Does Pregnancy Alter the Brain ’ s Immune Function?
Recent research published in the November 2017 issue of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity suggests that a woman’s immune response in the brain may decrease during pregnancy and the postpartum period. These findings, discussed by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, might help to establish a connection between the brain’s immune function and the anxiety and mood disorders that are common throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Previous research has shown that during pregnancy, the response of the body’s peripheral immune system (the part of our protective system that does not protect the brain)...
Source: World of Psychology - December 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Brain and Behavior General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Women's Issues Bipolar Depression fetal development immune changes Immune Function Immunity immunosuppression Mania miscarriage Moth Source Type: blogs

Researchers uncover a brain process that may help explain the curse of uncontrollable thoughts
The study represents a breakthrough in bridging neurophysiology and psychology By Alex Fradera Distressing conditions including PTSD, depression and anxiety have something in common: a difficulty in suppressing unwanted thoughts. Negative self-judgments and re-experienced traumas directly impact mental health and make recovery harder by intruding into the new experiences that should provide distance and a mental fresh start. Understanding what’s involved in thought suppression may therefore be one key to helping people with these conditions. Now research in Nature Communications has uncovered an important new br...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Brain Cognition Mental health Thought Source Type: blogs

Trusting Your Instincts in a Psychologically Abusive Relationship
Most people understand the concept of physical abuse. If you’re in a relationship where your partner is physically hurting you, this is an obvious sign that: 1. Things are not okay 2. This will probably not be the last time. 3. This relationship has the potential to be very dangerous. Emotional abuse is more confusing. Depending on how someone was raised, where they grew up, and who influenced their life, the term “emotional/psychological abuse” may vary. While there is no official definition of the term, the outcome is usually the same.  Emotional abuse can lead to: Anxiety Depression PTSD Probl...
Source: World of Psychology - December 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Anger Bullying Narcissism PTSD Relationships Trauma Abusive Relationship Instincts Manipulation Psychological abuse self-compassion self-confidence Source Type: blogs

Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: The Road to Recovery
Persistent neglect in childhood can lead you to believe that you don’t deserve to be loved or cared for. This idea begins to define you: you are a person who ought to be treated badly. When we think of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a specific list comes to mind: soldiers returning from combat zones and police officers connected to terrible incidents in the line of duty; victims of sexual trauma and women who were beaten by their partners; the families who stood on the roofs of their houses in the aftermath of Katrina and those who managed to walk away from the horrific South Asian tsunami in 2004...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Disorders Personal PTSD Publishers The Fix abuse acute C-PTSD chronic Fear Pain Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 2: Fred McNeill
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such asboxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations oftau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are shown below.Left: courtesy of Dr. Ann McKee inNYT. Right: courtesy of Dr. Bennett Omalu inCNN. These are coronal sections1 from the autopsied brains of: (L) Aaron Hernandez, aged 27; and(R) Fred McNeill, aged 63.Part 1 of this ...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

One way of using a biopsychosocial framework in pain management – i
While a biopsychosocial ‘model’ (or sociopsychobiological framework) has been widely adopted when attempting to understand pain, many critics argue that it just doesn’t give clinicians a clear way to integrate or prioritise clinical information and generate treatments. The ‘model’ itself has been challenged from many angles – it’s too complex, too simplistic, relies on Bertalanffy’s “general systems theory” which has itself been challenged, it’s too “fuzzy”, and of course there are many who think that psychological and sociocultural aspects of hu...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - December 10, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Professional topics Research Science in practice biopsychosocial treatment Source Type: blogs

Firms Race to Find New Ways to Scan Brain Health
“How consistently you type on a keyboard and the way you use your smartphone may one day tell your doctor — or someone else, like your employer — if your brain is ailing. Right now, doctors generally rely on questionnaires about a person’s symptoms and written challenges like drawing a clock to begin to home in on brain diseases like depression and dementia. New technologies would replace these with passive monitoring of things like computer or smartphone use, or even changes to a person’s brain waves, to detect brain changes consistent with diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ...
Source: SharpBrains - December 9, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology Source Type: blogs

