Dyslexia and Entrepreneurialism: Is There a Connection?
Conclusion Dyslexia is probably the result of deficits in the brain at multiple levels. There is an impaired phoneme discrimination resulting in difficulty in understanding spelling. Visual perceptual impairment leads to further worsening of word recognition, and phonological awareness impairment causes speech disturbances. In the center of all this is delayed temporal processing. The end result is delayed speech development, difficulties in reading and comprehending texts, and poor academic performance. What Makes a Dyslexic a Successful Person? From Leonardo da Vinci to Einstein, children with learning disabilities prove...
Source: World of Psychology - July 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Industrial and Workplace Personality Publishers Research business Dyslexia dyslexic Entrepreneurs Source Type: blogs

How Busy People Bolster Their Bonds with Their Partners
You have a demanding career that requires a lot of your time and energy. So does your spouse. Maybe one of you—or both—travels for work. Maybe you’re also parents, and you also like to golf, practice yoga, take painting classes or play soccer, which you do separately. It’s cliché, but true: Many days you’re two ships passing in the night. But that doesn’t mean that your relationship has to suffer. You can find ways to reconnect and even strengthen your bond. Here’s how other individuals, who too live busy lives, do just that. They have date nights and days. “I believe ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Happiness Marriage and Divorce Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Relationships Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 14, 2018
Are you ready for this week’s Psychology Around the Net? We’ve got some pretty interesting updates in the mental health world for you this week! Keep reading for how one doctor believes we should change the conversation about mental illness, ways you can boost your productivity when that sweet summer sunshine keeps distracting you, the problem with studies claiming artists have higher rates of mental illness, and more. 15 Culture Perks to Boost Team Productivity During the Summer: Summer can cause us to get a bit restless in the work department. It’s nice out; we want to go play! However, there are some p...
Source: World of Psychology - July 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Creativity Industrial and Workplace Psychology Around the Net Research Technology Artists Productivity self-assessment Sex Addiction sexual disorder not otherwise specified study virtual reality WHO World Health Organization Source Type: blogs

How Can I Get Rid of Anxiety?
As an advocate for OCD awareness, I get lots of emails from people. One of the most frequent questions I receive is some form of “How can I get rid of this terrible anxiety that is ruining my life?” While I’m not a therapist, I have learned a lot in the eleven years since my son was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and one thing I know for sure is that is not the question any of us should be asking. The reason? Well, for one thing, a life without anxiety is not only an unattainable goal but an unhealthy one. Anxiety serves a purpose and a few of the ways it can benefit us include: Our bodies...
Source: World of Psychology - July 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Anxiety and Panic Self-Help Source Type: blogs

What We Can Learn From the Stanford Prison ‘ Experiment ’
The Stanford Prison ‘Experiment’ is not so much an actual scientific experiment as it is a great piece of fiction, a piece of improvisational drama created by a budding psychologist at the time, Philip Zimbardo. So please, let’s stop calling it an “experiment” and let’s stop teaching it in psychology classes. It’s astounding how many people still believe the experiment to be a credible piece of research based on an objective set of hypotheses and scientific methodologies. As we’ve learned over the past decade, as more evidence has become available — and after another se...
Source: World of Psychology - July 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Ethics & Morality General Psychology Research Violence and Aggression fake science Prison Experiment Stanford Prison Experiment Zimbardo Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 13, 2018
Summer is a wonderful time to catch up on reading. Right now, I have five books vying for attention on my nightstand including Lynn Dannheisser and Jerry Rosenbaum, M.D.’s What’s Wrong With Me? The Frustrated Patient’s Guide to Getting an Accurate Diagnosis. If you’ve ever felt frustrated or labeled, “hypochondriac” or anxious by a doctor, then you might want to read it too. But I’m curious to know what you’re favorite health books are. Tell me what you’re reading currently or share your perennial favorites. I’m always looking to add more great books whether ficti...
Source: World of Psychology - July 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Replacing the Irreplaceable: On Finding a New Therapist
Some are between jobs. Some people are between husbands. I’m between psychiatrists. Last week, I saw my psychiatrist of 19 years for the very last time. Unfortunately, he was retiring. Next week, I will see my new psychiatrist. I have to admit, I feel untethered. Something funny happened on the day of our last appointment. I was sitting in the waiting room, minding my own business. I was wearing a pair of extremely loud green, flowered pants. A woman who was also waiting in the waiting room, took one look at me and rolled her eyes dramatically. Her harsh judgement of me made me mad. This is what I wanted to blurt o...
Source: World of Psychology - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Bipolar Personal Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Source Type: blogs

Why Consistency in Parenting Isn ’ t Always Best
Parents are often told that consistency is the key to successful parenting, especially in the areas of children’s bed times, expectations about behavior, and discipline. I agree with the first two: most of us benefit from a consistent bed time and sleep pattern, and it’s really helpful for children if they know what their parents’ expectations about behavior are. However, the last one, I’m not so sure. As a therapist and a mum, I’ve read a lot of parenting books, watched a lot of programs, and been to a lot of parenting workshops, and consistency is always promoted, especially in relation to d...
Source: World of Psychology - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie Yates Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Personal Self-Help Child Development Learning Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Let ’s Talk About Sex Therapy
 Sex therapy. The very term is one that produces a flush of embarrassment in many people and is also prone to being misunderstood. But sex therapy is like most other psychotherapy, focusing on how to fix your issues. In this episode, our guest sex therapist talks about what his work consists of, dispelling a few of the misconceptions. He talks about the three main hallmarks of arousal, discusses common problems, such as erectile dysfunction and partners with extremely different libidos, and introduces practices such as “simmering” and “lazy sex.” He also offers some thoughts on polyamory, includi...
Source: World of Psychology - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Relationships Sexuality The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard Sex Therapy Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

The Healing Qualities of Music Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment
Various types of therapies have proven to be useful in alcohol and drug rehab programs, but music therapy is a tool that many individuals seeking treatment may not understand fully. Studies have shown that music therapy provides significant healing, emotionally, physically, and mentally, and it may end up being an important aspect of your own substance abuse treatment. What Is Music Therapy? Music therapy is very different from music in the form of entertainment. It is a clinical and evidence-based therapeutic practice that utilizes music to accomplish goals within an individual’s therapy program.1 Each client&rsquo...
Source: World of Psychology - July 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kelsey Brown Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Creativity Habits LifeHelper Psychology Psychotherapy Recovery Substance Abuse Treatment Drug rehabilitation Music Therapy Source Type: blogs

Feelings: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
This was a title of a popular Western movie in the 60s, and indeed in life we will encounter situations we may consider good, bad, or ugly. It’s just the way our mind works. Our mind is an expert evaluator of feelings. When individuals are asked what feelings they would consider good, bad or ugly, they can readily create a list for each category. Feelings are neither good nor bad. They are simply emotions that arise depending on situations we encounter. They can run their course if we allow them to do so. Society and our upbringing influence the way we look at our feelings. As we get older our mind becomes our own j...
Source: World of Psychology - July 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Habits Happiness Mindfulness Emotional Dysregulation Emotional Regulation Feelings Strong Emotion Source Type: blogs

How to Declutter When You Don ’t Have the Time or Energy
You have a hard time finding important items–umm like your keys, driver’s license, birth certificate, that stack of bills, and those old family photos. Maybe you also have stuff in all sorts of nooks, crannies and corners, and much of this stuff overshadows the significant stuff. And it’s largely become invisible. As writer Brooke McAlary noted, “We don’t see it, we don’t use it, we don’t like it, and in many cases, we don’t even remember that we own it. And yet it takes up physical, mental, financial and emotional space.” You know you need to declutter. Desperatel...
Source: World of Psychology - July 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

The Not So Golden Rule
I am willing to wager that you’ve heard of the Golden Rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. In other words, treat others the way you would wish to be treated. This “ethic of reciprocity” has been expressed in many moral maxims and religious and spiritual traditions. It has even become a part of many formal educational systems. As with many commonly accepted directives and norms, I hadn’t put much thought into Golden Rule until fairly recently. After all, most of us don’t question commonly accepted beliefs. In contemplating its significance, however, I was somewhat surprised ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pratibha Anand Tags: Ethics & Morality Friends Habits Happiness Mindfulness Self-Help Compassion Empathy Source Type: blogs

5 Essential Communication Tips for Couples
Many couples make this mistake: They expect and assume that harmony will automatically happen in their relationship. But the opposite is true: “What appears automatically in human relationships is friction,” said Chris Kingman, LCSW, a psychotherapist and couples expert in Manhattan. That’s because partners have different preferences, styles, expectations and needs, he said. Harmony actually happens when we deal constructively and effectively with the inevitable frictions inside our relationships (and our lives). One way we can do that is through communicating well with our partners. In the book More Love...
Source: World of Psychology - July 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Communication General Marriage and Divorce Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 10, 2018
How do you return to a sense of normalcy after tragedy? Whether it’s something that’s happened to us or someone else, adversity can throw us off balance. It changes our worldview. How we cope can make a difference in the way we continue on our journey. We can grow resilient, strong and maybe even help others who are struggling or we can grow cynical, depressed and ill. How well we cope is determined by a lot of things such as our past, personality, and our support system. If it takes you longer to deal with struggle then another person, don’t judge yourself. As you’ll read this week, a narcissistic ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

6 Steps to Start ‘ Living Big ’ and Creating Your Best Life
Are you doing everything you can to achieve your dreams? “Living Big” is a mindset of living with abundance. Now the abundance is not what you own, or have, it is what you share. There are as many wonderful ways to Living Big as there are water drops in an ocean, needles on an evergreen tree, grains of sand on a beach. Living Big is learning to generously share yourself, your stories, and enjoy the exciting connections that develop. It’s putting yourself out into the world and embracing the things that once scared you. It can change your life and increase your happiness and even your self-assuredness. Th...
Source: World of Psychology - July 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Publishers Self-Help YourTango Discipline Dreams Empowerment Faith Freedom Gratitude Happiness Humility Living Big Opportunities Perseverance positive expressions Self-Esteem Success Source Type: blogs

My Top 5 Ways to Boost Well-Being During Summer
“Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under the trees on a summer’s day, listening to the murmur of water, or watching the clouds float across the sky is by no means a waste of time.” – John Lubbock I must confess I enjoy summer more than all other seasons. It isn’t just fond memories of long summer vacation and no homework or school to deal with, although that certainly influenced my preference. I remember fondly the family trips we took during summer and often reflect those were the best days of all. While being a kid meant I didn’t have a lot of responsibility &mdas...
Source: World of Psychology - July 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Happiness LifeHelper Motivation and Inspiration Personal Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Ep 17: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Big Brick of Soap
 Fan favorite, Two Truths and a Lie, is back again. In this edition, our hosts share past mistakes they’ve made because of the symptoms of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Gabe’s stories involve past regrets and soap, while Michelle sticks to young men named Stephen and Karl – and lacrosse, because that’s her thing. Listen in to learn all about living with bipolar and schizophrenia or to figure out what our hosts lie about when they play games.   SUBSCRIBE   “The faster you run, the faster it’s over!” – Michelle Hammer   Highlights From...
Source: World of Psychology - July 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Can We Use Gene Therapy to Treat Alzheimer ’ s Disease?
I have previously written about research that delves into episodic memory loss, which is the type of memory loss typically associated with Alzheimer’s disease. While most studies of potential Alzheimer’s drugs examine how these compounds affect spatial memory, it is episodic memory — the ability to remember specific events — that is most affected by the disease. Episodic memory impairment is also associated with aging in general. The above research was conducted on rats who were trained to memorize up to twelve different odors in a specific order. The results of the experiment pointed to strong evid...
Source: World of Psychology - July 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Aging Brain and Behavior Memory and Perception Research Alzheimer's disease Dementia Epigenetics Episodic memory Gene expression gene therapy memory impairment Memory Loss Mental Health Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Postpartum Anxiety: How to Get the Support You Need When You Are Feeling Overwhelmed
There is tremendous social and cultural hype around the joys, excitement, and wonder of pregnancy, birth, and raising children. Baby showers, parenting classes, and the array of pre-birth activities often convey the implicit and explicit message to parents-to-be that having kids is exclusively a magical albeit stressful experience. This mythology does us a grave disservice by creating the sense that there is something shameful or abnormal about postpartum depression and/or anxiety. The truth is, negative emotional postpartum experiences are very common and tragically underreported as new mothers in particular often feel th...
Source: World of Psychology - July 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Depression Parenting Psychology Women's Issues postpartum anxiety Source Type: blogs

6 Surprising Signs That You ’re Struggling with Depression
Most people know the telltale signs of depression: a deep, sinking sadness, loss of hope, a bleak outlook on life, and weight and appetite changes. As psychologist Deborah Serani, Psy.D, said, most people also picture a slow-moving individual with sloped shoulders who’s unable to get out of bed. While for some people the above is absolutely true, for others, different signs are more prominent and indicative of depression—signs that might surprise you. Below are six symptoms to watch out for. You have a super short fuse. Irritability is a common sign of depression in men, but it also shows up in women. For examp...
Source: World of Psychology - July 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Depression Disorders General Health-related Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Students Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Is Mindfulness at Work Detrimental? A Cautionary Tale About Scientific Research and the Dangers of Overgeneralizing
As consumers of news, we often take things we read at face value. This can be especially true of scientific research that we read in the newspaper and elsewhere, where we often don’t question the claims that are being made. But we need to learn to be cautious consumers, reading the fine print; we also need to be accurate scientists, being careful that our claims match the research conducted; and we need to rely on our media to make sure that what is being published is accurately portrayed, as it will likely influence a wide audience, often naive to the subject matter at hand. While scientific research can be extremel...
Source: World of Psychology - July 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beth Kurland, Ph.D. Tags: Habits Industrial and Workplace Mindfulness Minding the Media Motivation and Inspiration Perfectionism Research Source Type: blogs

How to Communicate Suicidal Feelings
Unfortunately, I know this subject all too well. When I was 19 years old I my dad died by suicide, and I have had an almost fatal attempt myself in my early 20s, along with very regular ideations of wanting to end my life. One thing I have learned through the years, is that if you are suicidal is incredibly important to reach out for help in a way that is supportive for all involved. It is not easy for anyone, and there is a very big difference between using suicide as a means to manipulate people in an abusive way, versus a means to ask for support to get the help you need. As I said, I know this issue well and unfortunat...
Source: World of Psychology - July 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Communication Depression Marriage and Divorce Peer Support Personal Recovery Self-Help Suicide Depressive Episode Emotional Dysregulation Emotional Regulation Hopelessness Mood Swings Self Harm Shame suicidal gestures Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 7, 2018
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! I hope all my fellow Americans had an amazing Fourth of July last week. I don’t know who Independence Day thinks it is, landing right smack in the middle of the week, but I hope everyone managed some celebrations! Keep reading this week’s Psychology Around the Net for the latest on using environmental psychology to improve your workplace design, how folic acid might help babies in the womb from developing severe mental illness, the new mental health education requirements implemented by Virginia and New York (they’re the first two U.S. states to do it!), and more. Training i...
Source: World of Psychology - July 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Health-related Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Students Technology Women's Issues Bobby Shafran David Kellman Eddy Galland Source Type: blogs

5 Simple Ways to Stop Being a People Pleaser
“If you spend your life pleasing others, you spend your life.” — Cheryl Richardson Looking back on my life, I came to realize that I spent quite a high amount of my precious time trying. Trying to be perfect. Trying to be appreciated and liked by everyone else around me. Trying to fit in with different groups of people so that I could feel accepted and approved of. I can recall many situations in my life when I did things I didn’t really want to do to comfort or please others. I was a master of people pleasing and, to be honest, it wasn’t always because I wanted to make everyone happy. The tru...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Friends Publishers Relationships Tiny Buddha Boundaries Communication Emotions Family Feelings no apologies no regrets opinions people pleaser thoughts Source Type: blogs

When You Feel Like Your Body Has Betrayed You
You couldn’t get pregnant easily, and needed fertility treatments. You had a miscarriage. Or several. You developed complications during your pregnancy. You delivered your baby preterm. Every single one of Parijat Deshpande’s clients feels like their bodies have betrayed them because of the above reasons. Deshpande, MS, is a perinatal mind-body wellness counselor and high-risk pregnancy expert, who helps women navigate stress so they can manage pregnancy complications and give their baby a strong start to life. Psychologist Julie Bindeman, PsyD, works with women struggling with reproductive challenges, depressi...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Addiction General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Betrayal Fertility miscarriage Parenthood Pregnancy Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 6, 2018
You’re tired, depleted, and full of regret. You’re suffering from the effects of overindulging. Maybe you ate or drank too much. Maybe you fought with a friend or relative over politics. Maybe you slid back into a relationship with a toxic ex. You can punish yourself or practice a little act of self-kindness. Whether it’s meditating, resting or getting back to your support group, being compassionate and forgiving can motivate you to stay the course. How the Narcissist Hurts You Using Cognitive Empathy (Liberation After Narcissistic Abuse) – Did you know empathy could be good or bad depending on how...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Psychologist Dr. Yip Speaks on Border Crisis & Its Impact on Children
The ongoing border crisis remains, despite fading from the front pages of news websites and newspapers. Thousands of innocent children, brought to the border by desperate parents trying to escape poverty and violence, remain separated from their families. This separation will likely have a life-long impact on most of these children. Dr. Jenny Yip is a clinical psychologist, author, speaker, as well as a nationally recognized OCD and anxiety expert. Dr. Yip has dedicated her professional career to treating families and individuals with severe OCD and anxiety disorders. She knows a thing or two about how anxiety can affect a...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Children and Teens General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy border crisis Emotional Impact jenny yip Source Type: blogs

10 Surprising Health Benefits of Mindfulness Meditation
“The real meditation practice is how we live our lives from moment to moment to moment.” – Jon Kabat-Zinn As someone who strives daily to be the best I can be, to be present in the moment, minimize stress and appreciate the beauty and preciousness of life, I’m always keen to learn about scientifically-proven new health benefits of mindfulness meditation. Get better sleep. Anyone who’s suffered the lingering mental and physical effects of a poor night’s sleep on a regular basis, as I have on numerous occasions in the past, can appreciate this all-important benefit from mindfulness meditat...
Source: World of Psychology - July 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Mindfulness Research Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

6 Steps to Improving Emotional Intimacy with Your Partner
Emotional intimacy is so very important for our individual wellbeing as well as the health of our relationship. Stressors, change, schedules, physical distance, mental preoccupation, the ebb and flow of life … so many things can lead to our waking up one morning and feeling distant from our intimate other. If we think of intimacy as a degree of special connection, we realize that even “good” things happening in our lives can lead to decreased intimacy. After all, often “good” changes or personal achievements also include deep investments in activities that don’t necessarily include our...
Source: World of Psychology - July 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Communication Marriage and Divorce Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Dating Emotional Intimacy Source Type: blogs

Podcast: A Mindful Approach to Overcoming Addiction
   More than 20 million Americans have a substance use disorder. Addiction is powerful and can easily destroy lives. Many approaches exist to fight such disorders, including the familiar “twelve-step” methods, but none of them have tremendous success rates. Now, two counselors present a way to use mindfulness in the fight against addiction. They speak with our hosts, discussing the evidence that mindfulness works and how it can be used to treat addiction. They speak of their new book on this topic and explain how it can be used by the reader. They also talk about forgiveness as a powerful therapy tool, ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Addiction General Recovery The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard Mindfulness Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Using Employee Assistance Programs to Improve Workplace Mental Health
Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) offer support to employees struggling with personal and work-related problems. The support typically takes the form of counseling, referrals, or follow up services. Primarily, EAPs focus on mental health, financial planning, legal aid, or childcare related problems experienced by employees. According to the International Employee Assistance Professional Association, 75% of companies with 251 to 1,000 employees have an EAP which climbs to over 95% of companies over 5,000 employees. These programs are cost effective with each dollar spent on services resulting in a $3 to $10 return on inve...
Source: World of Psychology - July 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Industrial and Workplace Mental Health America Mental Health and Wellness Publishers Eap Employee Assistance Programs workplace mental health Source Type: blogs

Is There Such a Thing as Too Much Daydreaming?
“I was trying to daydream, but my mind kept wandering.” – Steven Wright As a writer, I spend a great deal of time enwrapped in imagination. Nearly everything is a writing prompt and my creative Muse speaks to me at all hours. Daydreaming is one act that allows the flow to continue. Often, I sit in reverie, conjuring up ideas for my next article or blog post. I can be still for short periods of time while I move from one thought to the next. Sometimes my waking dream time is seed planting for the next steps in my life. I teach my clients and students how to use their imagination to manifest all sorts of e...
Source: World of Psychology - July 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Creativity General Habits Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Stress attention daydreaming Productivity Source Type: blogs

​How Parents Can Navigate Oppositional Defiant Disorder
It’s normal for teens to act out. They are growing up after all and with that comes an increased need for more independence and autonomy as they approach adulthood. They will test limits, argue with their parents and sometimes get into trouble. However, sometimes there might be more going on than normal teen rebelliousness. If you notice that your teenage son or daughter seems defiant, uncooperative and is hostile towards you, their siblings, peers, teachers and others in authority, they might have a type of behavior disorder known as Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). What Exactly Is Oppositional Defiant Disorder?...
Source: World of Psychology - July 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Anger Bullying Children and Teens General Parenting Personality Students Success & Achievement Violence and Aggression Acting Out Adolescence Autonomy Boundaries Defiance High School Independence Passive Aggression Questi Source Type: blogs

Want to Have Better Health? Science Says Connect with Nature
Now that summer is here, you might want to head to a nearby forest if you can, go for a nice hike, or visit a park/garden that is surrounded by a lot of trees and greenery. You might already know this intuitively, but studies have consistently shown that when you spend more time out in nature, you feel more alive. Published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, past and present studies conclude that getting out and connecting with nature is better for feeling rejuvenated than reaching for your proverbial cup of coffee. The findings are very important for both mental and physical health. Research has shown that people...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Brain and Behavior Habits Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Calm Fourth Of July Nature Present Moment Relaxation Source Type: blogs

Are You Telling Yourself Stories That Are Keeping You Stuck?
I don’t know anything about business, so how could I possibly succeed?   I don’t want to get involved in ‘marketing’ because marketers are slicksters who try to get people’s money. When Kate Swoboda started working for herself, these are the stories she carried. She didn’t question them. Instead, she believed them wholeheartedly. She wholeheartedly believed that she innately didn’t understand business-related information, and clearly couldn’t succeed. She wholeheartedly believed that marketing was bad and always used as a manipulative ploy. Many of us do the same. Our st...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement limiting beliefs Motivation self limiting Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 3, 2018
Having an illness whether physical or mental, can feel stifling and imprisoning. So can being in an unhealthy relationship. But having a sense of freedom in what you do and think can be incredibly healing and restorative. This holiday as you prepare for the quintessential 4th of July hotdog hamburger fireworks celebration, consider what things breaks you out of the chain of suffering and do more of that. It could mean releasing the need to wait for permission to cry or accept your body. It could mean freeing yourself from the constant need to compare. Our top posts will give you ideas for many ways you can celebrate freedo...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Fighting Perfectionism with Self-Compassion
“Be kind to one another.” You don’t need to be a die-hard Ellen DeGeneres fan to appreciate the value of that motto. And while we’re reminded how kindness goes a long way in our everyday interactions with others, we often forget to apply it to those who need it most: ourselves. Whether it’s setting a personal weight-loss goal, or believing that we can ace a final exam—all of us are familiar with the experience of setting high standards. We’re even more familiar with the inevitable let-down that comes from not living up to those very standards. Enter, the life of a perfectionist. Bu...
Source: World of Psychology - July 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Perfectionism Publishers Research Depression Kindness perfectionism and depression Perfectionist self-compassion Self-Esteem self-worth Source Type: blogs

Bummer in the Summer: How to Deal with Summertime Seasonal Affective Disorder
As I write this, sunlight glares off the pavement outside my window, the sky remains a plain of ceaseless blue, and the air is so bogged down with heat that the usual cheery birdcalls trilling through the neighborhood now sound shrill. It is summer; I am sad and annoyed — and there’s not a big overreaching reason why (not any more than all the other seasons, at least). I haven’t always been a “bummer in the summer” kind of person; in fact, it used to be my favorite time of year. All the way through childhood and even past my college years, I relished long days swimming in the ocean and countl...
Source: World of Psychology - July 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Depression Sad Seasonal Affective Disorder summer Summer Blues Source Type: blogs

Ep 16: Violence, Schizophrenia, and Bipolar. Oh My!
 Many people believe that violence and mental illness are linked in such a way that all mentally ill people will – eventually – be violent. Some people go as far as to believe that violence is only perpetrated by people with mental illness. In this episode, Gabe & Michelle explore these assumptions, thoughts, and ideas from their perspectives as people living with bipolar and schizophrenia. They discuss the president’s views on people with mental illness being responsible for seemingly all gun violence. They discuss why society is so quick to believe that mental illness and violence are intrinsic...
Source: World of Psychology - July 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Schizophrenia Violence and Aggression Source Type: blogs

Using Humor and Tragedy When Writing about Addicts
At its best, addict lit satiates our quintessential human yearning for stories that may lead to salvation. We want warm fuzzies. We want sweet, sweet, redemption. We started each morning of residential treatment with burned muffins, a house meeting, and introductions. “My name is Tom and I’m a junkie here on vacation. My goal today is to lay in the sun and sample the delicious food in this all-inclusive resort.” Tom’s sarcasm made orange juice squirt out of my nose. Humor was an elixir for the boredom of early sobriety and monotony of the rehab center’s strict daily schedule. Our addiction cou...
Source: World of Psychology - July 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Addiction Communication Creativity Publishers The Fix addict lit addicts Funny Humor Sobriety Tragedy tragic write about addiction writing Source Type: blogs

Are You Using Work to Numb Yourself?  
While my dad was in the hospital, on a ventilator with five chest tubes attached to his body, I thought it was a good time to start working on my website and a new blog. I’d sit in his room every day for two months reading about WordPress themes and coding tips. I’d spend lunch thinking of clever names for my blog and equally clever topics. As I think back, this was ridiculous. While my father was lying in hospital bed, in a medically induced coma, I was learning how to create headers. But, at the time, this seemed like a perfectly reasonable, terribly necessary and very normal thing to do. When he died, I retu...
Source: World of Psychology - July 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Grief and Loss Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Relationships Self-Help Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

If You Don ’t Use It, You’ll Lose It: 4 Tips for Aging Well
My grandfather was a true Yankee farmer. Taciturn and dignified, he rarely said a paragraph when a few words would do. Once, when I was in my mid-twenties and totally clueless about what it means to be dealing with old age, I found him sitting at the kitchen table translating poetry from German to English. Then in his late 70s, it had been over 50 years since he took basic German at the agricultural college he attended. I didn’t have any idea he knew even one German phrase. Yet there he was, diligently working out the poem, word by word by word. “Why don’t you just get an English translation?” I as...
Source: World of Psychology - July 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Aging Health-related Memory and Perception Self-Help Cognitive Function Memory Loss Source Type: blogs

3 Brain Tricks For Great Focus Anytime
The summer slowdown is upon us. Right now you may feel a little unmotivated, to say the least. Unless you’re one of those lucky people who works from the beach, it can be hard to concentrate on the tasks at hand during the summer months. You may be dreaming of your vacation and time off, but if there’s still work to do then you need to find a way to kick your motivation into high gear  —  fast. The truth is, if you keep waiting for inspiration to strike, you might be waiting forever. Procrastination can be difficult to overcome but it all starts with tiny steps that help you take action, then building...
Source: World of Psychology - June 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melody Wilding, LMSW Tags: ADHD and ADD Brain and Behavior Creativity General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Money and Financial Professional Psychology Self-Help Stress Student Therapist Students Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Think Your Kid Is Smart? Think Again!
Some folks are so proud of their child’s intelligence that they brag about it to the world. Emblazoned on the bumper of their SUV is the message: “My kid’s an honor roll student,” to be replaced years later with a college decal from an elite university. Since being smart is such a source of pride in our culture, let’s look at what we mean by “intelligence.” Years ago, intelligence was seen as a single entity, referred to as the “g” factor: “g” for general intelligence. Kids who were in front of the line when God handed out brains were those who scored high ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Child Development Emotional Intelligence kids Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: June 30, 2018
Happy Saturday! This week’s Psychology Around the Net brings you some insight on “the curse of knowledge” and writers (what is it…and do we care?), the feedback loops among financial, physical, and mental health and how to stop the damaging effects, why physical injuries affect our mental health, and more! Do Writers Care for What Psychology Has to Say About the Curse of Knowledge? Vera Tobin, a professor of cognitive science at Case Western Reserve University, Ohio, explains “the curse of knowledge” as such: “[T]he more information we have about something and the more experience ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Books Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Money and Financial Parenting Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research curse of knowledge genes for intelligence genes for neuroticism gen Source Type: blogs

Writing Your Heart Out: Re-scripting Your Life and Rewiring Your Brain
One of the most powerful means of expression involves taking pen to paper or fingers to keyboard as emotions spill forth. For those in mental health treatment, it is often a life line. Sitting with a client recently, I found myself holding back tears as she opened a previously nailed shut window behind which terrifying feelings were held captive. As she maintained a flat affect and read aloud what she had written, it was if she was telling someone else’s story, but we both knew that she was letting loose her demons, a Pandora’s Box of twisted, wing flapping fury. I felt honored that she was willing to lay bare...
Source: World of Psychology - June 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Books Creativity Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Creative Expression Emotional Expression Journaling writing writing exercise Source Type: blogs

Healing from Addiction: Finding the Road to Recovery
Addiction — and recovery — can look differently from individual to individual. As surely as we can be addicted to alcohol, substances, or medications, we can just as easily be addicted to love, work, sex, dieting, exercise, skin picking, and food. Addiction can refer to any compulsive and unhealthy attachment or behavior that one uses as a way of artificially enhancing, numbing, or avoiding feelings.  Addictions have negative consequences and are difficult to just “stop” doing.  There are certainly different levels of medical and psychological risks associated with different kinds of addic...
Source: World of Psychology - June 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Binge Eating Eating Disorders Substance Use Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: June 29, 2018
For many of us coping or taking care of someone with an illness, life is a constant battle. We lose track of time. We forget the seasons. We grow up and life’s struggles make us hard, inflexible and serious. I think summer is a great time to return to the sense of lightness and joy characteristic of childhood. Joy and laughter are important tools for the healing journey. Something as simple as walking on the beach, reading a summery book or watching the sunrise or set, can be beautiful ways to reconnect you with life. Slip into the ease of the season with our top posts and learn everything from what’s blocking ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Procrastination Has the Power to Sabotage Your Relationships
Don’t wait until tomorrow to figure it out! Falling in love with someone you’ve been dating is typically a beautiful, romantic experience, but when depression, low self-esteem and other mental health issues crop up and cause you to turn to the negative coping mechanism that is the bad habit of procrastination, it can raise problems in a relationship you otherwise might not encounter. Procrastination is the gap between intention and action, which is why people who procrastinate sometimes having trouble finding love or end up self-sabotaging their relationships. The word procrastination comes from “pro&rdqu...
Source: World of Psychology - June 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Publishers Relationships YourTango Depression Low Self Esteem negative coping mechanisms Procrastination Self Deception self-worth Stress trust Source Type: blogs