Counterintuitive Ways to Combat Anxiety
Through the years I’ve learned to douse the ongoing wildfire of fear with productive tools such as exercise, meditation, replacing negative, irrational thoughts with positive, rational statements, and tapping into my creativity (studies show that anxious people are often more creative — as it takes a lot of imagination to come up with those what-if scenarios — so it helps to channel that artistry into a positive outlet). Yet there are other ways I combat my anxiety that don’t sound as constructive. And they certainly don’t sound very positive, either. In fact, some tactics could be construed a...
Source: World of Psychology - April 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Anxiety and Panic Personal Anxious Thoughts Source Type: blogs

What It Takes to Be a Mental Health Advocate: An Interview With Christina Huff
Christina Huff At one point Christina Huff was living her dream: thriving as a paralegal in Chicago and newly in love. Five years and one divorce later, she’s still piecing together the debris – living with bipolar disorder and accepting a different kind of life. She has translated her passion for law to mental health advocacy, helping others rise from difficulty with gracefulness and determination, and is a beautiful model of turning pain into service. Living with bipolar, anxiety, eating disorders, and chronic pain, she beautifully weaves bits of her life and advice from other warriors on her site, Bipolar Ho...
Source: World of Psychology - April 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Bipolar Interview Mental Health and Wellness Peer Support Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Helping a Friend with Mental Illness
 Even if we live with mental illness, ourselves, we can be frustrated when we don’t know how to help a friend or family member who’s dealing with it. We may find that coping skills that work for us may not work for someone else. Medications that work for us may not work for the other person. In this episode, Gabe and Michelle discuss how to help friends with mental illness, including the help available through caregivers, medication, and more.   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “And I wonder to myself, ‘Why do you tolerate this s**t?’” – Gabe Howard   Highlights From &ls...
Source: World of Psychology - April 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Caregivers Depression Friends Source Type: blogs

Differences in Depression Between Men and Women
Depression is one of the most difficult conditions to contend with and manage. This is due in part to the fact that it can go undiagnosed for years. Many people suffer with depression not realizing that the problems they are having and the way they are feeling can be addressed and improved with help, time, and effort. And while anyone can suffer with depression, there are some significant differences in the way that it affects men versus women. Although there are several symptoms of depression that are common to both men and women, the way that a man experiences and expresses depression can be very different than the way a...
Source: World of Psychology - April 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC Tags: Depression Men's Issues Women's Issues Gender Difference Source Type: blogs

April Is Stress Awareness Month
April is Stress Awareness Month. When I first read that in a local newspaper, my response was “Really? As if we’re not all very well-aware that we are stressed — sometimes to the max. Do we really need a month to focus on it? Then I read what it’s actually about: April as Stress Awareness Month was initiated by the Health Resource Network in 1992 to encourage health organizations to develop and distribute educational materials and hold public events about stress. Okay. That makes sense. But as I looked at internet articles on stress, most of them stress (pun) things one can do about stress. Look and...
Source: World of Psychology - April 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: General Habits Happiness Health-related Self-Help Stress National Stress Awareness Month Source Type: blogs

5 Easy Breakthrough Ways to Build New Habits and Break Old Ones
You’d like to read more regularly. You want to write a novel. You’d like to start running. You’d like to build a new business. You’d like to learn a new language, or play the piano, or paint, or start a journaling practice. You’d like to stop smoking. You’d like to stop using your phone every 5 minutes. Maybe you’ve been wanting to do these things for a long time now. But you haven’t. Maybe you feel like a failure. Maybe you feel really lazy. Maybe you think you’re incapable or not smart enough or not brave enough. Maybe you start to doubt your desires: If I really want...
Source: World of Psychology - April 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books General Habits Happiness Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Success & Achievement Habit Change smoking Source Type: blogs

The Dangers of Cyberchondria
We’ve all done it, or at least most of us have. I know I’m certainly guilty of it. I’m talking about turning to the internet for answers to our health concerns. Just type in our (or our loved ones) symptoms and away we go. That rash we have? Turns out it could be anything from contact dermatitis to cancer. Which is it? Not sure? Well, search some more. There is always another website to check. And as many of us know, these searches can be never-ending. Excessively scouring the internet for answers to our health concerns is known as cyberchondria. One in three people, among the millions who seek health in...
Source: World of Psychology - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Health-related cyberchondia hyperchondria hyperchondriasis Source Type: blogs

6 Symptoms of Postpartum Depression and 6 Ways to Recover
According to a 2013 study published in JAMA Psychiatry, one out of seven mothers suffers from postpartum depression (PPD). That’s 14 percent of all new moms. Katherine Stone, founder of Postpartum Progress, makes a good point that more women will suffer from postpartum depression and related illnesses this year than the combined number of new cases for men and women of tuberculosis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. Even though, according to Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, PPD is the most common comp...
Source: World of Psychology - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Women's Issues Apathy Depressive Episode Postpartum Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: April 20, 2019
Get the latest on the effectiveness (or lack thereof) of trigger warnings, the cognitive perks of coffee you might get without even drinking it, why businesses lose when they ignore mental health, and more in this week’s Psychology Around the Net. Espresso Yourself: Coffee Thoughts Leave a Latte On the Mind: Researchers from the Monash Business School and the University of Toronto studied the association between coffee and arousal to find out if the brain’s exposure to stimuli can deliver the same cognitive perks as caffeine. Trigger Warnings Found to Be Virtually Worthless and Possibly Harmful: New research p...
Source: World of Psychology - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Celebrities Children and Teens Industrial and Workplace Psychology Around the Net Research Sports Caffeine cbd Coffee Dr Phil Game of Thrones social media Sophie Turner trigger warnings workplace mental hea Source Type: blogs

Neuromyth: Brain Scanners “See” Thinking
This article seems to go hand in hand with another, “Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About,” 116 which explains how imaging techniques work. The belief that brain scanners can see people’s thinking is due to lack of scientific literacy and/or expert knowledge about the limits of technology. In general, these headlines simply overextend the actual research findings. This is not their fault, however, as that is the job of a headline. The fault is in not reading beyond the headline, which is the reader’s decision. What We Know Now Each brain imaging machine can, at best, measure a si...
Source: World of Psychology - April 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Tags: Neuromyths brain imaging machine Brain Scan Brain Scanner Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

How to Turn Criticism into an Opportunity to Strengthen Your Child ’s Emotional Intelligence
Discussions do not always work, and if negative criticism is straining your relationship and affecting your child, it might be time to distance yourself from the critical person. The thing is, you can’t always change how people perceive things, but do not allow them to change your fundamental principles. It you feel that some people are toxic and have a negative impact on your child, do not hesitate to cut them out of your life. 5. Teach your child to be his own advocate. You won’t always be there to deal with difficult situations affecting your child, so it’s important to teach him how to deal with crit...
Source: World of Psychology - April 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sanya Pelini, PhD Tags: Children and Teens Communication Parenting Students Success & Achievement Child Development Emotional Intelligence Maturity Perfectionism Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: April 19, 2019
Many of us are still living in our childhood even if we’re not aware of it. It’s the reason we get easily overwhelmed, fall prey to others and external circumstances, and believe the world is scary. We learned these lessons early. Therapy can help break these ingrained beliefs. Mindfulness and meditation can alert us when we’re getting reeled in by our past. Is what we’re feeling a realistic response to this moment or is it a reaction triggered from something that already happened? We have the power to bring intention to every moment and situation. We can decide what kind of day we want to have or e...
Source: World of Psychology - April 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

How to Find the Strength to Leave a Relationship
It takes tremendous courage to leave a relationship that no longer fits. It takes tremendous self-love to know you deserve better. It takes tremendous faith to believe something better, someone better lies just around the corner in your future. It takes tremendous wisdom to feel deep in your bones that you were born to live a life of joy and that everything you dream about can be yours. I am here to offer living proof that you do deserve better. That you must leave. That if you can imagine being with someone that loves you and cherishes you, empowers you and uplifts you, someone who makes your heart sing, that you can&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - April 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Renee Linnell Tags: Books Relationships Self-Help Breakups Codependence Heartache Self Care Self Love self-worth Source Type: blogs

6 Inspiring Books That Will Lift Your Mood
Losing yourself in the pages of a riveting novel or memoir is a legitimate form of therapy. Even better is coming away from the characters and the story with a renewed purpose and sense of hope. John Green, one of my favorite authors, said “Great books help you understand, and they help you feel understood.” I think that’s true especially for people who struggle with depression and anxiety or some other chronic illness that is stigmatized in our culture. Between the covers of a book, we find a new world that shines some light on our reality. Here are a few inspiring books that will “help you underst...
Source: World of Psychology - April 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Books Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Change In Mood reading uplifting Source Type: blogs

Podcast: There ’s More to Trauma than PTSD
 Most of us are familiar with post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD (deservedly) gets a lot of attention, largely focused on soldiers returning from service. But trauma comes in many forms, and most people have experienced it in one form or another. In this episode, learn about the differences between PTSD and other forms of trauma, how to identify it, and what can be done about it.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Robert T. Muller, Ph.D., is the author of the psychotherapy book, “Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up:  From Avoidance to Recovery &...
Source: World of Psychology - April 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

On the Phone: Teaching Your Teen Better Communication Skills & Self-Control
You might have to communicate differently and get serious about your limits. Parenting teens is a challenge, especially when it comes to communicating with them. Sometimes, it seems like they’re not the best at listening, especially when you ask them to get off their devices. How do you get them to stop looking at their phone for a second and not have to ask them twice? There are two problems in this scenario: communication and self-control. Adolescence is a crucial time in every teenager’s life. And as a parent, communication with them is everything. There are so many ways to improve and even small tweaks on y...
Source: World of Psychology - April 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Children and Teens Communication Parenting Publishers Technology YourTango Cell Phones Communication Skills Parenting Tips Parents Self Control Source Type: blogs

A Spring Cleaning Primer: 15 Ways to Get Organized in 5 Minutes or Less
Getting organized can sound exhausting, especially if your house is filled with heaps and piles of stuff. Maybe it’s on the counters. Maybe it’s on your dining room table (and every other table in your home). Maybe it’s your entire closet. Wherever the clutter resides, you’re finding it incredibly frustrating. Because for one, clutter is all you can find—your keys, your home insurance policy, that bill that’s due any day now, not so much. And rest assured you’re not alone. Ashley Hatcher, the owner of Neat Method in Washington D.C., cited the following statistic: Ameri...
Source: World of Psychology - April 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Perfectionism Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

Break Free of Your Anxiety and Phobias in 4 Simple Steps
Anxiety that causes serious discomfort shouldn’t have to go on forever. Yet long-term talk therapy and treatment with medications don’t always free a person who’s suffering. Millions of Americans are dealing with some form of anxiety disorder: according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), each year, 40 million American adults grapple with an anxiety disorder in some form.  One approach that can help you break free of anxiety and phobias is a simple series of steps. Unlike open-ended talk therapy, it’s not expensive or time-consuming, and unlike ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Robert London, MD Tags: Anxiety and Panic Source Type: blogs

What Are Boundaries and Why You Need Them
One of the most misunderstood and important tools to develop healthy relationships is your ability to set boundaries. Brene Brown famously said: “The most generous people are the most boundaried.” She’s right because setting boundaries helps you to take more responsibility for your life and therefore feel more in control which increases your confidence, energy and enthusiasm for life. Boundaries help you to become more open and trusting with yourself and others, which in turn improves the quality and intimacy of your relationships. But what are boundaries exactly? My def...
Source: World of Psychology - April 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mike Matthews Tags: Communication Family Friends Relationships Self-Help Boundaries Source Type: blogs

Five Facts About Atypical Depression You Need to Know
Despite its name, atypical depression is one of the most common types of depression, affecting between 25 to 40 percent of depressed people. Because the symptoms differ from those of typical depression, this subtype of depression is often misdiagnosed. Atypical depression was named in the 1950s to classify a group of patients who did not respond to electroconvulsive therapy or to the tricyclic antidepressant Tofranil (imipramine). They did, however, respond to monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) antidepressants. Some of the same treatments that work for classic depression work for atypical depression, such as selective sero...
Source: World of Psychology - April 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Atypical Depression Major Depressive Episode Mood Disorder Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: April 16, 2019
Stress creeps on you. It’s the little aggravations that tear at you day after day. Traffic. Bills. Phone calls. Texts. Your child’s school. Family disagreements. Balancing work and family life. Even summer vacation can be stressful. Stress isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It’s the inability to build healthy support systems to cope over time that can impact your physical and emotional health. The trick is to set up tools and create habits in place to counteract daily stress. Schedule time for self-care daily, weekly and monthly. Make sure to include exercise, meditation and time in nature. Even when th...
Source: World of Psychology - April 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Autism Is But One Part of a Complex Personality Structure
April is Autism Awareness Month. To review: Autism is one of the five pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) listed in the DSM 5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual) which provides diagnostic guidelines for mental health professionals. Autism is characterized by difficulties in social interactions, a narrow and particular range of interests and repetitive behaviors. Although it is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, research has yet to identify the differences in the brain that determine what makes people with autism different from the norm. Since the combination of attributes can b...
Source: World of Psychology - April 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Aspergers Autism Communication anti-vaccination Asperger Syndrome Autism Awareness Month Autism Spectrum Disability polio Stereotypes Stigma Source Type: blogs

What the Media Get Wrong About the Goldwater Rule
Whenever I read an article about someone diagnosing a person from afar, inevitably the journalist will mention the “Goldwater rule.” This is an ethical guideline created by the American Psychiatric Association in 1973 in reaction to a claim that arose from a magazine article that surveyed psychiatrists about presidential candidate Barry Goldwater’s mental health. Journalists roll this “rule” out to try and explain why mental health professionals shouldn’t make statements about celebrities and politicians in the public eye. Unfortunately, they generalize an ethics rule for one small profe...
Source: World of Psychology - April 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Celebrities Minding the Media Psychiatry Psychology American Psychiatric Association Goldwater Rule psychiatry ethics psychology ethics Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Bad Habits and Vices Related to Mental Illness
 Everyone has bad habits. Even your sainted Granny who seems perfect to you has some bad habit that only your grandfather knows about. Bad habits, like everything, exist on a spectrum, from biting your nails to snorting cocaine – and everything in between. In this episode, our hosts discuss bad habits that many people with mental illness seem to have – from smoking, to alcoholism, to drug use and, you guessed it, everything in between.   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “90% of people with schizophrenia smoke.” – Michelle Hammer   Highlights From ‘Bad Habits Mental Illness&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - April 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Addiction Habits Schizophrenia Stress Source Type: blogs

6 Ways to Conquer Your Inner Bully for Good
“You’re too fat to wear that tight shirt to the gym.” “You’re not smart enough to take the lead on that project at work.” “You’re definitely going to screw up the vacation plans.” “You’re not good enough, cool enough, likable enough.” “You suck.” If we talked like this to anyone, it would be considered bullying. And yet we talk to ourselves like this all the time. We talk to ourselves in a way we would never talk to people we care about. We take these words to heart and believe them as truth. We turn these words into our core belief system,...
Source: World of Psychology - April 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Bullying Publishers Self-Esteem Self-Help Tiny Buddha Perfectionism Source Type: blogs

On Being a Positive Caregiver: An Interview with Veteran Caregiver Carol Bradley Bursack
According to the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) and the AARP Public Policy Institute, approximately 17 percent of Americans care for an adult. According to the same sources, a caregiver’s health appears to deteriorate over time and as burdens rise. Staying positive is perhaps the hardest challenge of a caregiver, especially over time. There is no one more equipped to tell us how to do that than veteran caregiver Carol Bradley Bursack. She has spent more than two decades caring for a total of seven elders. This experience provided her with her foundation upon which she built her reputation as a columnist, auth...
Source: World of Psychology - April 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Aging Caregivers General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Stress caregiving Optimism Self Care self-compassion Source Type: blogs

How Writers Write About Heartbreaking Things and Care for Themselves in the Process
For more than 20 years, Mary Cregan wanted to write her recently published memoir The Scar: A Personal History of Depression and Recovery, but she felt that she couldn’t. It’s primarily because she wasn’t ready to face the exposure required to be so honest about such a devastating, difficult part of her life. Because that’s the thing about writing: We let readers into our innermost thoughts and feelings, into our souls, and that can be scary. We tackle topics we’d never bring up with a close friend, let alone a stranger, and yet that’s exactly what we do. We share our stories with thou...
Source: World of Psychology - April 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Creativity Disorders General Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Stigma Heartbreak Vulnerability writing Source Type: blogs

The 10 Warning Signs of Having a Victim Mentality
When you feel like a victim, you’ll end up stuck. It can be depressing to be around someone who is always negative and constantly complains about everything. Someone with a victim mentality and negativity bias usually finds things wrong with their life or feel that they do not deserve the good things in life. Thus, their life goes nowhere. In order to detect if someone is playing the victim, they usually look at the glass half empty as a reflection for what is really going on deep down inside, within themselves. Sometimes, even when you offer them some hope, they can make you feel like you do not understand them, so ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Self-Help YourTango Co Dependency coping behavior Making Excuses Negativity Negativity Bias playing the victim Responsibility Self Love self-confidence Self-Defeating self-destructive self-punish self-sabotaging Source Type: blogs

Four Steps to Manage Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
When I was a young girl, I struggled with obsessive-compulsive disorder. I believed that if I landed on a crack in the sidewalk, something terrible would happen to me, so I did my best to skip over them. I feared that if I had bad thoughts of any kind, I would go to hell. To purify myself, I would go to confession and Mass over and over again, and spend hours praying the rosary. I felt if I didn’t compliment someone, like the waitress where we were eating dinner, I would bring on the end of the world. What Is OCD? The National Institute of Mental Health defines OCD as a “common, chronic and long-lasting disorde...
Source: World of Psychology - April 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mental Health and Wellness OCD Personal Self-Help Compulsions Intrusive Thoughts Obsessions Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: April 13, 2019
Ready for the latest in the benefits of animal-assisted therapy, a sneaky but super effective way to compliment your kids, why certain habits can be signs of mental illness, and more? Let’s get this week’s Psychology Around the Net going, then! The 5-Minute Workout That Could Boost Brain Function: According to preliminary results from a study out of the University of Colorado at Boulder, five minutes of Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training (IMST) a day can help sharpen our memory, as well as improve vascular health, lower blood pressure, and improve fitness. Even better? You can practice IMST just about anywher...
Source: World of Psychology - April 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Celebrities Children and Teens Exercise & Fitness Habits Health-related Parenting Psychology Around the Net Research Animal Assisted Therapy Apple TV Brain Function Communication Compliments Confidence emot Source Type: blogs

Does Time Really Fly When You ’ re Having Fun?
If you’re a parent, chances are you might recall a long road trip with your family when you’ve been on the road maybe all of ten minutes, and you hear that dreaded question from the back seat: “Are we there yet?” Time passes slowly for children, especially when they’re anticipating something (as in their vacation destination), or when they’re bored. So you suggest that your child read a book or watch a video. Or you play travel games with them. You know, to make the time go by faster. We know these activities don’t really speed up time, which is constant. But they sure can change o...
Source: World of Psychology - April 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Happiness Memory and Perception Cognitive Psychology Dopamine Memory Formation Neuroscience Neurotransmitter Source Type: blogs

Can You Be Too Trusting?
To trust someone you love is important. Otherwise, you’ll be forever doubting that person, creating serious dissension in the relationship. But can you be too trusting? Absolutely! If you’re a scrupulously honest person, you might assume everyone else is too, especially if it’s your very own spouse. Lara was hurting — hurting so badly there were moments when she seriously considered taking her own life. “My pain is unbearable. I trusted my husband totally. Then I found out that he’d been cheating on me and spending our savings to pay for expensive gifts for his girlfriend.” Lara ha...
Source: World of Psychology - April 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Marriage and Divorce Relationships Betrayal Boundaries Confidence Emotional Abuse Intuitive Wisdom Manipulation Trust Issues Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: April 12, 2019
It’s that time of year when spring cleaning gets mentioned in articles and blog posts. There’s physical clutter to deal with along with all the corners, nooks and crannies that you’ve avoided or forgotten to clean. There’s also emotional clutter that’s been storing up dust. There’s the conversation you know you need to have with your aging parent. There’s fear you’ve never dealt with from childhood that’s beginning to impact your relationships. It can be overwhelming no matter what you’re planning on cleaning up this spring. But it doesn’t have to be. Starti...
Source: World of Psychology - April 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

The Time I Hesitated Asking if Someone Was in Pain
The forecasted weather motivated a change of plans that sent me and my wife south on the Garden State Parkway to salvage as much time as possible on the quiet Belmar beach before we were shut down for winter. As we combed the shoreline gathering shells that had washed up after the weekend’s nor’easter, I noticed a young woman sitting alone on the sand staring out over the ocean. Her total and prolonged stillness made me feel she was experiencing an emotional crisis. That feeling heightened when she lay down in the sand and remained motionless for several minutes. I continued walking the beach ostensibly looking...
Source: World of Psychology - April 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Mental Health America Policy and Advocacy Publishers Stigma Emotional Crisis Emotional Pain Hesitation Outreach people in crisis Public Awareness Recovery The Mental Health First Aid Act well-being Source Type: blogs

6 Mistakes to Avoid in Your Recovery from Depression and Anxiety
Recovering from depression and anxiety call for the same kind of shrewdness and amount of perspiration as does running a 4,000-person company. I say that having never done the latter. But hear out my logic: great leaders must master impeccable governing skills, develop the discipline of a triathlete, and build enough stamina to manage multiple personalities. And so does anyone wanting to get outside of her head and live a little. So I think it’s fitting to translate the insight of a book about business success, The Wisdom of Failure: How to Learn the Tough Leadership Lessons Without Paying the Price by Laurence ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Depression General Habits Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Personality Self-Help Depression Recovery Depressive Episode Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Can Selfishness Be a Good Thing?
 As children, we are told that being selfish is a bad thing. We’re told to share our toys with our siblings, for example. And we’re told that putting others before yourself is the way to be. But is selfishness always wrong? Can it be that, sometimes, being selfish is a healthy thing, even in relationships? This week’s guest believes this to be so. Listen in to learn why.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Dr. Laura Dabney has been in practice in Virginia Beach for almost twenty years and has treated patients in more than a dozen cities across Vir...
Source: World of Psychology - April 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Relationships The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard Selfishness Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Challenges for Moms Who Have OCD
I have written before about the challenges children face, and the lessons they can learn, when one of their parents is dealing with obsessive-compulsive disorder. In this post I’d like to focus more on moms who have OCD, and the difficulties they might deal with. I won’t be focusing on postpartum OCD, but rather on moms who have already been diagnosed with the disorder and have been living with it for a while. Some of the most common types of obsessions in OCD involve various aspects of contamination such as fear of dirt, germs, or illness. The person with OCD might fear the worst for themselves, their loved on...
Source: World of Psychology - April 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: OCD Parenting Women's Issues Compulsions Motherhood Obsessions Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Source Type: blogs

7 Considerations When Leaving Your Marriage, Part Two
This is Part Two in a series, to read Part One click here. In the last article I highlighted three important considerations to think about before leaving your marriage: Be sure, be kind, and the guilt you might experience about leaving. These three considerations are very much about you and your internal dialogue and in this post, we’ll see how the next stages are very much influenced by those around us. You’re Going to Be Seen as the Bad Person: Your partner (and Children) will see you as the bad person in this break up because you ended it. No matter how valid your reasons, because you left, they see it as...
Source: World of Psychology - April 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Drew Coster Tags: Marriage and Divorce Relationships Self-Help Communication Doubt Friendship Parenting Perspective Projection Source Type: blogs

Looking for the Light When There ’s Darkness
“There is mud, and there is the lotus that grows out of the mud. We need the mud in order to make the lotus.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh Over the past few years, many of us in the helping professions have noticed an emotional shift that feels like a sense of gloom hanging over much of our universe. Many factors have no doubt contributed to these feelings, such as personal, political, environmental, and global issues. Some people have found themselves harboring a deep sense of darkness or negativity, but the fact is, there is no darkness without light. That is, we would not be able to understand the concept of dark feel...
Source: World of Psychology - April 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Diana Raab, PhD Tags: Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Professionals: US Statistics 2017
The mental health workforce in the United States is barely keeping up with the growing need for its services. According to the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there are more than 577,000 mental health professionals practicing in the U.S. today whose main focus is the treatment (and/or diagnosis) of a mental health or substance abuse concern. The data, the latest available, are from the 2016-2017 period. As people become more aware of the value of good mental health, they’re finding it increasingly difficult to access mental health services. Since 2011, the mental health professional wor...
Source: World of Psychology - April 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Mental Health Professionals Mental Health Statistics Source Type: blogs

Why It ’ s Okay to Cry in Public
I waited three months after I was discharged from the hospital for suicidal depression to make contact with the professional world again. I wanted to be sure I didn’t “crack,” like I had done in a group therapy session. A publishing conference seemed like an ideal, safe place to meet. A crowded room of book editors would certainly prevent any emotional outbursts on my part. So I reached out to colleague who had been feeding me assignments pre-nervous breakdown and invited her for a cup of coffee. “How are you?” she asked me. I stood there frozen, trying my best to mimic the natural smile I had...
Source: World of Psychology - April 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help bonding Crying Embarrassment Emotional Expression Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: April 9, 2019
The other day I went to a restaurant where they stopped giving out straws for environmental reasons, which was great. But when I grabbed my smoothie, I was perplexed and worried about the mess my kids would make trying to get it in their mouths. After a few minutes, I realized I didn’t need a straw. Since I had kids, straws were given at every restaurant. But did I really need one? Turns out I didn’t. I bring this up is because we all take part in habits not because it’s necessary, but often because it’s comfortable, convenient and part of our routine. But do we really need to check our phone as soo...
Source: World of Psychology - April 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

The Importance of Practice and Preparation
I used to shy away from certain activities. Why? Because I believed that I had to do them well or not do them at all. If I didn’t have any natural talent, then clearly they weren’t for me. On to the next pursuit.   Sometimes this approach makes sense. Take, for example, trying to play the violin. If, after many lessons, your “music” is jarring to your own ears and you don’t enjoy the experience, perhaps consider giving up what initially seemed like a good idea. You can lead an amazing life without ever picking up a violin again. Yet, there are other scenarios in which giving up your inter...
Source: World of Psychology - April 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Habits Perfectionism Personal Self-Help Habit Change Learning Memory preparation Source Type: blogs

8 Things Autistic People Wished You Knew about April
Every April, autism takes a center stage in global awareness. All around the world, well-meaning, good-hearted people “Light it up blue” for Autism Awareness Month, and they decorate their social media with the puzzle piece frames and the jigsaw rainbow awareness ribbons. And, every March, autistic adults are already dreading April. Many of them report feeling traumatized by previous Aprils. They begin to mentally prepare for what is ahead, feeling powerless to stop it. They’re bracing themselves for what is on the horizon. What autistic people wish their neurotypical allies knew going into April: We re...
Source: World of Psychology - April 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Terra Vance Tags: Aspergers Autism General Personal Stigma Autism Acceptance Month Autism Awareness Month Autism Spectrum medical disability model neurodivergent neurodiversity neurotypical allies stereotyping Stigmatization Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Hypersexuality with a Bipolar and Schizophrenic
 Hypersexuality is a very common symptom of bipolar mania and a potential symptom of schizophrenia, as well. Both Gabe and Michelle have experienced being hypersexual, but because of their ages and genders, it manifested itself in different ways. However, their personal differences aside, there is one thing that both our hosts completely agree on. . .  Listen now to find out.   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “Hypersexuality is not a good thing. It was a need that I had to fill.” – Gabe Howard   Highlights From ‘Hypersexuality’’ Episode [1:40] What is the correct defin...
Source: World of Psychology - April 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Addiction Relationships Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

7 Relationship Benefits of Good Communication
Are you listening? Relationships can be tough. Building a “context” of what your mate is really saying significantly increases emotional intimacy and closeness between the two of you. And, equally important, not only does building context help you learn how to be a better listener, but it also significantly lessens the disagreements couples have and improves your communication skills. We don’t always exactly mean what we say in our conversation. We open our mouth and some sentences come out. But we don’t always thoroughly think through what we are saying. Does that sound familiar? How to Make Even t...
Source: World of Psychology - April 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Communication Publishers Relationships YourTango Communication Skills Intimacy trust Source Type: blogs

9 Tips and Tricks for Creating a Calming Bedtime Routine When You Have Kids
It’s safe to say that everyone knows about the importance of having a bedtime routine for helping us get a good night’s sleep. But when you have kids, things can get tricky, because there are plenty of competing factors. Sometimes, it takes forever, plus an hour, to get your child to bed, and by that point, you’re exhausted — and restless. Maybe you find yourself zoning out on the couch or staring at the ceiling, thinking about the 100,000 things you need to do. And maybe you start doing them. Catch up on email. Unload the dishwasher, and load it back up. Sweep. Dust. Fold. Fix that random thi...
Source: World of Psychology - April 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Sleep Bedtime Children Hyperactivity Sleep Habits Sleep Hygiene Source Type: blogs

7 Simple Ways to Ease Anxiety
Anxiety serves a life-saving role when we are in real danger. Adrenaline pumps through our system, and suddenly we can run like Usain Bolt and lift a 200-pound man without much effort. However, most of the time, anxiety is like a fire alarm with a dead battery that beeps annoyingly every five minutes when there is absolutely nothing to worry about. We experience the heart palpitations, restlessness, panic, and nausea as if a saber-toothed tiger were 20 yards away. Thankfully there are a few simple gestures to communicate to your body that there is no immediate danger — that it’s a false alarm… yet again....
Source: World of Psychology - April 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mental Health and Wellness Research Self-Help Anxious Thoughts Coping Skills Relaxation Source Type: blogs

Retrain the Brain to Deal with Chronic Pain
An interesting March 2019 article discusses a new way to help teenagers to deal with certain types of chronic pain. Pain specialists estimate there are thousands of young people suffering from inexplicable pain that intensifies, traveling randomly from one part of their body to the next. It primarily affects girls, though some boys also experience this type of pain. Some doctors call it “amplified pain” and this term acts as a catch-all for a variety of diagnoses which are not yet well understood, particularly in children. For most of these children, the pain can’t be explained entirely by a current inju...
Source: World of Psychology - April 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Brain and Behavior Health-related Chronic Pain Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

7 Savvy Strategies for the Spring Season
Spring time is traditionally the time we feel freer. More hours of sunshine, warmer weather, and flowers blossoming inspire us to do better with whatever we want to achieve.  If you’re like most folks, you’ll begin to put pressure on yourself to lose those extra pounds and get on an exercise regime. After all, bathing suit time is just around the corner. You’ll also urge yourself to save money, get better organized, and be more focused. And, of course, spend more time with family and friends. Excellent ideas. So how come it takes you just a few days to give up on these determinations? Are you just we...
Source: World of Psychology - April 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Habits Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Source Type: blogs