Virtual Reality to Treat PTSD: Interview with Todd Richmond, Director of USC ’s Mixed Reality Lab
While PTSD is a significant issue for many of those serving in the military and others who work in traumatic situations, it also affects huge numbers of ordinary people who experience traumatic events such as assaults or natural disasters. Nearly 24 million Americans suffer from PTSD at any given time, and women are twice as likely as men to develop the condition. PTSD can sometimes be overlooked and is reportedly underdiagnosed, but anxiety disorders still cost society approximately $40 billion per year in treatment costs and loss of productivity. A relatively new option for PTSD therapy involves virtual reality, with the...
Source: Medgadget - December 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 1: Aaron Hernandez
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such asboxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations oftau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are shown below.Left: courtesy of Dr. Ann McKee inNYT. Right: courtesy of Dr. Bennett Omalu inCNN. These are coronal sections1 from the autopsied brains of: (L) Aaron Hernandez, aged 27; and(R) Fred O'Neill, aged 63.Both men played...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 4, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 1: Aaron Hernandez
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such asboxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations oftau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are shown below.Left: courtesy of Dr. Ann McKee inNYT. Right: courtesy of Dr. Bennett Omalu inCNN. These are coronal sections1 from the autopsied brains of: (L) Aaron Hernandez, aged 27; and(R) Fred McNeill, aged 63.Both men played...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 4, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Your Diagnosis Does Not Define You
I’ve been diagnosed, at one point or another, with depression, anxiety, PTSD and ADHD. It’s an annoying characterization of myself because my medical ‘diagnosis’ does not define me. Yet it has also been incredibly helpful to me as it explains certain behaviors and reactions, and gives me the tools I need to research and manage them. But let me be clear. What I ‘have’ does not equate to who I am. As despite the challenges, we can all thrive. I can say this now, as I’m in a new chapter in my life with success under my belt. My first consumer product turned into a 35 million doll...
Source: World of Psychology - November 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Addiction ADHD and ADD Anxiety and Panic Creativity Depression Habits Happiness iFred Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Professional PTSD Recovery Stigma Diagnosis Entrepren Source Type: blogs

More Not Blogging
I have been very busy the last fewday weeks. Now that I can drive, I have been driving and going places and thus wearing myself out and making my knee hurt. I had Thanksgiving prep for food and house guests and dinner for 14. I also have had some doctor appointments that were postponed from when I couldn't drive. I still have lots more appointments for the same reason as well as PT for my knee.So now that I am getting back to normal I have things on my mind for blogging topics. They will not get all the coverage due  because I have been a slacker for my reasons above.I have pondered the issue of losing friends and mak...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation ailments blogging friends holidays Source Type: blogs

The bacteria in your gut might affect your vulnerability to PTSD
By Emma Young After a traumatic experience, why do some people develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), while others don’t? Work to date has found evidence that various factors play a role, including a lack of social support and low levels of the neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (due to its role in the body’s stress response). Into this mix come new findings, reported in Psychosomatic Medicine, that an individual’s complement of gut bacteria (their gut microbiome) may contribute to their vulnerability to trauma. The researchers are now investigating whether tweaking the gut microbiome could help to p...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Mental health Source Type: blogs

Looking for Hope in 195 Places
My speech at the United Nations, advocating for mental health inclusion in Sustainable Development Goals I’m not sure about you, but I’ve felt hopeless plenty of times in my life. Like really, really hopeless. Enough for a suicide attempt in my early 20’s, and enough so that I made a firm commitment to figure out what, exactly, creates a hopeful mindset, and what I can do to foster and grow it in my life and the others around me. It is through our deepest pain we find our brightest light. I lost my dad to suicide when I was 19, so I am no stranger to the impact, devastation, and complete despair when all...
Source: World of Psychology - November 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Depression General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Suicide 195 anxiety Bereavement grieving Ifred Personal Growth Resilience Source Type: blogs

Christopher Robin: a sad story
Jump to follow-up Today we went to see the film, Goodbye Christopher Robin.  It was very good. I, like most children, read Pooh books as a child.  Image from Wikipedia I got interested in their Author, A.A. Milne, when I discovered that he’d done a mathematics degree at Cambridge. So had my scientific hero A.V. Hill, and (through twitter) I met AV’s granddaughter, Alison Hill. I learned that AV loved to quote A.A.Milne’s poem, OBE. O.B.E. I know a Captain of Industry, Who made big bombs for the R.F.C., And collared a lot of £ s. d.– And he–thank God!–has the...
Source: DC's goodscience - November 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: A.V. Hill AA Milne AV Hill Christopher Robin PTSD Winnie the Pooh Source Type: blogs

Christopher Robin: a sad story
Jump to follow-up Today we went to see the film Goodbye Christopher Robin.  It was very good. I, like most children, read Pooh books as a child.  Image from Wikipedia I got interested in their author, A.A. Milne, when I discovered that he’d done a mathematics degree at Cambridge. So had my scientific hero A.V. Hill, and (through twitter) I met AV’s granddaughter, Alison Hill. I learned that AV loved to quote A.A.Milne’s poem, OBE. O.B.E. I know a Captain of Industry, Who made big bombs for the R.F.C., And collared a lot of £ s. d.– And he–thank God!–has the ...
Source: DC's goodscience - November 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: A.V. Hill AA Milne AV Hill Christopher Robin PTSD Winnie the Pooh Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 305
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 305th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week What’s on the Trauma Professional’s blog this week? Lots as usual! Lear...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: November 4, 2017
This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers artificial intelligence and psychiatry, a decline in teachers’ mental health, how to continue making progress, and more. Let’s go! Artificial Intelligence Is Here and It Wants to Revolutionize Psychiatry: Are we more comfortable sharing our true feelings and deepest secrets with a machine we assume won’t (or at least at this point in time, can’t) judge us or bring other uncomfortable consequences? Could artificial intelligence make a huge impact in psychology? Whether Psychology Research Is Improving Depends On Whom You Ask: Results from a survey an...
Source: World of Psychology - November 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Industrial and Workplace Parenting Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Success & Achievement Technology Artificial Intelligence goals job stress kids Memory Progress Source Type: blogs

Smartphone-Based Interventions for Depression
Technology is rapidly advancing and more people are depending on it to stay in touch with friends, finding the quickest way to work or doing their weekly shopping. It is no surprise that people are turning to their smartphones to improve their mental wellbeing. There are many mobile applications available on smartphones that claim to improve your mental health, however not all mental health apps are created equal and it is important to know how to make sure the one you are using is truly helpful. Joseph Firth and colleagues conducted the first meta-analysis of apps for depressive symptoms in October 2017, which was publis...
Source: World of Psychology - November 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Andrés Fonseca Tags: Brain and Behavior Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research Stigma Technology Treatment Attention Deficit Disorder Confidentiality Depression mobile apps Privacy Sleep Disorder Smartphone Source Type: blogs

What I ’ve learned from 547 doctor suicides
Five years ago today I was at a memorial. Another suicide. Our third doctor in 18 months. Everyone kept whispering, “Why?” I was determined to find out. So I started counting dead doctors. I left the service with a list of 10. Now I have 547. Immediately, I began writing and speaking about suicide. So many distressed doctors (and med students) wrote and phoned me. Soon I was running a de facto international suicide hotline from my home. To date, I’ve spoken to thousands of suicidal doctors; published a book of their suicide letters (free audiobook); attended more funerals; in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Doing Your Inner Work as a Nurse
Nurse clinicians spend a great deal of time providing care for others. Nurses give physical care (including that which is immediately life-saving), psychoemotional support, and spiritual succor, often in the form of motivational conversation and nurse-to-patient teaching.What is a powerful way for us nurses to empower and elevate our understanding of human behavior, the human condition, and the nature of suffering? By assiduously doing our own inner work throughout a long lifetime of giving, loving, and feeling.Understanding the Self and Understanding OthersWe nurses can more truly understand the suffering and challenges o...
Source: Digital Doorway - October 30, 2017 Category: Nursing Tags: careers healthcare healthcare careers nurse nurse careers nurse self care nurse wellness nurses nursing nursing careers self development self-care Source Type: blogs

Healing from Trauma Boosts Relationship Joy
Trauma happens. It’s not something people often talk about. Possibly, someone you’ve been getting to know and like, your relationship partner, or your spouse has experienced a horrific life changing event, such as a sudden or violent death or suicide of someone close, physical or sexual abuse, bullying, violence, (domestic or family, war or political), a life-threatening illness, or something else. Healing takes both time and a willingness to face the trauma, whether it’s old, recent, large, or small. We cannot force readiness to deal with trauma. Each of us has our own timetable, which should be respect...
Source: World of Psychology - October 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marcia Naomi Berger, MSW, LCSW Tags: Bullying Psychology PTSD Relationships Trauma Treatment Active Listening Dating Divorce Empathic listening Intimacy Marriage Source Type: blogs

The smallest human acts can have a lifetime of impact
My dad died on May 11, 2003. It was Mother’s Day. I was 18 years old. Those are the easy facts. The more difficult ones are those detailing the events that led to his death. My dad was so many things — a brilliant geologist, a loving father, an inventor, a pilot, and a Vietnam veteran — to name a few. He survived three tours on the front lines in Vietnam, but he didn’t come out unscathed. He was a victim of post-traumatic stress disorder and, subsequently, progressive alcoholism. Despite numerous attempts by my family to help him, and treatment in every form imaginable, we watched a truly amazi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/karmen-wielunski" rel="tag" > Karmen Wielunski, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The Amazing Way Forgetting Helps Your Brain Function
The idea that forgetting is important for the proper functioning of the brain and memory may sound counterintuitive. However, forgetting is part of the process of memorizing, and it does not make us any less smart. Research shows that our brain has active mechanisms for forgetting. Both storing and losing memories are important for selecting and holding the most relevant information. Forgetting helps to get rid of outdated information. Forgetting the details also helps to generalize past experiences into specific categories and thus create appropriate responses to similar situations in the future. Forgetting details helps ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 25, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Memory and Perception Publishers Research Decision Making Depression Forgetting memorizing Mental Health Past Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Psychological Trauma thoughts Source Type: blogs

The challenge of “ evidence based ” sore throat guidelines
In 2007, Matthys and colleagues published a classic article: Differences Among International Pharyngitis Guidelines: Not Just Academic Jan Matthys, Marc De Meyere, Mieke L. van Driel, An De Sutter Ann Fam Med. 2007 Sep; 5(5): 436–443. doi: 10.1370/afm.741 PMCID: PMC2000301 RESULTS We included 4 North American and 6 European guidelines. Recommendations differ with regard to the use of a rapid antigen test and throat culture and with the indication for antibiotics. The North American, French, and Finnish guidelines consider diagnosis of group A streptococcus essential, and prevention o...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 23, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

The Nature of Post-Traumatic Growth
You’ve had a terrible, stressful experience. Maybe you’d even call it a trauma. Are you going to be debilitated by it for the rest of your life? Maybe; maybe not. PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder, is a term that’s bandied about a lot in our current culture. But have you heard about its corollary, post-traumatic growth (PTG)? Probably not. Since it’s not a reimbursable diagnosis, it doesn’t capture the headlines that often. But, it’s important to recognize that people can emerge from life’s traumas stronger, more resilient and even happier than they once were. How does this posi...
Source: World of Psychology - October 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: PTSD Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma acceptance Personal Growth Posttraumatic growth Posttraumatic Stress Trauma History Source Type: blogs

Virtual reality to train surgeons
Virtual reality technology that users can feel as well as see has been developed to train surgeons. The equipment allows them to interact with virtual “flesh and bone” in simulated theatre environments.   Related posts: Virtual Reality Becomes Real Virtual Reality for Treatment of PTSD Virtual Reality for Stress Management (Source: Dr Shock MD PhD)
Source: Dr Shock MD PhD - October 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dr Shock Tags: Shrink Life in General Source Type: blogs

Virtual reality to train surgeons
Virtual reality technology that users can feel as well as see has been developed to train surgeons. The equipment allows them to interact with virtual “flesh and bone” in simulated theatre environments.   Related posts: Virtual Reality for Treatment of PTSD Virtual Reality Becomes Real Virtual Environments for Health (Source: Dr Shock MD PhD)
Source: Dr Shock MD PhD - October 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dr Shock Tags: Shrink Life in General Source Type: blogs

7 Things a Person with a Mental Illness Doesn ’t Want to Hear
You're reading 7 Things a Person with a Mental Illness Doesn’t Want to Hear, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In the United States alone, nearly one out of every five people is suffering with one or more mental illnesses. That means that when a person passes you by on the street, they have a better chance of having a mental illness than of having green eyes. Yet, why are so many people struggling with knowing what to say, or maybe what NOT to say, when they are talking to a person with anxiety, depre...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angela Tags: depression featured psychology self confidence self improvement mental health mental illness pickthebrain relationships Source Type: blogs

Dementia Service Dogs an Idea That Should be Growing
Most of us are aware of service dogs, especially guide dogs for people with sight impairment, because we see them around our communities. These dogs are not pets. They are working animals and are allowed wherever the person they serve goes. Increasingly, other service dogs are being trained to help people with impaired hearing, people who have grand mal seizures and people with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. With more than five million people in the U.S. alone coping with the effects of Alzheimer’s, any attempt to help people with dementia have a better quality of life is welcome.  So why not have tra...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 9, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Kneel
While watching my son at a weekend hockey game last weekend I overheard a conversation an older, wealthy-appearing woman was having with her companion. I pretended to be reading (I ’m the bad dad who only watches the game when his own son is out on a shift) while she orated (in a faux, poorly executed, Mid Atlantic English nasal accent) a story she had heard from “down in Texas” about how arighteous high school coach had kicked two players off his team who had the gall and traitorous audacity to kneel during the pre-game rendering of the national anthem. “Whaaaaaat are they eeeeeven p...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - October 8, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Health 2.0 Fall Conference: SleepTech Summit Exhibit Hall Companies
A unique track at this year’s Health 2.0 Fall Conference is a SleepTech Summit focusing on innovations that enhance or improve a person’s ability to achieve a quicker, longer, and more refreshing sleep. As part of the main exhibit hall, six sleep-related companies were demoing their devices and technologies, and Medgadget had a chance to hold short interviews with each one. In addition to these six technology companies, Sleep-Geek was also in attendance. Sleep-Geek is a website and online community founded in 2010 with a mission to serve the mattress industry by connecting members with ideas that serve their pr...
Source: Medgadget - October 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Neurology OTC Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Philando Castile, Charleena Lyles, and PTSD: The consequences of fatal police encounters
Fatal police encounters can engender PTSD in non-white communities and forever impact interactions with police. In​ ​the​ ​last​ ​few​ ​years,​ ​we​ ​have​ ​witnessed​ ​in​ ​horror​ ​the​ ​erosion​ ​of​ ​trust​ ​between​ ​public​ ​servants charged​ ​to​ ​protect​ ​the​ ​community​ ​and​ the non-white ​communities​ they serve.​ ​The​ ​killing​ ​of​ ​Philando​ ​Castile​ ​and​ ​Charleena​ ​Lyles​ ​compounded the​ ​horror,​ ​as​ ​their​ ​violent​ ​deaths​ ​were​ ​witnessed​...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 1, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/marshall%e2%80%8b-%e2%80%8bfleurant-and-elizabeth%e2%80%8b-%e2%80%8bparris" rel="tag" > Marshall ​ ​Fleurant, MD, MPH and Elizabeth​ ​Parris, MS < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

October 6-7th in Stanford University: Virtual Reality and Behavior Change in Psychiatry and Behavioral Health
Quick heads-up about a timely conference taking place late next week. What: This year the conference is completely devoted to virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR) technologies and behavioral change, exploring the application of immersive technologies for treating and researching addictions, ADHD, anxiety, PTSD, psychosis, pain, depression, psychosomatic illness and more. Where: Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge 291 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 When: October 6-7th, 2017 –> To Learn More & Register, please click HERE. The Conference in Context: Five reasons the future of brain enha...
Source: SharpBrains - September 25, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology behavior change Behavioral Health psychiatry Stanford Stanford-University virtual-reality Source Type: blogs

Is the News Ruining Your Life?
With all the recent news stories about escalating tensions here, strife there, and severe weather all over the place it’s no wonder that we are all a bit more on edge than normal. It is easy to get caught up in the various news cycles and to become fixated on what is going on globally. Keeping up with current events is one thing, but allowing current events to affect your life is another. If you have found yourself feeling more anxious than usual, or like there is something bugging you that you cannot put your finger on, it may be that you are being affected by today’s many world issues. It is hard to avoid al...
Source: World of Psychology - September 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC Tags: Habits Happiness Minding the Media Self-Help Stress 24 hour news cycle anxiety civil unrest Devastation Environmental Catastrophes Hurricanes Natural Disasters News Media Protests sensationalization Worry Source Type: blogs

Secondhand Trauma — Is It Real? The 2017 Hurricane Season Is Affecting Everyone
As we have all witnessed in the last few months, 2017 has produced an incredibly destructive hurricane season. For many of us not living in the affected areas, just watching the devastation on TV and hearing about it on the radio or social media can also cause a deep sense of fear and anxiety. It can even cause many to suffer secondhand trauma or more specifically, Secondary Trauma Stress (STS). STS is a psychiatric condition which mimics symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It affects individuals who did not witness the traumatic event firsthand but were still exposed to it in other ways. When we are faced ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Tsilimparis, MFT Tags: Anxiety and Panic Inspiration & Hope Minding the Media PTSD Trauma Climate Change Destructive Hurricane Earthquakes fight or flight Natural Disasters Panic Attack Posttraumatic Stress Secondary Trauma Stress secondhand trauma T Source Type: blogs

Conspirators in their own memory loss – findings from 53 patients with “psychogenic amnesia”
By Christian Jarrett A person diagnosed with psychogenic amnesia complains of serious memory problems, sometimes even forgetting who they are, without there being any apparent physical reason for their symptoms – in other words, their condition seems to be purely psychological. It’s a fascinating, controversial diagnosis with roots dating back to Freud’s, Breuer’s and Charcot’s ideas about hysteria and how emotional problems sometimes manifest in dramatic physical ways. Today, some experts doubt that psychogenic amnesia is a real phenomenon, reasoning that there is either an undetected physica...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 21, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Memory Mental health Source Type: blogs

How To Clear Four Common Roadblocks to Coverage of Stuttering Treatment
Dealing with fluency issues can be confusing and frustrating for the client and family. Navigating health insurance reimbursement for stuttering treatment can also present challenges for them. In our extensive work with clients who stutter, we’ve learned several tips for getting treatment covered—either initially or through an appeal if the insurance company denies coverage. Ease your clients’ and your own anxiety by learning how to navigate through (or around) these four common insurance roadblocks. Does the policy cover stuttering treatment? Become familiar with an insurance company’s specified be...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - September 19, 2017 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Brooke Leiman Tags: Speech-Language Pathology Fluency Disorders Speech Disorders stuttering Source Type: blogs

Caution Warranted As VA Incorporates ICER Value Assessments Into Formulary Management Process
The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Pharmacy Benefits Management Services and the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) recently announced a collaboration in which the VA will use the ICER’s drug assessments as part of its formulary development and price negotiations. This type of relationship might be normal outside of the United States (for example, in the United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia), where input from governmental health technology assessment organizations is used in determining health care coverage decisions. However, in the United States—with our multipayer health care system cov...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 18, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Dubois Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation Insurance and Coverage Payment Policy Population Health Department of Veterans Affairs drug pricing Institute for Clinical and Economic Review pharmaceuticals quality of care Veterans' He Source Type: blogs

