Listening with the Ears of the Heart
I am a privileged listener, like cab drivers, clergy, bartenders and hair stylists. My ability has been long-honed, as a career therapist with over 40 years under my belt. It started way before I set foot on campus in 1977 at Glassboro State College (now Rowan University) in Glassboro, NJ. I figure it began when I was a kid and my friends would come to me for advice. Back then, I didn’t have the benefit of the education to offer anything of substance. I did learn the art of nodding, smiling and saying, “um, hummm,” while I held space. Apparently, it was what they needed, since they kept coming back for mo...
Source: World of Psychology - December 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Personal Professional Source Type: blogs

Opioid Overdose: Causes, Signs, and What to Do
Opioid Overdose: Signs, Symptoms, and What to Do Any individual who uses opioids runs the risk of overdosing. Overdoses can be fatal. In fact, more than 130 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids every day. This makes it important to know what causes an opioid overdose, the signs that an opioid overdose is occurring, and what to do in the event of an opioid overdose. Opioid Overdose Causes In 2017, the CDC reported that more than 15,000 individuals died from drug overdoses involving heroin in the United States. That’s almost 5 deaths for every 100,000 Americans. However, there are some people who...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 27, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Painkiller drug overdose opiate addiction opioid opioids Source Type: blogs

Why Do People Drink Alcohol?
Alcohol is a dangerous substance. It is addictive, can deteriorate one’s health, and puts innocent people in danger. However, it is embraced and celebrated in society and there are many opportunities throughout life to try alcohol. Knowing that alcohol is dangerous and addictive can leave many people wondering, “why do people drink alcohol?” Soothe an Underlying Mental Health Condition One of the major reasons that individuals who suffer from alcohol use disorder drink are because they are suffering from an underlying mental health condition and are using alcohol to self-medicate. This condition can be e...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 27, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center Source Type: blogs

Mindfulness Versus Microdosing: Get High on Being Present
Microdosing has become very popular, and many people believe it’s a life changer. It involves taking a small amount — a fraction of a dose — of a hallucinogenic drug to achieve psychological benefits while minimizing any undesirable side effects. Most microdosers ingest LSD (lysergic acid diethyl amide) or mushrooms (psilocybin), which are psychedelics that can create profoundly intensified sensory perception. These drugs became popular in the 1960s and ’70s, and for anyone who used them then, they too espoused the drugs’ mind-altering effects. The difference back then was that people weren&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - December 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ora Nadrich Tags: Addiction Medications Mindfulness Hallucinogens LSD lysergic acid microdose psilocybin Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 21, 2019
This article lists 8 simple things we can do to help minimize anxiety during the holidays. Grounding Techniques for Holiday Gatherings: During the holiday season, even the most healthy individuals can become destabilized — when your internal sense of calm and confidence is unexpectedly thwarted. And if you struggle with mental health issues, your chances for destabilization increase even more. In this article, the author shares four simple ways we can ground ourselves when we’re feeling unhinged. Lonely, Burned-Out, and Depressed: The State of Millennials’ Mental Health Entering the 2020s: The mental heal...
Source: World of Psychology - December 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: Anxiety and Panic Depression Disorders General Holiday Coping Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Around the Net Research Stress Body Dysmorphic Disorder grounding techniques Holiday Stress Holidays Millennials Pollution Se Source Type: blogs

The Top Digital Health Technologies Helping Refugees Around the World
“Refugees are persons who are outside their country of origin for reasons of feared persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or other circumstances which have seriously disturbed public order and, as a result, require international protection,” writes the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). However, refugees’ plea isn’t limited to people leaving their home country en masse following atrocious wars or political instability, but can be that of anyone else, like you and me, following unforeseen calamities, be it natural or man-made, leading to similar situations. The November ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Telemedicine & Smartphones digital health technology digital technology digital innovation refugee Source Type: blogs

Opioids and Mental Health
Opioids are a group of very strong pain relievers used to relieve pain after a surgery or traumatic injury. They are much more effective than over-the-counter pain relievers, however, they are also highly addictive. People who suffer from mental health conditions are much more likely to become addicted to opioids, making it important to understand the link between opioids and mental health. The Connection Between Addiction to Opioids and Mental Health People with mood and anxiety disorders are twice as likely to use opioids as people without mental health disorders They are also more than three times as likely to misuse ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 11, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Mental Health mental health costs mental health coverage mental illness opiate addiction opiates opioid opioid crisis opioids Source Type: blogs

A Disruptive Treatment Promises New Hope to PTSD Patients: Will Physicians Be Willing to Use It?  
Millions of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — from veterans to rape survivors — have new hope because of a watershed study showing that the injection of an anesthetic to a bundle of nerves in the neck can relieve their symptoms in a clinically significant way. The treatment is known as the stellate ganglion block, or SGB. Used since 1925 for problems such as pain in the arm and shingles, it is safe and effective. In the newly released, eight-week, U.S. Army-funded clinical trial of 108 active-duty service members with PTSD, the nonprofit research institute RTI International found that patients...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Eugene Lipov, MD Tags: Personal PTSD Research Treatment Hyper Vigilance Neuroscience Neurotransmitter Norepinephrine Posttraumatic Stress Disorder pruning Source Type: blogs

Three evidence-based ways to develop a resilient mind
___ Life throws chaos at us on a regular basis—whether it’s our finances, our relationships, or our health. In the work world, around 50 percent of people are burned out in industries like health care, banking, and nonprofits, and employers spend $300 billion per year on workplace-related stress. In response, we just keep on pushing through, surviving on adrenaline. We overschedule ourselves; we drink another coffee; we respond to one more email. If we stay amped up all the time, we think, we’ll eventually be able to get things done. But all that does is burn us out, drain our productivity, and lead to ex...
Source: SharpBrains - December 4, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness adrenaline Breathing coffee creativity Decision-making exhaustion Mindfulness-Training productivity relaxed state-of-mind Stress Stress Response workplace Source Type: blogs

Podcast | Chronic Illness and Depression
 After receiving two chronic illness diagnosis by the age of 24, it really was no surprise that host Jackie Zimmerman also started to experience depression. Unable to tackle both, Jackie chose to focus on her physical health, letting her mental health deteriorate quickly — and dangerously. In this episode, we discuss the mind-body connection and how when your body is sick, your mind can quickly follow.   (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular b...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Antidepressant Depression Medications Not Crazy Podcast Stress Suicide Trauma Source Type: blogs

Podcast | Psychiatric Ward: First Hand Account (Part 2 of 2)
 In part two of this series, we go into more detail about Gabe’s inpatient hospital stay and focus on what he was thinking while he was hospitalized and what he learned after he was discharged.  We talked about what to do if you feel like you need to be hospitalized, the steps you need to take in order to be admitted and the obstacles involved with getting the help you may need. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Bipolar Depression Not Crazy Podcast Trauma Treatment Source Type: blogs

Concerning Findings About Cannabis Use
While recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states as of November 2019, more states gravitating toward legalizing the recreational use of the substance, and 33 states allowing medical marijuana, there’s apparently no stopping this trend. Cannabis, in the form of marijuana, hemp, and cannabidiol (CBD)  is being used for pain relief, to alleviate stress, cope with anxiety, and a number of other mental health disorders and addictions. Yet, there’s a dearth of clinical studies that have been conducted on the overall effects on a user’s health. Clearly, as Crain’s Detroit Business points out, more ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Medications Substance Abuse Cannabis Marijuana Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: November 2, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net focuses on how turning your to-do list into an action plan can help you become more productive, why nightmares can be beneficial to your mental health, how your brain type affects who you are, and more. How Nightmares Could Be Good for Your Mental Health: Typically, we don’t view nightmares as pleasant experiences, but they might be positive ones. Well, have positive benefits, that is. Research shows that nightmares can help relieve stress, offer insight into our suppressed emotions, and prepare us for real-life threats. According to Harvard University’s Dr. Deirdre...
Source: World of Psychology - November 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Abusive Relationships Adhd brain types Mothers Nightmares Romantic Relationships Self Destruction Self Sabotage Teens Source Type: blogs

Free Live Webinar: Trauma Bonding (Why People Bond With Their Abusers)
(Please note: This free live webinar will be recorded and a copy made available to all who register.) Trauma bonding, as the name suggests, has to do with attaching to someone via a traumatic event and/or ongoing treatment. Often referred to as “Stockholm Syndrome,” wherein hostages bond with their captors — sometimes even assuming their captors’ views. Trauma bonding is common with abused children, who cry for their abusive parents when taken away by Children Services, victims of abuse often develop a strong sense of loyalty towards their abuser, despite the fact that the bond is damaging to them. ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Webinar abuse complex PTSD Domestic Violence Emotional Attachment trauma bonding Traumatic bonding Source Type: blogs

Making young minds resilient to disasters
As a pediatrician and a parent, I often think about what I’d do to keep my children safe if we were hit by a storm like Hurricane Dorian, which reduced whole towns in the Bahamas to rubble. Or by a wildfire, like the Camp Fire that burned the town of Paradise, California to the ground. Or how we’d deal with this year’s record-breaking rains that flooded scores of towns throughout the Mississippi River Basin. Disasters like these — which may be getting more dangerous with climate change — can directly harm a child’s body. But what’s less well appreciated is how they can harm our chi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aaron Bernstein, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Children's Health Environmental health Source Type: blogs

10 Ways to Boost Self-Care and Happiness When You ’ re Single
A lot of people feel guilty when they put themselves first. If you’re single and looking to learn how to take care of yourself and be happier, there are a few self care ideas and tips that can help. Self-care is the beginning of learning how to be happy with your life, even when you’re single. When you think of self-care, you may think of getting a massage or a mani-pedi. That’s alright because there’s nothing wrong with getting those things. But, learning how to take care of yourself means learning how to take care of your mind, body, and soul. Creative Ways To Be Happy & Confident When You&rsq...
Source: World of Psychology - October 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Happiness Publishers YourTango happy Self Care single Source Type: blogs

20 Medical Technology Advances: Medicine In The Future – Part I
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs

Top 7 Evidence-Based Mental Health Apps
According to a recently-published interview with John Torous, MD, MBI, Director of the Digital Psychiatry Division at the Department of Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, there are seven great evidenced-based mental health apps you should consider. Evidence-based means they’ve met the minimum requirements by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or have at least one randomized clinical research study that supports their use and effectiveness. The recommendation for these evidence-based mental health apps comes in an interview with Dr. Torous found in the Oct. 2019 issue of The Carlat Psychiatr...
Source: World of Psychology - October 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Self-Help Technology evidence-based mental health apps Smartphone Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Joker Movie and Mental Illness
Did the movie Joker portray mental illness correctly and does it matter? We passionately go over the movie Joker from the lense of people living with mental illness and discuss whether or not there are implications of making a movie like this. Does it help us or hurt us? What if it does both? Listen in to hear Gabe’s freakishly good recollection of scenes from the movie as Jackie struggles to separate entertainment from reality.  Spoiler Alert: You don’t need to see Joker to appreciate this conversation but we do go over the plot and reveal some important scenes from the movie. (Transcript Available Below)...
Source: World of Psychology - October 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Antidepressant Antipsychotic Depression Minding the Media Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child
You're reading How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Sometimes, it seems like our kids aren’t learning anything from us—but that’s simply not the case. Kids absorb all the information around them and learn by example. While that can be a good thing, it can also be a problem if you don’t want to pass on certain behaviors you’re modeling for them, like anxiety. If you’re struggling with anxiety, first remember that...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SarahDaren Tags: depression family featured psychology self improvement Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: October 5, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net looks at new research involving music and personality traits, learning how to talk to yourself with self-compassion, the possible link between air pollution and violence, and more. New Psychology Research Links Conservative Music, But Not Rebellious Music, to Maladaptive Personality Traits: According to new research published in Psychology of Music, intense and rebellious music genres — like heavy metal and rap — doesn’t seem to be linked to maladaptive personality traits; however, the research did show some “modest links” between certain other kind...
Source: World of Psychology - October 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Aggression Air Pollution assault Happiness Inner Dialogue Music Personality Traits PTSD Relationship self-compassion violence Violent Crimes Source Type: blogs

UW Medicine creates new Institute for Brain Health Solutions focused on cognitive aging, brain wellness and mental health
__________ $50 million gift is foundation for brain disorders research (UW press release): “UW Medicine is creating the Garvey Institute for Brain Health Solutions to develop effective new treatments for brain disorders, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, addiction and Alzheimer’s disease. The foundational $50 million gift to establish the institute was made by local philanthropists Lynn and Mike Garvey… In its first five years, the Garvey Institute will work on three flagship projects that have the potential to benefit millions of people: cognitive aging and brain wellness, the effects ...
Source: SharpBrains - October 4, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness addiction Alzheimer’s Disease brain disorders brain-wellness Cognitive Aging depression Garvey Institute mental health post-traumatic-stress-disorder UW Medic Source Type: blogs

Finding Mental & Emotional Support Now That You ’ re Sober
PSA: there’s some text missing from the headlines popping up lately that show quitting drinking improves women’s mental health. Essentially, the findings of the Canadian Medical Association Journal are that not drinking at all is actually better for your health than drinking when you’re stressed, no matter how much you want to lean into the whole a-glass-of-red-wine-a-day-is-good-for-you thing. But it’s not that simple. There’s no foolproof formula like: “If I stop drinking, then my mental health will improve” (as nice as that would be). For many of us, there’s legwork neces...
Source: World of Psychology - September 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers The Fix Emotional Support Mental Health sober Sobriety Source Type: blogs

A psychiatrist closes his practice
After practicing psychiatry and behavioral health for nearly 25 years, I ’m done. I feel sick, and especially sicker from my occupation. Not merely burned out, but ill. Primarily mentally. I’ve always had complex post-traumatic stress disorder. And depression and generalized anxiety, and many other diagnoses from the DSM. But, I’ve covered my illnesses so I […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-dorfman" rel="tag" > Michael Dorfman, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Psychotherapy leads in treating post-traumatic stress disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common, often debilitating mental health condition that occurs in some people who have experienced trauma. It can have a negative impact on mood, mimicking depression, and is characterized by petrifying episodes in which affected people re-experience trauma. New research suggests psychotherapy may provide a long-lasting reduction of distressing symptoms. Over the course of a lifetime, many people directly experience or witness trauma, such as sexual assault, violence, or natural disasters. Experts estimate that 10% to 20% of these people will experience acute (short-term) PTSD. So...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam P. Stern, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: September 7, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net has the latest on an upcoming star-studded mental health awareness special, a new report on mental health websites sharing user data, the dangers of avoiding discord in your relationships, and more. Enjoy! Shawn Mendes, Lizzo, Halsey & More to Participate in ‘I’m Listening’ Mental Health Awareness Radio Special: To kick off National Suicide Prevention Week, music and sports stars including Lizzo, Tegan and Sara, Blink-182, Halsey, Disturbed, and Shawn Mendes — as well as a number of mental health professionals and first responders — will partici...
Source: World of Psychology - September 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net anxiety Bipolar Disorder Christine McCullough Data Mining Diagnosis Dr. Lisa Sanders employee mental health excessive spending Privacy PTSD S1PR2 Starbucks Stigma Stress Veterans Source Type: blogs

Why Traumatic Memories Are So Hard To Suppress (M)
PTSD is thought to affect around one-third of people who experience a traumatic event. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - September 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Memory subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Physicians Should Play a New Role in Reducing Gun Violence
Julie Rosenbaum Matthew Ellman By MATTHEW S. ELLMAN, MD and JULIE R. ROSENBAUM, MD What if firearm deaths could be reduced by visits to the doctor? More than 35,000 Americans are killed annually by gunfire, about 60% of which are from suicide. The remaining deaths are mostly from accidental injury or homicide. Mass shootings represent only a tiny fraction of that number.  There’s a lot physicians can do to reduce these numbers. Typically, medical organizations such as the AMA recommend counseling patients on firearm safety.  But there is another way to use medical expertise to help reduce harm f...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Gun Control gun violence Julie Rosenbaum Matthew Ellman Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Mental Illness a Made up Disorder?
In this episode, our hosts discuss whether or not mental illness is a real disorder or if it’s just something that medical and pharmaceutical companies made up to make a profit.  SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “Instead of taking my psychiatric medications this morning, should I have just gone to yoga?” – Michelle Hammer Highlights from ‘Mental Illness Made Up’ Episode [2:00] Is mental illness real? [4:00] Yoga doesn’t cure all mental illnesses, just like it wouldn’t cure cancer. [16:00] Dealing with people who think mental illness is not real. [19:30] Eating disorders a...
Source: World of Psychology - August 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Brain and Behavior Disorders General Source Type: blogs

Kamala's Conundrum
During Wednesday night ’s Democratic presidential debate, Tulsi Gabbard tore into Kamala Harris for her track record as a prosecutor in San Francisco and later as California’s Attorney General. The attack was sharp and effective, earning Gabbard an outsize share of the post-debate commentary. Its thrust was entirely f air, too, as any number of articles have demonstrated, including Lara Bazelon’s recent takedown inThe New York Times titledKamala Haris Was Not a Progressive Prosecutor.The real significance of Gabbard ’s critique, however, lies not in the proposition that Harris was a particularly unp...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 2, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Clark Neily Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Policing and Mental Illness: A Better Approach
Police officers are often the first responders when someone is having a mental illness crisis.  But are members of law enforcement properly equipped for this job?  There are plenty of horrifying stories that would indicate that the answer is “no.”  How do we change this?  Join us as Gabe speaks with Officer Rebecca Skillern from the Huston, Texas, Police Department about how Houston is training its officers to respond to these difficult calls. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Policing and Crisis Intervention Training’ Podcast Episode   Officer Rebecca ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Policy and Advocacy Relationships The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Sandy Hook: Community Healing After a Large-Scale Trauma
  Everyone remembers the disturbing images from the Sandy Hook school shooting in December 2012 after a gunman killed 26 people, including 20 first-grade children.  It was traumatic for all of us, but what was it like to actually be a member of that community?  Today’s guest, Melissa Glaser, worked for 20 months as a coordinator for the Newtown Recovery and Resiliency Team, a group of mental health professionals, funded by a Department of Justice grant, who worked in partnership with local recovery providers, community organizations, and town employees to provide services to over 900 people imm...
Source: World of Psychology - July 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Violence and Aggression Source Type: blogs

Art therapy and the intersection between chronic illness and mental health
An excerpt from  My Beautiful Detour: An Unthinkable Journey from Gutless to Grateful. Managing chronic illness can leave a person susceptible to emotional and mental health issues that can further exacerbate their physical symptoms.  Post-traumatic stress disorder can often accompany managing a physical illness, and often is the illness that doctors and surgeons can’t see.  How […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/amy-oestreicher" rel="tag" > Amy Oestreicher < /a > < /span > Tags: Patient Patients Surgery Source Type: blogs

100-Hour MRI Delivers Unprecedented Detail
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital used a 7 Tesla MRI Scanner to capture the most precise and detailed 3-D photo of the brain ever taken, according to  recently published reports. The brain used belonged to a 58-year old woman who died of pneumonia and had no known neurological condition. Her brain was stored for nearly three years before researchers decided to scan it for 100 hours, producing unprecedented images that could zero-in on material that was .1 millimeters wide. The brain was held in a custom-made spheroid case made of urethane, which permitted interfering air bubbles to escape. The ca...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

How to detect brain health problems early: Examples in Alzheimer ’s Disease, Parkinson’s, anxiety and PTSD
? Rethinking and Retooling Brain Health and Mental Health from SharpBrains Hoping you enjoy this slidedeck supporting a great discussion held during the 2019 SharpBrains Virtual Summit: The Future of Brain Health (March 7–9th).  Full recordings are available for purchase here. 9–10.30am. How to detect problems early: Examples in Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s, anxiety and PTSD Dr. Srijan Sen, Professor of Depression and Neurosciences at University of Michigan Jan Samzelius, Co-Founder and Chief Scientist of NeuraMetrix Dr. Tony Chang, Associate at Merck V...
Source: SharpBrains - July 17, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Alzheimer’s Disease anxiety brain health early detection Parkinsons PTSD Source Type: blogs

Rethinking and Retooling Brain Health and Mental Health
from SharpBrains We hope you enjoy this slidedeck supporting two sessions held during the 2019 SharpBrains Virtual Summit: The Future of Brain Health (March 7–9th).  Full recordings are available for purchase here. 8–8.45am. Rethinking and Retooling Brain Health and Mental Health   Dr. Tom Insel, Co-founder and President of Mindstrong Health and former Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) 9–10.30am. How to detect problems early: Examples in Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s, anxiety and PTSD Dr. Srijan Sen, Professor of Depressi...
Source: SharpBrains - July 12, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology brain health digital mental health Dolby Family Ventures Merck Ventures Mindstrong Health NeuraMetrix Rethinking retooling University-of-Michigan Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Openly Discussing Suicide in Our Communities
   One of the most dangerous misconceptions about suicide is that asking a loved one if they are suicidal will increase the odds that they will attempt suicide.  Today Dr. Nate Ivers of Wake Forest University discusses the importance of making “the covert overt” by asking blunt, straightforward questions of those you suspect may be thinking about suicide.  What words should you use, and if the answer is yes, what should you do next?  And why are we so uncomfortable about asking these potentially lifesaving questions? Find out on this episode. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest infor...
Source: World of Psychology - July 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Depression Grief and Loss Suicide The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Is Past Trauma Affecting Your Relationship?
How early parent-child relationships affect adult romantic relationships. Our early experiences with those closest to us shape how we understand the nature of relationships. During these early years, we develop our attachment style. Attachment style influences who we fall in love with, how we behave in romantic relationships, and even how the relationship ends.  As we grow, the level of security that feel in our most important relationships, the tactics that we develop to get our needs met, and the coping strategies that we apply to manage our strongest feelings all strongly affect the attachment style that we develop...
Source: World of Psychology - July 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Relationships Trauma abuse Attachment Dating Insecurity Intimacy Neglect PTSD Source Type: blogs

PTSD: Dealing with the Boom of July 4th
With the summer in full swing. Many of us are looking ahead to July 4th, planning time away from work and looking forward to a well needed break. For most Americans, Independence Day reflects a day of fun, having barbecues with close friends and family, eating wonderful food and rejoicing at night under the fireworks. For some Americans, however, fireworks and crowds are a major trigger for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, inducing flashbacks, hypervigilance and sweating, among other symptoms. While in the general population, approximately 7-8% of people have PTSD at some point in their lives, this number increases to 10% i...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jessica Koblenz, PsyD Tags: General PTSD Self-Help Trauma 4th Of July Combat Veteran Fireworks Hypersensitivity triggers Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence In Mental Health Care
Could the advancement of machine and deep learning algorithms be harnessed meaningfully in the area of mental health? Could depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or any other mental disorder be quantified so that technology could somehow add positively to their diagnostics or treatment? We tried to explore the uses of artificial intelligence in mental health care, and stumbled upon smart algorithms that support clinicians with early detection and diagnostics of mental health issues, with the flagging of suicide risks, and other ones that help patients manage their condition through counselling and constantly being t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rozina Bura Tags: Future of Medicine AI artificial intelligence bipolar disorder chatbots future of psychiatry mental disorder mental health mental health disorders mental health issues moodkit pacifica schizophrenia suicide thriveport woebot Source Type: blogs

June is PTSD Awareness Month
June isPTSD Awareness Month. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can occur inchildren and adults who've experienced or witnessed a traumatic event. This can include a natural disaster, accident, physical/sexual/emotional abuse, terrorist act, war/combat, rape or other types of violent personal assaults.Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a treatable mental health disorder. Symptoms of PTSDIntrusive memories: Upsetting dreams or reoccurring flashbacks about the event.Avoidance: Avoiding the memory of the event, or places and people that remind you of the event.Negative changes in thinking or mood: Feeling numb...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - June 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns PTSD. Source Type: blogs

Will We Be Born in 2050?
Being born and giving birth is full of pain, blood, and trauma. Many science fiction works, such as Brave New World, Matrix, The Island, or I am Mother imagine being brought to the world without actually being born in a mother’s womb. How far-fetched are these scenarios? Could the appearance of the artificial womb replace human mothers and natural birth in the future? How will we come into this world in 2050? Will we be born? The trauma of being born and giving birth The experience of being born and leaving the nurturing womb of our mother after more or less nine months is painful, bloody, and traumatic. Abrupt...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Science Fiction artificial artificial womb baby birth designer baby Health Healthcare Innovation mother sci-fi scifi society technology uterus Source Type: blogs

Cyberbullying: The Psychological Effects on Teens
Cyberbullying is the repeated and willful use of digital technology to harass, threaten, embarrass or target another person. Cyberbullies use cell phones, computers and tablets. They use email, text messaging, social media, apps, forums and gaming in their efforts to humiliate their peers and others. With today’s mandatory need for smartphones and 24-7 access to social media platforms, anyone can be a perpetual target. But because teens and young adults access these digital platforms so often, they are the most vulnerable. Staying “connected” online with friends is not always as innocent as it appears. He...
Source: World of Psychology - June 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Tsilimparis, MFT Tags: Bullying Children and Teens Parenting Students Trauma Adolescence Cyberbullying Self Harm Social Isolation social media Substance Abuse Teen Depression teen suicide Source Type: blogs

Noa Pothoven Highlights VSED as Alternative to MAID
Noa Pothoven suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anorexia for years. She tried to survive despite her psychological problems, but that was no longer possible. Noa recently announced that she had stopped eating and drinking. When she died, her death was erroneously reported as having been through euthanasia. In fact, the Levenseind ​​clinic in The Hague had denied her request. Instead, Noa hastened her death by VSED, a method commonly used when MAID or euthanasia is not available. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Trauma Informed Care: How CBT & Mindful Awareness Are Key Factors in Repairing the Brain
We’ve come a long way since therapists prescribed to their clients to punch their pillows when angry as a cathartic way to release negative emotions. While it helped bring up the emotion, they left out a critical piece in recovery: connecting that emotion to the logical side of our brains. What the person felt was not relief but disassociation. What we know today in neuroscience and psychotherapy research is that when a traumatic event occurs, the brain goes into dysregulation. That is, the body and the mind become disconnected. Our survival or emotional part of our brain kicks in and calls the shots while our logic...
Source: World of Psychology - June 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maria Bogdanos Tags: PTSD Trauma Treatment Disassociation Emotional Dysregulation Resilience Trauma Informed care trauma recovery Validation Source Type: blogs

PTSD changed how this physician cared for pregnant women
Appointments with my doctor make me nervous. That ’s highly ironic, because I’m a doctor, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist who regularly deals with high-risk pregnancies. But ever since developing preeclampsia during my first pregnancy eight years ago, the thought of having my blood pressure taken triggers flashbacks and anxiety. The silver lining is that my experience […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/shivani-patel" rel="tag" > Shivani Patel, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions OB/GYN Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

10 Things I ’ve Learned as a Therapist and a Mom about Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders
I’ve been a mental health therapist for over 10 years and in the social work profession for more than 20. I have been pregnant 8 times, with 4 living children. I consider myself to be pretty self-aware, intelligent, and inquisitive. And yet… I had some form of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) with each of my pregnancies. I just didn’t know it. Oh, sure, I got sad and I got angry and with my older son, I couldn’t let myself fully bond to him until he was 9 months old, but I was fine, right? I even took medication, but that’s normal, right? I was introduced to PMADs last year when ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Allyson Guilbert, LCSW Tags: Parenting Personal Pregnancy Women's Issues Birth trauma perinatal anxiety disorder perinatal mood disorder Postpartum Disorder Source Type: blogs

5 Underlying Reasons for Addiction
What Are 5 Underlying Reasons for Addiction? Addiction always stems from a root cause, also known as one of the reasons for addiction. It is extremely important to treat both the root cause of the addiction in addition to the physical addiction itself. Staying sober involves much more than just detoxing from drugs or alcohol and abstaining from them in the future. It also involves finding the underlying reasons for the addiction and treating that as well, so that it does not exacerbate the addiction in the future. This is why so many people fail when they attempt to quit using drugs or alcohol cold turkey. While there can ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - June 4, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Abuse Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcohol Alcoholism Anxiety Children Depression Depression Treatment Drug Treatment LGBT LGBTQ Mental Health Painkiller Source Type: blogs

How secondary post-traumatic stress contributes to physician burnout
Physicians have the highest rate of suicide of any profession in the U.S., including military service. We lose about one doctor per day in the U.S. to suicide. The high levels of stress, lack of sleep, ease of self-medication, and reluctance to seek mental health treatment are among the reasons for these high numbers. But […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/laura-shamblin" rel="tag" > Laura Shamblin, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Practice Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs