Forgiveness: Yes? No? Maybe?
“My step-father abused me, and my mother is always telling me to forgive and forget.” Jodie shook her head ruefully. “And how is that going for you?” I ask. “Not so good,” Jodie replies, “I’m not doing a good job at all.” Alex shares, “My counselor told me if I don’t forgive my uncle for raping me, then I’m allowing him to live rent-free in my head.” “And how is that going for you?” I ask. “Not so good,” Alex cries, “I feel like I’m failing at recovery!” Both Jodie and Alex — and countless other sur...
Source: World of Psychology - July 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Abuse PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression Anger Forgiveness Rape Resentment Sexual Abuse Sexual Assault Sexual Trauma Source Type: blogs

2020: Jumanji Or Dystopia
“There’s No Going Back to ‘Normal’”, crudely proclaims the headline of a June piece from The Atlantic. “The Terrible Consequences of Australia’s Uber-Bushfires” reads a recent Wired article. One of our own April articles was titled “Will Medical Workers Deal With PTSD After COVID-19?”. If it wasn’t clear, an article published earlier this year in The Conversation rightly asks: “Are we living in a dystopia?”.  Indeed, what was once relegated to the fertile minds of fiction novelists has become daily occurrences. Many are drawing similariti...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Science Fiction Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality black mirror dystopia coronavirus covid19 jumanji Death Stranding video games bushfires Source Type: blogs

How PTSD Can Cause Learning Disabilities
Conclusion Researchers are still exploring potential links between PTSD and learning disabilities, but further studies will likely expand on what we know. Understanding how PTSD affects our ability to learn will help treat people with both conditions and lead to better outcomes for these patients. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - July 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amanda Levison, M.S., LMHC, LPC, CCBT Tags: Children and Teens Psychology PTSD Trauma associative learning learning disability Neuroscience Stress Hormones Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 20th 2020
This study was the first to demonstrate a causal relationship between glial senescence and neurodegeneration. In this study, accumulations of senescent astrocytes and microglia were found in tau-associated neurodegenerative disease model mice. Elimination of these senescent cells via a genetic approach can reduce tau deposition and prevent the degeneration of cortical and hippocampal neurons. Most recently, it was shown that clearance of senescent oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in AD model mice with senolytic agents could lessen the Aβ plaque load, reduce neuroinflammation, and ameliorate cognitive deficits. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

In Rats, Navitoclax Removes Senescent Chondrocytes that Contribute to Osteoarthritis
In this study, we examined the ability of the senolytic drug ABT263 to clear SnCs and further evaluated the therapeutic effect of ABT263 on post-traumatic osteoarthritis. A destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) rat model was established for in vivo experiments. We found that ABT263 reduced the expression of inflammatory cytokines and promoted cartilage matrix aggregation by inducing SnC apoptosis. Moreover, osteoarthritis pathological changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone in post-traumatic osteoarthritis rat were alleviated by ABT263 intra-articular injection. These results demonstrated that ABT263 not only ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

5 Reasons Why Games are Good for Mental Health
About a year ago, I started feeling stuck on where I wanted to go next in my career. It was a unique window for me to start something new, but the anxiety of staring into the unknowing was overwhelming.  I found myself playing solitaire, a game I loved growing up, as a way to escape the stress of thinking about what comes next. After playing I felt less anxious, and even recharged. It made me realize that games are a powerful tool to address mental health. In fact, games allow people to exercise their minds, develop social skills, and in some cases, build up hand-eye coordination and physical fitness. There a...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - July 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Neal Taparia Tags: featured internet culture psychology self-improvement focus games mental health motivation Source Type: blogs

Building a Therapeutic Alliance with a Dreamer: Trials and Tribulations of an Undocumented Immigrant
This article is a reminder to be compassionate towards your peers, even if you do not know about their immigration status. Be sensitive and understanding of the hardships associated with immigration status. More importantly, advocate for the undocumented immigrants to have access to mental health care. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alif Ahmed, MS Tags: Abuse Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy PTSD Relationships Stigma Trauma Abandonment C-PTSD DACA Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Health Insurance healthcare Immigration Insecurity Source Type: blogs

