Neuropsychologist Amy Serin, Co-Founder of Brainnovations Winner The Touchpoint Solution, would like to see everyone avoid the detrimental effects of an overactive stress response
Dr. Serin, what surprised you the most from the Judges’ questions and feedback during the Brainnovations Pitch Contest? It was great that at least one of the judges had already purchased and started using our product so we could delve into the nuances of our technology quickly. And I was thrilled that all judges saw the possibilities to create significant global impact. In a nutshell, what is the core idea behind TouchPoints? Too many people suffer too much stress, often leading to sleeplessness, cravings, anger, poor focus, poor performance, and feeling overwhelmed. TouchPoints aim at reducing stress by delivering h...
Source: SharpBrains - February 20, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology anger bi-lateral stimulation Brainnovations circadian rhythm regulation conscious capitalism corporate-wellness cravings EMDR eye movement desensitization and reprocessing Source Type: blogs

Study conducted during war finds one symptom that is especially indicative of PTSD vulnerability
By Emma Young After a traumatic event, some people develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – generally within about a month – while others don’t. Identifying those most at risk could allow for targeted interventions, aimed at stopping the disorder developing. So how do you spot these people? One way of exploring this question involves viewing PTSD as a dynamic process in which symptoms interact over time to cause the disorder, and some symptoms likely play a bigger causal role than others. So if you can identify the most problematic symptoms, and the people displaying them, at an early stage, then y...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Mental health Source Type: blogs

Preventing and Healing from School Violence Takes a Village
As our nation reels from the devastating event of the school shooting in Florida this week (number 18 in 2018, according to CNBC and other media outlets), it’s easy to point fingers and blame the gun industry for making the guns, law makers for what they are or aren’t doing to control gun access, the perpetrator for his mental health issues and his alleged obsession with guns and knives and death, the leadership of the school, the parents….the list goes on.   But, as  Dr. Mary Schoenfeldt, renowned expert and author of numerous books on school violence prevention and school violence aftermath, ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jill L. Ferguson, M.A. Tags: Children and Teens Criminal Justice Family General Minding the Media Parenting PTSD Students Suicide Trauma Violence and Aggression Childhood Trauma Coping Skills Gun Violence Homicide Intervention Mary Schoenfeldt mass s Source Type: blogs

How to Feel Normal Again
“The possibility of stepping into a higher plane is quite real for everyone. It requires no force or effort or sacrifice. It involves little more than changing our ideas about what is normal.” – Deepak Chopra When I was a young girl, I often felt as if I was not normal. It wasn’t that I had a noticeable birth defect or considered myself ugly or stupid, though. My feelings likely stemmed more from a sense that I was too sensitive or fragile or in need of protection and couldn’t stand up for myself. I had an older brother who sometimes was tough on me, yet I loved him dearly. He was my protector...
Source: World of Psychology - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: General Habits Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Awkwardness base line Comparison competition Coping Insecurity loss Normalcy Resilience self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Marijuana Research Catch 22
George Hodgin ’s mission seemed simple: manufacture uncontaminated, chemically consistent cannabis for use in scientific research on marijuana’s medical effects, all while complying with federal regulations surrounding the production of a drug still classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as h ighly dangerous. Despite new rules the DEA promulgated eighteen months ago, with the stated goal of allowing expanded cultivation of marijuana for scientific research, George Hodgin is still in administrative limbo. Hodgin, a former Navy SEAL, approached us recently for advice after encountering numer...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 15, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey Miron Source Type: blogs

Clinical Observations: Combat and Its Ensuing Trauma
In conclusion, I am deeply moved by your experiences, and don’t feel completely worthy to speak about your experiences. To you who are Marines, in the AF we called you “Gyrenes”. We are not worthy to unfasten your combat boots, and I readily admit that I served in the “cub scouts” of the armed forces as one ex-armine observed when visiting The Wall! This guest article originally appeared on the award-winning health and science blog and brain-themed community, BrainBlogger: Musings of a Combat Professor, Former AF Medic, and Retired Psychologist. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - February 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Disorders Military Personal PTSD Publishers Trauma Aggression combat killing Veterans violence war Source Type: blogs

PAS-18-624: Mechanistic investigations of psychosocial stress effects on opioid use patterns (R01- Clinical Trial Optional)
Psychosocial stress, defined here as socioenvironmental demands that tax the adaptive capacity of the individual (e.g., low socioeconomic status, childhood adversity, bullying), has repeatedly been linked to substance use disorders (SUDs). Neighborhood poverty and social support are shown to influence substance use patterns. Among smokers, multiple psychosocial stressors are associated with relapse, and acute psychosocial stress has been demonstrated to enhance cigarette craving and smoking behavior. Similarly, psychosocial stress has been associated with greater risk of relapse in individuals with alcohol and cocaine use ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - February 5, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Head Impact and Hyperphosphoralated Tau in Teens
We all agree that repeated blows to the head are bad for the brain. What we don't yet know is:who will show lasting cognitive and behavioral impairmentswho will show only transient sequelae (and for how long)who will manifest long-term neurodegeneration...and by which specific cellular mechanism(s)Adding to the confusion is the unclear terminology used to describe impact-related head injuries. Is aconcussion the same as a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Sharp and Jenkins say absolutely not, and contend thatConcussion is confusing us all:It is time to stop using the term concussion as it has no clear definition and no pa...
Source: The Neurocritic - February 5, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Be ketotic . . . but only sometime
Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, reducing blood pressure, reversing the inflammation of visceral fat, and may even cause partial or total remission of selected cancers. So what’s the problem? The problem comes when people remain ketotic for extended periods. We know with confidence that long-term ketosis poses substantial risk for health complications because thousands of children have followed ketogenic diets over the years as a means of suppressing in...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Giving Back
Or helping yourself while you help others. After going through cancer, or other nasty medical misadventure, you are traumatized, and, as in the words of Arlo Guthrie:" ...you get injected, inspected, detected, infected, ... "You do not have fun for many months as you watch your hair fall out, your blood counts go up and down. You also follow your tumor markers more than the stock market, try to figure out how to get rid of your'chemo pallor', and lighten up any surgical scars. At the end you feel like you have been dragged through a swamp, up a mountain, and under the proverbial bus. You spend a lot of time ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer bonds cancer support coping giving back Source Type: blogs

Psilocybin (from magic mushrooms) plus meditation and spiritual training leads to lasting changes in positive traits
By Emma Young “Conferences on psychedelics are popping up everywhere, like mushrooms!” said Jakobien van der Weijden, of the Psychedelic Society of the Netherlands, when I met her in Amsterdam last week. Indeed, research into the use of psychedelic (mind-altering) drugs as tools in the treatment of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and end-of-life angst, is on the increase. Psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, may help to alleviate symptoms of depression by altering brain activity in key areas involved in emotional processing, for example. Now a study in the Journal of Psychopharmacolo...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Brain Mental health Personality Source Type: blogs

When tears turn into pearls: Post-traumatic growth following childhood and adolescent cancer
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski It’s hard to imagine a crueller fate than when a child receives a diagnosis of an illness as difficult as cancer. A young human being, still not fully formed, is suddenly and irrevocably thrown into a situation that many adults are unable to cope with. Each year, around 160,000 children and youngsters worldwide are diagnosed with cancer, and this trend is growing in industrialised societies. Faced with such facts, it is particularly important to understand how children cope. What traces of the experience remain in their psyche if they manage to survive? Partial answers to these ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cancer guest blogger Source Type: blogs

Medical marijuana
There are few subjects that can stir up stronger emotions among doctors, scientists, researchers, policy makers, and the public than medical marijuana. Is it safe? Should it be legal? Decriminalized? Has its effectiveness been proven? What conditions is it useful for? Is it addictive? How do we keep it out of the hands of teenagers? Is it really the “wonder drug” that people claim it is? Is medical marijuana just a ploy to legalize marijuana in general? These are just a few of the excellent questions around this subject, questions that I am going to studiously avoid so we can focus on two specific areas: why do...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Drugs and Supplements Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Happy or Resilient?
Everyone wants to be happy. This goal is so central to the human experience that its “pursuit” is written into the US Declaration of Independence. Is perpetual happiness possible? And even more — is it even desirable? In 1962 Victor and Mildred Goertzel published a book called Cradles of Eminence: A Provocative Study of the Childhoods of Over 400 Famous Twentieth-Century Men and Women. They chose people who had had at least two biographies written about them and had made a positive contribution to society. Their subjects included Henry Ford, Louis Armstrong, Frida Kahlo, Eleanor Roosevelt and Marie Curie...
Source: World of Psychology - January 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lynne Cripe, PhD Tags: Celebrities Habits Happiness Parenting Peer Support Research Stress Success & Achievement Adversity Coping Skills determination Personal Growth Posttraumatic Stress Resilience Source Type: blogs

How Terminology Impacts the Emotions Surrounding Sexual Abuse
The terms surrounding sexual assault are hazy. With more people publicly sharing their stories of sexual assault, the details and technicalities have snagged. Everyone knows sexual abuse is horrific, but the vagueness of intention meeting action can create doubt. The description of assault is difficult enough to understand, but what about the other terminology? Since the #MeToo movement, disclosure of sexual abuse has become far more common in the media. As a society, we have recognized the abuse of celebrities and politicians. Our responses have varied, not just because of the status of those accused/accusers, but becaus...
Source: World of Psychology - December 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Celebrities Sexuality Stigma Trauma Violence and Aggression Women's Issues #MeToo language Sexual Abuse Sexual Harassment Sexual Trauma traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Bioelectronics for Neurological Diseases: Interview with Will Rosellini, CEO of Nexeon
Nexeon Medsytems is a medical device company focused on providing innovative neurostimulation products for patients suffering from debilitating neurological diseases, including Parkinson’s and essential tremor. It was founded in 2005 with the goal of changing how innovative ideas in the medical device industry move from concept to reality, with a focus on creating solutions for clinicians in their pursuit of improving patient outcomes. Medgadget had the opportunity to ask Will Rosellini, CEO of Nexeon, some questions about Nexeon, and their plans for the future. Conn Hastings, Medgadget: Can you tell us a little...
Source: Medgadget - December 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Joe Biden and Kesha ’ s Share this Key Strategy for Life
Joe Biden’s recent interview with Meghan McCain on The View was heart wrenching, powerful, authentic and emotional. It was a beautiful connection, and his word of advice was clear for the McCain family. He has stressed the importance of this one thing over and over again. The necessity to maintain it, no matter what life brings. And Joe Biden certainly has been through a lot. “You have to have hope.” – Joe Biden Time, USA Today, NY Times, Vanity Fair, CBS, CNN…  they all reported on that one thing, and many in the headlines. Which I think alludes to the magnitude of the message a...
Source: World of Psychology - December 21, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Anxiety and Panic Celebrities Children and Teens Depression General Grief and Loss Happiness iFred Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration PTSD Self-Help Spirituality Stigma Suicide Women's Issues contest global hop Source Type: blogs

Does Pregnancy Alter the Brain ’ s Immune Function?
Recent research published in the November 2017 issue of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity suggests that a woman’s immune response in the brain may decrease during pregnancy and the postpartum period. These findings, discussed by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, might help to establish a connection between the brain’s immune function and the anxiety and mood disorders that are common throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Previous research has shown that during pregnancy, the response of the body’s peripheral immune system (the part of our protective system that does not protect the brain)...
Source: World of Psychology - December 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Brain and Behavior General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Women's Issues Bipolar Depression fetal development immune changes Immune Function Immunity immunosuppression Mania miscarriage Moth Source Type: blogs

Researchers uncover a brain process that may help explain the curse of uncontrollable thoughts
The study represents a breakthrough in bridging neurophysiology and psychology By Alex Fradera Distressing conditions including PTSD, depression and anxiety have something in common: a difficulty in suppressing unwanted thoughts. Negative self-judgments and re-experienced traumas directly impact mental health and make recovery harder by intruding into the new experiences that should provide distance and a mental fresh start. Understanding what’s involved in thought suppression may therefore be one key to helping people with these conditions. Now research in Nature Communications has uncovered an important new br...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Brain Cognition Mental health Thought Source Type: blogs

Trusting Your Instincts in a Psychologically Abusive Relationship
Most people understand the concept of physical abuse. If you’re in a relationship where your partner is physically hurting you, this is an obvious sign that: 1. Things are not okay 2. This will probably not be the last time. 3. This relationship has the potential to be very dangerous. Emotional abuse is more confusing. Depending on how someone was raised, where they grew up, and who influenced their life, the term “emotional/psychological abuse” may vary. While there is no official definition of the term, the outcome is usually the same.  Emotional abuse can lead to: Anxiety Depression PTSD Probl...
Source: World of Psychology - December 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Anger Bullying Narcissism PTSD Relationships Trauma Abusive Relationship Instincts Manipulation Psychological abuse self-compassion self-confidence Source Type: blogs

Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: The Road to Recovery
Persistent neglect in childhood can lead you to believe that you don’t deserve to be loved or cared for. This idea begins to define you: you are a person who ought to be treated badly. When we think of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a specific list comes to mind: soldiers returning from combat zones and police officers connected to terrible incidents in the line of duty; victims of sexual trauma and women who were beaten by their partners; the families who stood on the roofs of their houses in the aftermath of Katrina and those who managed to walk away from the horrific South Asian tsunami in 2004...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Disorders Personal PTSD Publishers The Fix abuse acute C-PTSD chronic Fear Pain Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 2: Fred McNeill
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such asboxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations oftau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are shown below.Left: courtesy of Dr. Ann McKee inNYT. Right: courtesy of Dr. Bennett Omalu inCNN. These are coronal sections1 from the autopsied brains of: (L) Aaron Hernandez, aged 27; and(R) Fred McNeill, aged 63.Part 1 of this ...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

One way of using a biopsychosocial framework in pain management – i
While a biopsychosocial ‘model’ (or sociopsychobiological framework) has been widely adopted when attempting to understand pain, many critics argue that it just doesn’t give clinicians a clear way to integrate or prioritise clinical information and generate treatments. The ‘model’ itself has been challenged from many angles – it’s too complex, too simplistic, relies on Bertalanffy’s “general systems theory” which has itself been challenged, it’s too “fuzzy”, and of course there are many who think that psychological and sociocultural aspects of hu...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - December 10, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Professional topics Research Science in practice biopsychosocial treatment Source Type: blogs

Firms Race to Find New Ways to Scan Brain Health
“How consistently you type on a keyboard and the way you use your smartphone may one day tell your doctor — or someone else, like your employer — if your brain is ailing. Right now, doctors generally rely on questionnaires about a person’s symptoms and written challenges like drawing a clock to begin to home in on brain diseases like depression and dementia. New technologies would replace these with passive monitoring of things like computer or smartphone use, or even changes to a person’s brain waves, to detect brain changes consistent with diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ...
Source: SharpBrains - December 9, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology Source Type: blogs

Virtual Reality to Treat PTSD: Interview with Todd Richmond, Director of USC ’s Mixed Reality Lab
While PTSD is a significant issue for many of those serving in the military and others who work in traumatic situations, it also affects huge numbers of ordinary people who experience traumatic events such as assaults or natural disasters. Nearly 24 million Americans suffer from PTSD at any given time, and women are twice as likely as men to develop the condition. PTSD can sometimes be overlooked and is reportedly underdiagnosed, but anxiety disorders still cost society approximately $40 billion per year in treatment costs and loss of productivity. A relatively new option for PTSD therapy involves virtual reality, with the...
Source: Medgadget - December 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 1: Aaron Hernandez
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such asboxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations oftau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are shown below.Left: courtesy of Dr. Ann McKee inNYT. Right: courtesy of Dr. Bennett Omalu inCNN. These are coronal sections1 from the autopsied brains of: (L) Aaron Hernandez, aged 27; and(R) Fred O'Neill, aged 63.Both men played...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 4, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 1: Aaron Hernandez
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such asboxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations oftau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are shown below.Left: courtesy of Dr. Ann McKee inNYT. Right: courtesy of Dr. Bennett Omalu inCNN. These are coronal sections1 from the autopsied brains of: (L) Aaron Hernandez, aged 27; and(R) Fred McNeill, aged 63.Both men played...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 4, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Your Diagnosis Does Not Define You
I’ve been diagnosed, at one point or another, with depression, anxiety, PTSD and ADHD. It’s an annoying characterization of myself because my medical ‘diagnosis’ does not define me. Yet it has also been incredibly helpful to me as it explains certain behaviors and reactions, and gives me the tools I need to research and manage them. But let me be clear. What I ‘have’ does not equate to who I am. As despite the challenges, we can all thrive. I can say this now, as I’m in a new chapter in my life with success under my belt. My first consumer product turned into a 35 million doll...
Source: World of Psychology - November 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Addiction ADHD and ADD Anxiety and Panic Creativity Depression Habits Happiness iFred Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Professional PTSD Recovery Stigma Diagnosis Entrepren Source Type: blogs

More Not Blogging
I have been very busy the last fewday weeks. Now that I can drive, I have been driving and going places and thus wearing myself out and making my knee hurt. I had Thanksgiving prep for food and house guests and dinner for 14. I also have had some doctor appointments that were postponed from when I couldn't drive. I still have lots more appointments for the same reason as well as PT for my knee.So now that I am getting back to normal I have things on my mind for blogging topics. They will not get all the coverage due  because I have been a slacker for my reasons above.I have pondered the issue of losing friends and mak...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation ailments blogging friends holidays Source Type: blogs

The bacteria in your gut might affect your vulnerability to PTSD
By Emma Young After a traumatic experience, why do some people develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), while others don’t? Work to date has found evidence that various factors play a role, including a lack of social support and low levels of the neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (due to its role in the body’s stress response). Into this mix come new findings, reported in Psychosomatic Medicine, that an individual’s complement of gut bacteria (their gut microbiome) may contribute to their vulnerability to trauma. The researchers are now investigating whether tweaking the gut microbiome could help to p...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Mental health Source Type: blogs

Looking for Hope in 195 Places
My speech at the United Nations, advocating for mental health inclusion in Sustainable Development Goals I’m not sure about you, but I’ve felt hopeless plenty of times in my life. Like really, really hopeless. Enough for a suicide attempt in my early 20’s, and enough so that I made a firm commitment to figure out what, exactly, creates a hopeful mindset, and what I can do to foster and grow it in my life and the others around me. It is through our deepest pain we find our brightest light. I lost my dad to suicide when I was 19, so I am no stranger to the impact, devastation, and complete despair when all...
Source: World of Psychology - November 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Depression General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Suicide 195 anxiety Bereavement grieving Ifred Personal Growth Resilience Source Type: blogs

Christopher Robin: a sad story
Jump to follow-up Today we went to see the film, Goodbye Christopher Robin.  It was very good. I, like most children, read Pooh books as a child.  Image from Wikipedia I got interested in their Author, A.A. Milne, when I discovered that he’d done a mathematics degree at Cambridge. So had my scientific hero A.V. Hill, and (through twitter) I met AV’s granddaughter, Alison Hill. I learned that AV loved to quote A.A.Milne’s poem, OBE. O.B.E. I know a Captain of Industry, Who made big bombs for the R.F.C., And collared a lot of £ s. d.– And he–thank God!–has the...
Source: DC's goodscience - November 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: A.V. Hill AA Milne AV Hill Christopher Robin PTSD Winnie the Pooh Source Type: blogs

Christopher Robin: a sad story
Jump to follow-up Today we went to see the film Goodbye Christopher Robin.  It was very good. I, like most children, read Pooh books as a child.  Image from Wikipedia I got interested in their author, A.A. Milne, when I discovered that he’d done a mathematics degree at Cambridge. So had my scientific hero A.V. Hill, and (through twitter) I met AV’s granddaughter, Alison Hill. I learned that AV loved to quote A.A.Milne’s poem, OBE. O.B.E. I know a Captain of Industry, Who made big bombs for the R.F.C., And collared a lot of £ s. d.– And he–thank God!–has the ...
Source: DC's goodscience - November 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: A.V. Hill AA Milne AV Hill Christopher Robin PTSD Winnie the Pooh Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 305
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 305th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week What’s on the Trauma Professional’s blog this week? Lots as usual! Lear...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: November 4, 2017
This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers artificial intelligence and psychiatry, a decline in teachers’ mental health, how to continue making progress, and more. Let’s go! Artificial Intelligence Is Here and It Wants to Revolutionize Psychiatry: Are we more comfortable sharing our true feelings and deepest secrets with a machine we assume won’t (or at least at this point in time, can’t) judge us or bring other uncomfortable consequences? Could artificial intelligence make a huge impact in psychology? Whether Psychology Research Is Improving Depends On Whom You Ask: Results from a survey an...
Source: World of Psychology - November 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Industrial and Workplace Parenting Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Success & Achievement Technology Artificial Intelligence goals job stress kids Memory Progress Source Type: blogs

Smartphone-Based Interventions for Depression
Technology is rapidly advancing and more people are depending on it to stay in touch with friends, finding the quickest way to work or doing their weekly shopping. It is no surprise that people are turning to their smartphones to improve their mental wellbeing. There are many mobile applications available on smartphones that claim to improve your mental health, however not all mental health apps are created equal and it is important to know how to make sure the one you are using is truly helpful. Joseph Firth and colleagues conducted the first meta-analysis of apps for depressive symptoms in October 2017, which was publis...
Source: World of Psychology - November 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Andrés Fonseca Tags: Brain and Behavior Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research Stigma Technology Treatment Attention Deficit Disorder Confidentiality Depression mobile apps Privacy Sleep Disorder Smartphone Source Type: blogs

What I ’ve learned from 547 doctor suicides
Five years ago today I was at a memorial. Another suicide. Our third doctor in 18 months. Everyone kept whispering, “Why?” I was determined to find out. So I started counting dead doctors. I left the service with a list of 10. Now I have 547. Immediately, I began writing and speaking about suicide. So many distressed doctors (and med students) wrote and phoned me. Soon I was running a de facto international suicide hotline from my home. To date, I’ve spoken to thousands of suicidal doctors; published a book of their suicide letters (free audiobook); attended more funerals; in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Doing Your Inner Work as a Nurse
Nurse clinicians spend a great deal of time providing care for others. Nurses give physical care (including that which is immediately life-saving), psychoemotional support, and spiritual succor, often in the form of motivational conversation and nurse-to-patient teaching.What is a powerful way for us nurses to empower and elevate our understanding of human behavior, the human condition, and the nature of suffering? By assiduously doing our own inner work throughout a long lifetime of giving, loving, and feeling.Understanding the Self and Understanding OthersWe nurses can more truly understand the suffering and challenges o...
Source: Digital Doorway - October 30, 2017 Category: Nursing Tags: careers healthcare healthcare careers nurse nurse careers nurse self care nurse wellness nurses nursing nursing careers self development self-care Source Type: blogs

Healing from Trauma Boosts Relationship Joy
Trauma happens. It’s not something people often talk about. Possibly, someone you’ve been getting to know and like, your relationship partner, or your spouse has experienced a horrific life changing event, such as a sudden or violent death or suicide of someone close, physical or sexual abuse, bullying, violence, (domestic or family, war or political), a life-threatening illness, or something else. Healing takes both time and a willingness to face the trauma, whether it’s old, recent, large, or small. We cannot force readiness to deal with trauma. Each of us has our own timetable, which should be respect...
Source: World of Psychology - October 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marcia Naomi Berger, MSW, LCSW Tags: Bullying Psychology PTSD Relationships Trauma Treatment Active Listening Dating Divorce Empathic listening Intimacy Marriage Source Type: blogs

The smallest human acts can have a lifetime of impact
My dad died on May 11, 2003. It was Mother’s Day. I was 18 years old. Those are the easy facts. The more difficult ones are those detailing the events that led to his death. My dad was so many things — a brilliant geologist, a loving father, an inventor, a pilot, and a Vietnam veteran — to name a few. He survived three tours on the front lines in Vietnam, but he didn’t come out unscathed. He was a victim of post-traumatic stress disorder and, subsequently, progressive alcoholism. Despite numerous attempts by my family to help him, and treatment in every form imaginable, we watched a truly amazi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/karmen-wielunski" rel="tag" > Karmen Wielunski, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The Amazing Way Forgetting Helps Your Brain Function
The idea that forgetting is important for the proper functioning of the brain and memory may sound counterintuitive. However, forgetting is part of the process of memorizing, and it does not make us any less smart. Research shows that our brain has active mechanisms for forgetting. Both storing and losing memories are important for selecting and holding the most relevant information. Forgetting helps to get rid of outdated information. Forgetting the details also helps to generalize past experiences into specific categories and thus create appropriate responses to similar situations in the future. Forgetting details helps ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 25, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Memory and Perception Publishers Research Decision Making Depression Forgetting memorizing Mental Health Past Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Psychological Trauma thoughts Source Type: blogs

The challenge of “ evidence based ” sore throat guidelines
In 2007, Matthys and colleagues published a classic article: Differences Among International Pharyngitis Guidelines: Not Just Academic Jan Matthys, Marc De Meyere, Mieke L. van Driel, An De Sutter Ann Fam Med. 2007 Sep; 5(5): 436–443. doi: 10.1370/afm.741 PMCID: PMC2000301 RESULTS We included 4 North American and 6 European guidelines. Recommendations differ with regard to the use of a rapid antigen test and throat culture and with the indication for antibiotics. The North American, French, and Finnish guidelines consider diagnosis of group A streptococcus essential, and prevention o...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 23, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

The Nature of Post-Traumatic Growth
You’ve had a terrible, stressful experience. Maybe you’d even call it a trauma. Are you going to be debilitated by it for the rest of your life? Maybe; maybe not. PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder, is a term that’s bandied about a lot in our current culture. But have you heard about its corollary, post-traumatic growth (PTG)? Probably not. Since it’s not a reimbursable diagnosis, it doesn’t capture the headlines that often. But, it’s important to recognize that people can emerge from life’s traumas stronger, more resilient and even happier than they once were. How does this posi...
Source: World of Psychology - October 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: PTSD Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma acceptance Personal Growth Posttraumatic growth Posttraumatic Stress Trauma History Source Type: blogs

Virtual reality to train surgeons
Virtual reality technology that users can feel as well as see has been developed to train surgeons. The equipment allows them to interact with virtual “flesh and bone” in simulated theatre environments.   Related posts: Virtual Reality Becomes Real Virtual Reality for Treatment of PTSD Virtual Reality for Stress Management (Source: Dr Shock MD PhD)
Source: Dr Shock MD PhD - October 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dr Shock Tags: Shrink Life in General Source Type: blogs

Virtual reality to train surgeons
Virtual reality technology that users can feel as well as see has been developed to train surgeons. The equipment allows them to interact with virtual “flesh and bone” in simulated theatre environments.   Related posts: Virtual Reality for Treatment of PTSD Virtual Reality Becomes Real Virtual Environments for Health (Source: Dr Shock MD PhD)
Source: Dr Shock MD PhD - October 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dr Shock Tags: Shrink Life in General Source Type: blogs

7 Things a Person with a Mental Illness Doesn ’t Want to Hear
You're reading 7 Things a Person with a Mental Illness Doesn’t Want to Hear, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In the United States alone, nearly one out of every five people is suffering with one or more mental illnesses. That means that when a person passes you by on the street, they have a better chance of having a mental illness than of having green eyes. Yet, why are so many people struggling with knowing what to say, or maybe what NOT to say, when they are talking to a person with anxiety, depre...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angela Tags: depression featured psychology self confidence self improvement mental health mental illness pickthebrain relationships Source Type: blogs

Dementia Service Dogs an Idea That Should be Growing
Most of us are aware of service dogs, especially guide dogs for people with sight impairment, because we see them around our communities. These dogs are not pets. They are working animals and are allowed wherever the person they serve goes. Increasingly, other service dogs are being trained to help people with impaired hearing, people who have grand mal seizures and people with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. With more than five million people in the U.S. alone coping with the effects of Alzheimer’s, any attempt to help people with dementia have a better quality of life is welcome.  So why not have tra...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 9, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Kneel
While watching my son at a weekend hockey game last weekend I overheard a conversation an older, wealthy-appearing woman was having with her companion. I pretended to be reading (I ’m the bad dad who only watches the game when his own son is out on a shift) while she orated (in a faux, poorly executed, Mid Atlantic English nasal accent) a story she had heard from “down in Texas” about how arighteous high school coach had kicked two players off his team who had the gall and traitorous audacity to kneel during the pre-game rendering of the national anthem. “Whaaaaaat are they eeeeeven p...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - October 8, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs