabetic macular edema (DME). Both studies met their primary endpoint and showed that faricimab given every eight weeks and at personalised dosing intervals of up to 16 weeks demonstrated non-inferior visual acuity gains compared to aflibercept given every eight weeks. Faricimab was generally well-tolerated, with no new safety signals identified. The studies each h...
Source: Roche Investor Update - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

1 in 5 Prisoners in the U.S. Has Had COVID-19, 1,700 Have Died
BETH SCHWARTZAPFEL and KATIE PARK of The Marshall Project and ANDREW DEMILLO of The Associated Press LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times higher than the general population. In some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected, according to data collected by The Associated Press and The Marshall Project. As the pandemic enters its 10th month — and as the first Americans begin to receive a long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine — at least 275,000 prisoners have been infected, m...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

1 in 5 Prisoners in the U.S. Has Had COVID-19, 1,700 Have Died
BETH SCHWARTZAPFEL and KATIE PARK of The Marshall Project and ANDREW DEMILLO of The Associated Press LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times higher than the general population. In some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected, according to data collected by The Associated Press and The Marshall Project. As the pandemic enters its 10th month — and as the first Americans begin to receive a long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine — at least 275,000 prisoners have been infected, m...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

1 in 5 Prisoners in the U.S. Has Had COVID-19, 1,700 Have Died
BETH SCHWARTZAPFEL and KATIE PARK of The Marshall Project and ANDREW DEMILLO of The Associated Press LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times higher than the general population. In some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected, according to data collected by The Associated Press and The Marshall Project. As the pandemic enters its 10th month — and as the first Americans begin to receive a long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine — at least 275,000 prisoners have been infected, m...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

1 in 5 Prisoners in the U.S. Has Had COVID-19, 1,700 Have Died
BETH SCHWARTZAPFEL and KATIE PARK of The Marshall Project and ANDREW DEMILLO of The Associated Press LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times higher than the general population. In some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected, according to data collected by The Associated Press and The Marshall Project. As the pandemic enters its 10th month — and as the first Americans begin to receive a long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine — at least 275,000 prisoners have been infected, m...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

1 in 5 Prisoners in the U.S. Has Had COVID-19, 1,700 Have Died
BETH SCHWARTZAPFEL and KATIE PARK of The Marshall Project and ANDREW DEMILLO of The Associated Press LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times higher than the general population. In some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected, according to data collected by The Associated Press and The Marshall Project. As the pandemic enters its 10th month — and as the first Americans begin to receive a long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine — at least 275,000 prisoners have been infected, m...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

1 in 5 Prisoners in the U.S. Has Had COVID-19, 1,700 Have Died
BETH SCHWARTZAPFEL and KATIE PARK of The Marshall Project and ANDREW DEMILLO of The Associated Press LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times higher than the general population. In some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected, according to data collected by The Associated Press and The Marshall Project. As the pandemic enters its 10th month — and as the first Americans begin to receive a long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine — at least 275,000 prisoners have been infected, m...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Janssen Acquires Rights to Novel Gene Therapy, Pioneering Treatment Solutions for Late-Stage Age-Related Macular Degeneration
RARITAN, NJ, December 2, 2020 – Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, today announced the acquisition of rights to Hemera Biosciences, LLC’s investigational gene therapy HMR59, administered as a one-time, outpatient, intravitreal injection to help preserve vision in patients with geographic atrophy, a late-stage and severe form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Financial terms of the transaction with Hemera Biosciences, a privately-owned biotechnology company, are not being disclosed. Patients with AMD often have low levels of CD59, a prote...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - December 2, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Healthcare Workers and Elderly Care Home Residents Will Get First Doses of COVID-19 Vaccine, CDC Panel Says
Frontline healthcare workers and elderly residents of long-term care facilities will receive the very first COVID-19 vaccinations, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advisory board recommended Tuesday. These groups will make up Phase 1A of U.S. vaccine recipients who will receive the first 40 million or so doses that could be available by the end of the year. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently reviewing two vaccines, from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, for emergency use authorization. According to the CDC, there are about 21 million healthcare workers, including people who work in hospitals...
Source: TIME: Health - December 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News overnight Source Type: news

Reality check: public sector pay freeze
Let’s unpack some of the chancellor’s statements and see how they stack up when they’re checked and given a bit more context. ‘Pay has been rising faster in the public sector than the private sector’ Pay rises have been higher on average in the public sector over the last year. However, they have been lower than the increases in the private sector for much of the last ten years.  Averages can be misleading – which was obviously the chancellor’s intention.  A recent Office for National Statistics (ONS) study that compared jobs on a like-for-like basis found tha...
Source: UNISON Health care news - December 1, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: Janey Starling Tags: Article budget chancellor spending review Source Type: news

Spending Review 2020: priorities for the NHS, social care and the nation's health, The Health Foundation
This analysis highlights the scale of funding increases needed to meet the demands of Covid-19, make the improvements to services laid out in the NHS long-term plan, fix social care and secure the nation's health for the long term. It warns that the government risks losing sight of the action needed now to shore up the future of health and care post Covid. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Spending Review 2020: priorities for the NHS, social care and the nation's health, The Health Foundation
This analysis highlights the scale of funding increases needed to meet the demands of Covid-19, make the improvements to services laid out in the NHS long-term plan, fix social care and secure the nation's health for the long term. It warns that the government risks losing sight of the action needed now to shore up the future of health and care post-Covid. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ We Want To Be Safe ’ : Winthrop ’ s COVID Testing Sites Host To Long Lines Before Thanksgiving
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Coronavirus Testing Winthrop News Source Type: news

UK coronavirus live: 11 areas in Scotland to move to toughest rules; 600,000 pupils off school last week
Latest updates: Sturgeon also bans non-essential travel to other parts of the UK; schools sufferingincreased disruption;PM tests negative for CovidNear-lockdown curbs imposed on west of ScotlandCovid tier system for England under review, says ministerOne in four children absent from school in Hull as cases soarDevolution ‘a disaster north of the border’, says Boris JohnsonCoronavirus – latest global updates5.03pmGMTRelated:Coronavirus live news: Italy reports highest death toll since 3 April; Iran registers new case record4.56pmGMTFrom Times Radio ’sTom Newton DunnIs a Brexit trade deal imminent? Bi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Sparrow Tags: Scottish politics Coronavirus UK news Scotland Boris Johnson Nicola Sturgeon Science Conservatives Devolution Scottish independence Labour Jeremy Corbyn Office for National Statistics Education Schools Brexit Source Type: news

Damien Harris Was Worth The Wait And Other Leftover Patriots Thoughts
By Michael Hurley, CBS Boston BOSTON (CBS) — When the Patriots drafted Damien Harris in the third round, lots of people in New England were excited to see what the running back could do in the NFL. After one of the most productive careers in Alabama history, the expectations were high. Unfortunately for those folks, that opportunity never really came. Buried on the depth chart behind Sony Michel, Rex Burkhead, and James White, Harris barely saw the field as a rookie. He ultimately got four carries for 12 yards in what essentially served as a redshirt season. Now a year later, though, an injury to Michel opened t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: Featured NFL Patriots Sports Syndicated Sports Baltimore Ravens Cam Newton damien harris kyle dugger Leftover Patriots Thoughts Michael Hurley New England Patriots Sports News Source Type: news

Collateral beauty
Last weekend I watched the film Collateral Beauty with my husband Steve, aside from being awed by the concept of the film and it’s core message it really got me thinking about what we’ve witnessed this past 10 months. The film focuses around three abstractions, Love, Time, and Death. As the central character, Howard, explains right at the beginning of the film, we long for love, we wish we had more time and we fear death. I realised that since the beginning of 2020 I’ve been increasingly living in a world that focused on me and mine and I had forgotten about the world I had previously inhabited which was ...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - November 7, 2020 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Happiness beauty compassion Source Type: news

The collateral beauty of 2020
Last weekend I watched the film Collateral Beauty with my husband Steve, aside from being awed by the concept of the film and it’s core message it really got me thinking about what we’ve witnessed this past 10 months. The film focuses around three abstractions, Love, Time, and Death. As the central character, Howard, explains right at the beginning of the film, we long for love, we wish we had more time and we fear death. I realised that since the beginning of 2020 I’ve been increasingly living in a world that focused on me and mine and I had forgotten about the world I had previously inhabited which was ...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - November 7, 2020 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Happiness beauty compassion Source Type: news

Out of sight who cares? A review of restraint, seclusion and segregation for autistic people, and people with a learning disability and/or mental health condition
This report tells the story of restrictive practices from the perspective of people who have experienced it first-hand and looks at how long-term segregation was used. The review finds that the environment of mental health hospitals was often not therapeutic. It also finds that some people were admitted without proper assessment and did not have an assessment of their needs while in hospital, resulting in the lack of a clear care and treatment plan. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Out of sight, out of mind: the continuing impact of Covid-19 on people living with kidney disease, Kidney Care UK
This report (compiled using 860 responses from an online survey open from 28 August to 21 September 2020) finds that the majority of kidney patients have been expected to return to work once shielding ended and the furlough scheme ends. Nearly two-thirds of respondents (63 per cent) said they were concerned for their safety but had to return regardless. Almost one in five (19 per cent) said that their employer has been'very unhelpful'or'unhelpful'in their return. The report states that the government needs to take immediate and long-term action to protect the wellbeing of around 70,000 vulnerable kidney patients. (Source: ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Swedish COVID-19 Response Is a Disaster. It Shouldn ’t Be a Model for the Rest of the World
The Swedish COVID-19 experiment of not implementing early and strong measures to safeguard the population has been hotly debated around the world, but at this point we can predict it is almost certain to result in a net failure in terms of death and suffering. As of Oct. 13, Sweden’s per capita death rate is 58.4 per 100,000 people, according to Johns Hopkins University data, 12th highest in the world (not including tiny Andorra and San Marino). But perhaps more striking are the findings of a study published Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which pointed out that, of the countries the resea...
Source: TIME: Health - October 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bjorklund and Andrew Ewing Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Central Sahel – Shaping peace together with women and young people Statement for International Peace Day
By Mabingue Ngom and Shoko ArakakiNEW YORK, Sep 21 2020 (IPS) The countries of Central Sahel—Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger—face an unprecedented crisis, marked by violent extremism, forced displacement, and rising insecurity. The sharp increase in armed attacks on communities, health centres, schools and other public institutions and infrastructure has disrupted livelihoods and access to social services. The impact on affected people is devastating. As the international community responds to the crisis, we must meet immediate needs, and invest in long-term development. We must also work on shaping peace togeth...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Mabingue Ngom and Shoko Arakaki Tags: Africa Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Gender Gender Violence Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Peace Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

‘How Am I Going To Make It?’ Months of Eviction Uncertainty Are Taking a Toll on Millions of Families
Nine months into the COVID-19 pandemic, Marlenis Zambrano is out of money. A 48-year-old single mother in Virginia, she tried her best to get by after being furloughed from her Defense Department daycare job in March by selling homemade face masks and empanadas to help support her two dependent children, both in college. She twice applied for housing relief from Arlington County, but was denied because, at the time, she had $5,000 in savings intended for her daughter’s tuition. With that money long gone, Zambrano is living off her credit card, racking up $5,000 in charges to pay for her Arlington, Virginia apartment....
Source: TIME: Health - September 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

CERENOVUS Launches New Suite of Technologies to Advance Stroke Treatment
IRVINE, CA – September 9, 2020 – CERENOVUS, part of Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies* today announced that it has launched CERENOVUS Stroke Solutions™, which includes a suite of three devices designed to aid physicians in clot removal procedures. The announcement was made during the virtual European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT).Strokes are the second leading cause of death globally, and account for an estimated 140,000 deaths in the United States each year.[i],[ii] Over half of stroke survivors become chronically disabled placing an estimated $34 billion econo...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - September 9, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Inside the Dangerous Mission to Understand What Makes Extremists Tick —and How to Change Their Minds
On a cool winter’s day in early 2014, the American academic Nafees Hamid was invited for tea at the second-story at the Barcelona apartment of a young Moroccan man. It started well enough; they sat down at the kitchen table, chatting amiably in French while two acquaintances of the host sat nearby in the living room. Halfway through the conversation, though, things took a turn. “He started saying things like, ‘Why should we trust any Westerner?’” Hamid recalls. “‘Why would we not kill every one of them? Why should I even trust you—you are an American—sitting here? Why s...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emily Feldman and Malia Politzer Tags: Uncategorized extremism feature Londontime Source Type: news

Online Therapy, Booming During the Coronavirus Pandemic, May Be Here to Stay
Mental health flows from the ceramic jug psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb keeps on her desk. There’s nothing special about the jug—a minor accessory in an office designed with the sort of tidy impersonality common to her field. And there’s no special elixir in it—just water. But all the same, the jug provides a certain kind of healing. When patients are struggling, crying, overcome in some way, Gottlieb, a Los Angeles based practitioner and author of the book Maybe You Should Talk to someone, will offer up a cup of water, pour it for them and hand it across. In that small gesture is a whole constellati...
Source: TIME: Health - August 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Paying for cell and gene therapy - Is the future already here?
The ascent of cell and gene therapies over the past few years has been astonishing. And their rise looks unstoppable: By 2025, the FDA expects it will be reviewing 10 to 20 of these transformative drugs per year.    But as we listen to affordability concerns from payers, providers and patients, we ’ve also had to ask, perhaps a bit provocatively, how we can afford to pay for this boom in future cures?  " Without solutions to help payers manage the cost, some of our members may make the choice to exclude coverage " , stated insurer CVS Health earlier in the year in its position paper on ...
Source: EyeForPharma - August 25, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ulrich Neumann Source Type: news

Paying for cell and gene therapy - Is the future already here?
The ascent of cell and gene therapies over the past few years has been astonishing. And their rise looks unstoppable: By 2025, the FDA expects it will be reviewing 10 to 20 of these transformative drugs per year.    But as we listen to affordability concerns from payers, providers and patients, we ’ve also had to ask, perhaps a bit provocatively, how we can afford to pay for this boom in future cures?  " Without solutions to help payers manage the cost, some of our members may make the choice to exclude coverage " , stated insurer CVS Health earlier in the year in its position paper on ...
Source: EyeForPharma - August 25, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ulrich Neumann Source Type: news

Local Economies Have Been Decimated by the Coronavirus —But This Is Just a Preview of What Climate Change Could Do
This summer has been a cruel one in the American Sunbelt. In our hospitals, pain, fear and death abound because of COVID-19. Outside, a mass of restive, unemployed workers face down deadly heat waves, swiftly rising sea levels and the peak of hurricane season. But even if the viral hardship feels wanton, it doesn’t have to be without purpose. In South Florida, Phoenix and the Rio Grande Valley – all of which have battled surging COVID cases – citizens are being offered a vision of their climate-changed future through the pathogen’s devastation. Which means we have a chance to adapt now and avoid the...
Source: TIME: Science - August 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mario Alejandro Ariza Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news

Future of Education Is Here
Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot WaitBy Yasmine SherifNEW YORK, Aug 19 2020 (IPS) There are moments when the world has no choice but to come together. Those moments become historic turning points. This is one of them. We are now faced with the greatest education emergency of our time. Over one billion children are out of school. The COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented crisis of such magnitude and depth that the next generation might neither have the capacity and tools, nor the will, to rebuild – let alone build back better. Yasmine Sherif The world has not planned well for the future. At its w...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Yasmine Sherif Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity TerraViva United Nations Education Cannot Wait (ECW) Source Type: news

No End in Sight as U.S. Cases Pass 5 Million
The U.S. logged 5 million confirmed COVID-19 cases today, hitting another grim milestone in the nearly 6-month long pandemic that has devastated the country. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The New Poor Post-pandemic: Time for Cushioning the Most Vulnerable in Southeast Asia
Credit: Unsplash / Lynda Hinton By Kaveh Zahedi and Van NguyenBANGKOK, Thailand, Aug 4 2020 (IPS) After decades of impressive growth, for the first time, Southeast Asia is experiencing a drop in measured human development. The economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic will likely take months to reveal itself and years to put right. Yet, a legacy of mobilizing under constraints is leading Southeast Asia’s pandemic response. During the first two months of COVID-19 lockdown, the once bustling streets of Bangkok were unusually quiet. In the alley nested between two high-end shopping malls in downtown Bangkok, an elder...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kaveh Zahedi and Van Nguyen Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Financial Crisis Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Mysterious cloud over volcano Arsia Mons in Mars reappears 2 years after previous sighting
(Natural News) The spacecraft Mars Express from the European Space Agency (ESA) captured images on July 17 and 19 that show a mysterious cloud about 1,110 miles long hovering over the volcano Arsia Mons in Mars. Scientists said that it previously appeared in the same spot in 2018, as well as at least three more occasions... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Froedtert Hospital's Eric Conley hits community health head-on
Froedtert Hospital's new president Eric Conley never lost sight of the central role of health care systems serving all segments of their communities and addressing long-running health challenges. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 31, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rich Kirchen Source Type: news

Here ’s What the Science Actually Says About Kids and COVID-19
Benjamin Knorr, a 40-year-old single father in Janesville, Wisc., says there’s about a 50-50 chance he’ll send his two teenage sons back to school this fall. His 13-year-old, Aiden, would especially like to get back to his friends, sports, and regular life. But Knorr, an independent contractor, has asthma, and fears that his health and finances would be imperiled if one of his boys brought COVID-19 home from school. “If the numbers go up in Dane County and Rock County, where I work and live, it’s over. We’re just doing the online school,” Knorr says. “We already got through two mon...
Source: TIME: Health - July 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Webinars: Engaging at scale now and tomorrow
Almost overnight, webinars have become a key resource for pharma during the COVID-19 pandemic.  In May for example, Reuters Events Pharma witnessed the biggest virtual audience of any of its online events, when 3000 attendees joined the webinar on “The new normal of HCP engagement.”    It was just one demonstration of the powerful reach webinars can have. In March webinar use soared across multiple industries – a huge increase in frequency from the same time last year when audiences typically avoided Mondays and Fridays for online events.  The benefits of webinars A chief advan...
Source: EyeForPharma - July 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Nicola Davies Source Type: news

London hospital starts virtual ward rounds for medical students
Imperial College doctors with AR glasses examine patients as trainees watch remotelyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA flock of students stumbling after a consultant on a ward round has long been a familiar sight in hospitals. Perhaps not for much longer though – a university has pioneered the use of augmented reality to allow students to take part from home.Imperial College has conducted what it said is the world ’s first virtual ward round for medical students, which means an entire class of 350 students can watch a consultant examining patients rather than the three or four w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: James Tapper Tags: NHS Augmented reality Hospitals Coronavirus outbreak UK news London Microsoft Health Science Technology Medicine Source Type: news

COVID-19 has Further Marginalised Persons with Disabilities
Containment measures, such as physical distancing and self-isolation, may be impossible for those who rely on the support of others to eat, dress, and bathe. Credit: Bigstock By Srilakshmi BellamkondaHYDERABAD, India, Jun 16 2020 (IPS) Since the beginning of the year, more than 200 nations across the globe have been affected by COVID-19. Many are still reeling under the devastating effects of the pandemic, with both public health and the global economy having taken a major blow. Emerging markets seem to be especially vulnerable, given that their healthcare facilities tend to be ill-equipped to tackle a pandemic of this nat...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Srilakshmi Bellamkonda Tags: Asia-Pacific Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news