What should you do during a psychiatric medication shortage?
You have finally found a medication to treat your depression that your body tolerates well. It has taken your psychiatrist months to find the optimal dose (after two failed medication trials). The COVID-19 pandemic hit, but in spite of your new daily stressors, you seem to be doing relatively well. That is, until you hear that your antidepressant medication is now in short supply. What can you do? Mental health treatment during COVID-19 With the increased stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, prescriptions for medications to treat mental illnesses have increased more than 20% between February and March 2020. Sertraline, or Zolo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephanie Collier, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Source Type: blogs

July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month
July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. This awareness day was named after mental health activist and author Bebe Moore Campbell - and focuses on building awareness about the importance of mental wellness and effective mental health care for minorities. According to research, minorities are less likely to receive a mental health diagnosis, less likely to receive treatment for mental illness, have less access to and availability of mental health services and often receive a poorer quality of mental health care. More specifically:The percentage of Black and Latinx chi...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - July 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns mental health Source Type: blogs

Psychologists Are Mining Social Media Posts For Mental Health Research — But Many Users Have Concerns
This article contains discussion of suicide and self-harm In 2014, the Samaritans launched what seemed like an innovative new project: Radar. Designed to provide what the charity described as an “online safety net”, users could sign up to Radar to receive updates on the content of other people’s tweets, with emails sent out based on a list of key phrases meant to detect whether someone was feeling distressed. In principle, this meant people could keep an eye on friends who were vulnerable: if they missed a tweet where somebody said they felt suicidal or wanted to self-harm, for example, Radar would send ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Facebook Feature Mental health Twitter Source Type: blogs

Sexual Abuse and Eating Disorders: What ’s the Connection?
What is the connection between sexual abuse and developing an eating disorder? Why does bingeing, purging, starving and chronic dieting become a “solution” for the abuse? Abuse shatters the sacred innocence of a child and often becomes a primary trigger for an eating disorder. The survivor of sexual abuse becomes plagued with confusion, guilt, shame, fear, anxiety, self-punishment, and rage. She (or he) seeks the soothing comfort, protection, and anesthesia that food offers. Food, after all, is the most available, legal, socially sanctioned, cheapest mood altering drug on the market! And emotional eating is a m...
Source: World of Psychology - June 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Abuse Eating Disorders Trauma Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Sexual Abuse Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Addiction a Disease?
  What is the link between addiction and mental illness? Is addiction a choice? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss whether addiction should be classified as a disease and whether or not it should require medical treatment. Gabe also shares his personal story of addiction and how it tied in with his bipolar disorder. What’s your take? Tune in for an in-depth discussion which covers every angle of this often controversial topic. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning...
Source: World of Psychology - June 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs

The Unique Benefits of Teletherapy
Teletherapy is seen as an inferior alternative to in-person therapy. But while it has some drawbacks, online therapy has plenty of pluses, too. First the drawbacks: Some clients miss their therapist’s office, which they associate with safety and healing, said Jodi Aman, LCSW, a psychotherapist in Rochester, N.Y. Technical difficulties—from poor internet connections to visibility issues–can interrupt sessions. Finding a private, quiet space at home can be challenging. Still, many people prefer teletherapy. As psychologist Regine Galanti, Ph.D, pointed out, the biggest myth about teletherapy is that it&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - June 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Psychotherapy Treatment teletherapy Source Type: blogs

Repetitive negative thinking may increase (or perhaps be caused by) cognitive decline and Alzheimer ’s pathology
This article was originally published on The Conversation. The Study in Context: Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical disease Report: 35% of worldwide dementia cases could be prevented by modifying these 9 modifiable risk factors Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - June 16, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Conversation Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness aging Alzheimer's disease prevention Alzheimers-disease anxiety behavioural marker brain health Brain-Fitness chronic-stress cognitive behavioural therapy Cognitive Debt cognitive decline Source Type: blogs

Living in the Now while Dealing with Distress
As a chronic worrier, ongoing anxiety warrior, and general wary-of-what’s-going-to-happen-next kind of person, I know how healing it can be to practice the art of living in the present. As simple as that goal seems, though, it sometimes proves a lot harder than it sounds.  I’ve read numerous articles and books on the subject, including Eckhart Tolle’s The Power of Now, which offers specific practices on how to connect to the outer world and, even more importantly, to the stillness of our inner being to help anchor ourselves in the present moment. As Tolle points out, people can cope with whatever ari...
Source: World of Psychology - June 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Anxiety and Panic Books Self-Help Eckhart Tolle Living in the Now Meditation Stress The Power of Now Source Type: blogs

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June is PTSD Awareness Month. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can occur inchildren and adults who've experienced or witnessed a traumatic event. PTSD can also occur for new moms.PTSD can result from a natural disaster, accident, physical/sexual/emotional abuse, a terrorist act, war/combat, rape or other types of violent personal assaults. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a treatable mental health disorder. Here are some of the hallmark symptoms:Intrusive memories: Upsetting dreams or reoccurring flashbacks about the event.Avoidance: Avoiding the memory of the event, or places and people that remi...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - June 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns maternal mental health postpartum PTSD. Source Type: blogs

Fears About Reentering Our Lives (FAROL): A Psychotherapist Takes You Behind the Scenes
The cicada, an insect with large clear wings, hibernates underground for 17 years. It takes almost two decades for this insect to slowly crawl out of the earth, to live, to breathe, to mate. As the United States slowly lifts quarantine and lockdowns, we find ourselves burrowing out of our own cocoons in which we have hunkered down to once again emerge to the light of day. We identify with the cicada in that this quarantine has surely felt like a full 17 years! And — coincidentally — it is this very year of 2020 that the broods of cicadas are emerging in droves. We emerge gradually, with trepidation, masks still...
Source: World of Psychology - June 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Habits Happiness Alcohol Use Authenticity Career Change coronavirus COVID-19 Habit Change Marriage Personal Growth social distancing teletherapy Source Type: blogs

Details of 155 Immigration Detainers for U.S. Citizens
David J. BierImmigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) routinely requests that local law enforcement detain U.S. citizens to allow it to pick them up. ICE ’s recordslist 3,158 U.S. citizens as targets of ICE detainers from October 2002 to September 2019. Another 1.6 percent of actual ICEarrests through Secure Communities —the targeting system that ICE uses to issue detainers—were U.S. citizens from October 2008 to April 2011—or 3,627 citizens. Immigration courts—again with incomplete records—show 2,549 removal proceedings terminated in the favor of U.S. citizens from 2002 to June 9, 2017...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 4, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

After COVID-19: What Will Be the Long-Term Emotional Effects?
We hear that we’re headed in the right direction as the curve continues to flatten and states begin to loosen restrictions and open up. For the first time, there may be a light at the end of the tunnel. Great news!  But as encouraging as this news may be, many remain fearful of opening up too soon, instigating a second wave. Regardless of who’s right or wrong, there will come a day when we will be without COVID-19 (my lips to God’s ears, eh?). And as we begin to heal our broken lives, many of us may find our psychological recovery lagging far behind the scourge of this pandemic. This pandemic has ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joseph Luciani Tags: depression featured health and fitness psychology reading self education self-improvement covid covid_19 mental health pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

How this emergency room nurse got diagnosed with PTSD [PODCAST]
“Over a period of about two years, our city experienced a very large influx of seniors. One nearby town grew by over five thousand people. This, in turn, created a surge of patients coming to the hospital. As most were older, they often had multiple medical conditions. They would almost always require more complex care. […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 1, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/the-podcast-by-kevinmd" rel="tag" > The Podcast by KevinMD < /a > < /span > Tags: Podcast Emergency Medicine Nursing Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Feeling Trapped or Abandoned: When Relationships Run Hot or Cold
By nature, humans are wired for connection. We seek out others to share our lives with, with the goal of forming lasting and intimate bonds. So feeling trapped or abandoned in an intimate relationship shouldn’t be a common thing, should it? Actually, these experiences are common for partners who wind up repeating cycles within intimate relationships that they may be unaware of. Feeling trapped or abandoned are commonly seen in the push-pull dynamic found in unhealthy relationships; both styles often represent two sides of the same coin. Engulfment and Abandonment Defined Fear of being engulfed, or trapped, is often i...
Source: World of Psychology - May 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: Relationships Abandonment Attachment Style Borderline Personality Engulfment Intimacy Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

The Second Wave: Coronavirus & Mental Health
The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - May 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 25th 2020
In conclusion, our results suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby the canonical NF-κB cascade and a mitochondrial fission pathway interdependently regulate endothelial inflammation. Lin28 as a Target for Nerve Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/05/lin28-as-a-target-for-nerve-regeneration/ Researchers here show that the gene Lin28 regulates axon regrowth. In mice, raised levels of Lin28 produce greater regeneration of nerve injuries. Past research has investigated Lin28 from the standpoint of producing a more general improvement in regenerative capacity. It improves mitoch...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How the COVID-19 pandemic is traumatizing health care professionals
Many of us (especially psychiatrists and physician coaches) have been warning the medical profession at large for weeks now that we are headed for unprecedented numbers of physicians, nurses, other health care workers, and first responders suffering from PTSD. A free support group of psychiatrists for physicians formed rapidly. Several articles have been written. Physician […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 21, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rebecca-elia" rel="tag" > Rebecca Elia, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

An emergency room nurse diagnosed with PTSD
An excerpt from The View From The Wrong Side Of The Day: A Story About Nursing, PTSD And Other Shenanigans. I’m not exactly sure when things first started to get bad for me. Thinking back, it was all rather like the analogy of the frog in the boiling water. Put a frog in a boiling […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 19, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/t-c-randall" rel="tag" > T. C. Randall < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Emergency Medicine Nursing Source Type: blogs

Follistatin Gene Therapy Doubles Muscle Mass in Mice
Follistatin is an inhibitor of myostatin. Blocking myostatin activity enhances muscle growth, with accompanying beneficial side-effects such as a loss of excess fat tissue. This is well proven. There are a good number of animal lineages (mice, dogs, cows, and so forth) resulting from natural or engineered myostatin loss of function mutations, and even a few well-muscled human individuals with similar mutations. A number of groups are at various stages in the development of therapies to either upregulate follistatin or inhibit myostatin. The latter is further along in the formal regulatory process: human trials have been co...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Understanding and Coping with Emotional Flashbacks
What is an emotional flashback? Posttraumatic emotional flashbacks go by several different names including: emotional “triggers”, flashbacks or simply “triggered.” Emotional flashbacks are intrusive thoughts or mental images of a lived traumatic experience where it may feel like a replay button is causing you to relive the trauma over and over. Certain scents, noises, tastes, images, places, situations or people may create a flashback of the emotional or psychological trauma, making it feel as if it were happening all over again. For example, if you were at an airport awaiting your flight and witne...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: Memory and Perception PTSD Trauma emotional flashbacks traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Here ’s What Loneliness Can Do to You During COVID-19
“The loneliest moment in someone’s life is when they are watching their whole world fall apart, and all they can do is stare blankly.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald Loneliness is never easy to endure, yet during times of mandatory social isolation and distancing, such as millions of Americans are experiencing during the COVID-19 pandemic, it can be particularly damaging. Among its many effects, loneliness can exacerbate and bring upon a host of mental and physical conditions. Social Isolation and Loneliness May Increase Inflammation A study by researchers at the University of Surrey and Brunel University Lo...
Source: World of Psychology - May 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Self-Help coronavirus COVID-19 Loneliness social distancing Source Type: blogs

Want to Stem the Rising Mental Health Crisis? Look Beyond the Usual Suspects for Help
As the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic effects spread, concerns about mental health impacts continue to grow. For example, we worry for health and human services professionals whose duties involve higher risk for trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress. Reports of global increases in family violence also suggest that there will be many violence victims and witnesses in need of mental health support. Add to this the potential effects of social isolation, health-related anxiety, and that these mental health problems may persist and worsen long after society goes back to “normal.” And this is all happening as...
Source: World of Psychology - May 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lynsay Ayer, Ph.D. & Clare Stevens, M.P.H. Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Stress Suicide coronavirus COVID-19 Depression pandemic Task sharing Source Type: blogs

The Top 5 Practical Digital Health Technologies in the Fight Against COVID-19: An Infographic
We reported on how digital health came to the spotlight early on. As we learn more about the disease, we see digital health technologies increasingly getting adopted in this context. We created an infographic to summarize all the digital health tech efforts against this pandemic.  This will help caregivers and policymakers understand how we can rely on technologies in the fight against the novel coronavirus; and which sectors and phases of healthcare are aided by digital health. In our infographic, listed on the Y-axis are the technologies making a significant impact in the fight against the pandemic. Indicated ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 7, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality digital health infographics covid covid19 Source Type: blogs

The Unseen Trauma of COVID-19
The kind of trauma doctors, nurses, and others in direct contact with COVID-19 patients have endured for months now — with an uncertain future posing a threat of many more months of horror in the hardest-hit areas — is the kind of exhausting and overwhelming stress that impacts the brain and the rest of the body in the worst ways. Whether or not these individuals were mentally healthy before the pandemic, this work takes an often-invisible toll. Sometimes, in a life and death struggle, that toll becomes a pull toward suicide. Compassionate Fatigue, also called Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS), can happen when p...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Trauma Compassionate Fatigue coronavirus COVID-19 Healthcare Workers Secondary Traumatic Stress Source Type: blogs

Minimizing your Risk of PTSD from COVID-19
I was recently asked if I thought the pandemic is a national trauma. The answer is a simple “Yes.” By the standards of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual), the volume used by mental health professionals to guide diagnosis and treatment, the COVID-19 pandemic meets the criteria for trauma. Not all stressful events meet those criteria. The DSM-5 definition of trauma requires “actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violence” (italics mine). Stressful events not involving an immediate threat to life or physical injury (such as a divorce or job loss) are not considered ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Psychology PTSD Self-Help coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic social distancing Trauma Source Type: blogs

Will Medical Workers Deal With PTSD After COVID-19?
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is commonly linked with war veterans. This mental health condition however can be triggered by suffering or witnessing any terrifying event like accidents, natural disasters,  violent experience – or a disastrous pandemic. It comes as no surprise that medical health professionals and other people in the frontline of the fight against coronavirus are expected to have a surge in trauma-related illnesses, particularly PTSD. Beside protecting and helping personnel physically as well as mentally, there are also digital health solutions that can come to the rescue. A Canadian r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality digital health ptsd stress stress management medical professionals digital healthcare coronavirus covid covid19 Source Type: blogs

Tracking Emotions as Part of a Daily Routine During a Pandemic
If you’re like many, you probably have your calendar marked off with how many days you’ve been stuck at home during this “new normal.” We all want to get back to work, back to school, and back to our lives as we knew them before social distancing and quarantine were being included with #saferathome on social media.  If you’re among the lucky ones, then working from home or distance learning are old hat for you, so being quarantined may make little difference in your everyday life outside of community or state restrictions and closures. For the rest, these new conditions and restrictions o...
Source: World of Psychology - April 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: Self-Help Boredom Busyness coronavirus COVID-19 Hobbies Meditation routine social distancing Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: April 25, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net is, unsurprisingly, heavy on COVID-19 news. Get tips on how to build a psychological first aid kit, the latest on how coronavirus quarantine could affect different kids, ways your media consumption is traumatizing you, and more. Be well, friends! How to Build a “Psychological First Aid Kit”: The American Mountain Guides Association recently published “Stress and the Resilience for Coronavirus” which is a collection of mental health resources designed by Laura McGladrey, a National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) instructor. McGladrey is also a nurse prac...
Source: World of Psychology - April 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Autism Children coronavirus COVID-19 neurodivergent pandemic PTSD Source Type: blogs

Life after COVID-19: What Will Change?
The news is ripe with information surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. We saw the number of confirmed cases is plummeting in countries like South Korea. In a surprise move, Apple and Google teamed up to help track the virus. Some countries are even thinking of lifting their lockdowns altogether. Yes, that’s the good news we’re all looking forward to: when this will be finally behind us. Let’s have no doubt about it, this will come to an end, like we discussed in a recent article. We will have a vaccine and new, approved treatments based on millions of patients’ data. We will have new public health ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 21, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Telemedicine & Smartphones ptsd healthcare systems data privacy tracking coronavirus covid19 immunity passport vaccine research Source Type: blogs

We must care about our doctors. Especially now.
We are all traumatized by the unfathomable devastation caused by the coronavirus. What can we expect as a result of this national and worldwide trauma? The trauma approach uses posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as a frame to understand trauma. PTSD is a normal reaction to abnormal situations, which can be ongoing, according to the American […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peggy-a-rothbaum" rel="tag" > Peggy A. Rothbaum, PhD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The COVID-19 Crisis Is a Trauma Pandemic in the Making
The majority of the attention on COVID-19 has focused on slowing down the progression of the spread of this virus. The importance of “flattening the curve” to support our medical system has understandably taken center stage in the media. However, as a trauma therapist, I see a pandemic of another kind brewing as well, which isn’t being focused on enough. The social, mental, and cultural impact of going through a global pandemic will leave a psychological trauma pandemic behind.  As we have been reminded in this situation, it’s important to be prepared for the medical impact of a pandemic. Our s...
Source: World of Psychology - April 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Michael J. Salas, PsyD Tags: Trauma coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Using Death as Motivation to Live
 How often do you think about death? If you’re like most people, you probably try to keep it in the back corners of your mind. But according to today’s guest, Kate Manser, remembering you might die tomorrow is the best inspiration to live today. Kate asserts that when we incorporate a certain level of mortality awareness into our daily lives, it motivates us to value life so much more and to live each day with intention. We start to find joy in the small things and live in a way that makes a positive outward ripple for all of humanity. So how do we manage to think about death without falling into fear? Tune...
Source: World of Psychology - April 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Death & Dying General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Interview LifeHelper Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: March 28, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net dissects the psychology of comfort TV, tips on how to protect yourself from others’ negative energy, ways to take care of your mental health while working from home, and more. Why You Can’t Stop Streaming Seinfeld. Or Frasier. Or Bones: On the Psychology of Comfort TV: No doubt you’re familiar with comfort television, but is your idea of comfort TV the same as your mom’s or dad’s? Sister’s or brother’s? What about your spouse’s or significant other’s? College roommate’s? You might have answered “yes” or &ldq...
Source: World of Psychology - March 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net comfort TV First Responders Journaling MDMA methylenedioxymethamphetamine military Negative Energy PTSD Veterans Source Type: blogs

Minimizing the Risks of PTSD from the COVID-19 Pandemic
It is a stressful time. Many have begun feeling the emotional and psychological effects of being quarantined. People are being told to stay indoors, to limit leaving their home except for necessities and to skip socializing altogether, if possible. Supermarket shelves are empty; toilet paper and hand sanitizer are sold out. Many communities are placing restrictions on where people can go. Buzzwords like “social distancing” and “martial law” are in the news in recent weeks. Hospitals are overcrowded and staff are overworked. Many playgrounds, amusement parks, hotels and beaches have been closed until...
Source: World of Psychology - March 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness PTSD coronavirus COVID-19 quarantine traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Coping with the coronavirus pandemic for people with anxiety disorders
These days, we all have to accept the anxiety inherent in living in the time of the coronavirus pandemic and COVID-19. If there was a way to dispel all anxious feelings, I’d tell you, but there isn’t. The one exception might be someone who could summon such a degree of denial that they carry on as if everything was normal. And that, as I’m sure you can see, would prove to be very, very unwise. Anxiety helps us prepare to respond in a more adaptive and healthy way. Some people find it possible to tolerate some degree of discomfort and can manage their anxiety in a healthy manner. Often that’s because...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Sharp, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Infectious diseases Mental Health Source Type: blogs

The Memory of Trauma in the Body
Keith hadn’t thought about his father in many years. Though he had some good times with his dad, one of his most vivid memories was not so good. He was 10 years old and his father was determined to teach him how to dive. He remembers feeling pressured to get on the diving board and just do it. He remembers trying, really trying but he just couldn’t take the plunge. “Let’s go, boy,” his dad yelled. “Just do it. Don’t be a wimp! It’s no big deal. Jump!” Keith wished it was no big deal, but for him it was. He felt terrified as he listened to his dad shouting and saw the ot...
Source: World of Psychology - March 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: PTSD Trauma Breathing Exercise Childhood Trauma Memory Post Traumatic Stress stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Childhood Emotional Neglect and the Coronavirus
Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN) impacts individuals in a wide variety of ways. But in this unprecedented time of social distancing, working remotely, and even quarantine, CEN can exacerbate the responses that so many of us already experience in “normal” times. It’s important for those of us who are having feelings that are more heightened than usual, or which seem disproportionate to the situation, to know that we are not alone. Our reactions, however extreme or confusing, are a natural response to childhood events over which we had little or no control There are a myriad of effects of growing up with C...
Source: World of Psychology - March 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Robin Schwartz Tags: Abuse PTSD Trauma childhood emotional neglect Childhood Trauma Codependence Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 fight or flight Resilience scarcity of necessities social distancing Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Schizophrenia in Men
Men and women experience schizophrenia differently; from the age of onset to symptoms and how society treats those with mental disorders.  Schizophrenic, Rachel Star Withers and co-host Gabe Howard continue the discussion of the differences from the last episode but change the focus to men.  Jason Jepson, an author who has schizophrenia joins for a man’s perspective and Dr. Hayden Finch returns to explain the clinical side of the issues. Highlights in “Schizophrenia in Men” Episode [01:30] Age of onset [04:00] Symptoms in men vs women [05:00] Interview with Jason Jepson [07:30] Jason discusses ...
Source: World of Psychology - March 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Men's Issues Psychiatry Psychology Living With Schizophrenia Mental Disorder Mental Health Mental Illness Symptoms Of Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Finding Resilience in the Midst of Challenges
“A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him.” – David Brinkley One thing is certain, and that is that each day presents new challenges. It isn’t the fact that challenges occur that is most important, however, but how well an individual is able to adapt and bounce back from setbacks and go on to face daily challenges. The secret is resilience, yet a little known fact is that it is possible to find and tap into a wellspring of resilience even in the midst of challenges.  A common misconception for many people is to wonder if we’re up for ...
Source: World of Psychology - March 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Coping Skills Resilience Source Type: blogs

Coping with COVID-19: Resources for Managing Mental Health
Despite coronavirus, Trump keeps shaking hands(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Don't shake hands. Maintain a distance of 6 feet. Don't touch surfaces that could contain respiratory droplets. Don't touch your face. [It'svery hard tonot touch your face.]When your leaders fail to follow the most basic guidelines forpreventing the spread of COVID-19, trust and confidence are eroded.Trump coronavirus press conference an exemplar of what not to do  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)The coronavirus pandemic has raised (nearly) everyone's level of anxiety and stress. Rampant panic buying, superstore shelves emptied of toilet pap...
Source: The Neurocritic - March 14, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Stealing Cinderella (A True Story)
 Would you risk everything for love? Even your life? In today’s podcast, Gabe interviews Mark Diehl, author of Stealing Cinderella: How I Became an International Fugitive for Love. Mark’s book is his true-life story of growing up with an emotionally unstable mother, his resulting rebellious streak and drug use, and the wild ride of his forbidden love affair with a South Korean woman. The story details the couple’s narrow escape from her rich, abusive family in a journey where they almost lost their lives. Tune in for a true-life fairy tale that’s stranger than fiction. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW G...
Source: World of Psychology - March 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Motivation and Inspiration Podcast Relationships The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Male Survivors of Sexual Assault and Abuse
 Did you know one in six males are sexually assaulted before their 18th birthday? Unfortunately, many victims are reluctant to come forward due to cultural conditioning. In today’s podcast, Gabe speaks with two psychologists about this very common but somewhat taboo issue. They tackle the prevalent myths surrounding male sexual assault and discuss why so many victims suffer in secrecy. What can be done? Where can survivors reach out for help? Join us for an in-depth talk on this very important and under-discussed topic. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW Guest information for ‘Male Sexual Assault’ Podcast Episo...
Source: World of Psychology - March 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Abuse Children and Teens General Interview Men's Issues Podcast The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Why does Generation Z require so many workplace accommodations?
Recently the Wall Street Journal reported on how many young people are now seeking“accommodations” at work for their anxiety, PTSD, depression, and other mental conditions. The article provoked a lively discussion split largely on age lines. While older people accuse Gen Z members of being“emotional hemophiliacs,” Gen Z members often say they have […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/martha-rosenberg" rel="tag" > Martha Rosenberg < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs