What Is ‘Tragic Optimism’ and Can It Help Us Make Sense Of This Moment?
Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up to get a new edition every Saturday. After another week of searing headlines about just about everything—global climate issues, the unfurling tragedies in Afghanistan, in Louisiana and parts south, the pandemic—all of it left me sleepless and sad and cynical. The latter is the most corrosive emotion I can think of right now, and when I’m not that ditch, it’s getting harder to imagine what our future looks like as the sands continue to sink and shift beneath our ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized It's Not Just You Source Type: news

U.S. Civil Engineers Bent the Rules to Give New Orleans Extra Protection from Hurricanes. Those Adjustments Might Have Saved the City During Ida
In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans in late August 2005, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was tasked with building a new flood-defense network. Congress allocated billions of dollars to build pumps, dikes and floodwalls for a system meant to withstand a so-called “100-year storm.” That’s typical. In building flood protection, engineers can’t guarantee their designs can survive every possible weather event. Instead, they often build to a standard based on the 100-year storm, an extreme weather event with a 1% probability of occurring in any given year, calculated statisticall...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

‘ COVICANE ’ – How One Caribbean Country is Coping with the Hurricane Season during COVID-19
Dominican Farmer and Vendor Ayma Louis has COVID restrictions and the hurrricane season to contend with. Credit: Alison Kentish (IPS)By Alison KentishDOMINICA, Aug 31 2021 (IPS) Around 2:00 pm on August 18, 89-year-old farmer Whitnel Louis and his wife Ayma began packing up their unsold produce, hoping to leave the capital of Roseau and get home way ahead of the 6 pm curfew recently put in place to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Their pickup was among dozens that lined the Dame Mary Eugenia Charles Boulevard, known by locals simply as ‘the Bayfront,’ a wide street near the ocean with a cruise ship berth, sea d...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Alison Kentish Tags: Climate Change COVID-19 Development & Aid Environment Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations COVID-19 vaccines Source Type: news

Diabetes in Pregnancy Tied to Eye Issues in Kids
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18, 2021 -- Children whose mothers had diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk for severe forms of common eye problems such as far- and near-sightedness and astigmatism, a long-term study suggests. Collectively, they ' re known... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 18, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Tropical Storm Grace forms with Florida in sights next week
Tropical Storm Grace formed Saturday morning with a long-range forecast that threatens Florida by mid-week. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ECW Interviews the Honourable Awut Deng Acuil, Minister of General Education and Instruction for South Sudan
By External SourceAug 6 2021 (IPS-Partners) Awut Deng Acuil is the first female Minister of Education for South Sudan, and only the second person to serve as Minister of Education for her country – which became independent country in 2011. Prior to this role, Minister Acuil was the first woman to serve as the country’s Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. Recently, Minister Acuil made history as the first women to lead a South Sudan university when she was appointed head of council at the University of Bahr El-Ghazal. Since 2005, Minister Acuil has served as Presidential Advisor on Gender and Hum...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: COVID-19 Education Education Cannot Wait. Future of Education is here Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Education Cannot Wait (ECW) Source Type: news

‘The Ripple Effect Is a Major Concern.’ Chicagoans Worry About the Aftermath of Lollapalooza as the Delta Variant Surges
When music fan Noah Zelinsky bought tickets to the Chicago music festival Lollapalooza in May, he thought it might signal something of a return to normalcy after more than a year of isolation. “There’s so much pent up excitement, being the first major thing back,” he says. But a lot can change in two months. “Now, there’s a lot of fear countering that.” This weekend, thousands of Lollapalooza attendees swept into Grant Park in the midst of a spike in the highly contagious Delta variant of the coronavirus. Leading up to the festival, Chicago’s COVID-19 daily case rate was quintuple ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew R. Chow Tags: Uncategorized culturepod feature Music Source Type: news

FDA accepts application for Roche ’s faricimab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME)
Basel, 29 July 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company ’s Biologics License Application (BLA), under Priority Review, for faricimab for the treatment of neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME). The FDA has also accepted the company’s submission for diabetic retinopathy.Faricimab will be the first and only bispecific antibody designed for the eye, if approved. It targets two distinct pathways – via angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) ...
Source: Roche Media News - July 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA accepts application for Roche ’s faricimab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME)
Basel, 29 July 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company ’s Biologics License Application (BLA), under Priority Review, for faricimab for the treatment of neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME). The FDA has also accepted the company’s submission for diabetic retinopathy.Faricimab will be the first and only bispecific antibody designed for the eye, if approved. It targets two distinct pathways – via angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - July 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New device could help visually impaired avoid obstacles, research suggests
Chest-mounted video camera and vibrating wristbands developed by US team reduce collisions by 37% in small studyVibrating wristbands could help visually impaired people to avoid collisions when out and about, a study indicates.According to the NHS, about 360,000 people in the UK alone are registered as blind or partially sighted, with long canes and guide dogs among the methods used to help individuals avoid obstacles.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Blindness and visual impairment Disability Technology Science Source Type: news

Jeff Bezos Blasts Himself Off-Planet, Helping to Usher In a New Era of Space Tourism
Give Jeff Bezos this: When he builds a rocket, he rides the rocket, strapping his own mortal hide into a seat and test-flying what he’s developed before inviting paying passengers aboard to make the same journey. “If it’s not safe for me, it’s not safe for anyone,” Bezos said in a video segment released by Blue Origin, his private rocket company, before Tuesday morning’s first crewed launch of its New Shepard rocket on a suborbital lob shot that soared to an altitude of 106 km (66 mi.). Today, the rocket—which had previously flown 15 uncrewed missions to suborbital space—inde...
Source: TIME: Science - July 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

European Duplicity Undermines Anti-Pandemic Efforts
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Jul 20 2021 (IPS) Despite facing the world’s worst pandemic of the last century, rich countries in the World Trade Organization (WTO) have blocked efforts to enable more affordable access to the means to fight the pandemic. Everyone knows access for all to the means for testing, treatment and prevention – including diagnostic tests, therapeutic medicines, personal protective equipment and vaccines – is crucial. Anis ChowdhuryEuropean deceit In October 2020, South Africa and India requested the WTO to temporarily suspend relevant provisions of its Agre...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Aid Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions
In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of sp...
Source: TIME: Health - July 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Duggan Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions
In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of sp...
Source: TIME: Science - July 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jennifer Duggan Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

Considerations About Deciding to Send a Child to School
Discussion For parents there can be a lot of pressure to “get it right” when deciding to send their child to school. Positive adult life outcomes such as employment, physical and mental health, and prosocial relationships are associated with higher educational attainment. Higher educational attainment such as finishing high school and potentially an advanced degree is associated with positive school experiences and domain specific skill attainment (e.g. reading, writing, math skills) and is also associated with readiness to begin school. Therefore if a child is “not ready” to start school, then the ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 12, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news