My Neverending iPhone 7+ Fiasco
If you've already read the beginning of this, you can scroll down to the Addendum added on 1/17/17.Please note that while this is usually a psychiatry blog, today I am using it to vent for my own personal psychotherapy.  Please feel free to offer words of support, to make helpful interpretations to improve my insight, or if you know CBT techniques that may help me, I'm open to that.  Is there a 12 step group for iPhone users?  Medications to treat Post Traumatic iPhone Seven Disorder? --------------------Dear Mr. Jobs,I know you've died and left the job and I should leave you to your death in peace, but...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Why Feeling Like Shit Is Your Best Path To Happiness
Want to find your path to happiness? Then read this very cool guest post from Therese Sibon. Your day starts in hell. The train door slams in your face and moves on without you. You miss your interview. You’re stuck in traffic and a fender bender plummets you into an insurance nightmare. Your start-up has wound down. Your day starts in hell, enters a dimension of damnation and spirals out of control. It sucks. Totally. The culture-at-large counsels you to Think Positive! Be Grateful for All You Have! A Smile Changes All – Science has Double-blind Proof!! While part of you wants to bypass the misery and jum...
Source: A Daring Adventure - November 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tim Brownson Tags: Guest Posts Source Type: blogs

Are Public –Private Partnerships The Future Of Serving Veterans?
Despite hearing far too often only about the problems our veterans face, the majority of transitioning veterans return home safely—free of mental health problems—and quickly reintegrate into the communities where they will continue to serve. Unfortunately, when the media and conventional wisdom propagate the false notion that veterans as a group are broken, it contributes to the stigma many veterans feel about getting help and often prevents them from seeking care when they do need it. But when veterans do need health care—whether it’s for a physical or a behavioral health issue—they and their...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 10, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Derek Coy Tags: Featured GrantWatch Hospitals Organization and Delivery Quality Source Type: blogs

Caring for those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Are you taking care of someone who seems to be against you? This can be the experience of taking care of a family member with post-traumatic stress disorder — PTSD — and it can take a huge toll on everyone involved. At the same time, caring for a person with PTSD can be an act of love and courage. What causes PTSD? PTSD can develop when people experience massively stressful events that involve childhood physical or sexual abuse, being sexually assaulted, or narrowly escaping getting killed or severely injured, whether from accidents or violence or military combat. PTSD can also be caused by witnessing these kin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Cartreine, PhD Tags: Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Caregiving Mental Health Source Type: blogs

MOC Exam Topic: More on Aquaporin-4
My last post elicited two important comments on aquaporin-4. Since not all readers necessarily look at the comments, I am publishing them as a separate post here: Maria said...Worth mentioning that [aquaporin-4] is the most well known target in Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorders, since about 80% of patients with this syndrome will have circulating anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies. The IHC is useful when considering active NMOSD on a biopsy specimen by showing loss of staining (Neurology. 2015 Jan 13;84(2):148-58)Agent86 said...And one can only get so far without mentioning the glymphatic pathwa...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: autoimmune MOC trauma Source Type: blogs

Grief = Anxiety?
After writing my post yesterday, even though I did not want to feel any grief or really anything, it did get me to thinking about the grieving process of losing someone to suicide.I started wondering if my anxiety went from bad to unbearable about the same time I found out about his death, or even if it had gotten worse at all. I asked my husband about it. He did say definitely it had gotten a lot worse, and the timeline sounded right - it was about the same time my anxiety increased. He said he thought that I had been upset that because I had told him I found out that my friend and I had exactly the same me...
Source: bipolar.and.me - November 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trumping the Evidence - The Donald Denies Asbestos Related Disease, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy but Asserted Vaccines Cause Autism
One of the main causes of health care dysfunction identified by demoralized health care professionals in our 2003 qualitative study was threats to evidence-based medicine, and by extension, evidence-based public health and health policy.(1) Since then, we have frequently discussed threats such asmanipulation andsuppression of clinical research to further vested interests, and distortion of research dissemination, such asghost written articles, often enabled byindividual andinstitutional conflicts of interest.These and other causes of health care dysfunction which we discuss, however, have hardly been the stuff of political...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 2, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: asbestos Donald Trump evidence-based medicine health policy public health Source Type: blogs

Awesome Mental Health Resources You Probably Didn ’ t Know About
We come across a lot of announcements for this new thing or that, and most of it is garbage. We do, however, like to promote ideas that we feel offer a valuable community service to both mental health consumers and professionals alike. I’ve discovered two awesome mental health resources you probably didn’t know about, both of which are absolutely free. Whether you like mental health and psychology apps, or psychology and mental books, one of these services can have the potential to change your life. Free Psychotherapy e-Books Who doesn’t like a free book? Sure, it’s an e-book rather than a physical...
Source: World of Psychology - September 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Books General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Technology free download Free E Books help with apps mental health apps mental health e-books psyberguide review of mental health Source Type: blogs

Six Pharma Innovations Marketers Should Be Aware Of
It seems that since the start of this Century, technology has advanced faster than the speed of light. In this fast paced world of technology, healthcare innovations seem to be taking the lead. There is no telling where the next ten years will lead to but one thing is for sure, a lot of change is coming. Businesses and governments around the world are working to bring new healthcare innovations into the world in a quick and efficient manner. These disruptive technological innovations will not only decrease healthcare cost but they will also improve the quality of healthcare delivery. These advancements will have a huge imp...
Source: ePharma Summit - September 29, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: 3d printing artificial intelligence Digital Health eHealth ehealth apps ePharma med tech medical marketing mhealth mhealth sensors nanotechnology Pharma Innovation precision medicine virtual reality Source Type: blogs

What Tig Notaro ’ s New Show Gets Right about Child Sexual Abuse
In the new Amazon series One Mississippi, loosely based on the life of comedian Tig Notaro, she finds herself living back home in Mississippi following the sudden death of her mother. Staying in her childhood home with her stepfather, Bill, and her adult brother, Remy, Tig isn’t just facing the grief of losing her mother, she’s recovering from breast cancer, which resulted in a double mastectomy, and suffering from a C. diff infection. She’s also dealing with the ghosts of her past. Tig — as she’s also called on the show — was molested by her grandfather throughout her childhood. Althoug...
Source: World of Psychology - September 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Celebrities Family Grief and Loss PTSD Trauma abuse brene brown Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Childhood Trauma Complex post-traumatic stress disorder Denial Empathy Molestation Psychological Trauma Rape Shame Tig Notaro Source Type: blogs

Grief is Not Self-Pity: Joan Didion ’s The Year of Magical Thinking
by Vivian Lam“Life changes fast.Life changes in the instant.You sit down to dinner and life as you know it ends. The question of self-pity. ”When does grief become “self-pity”? What is the “proper” way to grieve?Joan Didion begins writing what would becomeThe Year of Magical Thinking a few days after her husband, John Dunne, dies from a heart attack. Coupled with the mounting health crises of her daughter, Quintana, Didion ’s world is thrown out of joint. In the ongoing aftermath of these tragedies, Didion, acclaimed novelist and literary journalist, copes by doing what she ha...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - September 28, 2016 Category: Palliative Care Tags: book Didion grief lam magical media review Source Type: blogs

The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own
It doesn’t take an encounter with a bear or a threatening gun to trigger symptoms of the fight or flight response. I experienced similar phenomena when undergoing a consultation with a surgeon for an elective, life-altering surgery. Her bedside manner exuded a cold, indifferent and detached attitude. With barely a glance at me, she entered the consulting room and settled into her chair. A few perfunctory questions and she did her due diligence by rattling off the risks involved with a robotic monotone that had been programmed into her. A few hasty and superficial parting words and the meeting ended abruptly. I und...
Source: World of Psychology - September 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Libby Simon Tags: Brain and Behavior General Health-related Motivation and Inspiration Personal Psychology Treatment fight or flight Physicians surgery Source Type: blogs

Breaking Up with My PTSD: The Reality of Recovering from Haunting Trauma
My almost life-long companion and I are actually breaking up. I should be more specific. What I’m breaking up with is more exactly known as C-PTSD, a form of PTSD. I think we’re in the final stages of our separation. It’s been a long and drawn-out breakup because that’s how it goes with C-PTSD. Once you get to know it well, you practice breaking up with it every day. Some days require more sorting out and negotiation than others. It’s been around a long time for me. My children have all become very familiar with it even though they didn’t know what they’re really seeing. Most peopl...
Source: World of Psychology - September 22, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Donna Syed Tags: Anxiety and Panic Inspiration & Hope Men's Issues Personal Self-Esteem Trauma Women's Issues C-PTSD Complex post-traumatic stress disorder complex PTSD Complex trauma Domestic Abuse Domestic Violence Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

Brain hacking study: Train your cingulate cortex to reduce bias and regulate emotions
———- Don’t Like Their Faces? Train Your Brain to Feel More Positive (IEEE Spectrum): “Like it or not, we often have positive or negative feelings about a total stranger based solely on the looks of his or her face…Last week, researchers described, in the journal PLOS Biology, a brain training system that can alter emotions evoked by the sight of someone’s face. With just a few days of training, study volunteers felt more positively or negatively about a photo of a stranger… The fact that the brain activity monitored over the course of the experiment was going on in the cing...
Source: SharpBrains - September 21, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning behavior brain training system Brain-Training cingulate cortex Cognitive-functions DecNef fMRI neural activation Neurofeedback Source Type: blogs

WOMEN ’S BRAIN HEALTH SERIES: The Health e-Brain Study: Reflecting on the Cognitive Health of the Caregiver
Meryl Comer Today’s post acknowledges World Alzheimer’s Day by calling attention to the caregivers. Dr. Lathan is the Founder & CEO of AnthroTronix and Meryl Comer, a caregiver who has shared her personal journey through her book, Slow Dancing with a Stranger, is President, Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’s Initiative and Founding Partner, 21st Century Brain Trust® and board member of UsAgainstAlzheimer’s.  A huge shout out to Lynn Posluns, President, Women’s Brain Health Initiative, headquartered in Toronto.  Lynn has given us permission to share today’s post which...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Brain Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

What ’s it like to be a child and your sibling is diagnosed with cancer?
By Christian Jarrett When the dreadful news arrives that a child has cancer, understandably the focus of parents and health professionals turns to supporting the sick child as best they can. But also caught up in the nightmare are the child’s siblings. Not only will they likely be consumed by shock and fear, but they must adapt to the cancer journey the whole family has to embark on. Official health guidance here in the UK and in the USA states that it’s important to provide support to the siblings of children with cancer. Yet the reality is we know relatively little about their experience. A new stud...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Cancer Health Positive psychology Qualitative Source Type: blogs

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Coping with Trauma
The original 2015 Netflix series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, starring Ellie Kemper, is pure comedy at its finest as quirky — and certainly bubbly — 29 year-old Kimmy Schmidt moves from Indiana to New York City for a fresh start. She finds a home with Titus, the dramatic and eccentric roommate looking for stardom (played by Tituss Burgess), has adventures with Lillian, the tough-as-nails and offbeat landlord (played by Carol Kane), and begins to work as a nanny for Jacqueline, a snobby but lovable socialite (played by Jane Krakowski). But underneath the literally laugh out loud dialogue and hilarity is a serious ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lauren Suval Tags: Celebrities General Psychology PTSD Trauma Women's Issues Ariel Castro bunker Childhood Trauma Ellie Kemper kidnapping Optimism Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Sexual Abuse Sexual Assault Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Source Type: blogs

Childhood Trauma: Focus on Validating Feelings
When you’re a child and you suffer abuse, whether it’s physical, sexual, or emotional, you make it your mission to find out if this is normal. You wonder if other kids experienced the same things. It’s easier to doubt your perception than it is to accept the fact that you are living in a dangerous situation. If you knew that to be true, you’d have to do something about it. You’d have to talk to a teacher, a school counselor, or a police officer. You’d have to expose something that brings you great shame and pain. You’d have to face your abuser. Even though you’re only a child...
Source: World of Psychology - September 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Inspiration & Hope Personal PTSD Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma Child Abuse Childhood Trauma Domestic Violence Emotional Abuse Molestation Physical Abuse self-compassion Sexual Abuse Validation Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: September 9, 2016
Autumn is here. While some anxiously await the cool respite from the summer heat, you are anxious about the upcoming fall and winter season and all that it brings. If thinking about the holidays is filling you with dread, there is something you can do to prepare. Recently, I was listening to Elizabeth Gilbert’s podcast Magic Lessons. In the episode entitled, “Dancing From the Heart,” Gilbert talks to a dancer named Penelope who continually uses the word “hard” to describe her future performance. The advice Paralympian, and author Amy Purdy gave was to soften into what was hard. That doesn&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - September 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs C-PTSD Childhood Trauma Conflict Avoidance covert narcissist Emotional Neglect Manipulation Narcissism Narcissistic abuse Narcissistic Personality Disorder Pathological Liar Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

New book on how to practice mindfulness meditation with humor and playfulness
From the outside, meditation appears to be a thoroughly serious endeavor. You have to sit down, dutifully count your breaths and rein in your wandering mind, and practice this every day whether it’s fun or not. But that isn’t Chade-Meng Tan’s approach to mindfulness. The founding chair of the Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute, which started as a mindfulness class at Google and now trains employees around the world, Tan lives by the motto that “life is too important to be taken seriously.” And he adopts the same attitude toward cultivating mindfulness—outlined in his new book, J...
Source: SharpBrains - September 2, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness book Joy meditation mindfulness mindfulness-meditation therapies Source Type: blogs

Child Sexual Abuse: Don ’ t Hide Your Head in the Sand
Right as the Summer Olympic Games started in Rio, the IndyStar reported that USA Gymnastics, the national governing body for gymnastics, ignored sexual abuse allegations filed against coaches. Complaints were reportedly filed against more than 50 gymnastics coaches, but authorities were not contacted about the complaints if they did not come directly from a victim or her parents. Three of those coaches have since been convicted, while a fourth killed himself in jail. Before I mention any details, I have to give a trigger warning to trauma survivors. This news brought up a lot of poignant, ugly feelings for me. In the case ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Bullying Children and Teens General Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Personal Policy and Advocacy PTSD Sports Students Trauma Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Childhood Trauma coaches Darkness to Light Source Type: blogs

Vicarious Trauma: How Much More Can We Take?
Another week, another tragedy. It’s hard to take it all in, let alone make any sense of it. How does bad news affect us? We can all be affected by vicarious trauma. That is the “one step removed” trauma that didn’t actually happen to us directly, but which still impacts us nonetheless. Obviously, for the victims’ friends and relatives the effects are acute, but for onlookers (also from the news, social media and the press) these events have a profound cumulative effect. When experiencing physical or emotional trauma first- or secondhand, our brains are affected by a perceived threat...
Source: World of Psychology - August 31, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maxine Harley Tags: Disorders General Grief and Loss Psychology PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression brain Emotion Feeling fight or flight Mass murder mass shooting Psychological Trauma ripple effect social media Terrorism Tragedy Worry Source Type: blogs

The Case for Recognizing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a Purple Heart Injury
Receiving a Purple Heart in recognition of a veteran’s bravery and sacrifice is a cherished honor among military families. Traditionally given out by the Pentagon in the name of the sitting president, Purple Hearts formally recognize the physical injuries and sacrifices an individual endures in combat, including death. But not all of the most disfiguring injuries our veterans experience during their service are physical, and the lasting effects of mental health disorders originating in combat are sorely underestimated and often ignored. If severe cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are capable of destroyi...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - August 30, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: Constance Scharff, PhD Tags: Abuse Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Current Events Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Mental Health addiction treatment center drug addic Source Type: blogs

The Denial of Trauma
“I don’t have trauma.” “What happened to me isn’t trauma.” “Trauma is something horrific.” “I should have been able to cope with it.” “It’s not sad.” “I’m not upset.” Accepting you are suffering from trauma is by far one of the most difficult aspects of recovery. I thought that admitting I was suffering from trauma suggested I couldn’t cope with the events in my life or I didn’t have the strength to deal with and process those events. I thought (and sometimes in my dark moments still think) that suffering from the ef...
Source: World of Psychology - August 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amy Kee Tags: Brain and Behavior Bullying Children and Teens Disorders General Personal Psychology PTSD Relationships Self-Esteem Trauma Child Abuse Childhood Trauma Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Reactivity Source Type: blogs

Healing Prayer and the Brain: Not a Match Made in Heaven
Activity of the medial prefrontal cortex after psycho-spiritual healing (Baldwin et al., 2016).Everything we do and feel and experiencechanges the brain. Psychotherapy, juggling, taxi driving, poverty, reading, drugs, art, music, anger, love. If it didn't we'd bedead. Why should prayer be any different? The trick is to accurately determine the structural or physiological changes that are unique to a specific activity. And when assessing the effectiveness of clinical interventions, how the changes compare to an adequately matched control intervention. Plenty of high profile studies have failed to do that, including a recent...
Source: The Neurocritic - August 28, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Dear Boston Globe Spotlight Team: Access to Care is About So Much More than Public Safety
The Boston Globe Spotlight Team -- the investigative reporting team featured in the Oscar-winning, best pictureSpotlight -- is doing a six-part series on the shambles the mental health system has become in Massachusetts.  And make no mistake, their system is a shambles.  The series is called The Desperate and the Dead, and while I understand that journalism involves sensationalism to get people to read, the emphasis on violence in these articles is striking, and unnecessarily provocative.  It's stigmatizing and distracts from the real issues.  This from an author who has abook coming out shortly about p...
Source: Shrink Rap - August 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 27, 2016
The latter part of August is when most kids are headed back to school in America, and while many parents take this time to post first-day-of-school photos (as well as jokingly posting a few thoughts on their kids heading back to school!), there’s one topic that’s even more serious: bullying. (Of course, I realize this is a major issue for kids around the globe.) According to StopBullying.gov, children who are often at risk for being bullied are “perceived as different from their peers,” “depressed, anxious, or have low self-esteem,” or “antagonize others for attention,” whil...
Source: World of Psychology - August 27, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Bullying Children and Teens Depression Disorders Health-related Men's Issues Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Self-Esteem Self-Help Sexuality Sleep Technology abuse Am Source Type: blogs

Surprise Diagnoses
When I was diagnosed with PTSD at the beginning of the year, it came as a surprise to me. I’d gone to this psychologist for a potential BPD diagnosis. I walked out with not only that, but four years’ worth of PTSD as well. It was surprising because in these four years I’d not once thought about this disorder; it never even occurred to me. But as I thought about it, letting it sink in, things started making sense. And since the diagnosis, I’ve had to think about what happened. Because I really didn’t deal with it; I’m still having trouble figuring out where to go from here. I know it cou...
Source: World of Psychology - August 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Forrest Jamie Tags: Anxiety and Panic Borderline Personality Bullying Children and Teens College Disorders General PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression battery bpd Panic Attack Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Rape Sexual Assault Sexual Trauma s Source Type: blogs

The Many Conditions that Mimic Depression
Finding the right diagnosis for any disorder requires a comprehensive evaluation. Because many illnesses share many of the same symptoms. Take symptoms such as headache, stomachache, dizziness, fatigue, lethargy, insomnia and appetite loss. There are countless conditions with these exact signs. Similarly, many mental illnesses share the same symptoms, said Stephanie Smith, PsyD, a psychologist in practice in Erie, Colo., who specializes in working with individuals with depression. Which makes “the process of diagnosing mental illness tricky, to say the least.” For instance, attention deficit hyperactivity disor...
Source: World of Psychology - August 22, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Anxiety and Panic Depression Disorders General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Self-Help Stress Beck Depression Inventory Bipolar Disorder Cancer Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Clinical Depression Source Type: blogs

8 Tips for Learning to Work with Your Stress
Feeling overwhelmed? These tips are a total game-changer. Are you stressed? I’m not going to tell you to “relax.” Instead, I’ll actually show you how to regulate it. For many people, stress is a daily occurrence. When stress overruns your life, you’re left feeling “stressed out” and depleted. You can’t get enough rest, life “comes at you” super-charged, and your ability to bounce back or be resilient to the everyday challenges of living becomes harder. 6 Ways Stress is DESTROYING Your Relationship Under too much stress, chances are you’re not coping well. ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Mindfulness Publishers Stress YourTango Amygdala anxiety balance brain Breathing Exercises Chronic Stress Cortisol Counselor Fear kinds of stress Negative Statements Nervous System Neuroscience overwhelmed Perception Source Type: blogs

We Don ’ t Always Have to Say We ’ re Fine — and That ’ s Fine
We put so. much. effort into the illusion of being fine. There’s a picture saved on my computer that I will probably never show another person. It was taken a few hours before my mother died, at my daughter’s insistence, her sweet 4-year-old smile hovering over the planes and angles cancer had carved into my mom’s face. 15 Beautiful Ways To Reclaim Your Life When You’re Broken We do weird things in death sometimes, and my mom’s left eye just wouldn’t stay closed. Neither would her mouth, hanging open with each long, slow, laborious breath. I guess if you weren’t me, this picture c...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Depression Disorders Grief and Loss Publishers YourTango Anguish Bad Day broken Cassie Fox Compassion Crying death Emotions empty energy fine Lie loving Muriel Rukeyser Pain painful Sadness strong Truth vuln Source Type: blogs

Watching someone suffer extreme pain has a lasting effect on the brain
Image via Los Alamos National Laboratory/Flickr New research suggests that witnessing extreme pain – such as the injury or death of a comrade on the battlefield – has a lasting effect on how the brain processes potentially painful situations. The research team, chiefly from Bar-Ilan University and headed up by Moranne Eidelman-Rothman, investigated the brain using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Like more widely used fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging), MEG localises which parts of the brain are more active during a particular mental activity, but it offers more fine-grained information about when this a...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Emotion Brain Source Type: blogs

7 Surprising Ways Floating Improves Your Mental and Physical Well-Being
You're reading 7 Surprising Ways Floating Improves Your Mental and Physical Well-Being, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. When you enhance your body, you also change your mind. When you float, your body achieves a level of relaxation that is even deeper than sleep. As your mind stays awake, large portions of the brain are free from their normal tasks of sending signals from the organs and nervous systems. With more studies about floating every day here are 7 surprising ways floating improves your ment...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DavidGomes Tags: featured health and fitness productivity tips self improvement alternative medicine benefits of floating best meditation practice mental health physical fitness pickthebrain reduce stress what is floating Source Type: blogs

Bully Online
One of BullyOnLine’s main benefits has always been felt by people who were suffering very unfair, often underhand and devious treatment at work, by revealing to them that their experience had a name and was predictable, and they were not to blame for it. Similarly, it has taught people who were beset by unprecedented psychological conditions that they could not explain, about the relationship between bullying, stress, anxiety, depression and other illnesses. The website has enlightened, validated and empowered bullied people for almost two decades. As well as describing bullying in considerable detail, Tim Field stud...
Source: PsychSplash - August 15, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Clyde Tags: Anger Anxiety Articles Books Clinical Psychology Consumers Depression Emotional Health Features For General Psychology Information Insomnia Life Lifestyle Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Search Engine Self-harm and suicide Source Type: blogs

Aug 13, Victor Horsley: Today in the History of Psychology (13th August 1886)
Sir Victor Horsley gave a landmark address to the British Medical Association on 'Advances in the Surgery of the Central Nervous System' in which he described how he had successfully inferred the seizure localization of three epilepsy surgery patients; most notably 'James B.' who suffered from post-traumatic epilepsy as a result of a depressed skull fracture following a traffic accident. Drawing on both the pioneering work of John Hughlings Jackson and his own experimental findings, Horsley was confident that James B's seizure onset occurred in the contralateral sensorimotor strip. Horsley operated to remove the cortical s...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - August 14, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Why Some Therapists Want to Treat Patients with LSD, Explained
When someone tells you they’re in therapy, their taking LSD as part of that psychotherapy is probably not the first thing that comes to mind. While most of the time your instincts would be spot on, small but meaningful studies being conducted around the globe are beginning to change that. There is growing proof that the clinical use of LSD, in limited doses and for a very short period (usually 1-2 sessions), can have a tremendous positive impact on mental health. Take for example the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nearly one in ten Israelis have post-traumatic stress disorder, pushing therapists...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - August 13, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: sheilas Tags: Abuse Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Current Events Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Mental Health Uncategorized drug treatment center Source Type: blogs

Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List
Editor’s note: “Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List” is a monthly roundup where we share some of the most compelling health care narratives driving the news and conversation in recent weeks. In this month’s Narrative Matters essay, former Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Louis Sullivan writes about growing up in rural Georgia and entering medical school as the only black student in his class. Sullivan graduated from Boston University School of Medicine in 1958 with only $500 in debt — hard to fathom when, today, med students might finish school owing some $150,00...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 12, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bylander Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Featured Narrative Matters On Our Reading List opioids Veterans Source Type: blogs

Embracing Optimism Even When Life Seems Unfair
About a year ago, I entered trauma therapy. For the first time I was honest with myself about the sexual abuse I experienced as a child. It opened a floodgate and shame, disgust, resentment, and depression rushed in. I’m happy to say that today those feelings are lessened or absent completely. I started working out a lot and traded a lot of fat for muscle. Every inch of me is now shaped differently. I’m the fittest and strongest I’ve ever been in my life. And yet I’m also sick. The stress of the past year did a number on my body. I was recently diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 6, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Personal PTSD Sexuality Stress Trauma Cancer Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Child molestation Child Sexual Abuse CIN II Depersonalization Dissociation dysplasia Exercise HPV vac Source Type: blogs

7 Ways to Become More Comfortable Being with Ourselves
So many of us have a hard time being alone with ourselves. Which is why we have a few glasses of wine when we’re the only one at home. It’s why we try not to be home by ourselves. It’s why we like to stay busy. It’s why we turn to all sorts of substances; anything not to think or feel or sit with ourselves. Because, as clinical psychologist Carolyn Ferreira, Psy.D, said, “When we are still with our own thoughts and feelings, there is always the possibility that those thoughts and feelings will go to a place that we don’t like.” That place might be a conflict at work, a rocky r...
Source: World of Psychology - August 6, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Personality Psychology Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Being alone Carolyn Ferreira Christine Selby Clinical Psychology Cognit Source Type: blogs

The word “burnout” perpetuates medicine’s cycle of abuse
Illustration by Jorge Muniz. We enter medicine with our hearts and souls on fire ready to serve humanity. By the time we complete medical training many of us have anxiety, PTSD, depression — even suicidal thoughts. Why? Medicine is stressful. Many of us work 100-hour weeks surrounded by suffering and death. We may deliver a stillborn, try to save a teenager with a gunshot wound, and then rush into the next room to help a lady having a heart attack — all within an hour. With no debriefing or emotional support. Medical training glorifies physical and emotional self-neglect and endorses teaching by intimidati...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 29, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Update: Well-targeted brain training might significantly reduce dementia risk
— M GLASSER, D VAN ESSEN/WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY Time for a new edition of SharpBrains’ e-newsletter. Happy reading! New brain research ACTIVE study: Well-targeted brain training might significantly reduce dementia risk To improve brain health you need BOTH aerobic and cognitive exercise A new era of brain cartography, powered by neuroimaging and machine learning New tools for brain health and performance Akili raises an additional $11.9M; brings Amgen, Merck, Pfizer and Shire to the digital medicine table Shaping the Future of Human Enhancement Is Mental Health ready to start transitioning towards measurable ...
Source: SharpBrains - July 28, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology Uncategorized brain Brain-Training dementia risk digital medicine exercise neuroimaging Source Type: blogs

Childhood Trauma: Overcoming the Hurt of Invalidation
“When we deny our stories, they define us. When we own our stories, we get to write a brave new ending.” — Brene Brown I talk about my childhood trauma because I lived in denial for most of my life. I write about it because I didn’t understand what happened, why it happened, what it meant. I couldn’t explain all these feelings of shame, depression, and disgust. As I grow to understand it better, I hope my writing can help other victims who feel lost and scour the internet for answers — for a childhood they can relate to. “We can’t smooth over hurt feelings in our familie...
Source: World of Psychology - July 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: General Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Personal PTSD Spirituality Stress Trauma brene brown Child molestation Child Sexual Abuse Childhood Trauma complex PTSD Denial Elisabeth Corey gaslighting grooming Invali Source Type: blogs

Would You Inhale?
We know Bill Clinton did not inhale but Barak Obama did inhale (because that was the whole point). I might have inhaled in the past but would never consider it now. All my past experiences involved smoking and occasional batches of brownies. One friend told me that she asked her doctor about it and he told her it wasn't appropriate for her. She thinks she could go off all her other medications if she could go to pot. Another blogger recently revealed her problems trying to determine how much marijuana was contained in cookies she purchased. Medical marijuana has been looming outside of my wheelhouse recently. I have hear...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - July 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments medical marijuana medications pain relief Source Type: blogs

The VA and Dr. Tracy Gaudet: Integrating quackery into the care of veterans
I was originally going to write this post for the 4th of July, given the subject matter. However, as regular readers know, I am not unlike Dug the Dog in the movie Up, with new topics that float past me in my social media and blog reading rounds serving as the squirrel. But never let… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - July 25, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Politics Quackery acupuncture post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD traditional Chinese medicine VA Veterans Administration Source Type: blogs

The Importance of Getting Comfortable with Discomfort
When we exercise, are we strengthening more than just our body? In a recent article, Brad Stulberg explained how working out strengthens the mind. Physical exertion means having to face something that many of us avoid every day: Discomfort. “In a world where comfort is king, arduous physical activity provides a rare opportunity to practice suffering,” Stulberg writes. After interviewing various athletes and reviewing research, he found the psychological benefits were clear. Withstanding physical discomfort taught the athletes to stay in the moment and adapt. They learned to divide real risk from perceived ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Habits Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Personal Sports Stress Trauma anxiety athletics Avoidance Brad Stulberg Child Abuse complex PTSD Discomfort Dissociation Endurance Exercise Physical Exercise Physical Fit Source Type: blogs

Understanding PTSD and its Effects on Marriage
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that occurs following a life-threatening event such as military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, serious accidents, or physical or sexual assault. Approximately eight percent of all people will experience PTSD at some point in their life. That number rises to about 30 percent for combat veterans. Those suffering with PTSD may experience several different types of symptoms: Reliving. Becoming emotionally or physically upset when reminded or triggered. Nightmares and flashbacks are extremely common. Avoidance. Staying away from places or peop...
Source: World of Psychology - July 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Staci Lee Schnell, MS,CS,LMFT Tags: Addiction Anger Disorders General Marriage and Divorce Medications Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships Trauma Anxiety Disorder Counseling Medicine Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Psychological Trauma Source Type: blogs

Rape as a public health issue
Some people may be surprised that I am discussing rape on a bioethics blog because they do not think that sexual violence is a bioethics issue. However, rape is a public health matter that raises serious ethical concerns, especially regarding justice and equality. The goal of public health is to protect and improve the lives of the public. Rape harms many people especially women: 1 out of 6 women and 1 out of 33 men in the United States will experience a rape or attempted rape (Esposito 2006). The act of rape can cause various immediate health concerns such as general body trauma (e.g. bruises, lacerations, broken bones...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 18, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care gender Law Enforcement Sex and Sexuality syndicated Source Type: blogs

Maternal Mental Health Screening: What I Wished I’d Had
When I was pregnant back in 1997, I wish my doctor had told me I might be at risk for postpartum depression. Her words wouldn’t have alarmed me. They would have prompted me to get treatment when the darkness did indeed hit. During my six-week postpartum checkup when I was at my worst, I wish my OB/GYN had handed me a mental health screening and explained the difference between the “blues” and depression. Perhaps I would have lied on the screening, although I doubt it. At the time I was desperately trapped inside my terrified silence. Only my husband knew how far I’d fallen until one night on the ph...
Source: World of Psychology - July 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura G Owens Tags: Depression Disorders General Health-related Parenting Personal Psychology Women's Issues Baby Blues Childbirth Hormonal Changes Mental Disorder Motherhood Obstetrics postpartum depression Pregnancy Source Type: blogs

20 Potential Technological Advances: Medicine in the Future Part I.
As there are so many amazing things going on worldwide in medicine and healthcare, a shortlist of some of the greatest ideas and developments would give us a glimpse into the future of medicine. It is always a challenge to detect the projects with the biggest potential to be used in everyday medical practices, but here are the most promising candidates for fulfilling this notion.   1) Augmented reality The digital contact lens patented by Google aims to change the course of diabetes management by measuring blood glucose levels from tears. While the prototype is going through vigorous testing, regulations must prepare...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 14, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: TMF Tags: Augmentation in Medicine Cyborgization Future of Medicine bionic GC1 google glass Healthcare Innovation List ptsd social media Surgery Source Type: blogs

20 Medical Technology Advances: Medicine in the Future – Part I
As there are so many amazing things going on worldwide in medicine and healthcare, a shortlist of some of the greatest ideas and developments would give us a glimpse into the future of medicine. It is always a challenge to detect the projects with the biggest potential to be used in everyday medical practices, but here are the most promising candidates for fulfilling this notion. Here are the first 10 of the top 20 future medical technologies.   1) Augmented reality The digital contact lens patented by Google aims to change the course of diabetes management by measuring blood glucose levels from tears....
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 14, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: TMF Tags: Augmentation in Medicine Cyborgization Future of Medicine bionic GC1 google glass Healthcare Innovation List ptsd social media Surgery Source Type: blogs