Down syndrome traits -- many also true of non-Down low IQ adult
Recently I had the privilege of taking about  smartphone support for special needs adults for the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota. As a speaker I could attend the conference for free, including a talk by a psychologist,Dennis McGuire.I don ’t have a child with Down Syndrome (John Langdon Down ’s syndrome has become Down Syndrome) but #1 ’s IQ is in the typical Down Syndrome range. So I was curious how much of Dr McGuire’s talk applied to my son. I decided about 80% or so — even though #1’s temperament is very different from the Down Syndrome athletes I know from Special Olymp...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - September 10, 2017 Category: Disability Tags: adolescence adult behavioral therapy cognitive impairment support Source Type: blogs

Survival and Grief
There is no transcendent moment of growth or meaning in watching a childhood friend die of cancer. There is no learning experience that will somehow make me stronger. Only horror, helplessness, loss, and grief. I am deriving no spiritual uplift from this experience, only depression and despair. If someone wants to talk to me about post-traumatic growth, I will spray paint their car.Others disagree with me, I'm sure of it. For religious reasons. And I will respect their beliefs. There is no point in being a skeptical asshole to a grieving family.The most important point here is that dying patients should not have to suffer ...
Source: The Neurocritic - September 4, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Back to basics about psychosocial factors in pain (i)
From time to time I see a flurry of tweets or Facebook posts about pain and psychosocial factors. Many of them are informative, intriguing and empathic, but some are just plain wrong. The ones I most get upset about are those arguing that because someone has “psychosocial factors” their pain must be psychological in origin, followed closely by the idea that psychosocial factors equate to psychopathology. This is a series of back to basics posts where I hope to set these things right. Pain, according to the current definition, is “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or po...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - September 3, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial Source Type: blogs

Ecstasy for PTSD: Some Background
(Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog)
Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How Did I Get So Lucky?
Somehow I got the'lucky'card in the health department. Somewhere in my genes I ended up with the crapshoot of everything. I do know I have my mother's bad back and Rheumatoid Arthritis but I also got my father's hair (which is still not completely gray at 89). But the rest of it, I have no idea.So I always look for hints of how I could have gotten these lovely ailments. Then find an article that asks 'Can Trauma Cause Fibromyalgia?' But I am not so sure I understand how it would help me. They list:" The traumatic experiences that are usually correlated with fibromyalgia are the following:Certain types of viruses ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation ailments frustration Source Type: blogs

The Problem with Yelling
“The problem with verbal abuse is there is no evidence,” Marta shared. She came for help with a long-standing depression. “What do you mean lack of evidence?” I asked her. “When people are physically or sexually abused it’s concrete and real. But verbal abuse is amorphous. I feel like if I told someone I was verbally abused, they’d think I was just complaining about being yelled at,” Marta explained. “It’s much more than that,” I validated. “Much more,” she said. “The problem is no one can see my scars.” She knew intuitively that her ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hilary Jacobs Hendel, LCSW Tags: Anger Bullying PTSD Relationships Self-Esteem Trauma Treatment Dating Divorce Domestic Abuse Emotional Abuse Marriage traumatic relationship Verbal Abuse Source Type: blogs

Scientists Use Light to Erase Unwanted Memories
This study expands our understanding of how adaptive fear memory for a relevant stimulus is encoded in the brain,” said Cho. “It is also applicable to developing a novel intervention to selectively suppress pathological fear in PTSD.” Here’s UC Riverside video about how the technology works: Study in Neuron: Encoding of Discriminative Fear Memory by Input-Specific LTP in the Amygdala… Via: University of California, Riverside… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - August 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 19, 2017
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! Guess what? I’m going “off the grid” this weekend. Well, maybe not in the strictest of senses (I’ll still have my computer and phone) but in the sense that…well, let’s just say I’ve been neglecting my own personal interests — things I enjoy and feel help my personal growth — and it’s hurting my mental health. I feel unfulfilled. I have to figure out a way to stop that. Starting today. But first, the latest in this week’s mental health and wellness news! Learn how to be more supportive of your child’s teacher, why some r...
Source: World of Psychology - August 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Brain and Behavior Industrial and Workplace Narcissism Personality Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net PTSD Research Technology Source Type: blogs