Active Shooter Drills at School: How to Do Them Right
Threats to school-aged children are not new. From the 1940s through the 1980s, children in primary schools participated in bombing preparation drills, in case their school came under a bombing attack. After the mass shooting at Columbine by a pair of disaffected youth, the drills shifted from bombing to active shooter. No longer did children sit in the hallway with their heads between their knees. Instead, teens and kids were taught how to lock the classroom door and shelter in place. Unfortunately for too many children these days, well-meaning school administrators have taken it upon themselves to make an active shooter d...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Children and Teens Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research Students Trauma Violence and Aggression active shooter Childhood Trauma intruder drill school crisis School Shooting Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Anxiety and Anger: A One-Two Punch
  Do you struggle with anger? Did you know that some of our most hot-headed moments are actually rooted in anxiety? In today’s podcast, Jackie openly shares her own fuse-blowing moment when her husband’s keys were (gasp!) missing from the hook, and now she must face being late for therapy and perhaps even lie dying on the side of the road. How did she handle this catastrophic situation her mind so graciously forewarned her about? Does this sound familiar? Join us as we discuss anxiety-driven anger and explore ways to minimize and possibly even prevent it. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIE...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Anger Anxiety and Panic Disorders General Not Crazy Podcast Psychology Source Type: blogs

February 17 is National Random Acts of Kindness Day
National Random Acts of Kindness (RAK) Day is devoted to just that: People doing random, unasked for gestures, big and small, to make the world a better, kinder place.  There are different stories about how it began. In the U.S., the National Random Acts of Kindness Day was created in 1995 by the Random Acts of Kindness Foundation, a small nonprofit organization. They selected February 17 as the annual day to recognize and support more purposeful kindness.  New Zealand also claims founding credit. RAK day has been an annual day of celebration of kindness there on September 1 for the past 15 years. Josh de Jong is...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Happiness Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration Compassion Random Acts of Kindness Day Source Type: blogs

The Psychology of Staying Put: Why Mobility in the U.S. Has Been Declining for Decades
Do you think that, over time, the U.S. has become an increasingly mobile nation? Is it your sense that people pick up and leave far more often than they did in the past? That’s part of our conventional wisdom, propped up by declarations in prestigious newspapers, scholarly journals, and popular culture. Remember those Carole King lyrics? “So far away / Doesn’t anyone stay in one place anymore?”  There is one big problem with our belief that mobility in the U.S. has been increasing: It is exactly wrong. Sociologist Claude Fischer has shown that American mobility has been declining for well over ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bella DePaulo, Ph.D. Tags: Psychology Cohabitation Hometown Moving Source Type: blogs

Turbocharge Your Brain  
Life sure does require a lot of thinking. The heavy lifting includes solving problems, charting the right path to our goals, and making important decisions. Each requires us to rev up our thinking engines and put our brains into gear. And, just like with a car, you can boost the effectiveness of your thinking power with a brain turbocharger — easily.   To understand how turbocharged thinking works, you need to understand a little bit about the two sides (hemispheres) of the brain. The left and right sides of the brain process information in different and specialized ways. The left hemisphere usually thinks ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Michael R. Kandle, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Psychology Ambidextrous Cognitive Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

A Meditation on Leaving a Job Behind and Taking Back Control
When you’re in a job that you dislike, it could be complicated to simply walk away. It’s tough to walk out the door without looking back and weigh the various consequences. But at the same time, walking away from detrimental situations also can be a beautiful exercise in taking back control — taking back control of your life and yourself and all you embody, even if it’s not always so easy.  In my personal experience, I planned to stay at a particular job for a decent amount of time. Then, when I started to see the writing on the wall, marked in red (you know, for red flags), I had to reconstruc...
Source: World of Psychology - February 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lauren Suval Tags: Industrial and Workplace Motivation and Inspiration Personal anxiety quitting a job Self Care Stress unemployment Source Type: blogs

10 Strategies for Recharging on the Spot
While it would be nice to have an entire day to recharge, it’s not necessary. And if you wait until you have a full day off (from work or parenting or any other countless responsibilities you have), you’ll likely be incredibly exhausted—physically, mentally, and emotionally. The good news is that there are plenty of ways to recharge on the spot, whether you’re responding to emails at your desk, sitting on the subway, or dealing with a tantruming toddler (yes, really). Below, you’ll find an assortment of soothing strategies to try anywhere—from breathing techniques to mindset shifts. Take...
Source: World of Psychology - February 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books General Habits Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: February 15, 2020
This article details the study’s fascinating findings. My Patients Don’t Separate Their Physical and Mental Health. Medicare Must Stop Asking Us To: In this opinion article, a general practitioner in Melbourne, Australia shares her frustration over a new Medicare report that warns doctors against billing Medicare for both physical health and mental health issues within the same consultation. She argues that the rule essentially punishes practitioners who want to provide good-quality, holistic care for their patients. When Mental Illness Memes Stop Being Funny: Finding humor in our pain can be therapeutic, but c...
Source: World of Psychology - February 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Around the Net Sleep Students Technology Trauma Alternative Schools digital technology Medicare Memes school for traumatized stud Source Type: blogs

You ’ ve Hurt Your Partner: Here ’ s How to Apologize Sincerely
Everyone makes mistakes. Here’s how to fix them. You messed up and made a huge mistake. You really blew it, and now your partner is giving you heck about it, seething with disappointment, hurt, and pain. Now you need to apologize so it doesn’t continually affect your relationship — but sometimes, knowing how to apologize in a way that your partner knows you mean it is the tough part. Guilt washes over you as your conscience reminds you that you didn’t keep your word or your end of a commitment. Or quite adversely — a more flippant, “What’s the big deal anyway? Get over it!” a...
Source: World of Psychology - February 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Communication General Marriage and Divorce Publishers Relationships YourTango apologize how to say your sorry Source Type: blogs

The Things We Do for Love: Avoiding Co-Dependency When Addiction Affects Your Relationships
Valentine’s Day is a time to show your appreciation for those you love, often with gifts, a special dinner or even doing a few chores so that they can relax and feel at ease. But, when addiction is part of your relationship, there can be a very fine line between showing your love and support and enabling substance use with codependent behavior. This is especially true in romantic and parent-child relationships where one partner or the child is battling addiction. Naturally, we want so badly to help our partner or child get better, protect them from harm, and maintain the relationship by keeping the peace, that it&rsq...
Source: World of Psychology - February 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Claire Orr Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Recovery Relationships Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery addiction support Codependency Codependent Coercion Enabling Guilt Trip Manipulation Source Type: blogs

How to Spot Red Flags in Your Relationship
Every week, I get letters here at PsychCentral, asking for my advice about red flags in relationships. From my files: “I love him very much, but he spends more time with his buddies than with me and he won’t introduce me to his friends. He won’t talk about it. He says he has to have his guy time.” “I love her very much but we’re almost at our wedding date and she hasn’t quit smoking like she promised she would do before we got married. She just hides it.” “I love this man more than my own life but he constantly sides with his mother when she disagrees with me. When I tr...
Source: World of Psychology - February 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Abuse Communication Marriage and Divorce Relationships Boundaries Compromise Dating Defensiveness gaslighting Intimacy Love Red Flags stonewalling Source Type: blogs

So You Really Want to Love Yourself?
We’ve all learned about the importance of loving ourselves. Even kids today pick it up from popular media. And there’s no shortage of advice for how to love yourself, most of which is very helpful. But I’m sorry to say that all of the conventional wisdom about self love is inadequate. I’ll explain why. The fundamental misunderstanding about self love is the mistaken notion that the self is a singular entity that needs to be loved.  In reality, our selves are not singular in nature. The truth is that we have a multiplicity of selves in our subconscious minds. Remember Freud’s Id, Ego, and ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Michael R. Kandle, Psy.D. Tags: History of Psychology Personality Dysfunctional Family Empowerment Internal Family Systems Self Love Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

A Psychiatrist ’s Perspective on How to Overcome the Stigma of Mental Illness
I was a third-year medical student when I discovered my calling to become a psychiatrist. To this day, I remember the gentleman who changed the trajectory of my life.  He was a middle-aged individual who presented to the clinic due to difficulties with depression. As I entered the exam room, I remember feeling uneasy by the magnitude of his suffering. I could not see his eyes as he slumped over his chair resting his head in his hands. He spoke very slowly as he mustered the strength to answer my questions. The interview lagged with noticeable pauses in his answers. His answers were brief, but his suffering was pervasi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dimitrios Tsatiris, MD Tags: Inspiration & Hope Personal Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Stigma discrimination Mental Illness Stigmatization Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Managing Coronavirus Outbreak Anxiety
Does the new coronavirus from China make you a little anxious? How concerned should we be? Is it a real threat or mostly hype? In today’s podcast, Dr. John Grohol, founder and editor-in-chief of PsychCentral.com, explains what the coronavirus is, how it compares to the flu and why it seems to have hit the panic button in a lot of people. He offers tips to avoid getting sick in general, and importantly, gives advice on how to keep our anxiety levels in check when it comes to new disease outbreaks, especially in how we seek information from the media. If you’d like to learn more about the coronavirus and how to...
Source: World of Psychology - February 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders General Health-related Interview Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Stress Management: An Act of Self-Love
Managing your stress is a form of love. It is taking a look at your life and deciding where changes could be made to help improve your sense of control over certain stressors in your life. Stress is not something tangible. It cannot be touched or held. However, it can originate from something tangible. Stress is a state of mental or emotional strain resulting from adverse or very demanding circumstances. Stress is everywhere. It comes in all shapes and sizes. It does not discriminate according to race, gender, or socioeconomic status. There is no escaping stress. However, we so often try to. The sooner we accept and adapt...
Source: World of Psychology - February 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cerena Reid-Maynard, LICSW Tags: Self-Help Acceptance And Commitment Therapy Self Care stress management stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Reduce Stress with This Simple Strategy
You have a lot going on. And all those countless tasks are bouncing around inside your head. Maybe you have a demanding job, and you’re a full-time student. Maybe you have three kids who have all kinds of activities and appointments. Maybe you’re just starting your business. Maybe you’re also caring for your ailing parents. And you’re officially stressed out. You’re overwhelmed and exasperated. There’s too much to do, and you feel like it all rests on your shoulders. Of course, one invaluable strategy is to delegate. But sometimes you’re so stressed out that you don’t even kn...
Source: World of Psychology - February 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books General Habits Happiness Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Feeling Disappointed? These 4 Truths Will Help You Move Forward
No one is free from the trials and tribulations of living on planet Earth. The unfortunate truth is that a large percentage of the planet’s more than 7 billion inhabitants are, at this moment, hungry and suffering. So, when I’m faced with unexpected challenges — those disappointments that seem to sneak up and blindside me — I feel a push and pull in my inner psyche. On one side, I feel victimized. On the other, I feel guilty for having feelings of “Why me?” or “When is enough, enough?” Yet in these disappointments lies great learning and tremendous opportunities for personal ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Michael Bianco-Splann Tags: Motivation and Inspiration Perfectionism Personal Source Type: blogs

3 Questions to Ask Yourself When Worry Takes Over
Are you an overthinker? Do you sometimes suffer from nonstop anxious thoughts? A lot of people do: bright, accomplished professionals, executives, and leaders who look like they have it all together actually don’t know how to stop overthinking. Even the most focused and grounded high achievers get sucked into today’s perfect storm of unremitting urgency and unhealthy expectations. Their sharp, but overworked, minds wind up circling in self-doubt or stuck on the simplest decisions… the result is overthinking. You know the feeling. You’re tired, overwhelmed, or emotionally triggered or spent, and you...
Source: World of Psychology - February 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders General Publishers Self-Help Stress YourTango Overthinking Worry Source Type: blogs

Self-Care as a Foundation for Love
Many of us have been taught that loving another person means sacrificing ourselves to serve others. We suspend our own desires in a noble effort to love.  Indeed, love relationships are not just about meeting our own needs. They require an effort to listen deeply to what our loved one needs to be happy and feel connected with us. However, if we continually suspend our own needs in order to accommodate others, we may become resentful and unhappy. We fall into a pattern of codependence — neglecting our own needs in order to accommodate the other. Love requires reciprocity. I’ll address two important ways tha...
Source: World of Psychology - February 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Communication General Happiness Mindfulness Psychology Relationships Self-Help Codependence Emotional Connection Intimacy Love Self Love Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

The Psychology of Confirmation Bias
People seem to stubbornly cling to their preexisting beliefs, even when provided evidence to the contrary. In psychology, researchers have a name for this stubbornness — confirmation bias. It’s one of the most common of biases humans hold in their mind, called cognitive biases. Confirmation bias is the tendency for a person to interpret or remember information in a manner that simply confirms their existing beliefs. It is one of the strongest and most insidious human biases in psychology, because most people are unaware they are doing it. It is the invisible voice inside our heads that always agrees with what w...
Source: World of Psychology - February 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Self-Help Confirmation Bias Open Mindedness Perspective taking selective recall social media Source Type: blogs

When Your Depression Is Perfectly Hidden (Even from Yourself)
Natalie always had a smile on her face, even when discussing painful topics. She was a highly successful, hard worker and an involved, loving mother. In addition to her full-time job as an accountant, Natalie volunteered at her children’s school and in her community. Her house was immaculate. Every item had a place, everything was neatly labeled, and every appliance gleamed. So it was quite a shock to her therapist, Margaret Robinson Rutherford, Ph.D, when she found Natalie lying still in her bed with empty vodka and pill bottles by her side. Rutherford was helping Natalie work through her anxiety over juggling so ma...
Source: World of Psychology - February 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Depression Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Managing Marriage and Depression
  What’s it like being the spouse of someone with mental illness? In today’s podcast, our hosts Gabe and Jackie invite their beloved spouses, Kendall and Adam, to share what marriage with mental illness is like from their point of view. What issues have the couples run into so far and how did they resolve them? Do they have a safety plan if something goes awry? Is a strong partnership with mental illness even doable? Tune in to get a glimpse of married life with mental illness and see how both couples support each other through it all. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Cr...
Source: World of Psychology - February 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Bipolar Depression Disorders General Marriage and Divorce Not Crazy Podcast Relationships Source Type: blogs

Why Don ’t My Children Behave?
Kelly is beside herself. She and her husband are parents of two children, ages 4 and 3. They decided to have their children close together so they could get through the more intense parenting of the preschool years within 5 years. Both are committed to their careers and work full-time. Both are exhausted by the end of the day. They want to have peaceful evenings and weekends, but the kids act up and they end up acting up, too. They’ve tried everything from the “naughty chair” to letting the kids duke it out to separating them. Nothing works. What can they do? It’s said that there is no manual for h...
Source: World of Psychology - February 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Discipline kids Socialization Teaching Toddlers Source Type: blogs

Nesting Syndrome: 10 Signs You ’ve Become Too Comfortable at Work
Are you a victim of “nesting syndrome”? I coined this phrase to depict our unconscious — and sometimes conscious — refusal to leave the comfortable circumstances we’ve created for ourselves. When we refuse to leave the nest, we stop looking for improvements and resist challenges from others. We feel as if we’ve “made it” and earned our position, so why rock the boat? Sure, I can hear you thinking, “This doesn’t apply to me.” But nesting syndrome manifests in surprising ways, even among the most proficient of leaders. Do any of these apply to you? The uncon...
Source: World of Psychology - February 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alan Weiss, Ph.D. Tags: Industrial and Workplace Self-Help Source Type: blogs

How to be Assertive When You ’re Worried About Being Criticized or Rejected
It’s hard to be assertive when you’re really worried about the other person’s response. Maybe you’re worried they’ll think you’re being ridiculous and reject you. Maybe you’re worried they’ll be critical, and you’ll feel even more uncomfortable. These are legitimate concerns. Maybe they’ve even been substantiated by past experiences. For instance, after trying to be assertive, you’ve left an interaction feeling “misunderstood, shunned or ignored,” and the issue went unresolved, said Leslie Garcia, LCSW, a psychotherapist and founder of Counseling...
Source: World of Psychology - February 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Family Friends General Industrial and Workplace Marriage and Divorce Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: February 8, 2020
This article offers tips for those struggling with severe health anxiety. The Environmental Burden of Generation Z: Kids today are terrified, anxious and depressed about climate change. In this article, the author discusses why this is so: “As climate change continues unabated, parents, teachers and medical professionals across the country find themselves face-to-face with a quandary: How do you raise a generation to look toward the future with hope when all around them swirls a message of apparent hopelessness?” Students Shouldn’t Have to Choose Between Groceries and Therapy: In this article, the author ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens College Depression Disorders General Green and Environment Mental Health and Wellness OCD Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Psychotherapy Stu Source Type: blogs

How to Survive a Traumatic Experience
Somewhere in the world people are experiencing traumatic events every day. Communities fall apart due to tornadoes, floods, fires, and war — cataclysmic events that cause multiple losses for everyone in their path. Homes and possessions are lost; individuals suffer injuries; friends and family disappear or die.  Individual events like physical, sexual and/or verbal abuse, illness, abduction, injury or death of loved ones, sudden loss of health, home or job are devastating as well. Traumatic events, whether on a community or personal level, are shocking and life-changing. To feel devastated is normal. To want to...
Source: World of Psychology - February 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Grief and Loss Self-Help Trauma Source Type: blogs

Self Compassion: The Secret to Keeping the Promises You Make to Yourself
It is not just at the beginning of a new year that people promise themselves to do better. I rarely make New Year’s resolutions. But there are always times during the year when I think about something I just said or did, or didn’t do, and say to myself, “Self, you have got to do better.”  But how? My natural inclination is to berate myself. I’ll give you a trivial example. Sometimes I carelessly do something that costs me money. At the supermarket, for instance, I pick up a yogurt that I know is on sale. But when it gets rung up, I don’t get the discount. Oh, it only applied to cert...
Source: World of Psychology - February 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bella DePaulo, Ph.D. Tags: Mindfulness New Year's Self-Help brene brown kristin neff self-compassion Self-Esteem Self-Talk self-worth Source Type: blogs

Six Secrets to Healing Your Mind
The first secret to healing your mind is to know that it is actually possible. This shouldn’t be a secret at all, but most people don’t realize their minds can heal. Healing is a word that psychologists rarely use. In fact, the word “healing” isn’t even in the lexicon of our education or training. Instead of healing people, we are taught how to treat conditions, usually targeting specific symptoms or behavioral dysfunctions. But the distinctions between treating and healing are meaningful in terms of their depth and permanence. Though most therapists are not trained to heal, there are models f...
Source: World of Psychology - February 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Michael R. Kandle, Psy.D. Tags: Personality Psychology Ego Freud id Internal Family Systems Super Ego Source Type: blogs

7 Expert Tips for Adapting to Life ’s Curveballs
Life throws us curveballs all the time—and sometimes, all in one day. These curveballs might be relatively minor: a work project doesn’t go your way, your colleague makes a hurtful remark, your car won’t start, you get sick before a big presentation, your kids won’t sleep. Or these curveballs might be major and (initially) seem insurmountable: You don’t get into your first-choice school. You don’t get the promotion. You lose your job. Your relationship ends. You need surgery. Big or small, these situations might lead you to feel very overwhelmed—and frustrated. So, you stew and wal...
Source: World of Psychology - February 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anger Creativity General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Finding a Therapist- What to Look For
 Are you thinking about making a therapy appointment but have no idea where to begin? What should you look for in a therapist? What’s the difference between an LPC, LCSW, Phd and PsyD? In today’s podcast, Jeff Guenther, LPC, founder of TherapyDen.com, takes us through the entire therapist-hunting process. He breaks it down into simple parts so it no longer feels daunting or confusing. He even gets us thinking about what kind of person we’d feel comfortable sharing our problems with — for example, would you prefer a male or female? A vegan? A parent? A religious person? Is it even OK to ask a pote...
Source: World of Psychology - February 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Podcast Psychology Psychotherapy The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Why Are We Afraid of Grief?
After receiving news of a death, no matter our emotional state, most of us think to do at least some of these things: call others, check our schedules and arrange any necessary changes to accommodate the funeral or memorial service and any travel required, organize meals for the bereaved, visit the home or funeral home and leave offers of help, and comfort survivors. Stop for a moment and think now about the people you encountered in your everyday life today, on the roadways, public transportation, in shops and offices of every kind, or just walking down the street. Might some of these have received that call and be grievi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Grief and Loss Personal Self-Help Bereavement Source Type: blogs

The Connection Between Childhood Trauma and Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Numerous studies have been done on the implications of childhood trauma on mental health. Although the general consensus is that trauma does affect an individual in many ways, very little research has been done to narrow the investigation into the possible links between childhood trauma and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). One 2013 study, Childhood Maltreatment is Associated with Larger Left Thalamic Gray Matter investigated the relationship between GAD and childhood maltreatment by examining the brain scans of individuals with a history of GAD and trauma. As a person with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Complex ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sue Morton Tags: Abuse Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Trauma Anxiety Disorder Childhood Trauma Source Type: blogs

Why Finding Your Purpose Is Important When Battling Depression
When your mood is at the lowest of low, it’s hard to even think that someone loves you or cares about you. You feel like you’re unnoticed by everyone. It’s hard to even think that anyone wants to have you around, and you may even feel like you’re a burden to everyone. In reality, you do have value and a meaning in life. Everyone is imperfect and everyone makes mistakes. But we all need to understand that imperfections don’t put a value on our worth. You have awesome abilities and talents that no one else has and that makes you uniquely valuable. Your life matters, and when you begin to underst...
Source: World of Psychology - February 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jasmine L. Bennett Tags: Depression Self-Esteem Suicide Existential Questions Greater Purpose Source Type: blogs

Coping with Internet Trolls
In Norse mythology and Scandinavian folklore, a troll is an ugly being that hides under bridges or in rocks. They have claws and harm humans whenever they get the chance. An internet troll is a person who posts hateful mean comments online. They hide under pseudonyms to avoid real-life repercussions.   According to a 2014 study by psychologists Erin Buckels, Paul Trapnell and Delroy Paulhus, trolls have what is referred to as the dark triad of personality traits. In their article Trolls Just Want to Have Fun they state, “trolling correlated positively with sadism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism, using bo...
Source: World of Psychology - February 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Lee Glass, MA, CLC Tags: Bullying Technology internet trolls online bullying social media Source Type: blogs

4 Guilt-Free Ways of Saying No
I get it — saying no to others in your life can be incredibly difficult. I’ve had trouble myself saying “No” many times. But whether it’s to a partner, a friend, a co-worker, or even your boss, sometimes you just have to say no if you want to protect your own sanity. Here are four sure-fire ways to say no without feeling guilty. Know Your Own Needs & Limits Before you can successfully navigate saying no, you need to be consciously aware of your own needs and limits. This is a problem for many, because they aren’t always aware of their needs or limits — until the stress has bec...
Source: World of Psychology - February 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Psychology Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Boundaries guilt-free How to say no overwhelm saying no Stress Source Type: blogs

How to Practice Self-Compassion When You ’ve Screwed Up
When we make a massive mistake or bad decision, the last thing we want to do is be nice to ourselves. Instead, we unleash our rage… and anxiety and shame. We bash ourselves. We panic. We minimize the impact (while subconsciously freaking out). According to therapist and self-compassion expert Lea Seigen Shinraku, MFT, these are all ways we try to maintain some semblance of control. Because “when we’ve really screwed up, we feel like the situation is out of control.” So, we think to ourselves: If only I’d done things the right way; this would’ve never happened, and everything would be fi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Relationships Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Will Your Marriage Last? Here ’ s What the Research Says
You put the “happy” in happily ever after! We all dream of living happily ever after in marriage with the love of our life. And, in pursuit of that dream, more than 6,000 people walk down the aisle in the U.S. each and every day! (That’s more than two million weddings per year.) And, according to a report from Sound Vision, the average wedding costs around an estimated $20,000.  The 12 “Golden Rules” Of A Happy, Long-Lasting Marriage But, for all of that dreaming of wedded bliss, 40 to 50 percent of marriages still end in divorce. When you talk about marriage, most people t...
Source: World of Psychology - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: General Marriage and Divorce Publishers Relationships Sexuality YourTango Dating Love Language wedding Source Type: blogs

Psych Central Live on Your Stage
Conferences can be long and repetitive, year after year of similar kinds of talks, given by many of the same people. What gets lost in many conferences is the voice of the attendee, the voice of a different kind of expert. Are you looking for something different to educate and engage your attendees at your next conference, fundraiser, meeting, or other event? If so, we’ve got something awesome to announce — Psych Central LIVE! A unique live taping of a podcast show, tailored to your needs and audience. You can give your audience a break from the usual presentations and speeches by hosting a live recording of T...
Source: World of Psychology - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Peer Support Podcast Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Loneliness a Mental Health Issue?
  America is facing a loneliness epidemic, according to research. But what exactly is loneliness? Is it social isolation? A lack of intimacy? And importantly — is loneliness a choice? In today’s podcast, Gabe and Jackie tackle these difficult questions and share their own thoughts on loneliness and how it relates to mental health. Gabe also unveils the 7 different types of loneliness — one of these being “no-animal loneliness.” But is there really such a thing? Jackie is doubtful. Tune in to hear a thoughtful and nuanced discussion of what it means to be lonely, and see if you can relate...
Source: World of Psychology - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Psychology Self-Help Source Type: blogs

How Conflict Can Be Constructive
Full disclosure, I have long considered myself conflict avoidant. Chalk it up to being a Libra peacemaker, who craves harmonious relationships, as well as someone who grew up in a household in which raised voices were rare. As a result, I didn’t learn how to gracefully navigate the waters of opposing viewpoints. More often than not, I would “go along to get along” and refrain from rocking the boat lest it capsize in emotionally stormy seas. Those were also the roots of long-time co-dependency which led me to relationships in which I was often attempting to figure out how to maintain peace and keep everyon...
Source: World of Psychology - February 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Communication Personal Relationships Conflict Avoidance Conflict Resolution Source Type: blogs

Loneliness Erodes Your Mental Health: How You Can Get Past This Toxic Emotion
“Loneliness is proof that your innate search for connection is intact.” – Martha Beck Loneliness is one of the most miserable feelings to experience. Being alone, however, doesn’t necessarily mean a person is lonely. They may be, although they may be quite deliberate in wanting to be alone for a time, and have no negative affects from such solitude. It’s the protractedness and sense of isolation and desperation that can set in that seems to push loneliness to extremes, even potentially resulting in worsening mental health conditions such as depression or anxiety. Yet, for those who are sufferi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Relationships Self-Help Loneliness Source Type: blogs

9 Unique Valentine ’ s Day Gift Ideas for Everyone on Your List
When we think of Valentine’s Day, we think chocolate-covered everything, big and bright balloons, and grand, costly gestures. But these presents might not precisely express your true appreciation and love for the special people in your life. Below, you’ll find nine creative and unique Valentine’s Day gift ideas for your partner, kids, best friend, mom, dad, and anyone else on your list. These ideas range from presents you can make to meaningful activities you can do together.  Leave little notes. This could be anything from a Post-It note on your partner’s car window to a lengthy love letter t...
Source: World of Psychology - February 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity Family Friends General Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Dating Intimacy Love valentine's day Source Type: blogs

Questions for Discerning a Healthy Relationship
Part of the process of growing up is developing discernment for whether or not your relationships are healthy. We learn to navigate this early on. One of the markers of the emergence of early childhood is the identification of having “best friends.” While toddlers exhibit parallel play, playing alongside a peer without much direct interaction, as early as age three, children begin to crave more social engagement with their peers and begin to identify and assign specific value to their friendships.  We continue to practice this through all phases of development as we learn conflict resolution and how to tre...
Source: World of Psychology - February 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Abuse Relationships Violence and Aggression Boundaries Codependence Domestic Violence Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month teen violence awareness valentine's day Source Type: blogs

Kobe Bryant ’s Death: Why We Mourn Celebrities So Deeply
In light of Kobe Bryant’s tragic and untimely passing on January 26, the question of why we grieve so deeply when a celebrity dies is intriguing. We learn about deaths nearly every day from all corners of the world often straight from devices already in our hands. But when a well-known figure passes away, especially so unexpectedly, we can be profoundly affected. Why? Are we in fact a country obsessed with death, especially celebrity death, as America’s oft-cited reputation suggests? If so, are we fascinated with death for sensationalistic reasons at the expense of others? Or does celebrity death captivate us f...
Source: World of Psychology - February 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Tsilimparis, MFT Tags: Celebrities Grief and Loss Compassion Cultural Identity Empathy grieving Kobe Bryant Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: February 1, 2020
This article shares her story of recovery. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - February 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: Anorexia Anxiety and Panic Disorders Eating Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Depression gut bacteria Magic Mushrooms postpartum depression psychedelic therap Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus Anxiety: 4 Ways to Cope with Fear
As the coronavirus spreads, more and more people are becoming anxious about what it means in their life. After all, entire cities have been quarantined in China. Travel restrictions have been put in place throughout the world. It’s perfectly normal to feel anxiety about this emerging health crisis. The coronavirus can be a deadly disease, but we also know that it’s most likely to be deadly in people who already have a weakened immune system. Here’s how to cope with the anxiety and fear surrounding the coronavirus outbreak. 1. Don’t Inflate the Risk Our brains are used to taking something that is ma...
Source: World of Psychology - January 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Health-related Psychology Self-Help Stress anxious about virus coronavirus virus outbreak Source Type: blogs

Does Your Vocabulary Help or Hinder Your Self-Esteem?
The words you choose either give you power or take it away. How familiar are you with your internal dialogue when it comes to building self-esteem? The language you use can have a profound impact on your self-image, how you show up in the world, and how you live your life. Words have the power to shape your beliefs and influence your decisions and can either empower you to love yourself more or to feel awful. The way you express yourself, your choice of words, and tone of voice creates energy that either gives you power or takes it away, so it makes sense that using empowering words does more for your everyday life than pe...
Source: World of Psychology - January 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Communication General Self-Esteem YourTango empowering words negative self-talk Vocabulary Source Type: blogs

How to Shift Perspective When You ’ re Stuck in Your Own Way
Why We Can’t Believe Everything We Experience Sitting by the edge of the indoor pool on a winter’s day, I swung my feet into the water, feeling the full-on rush of cold water against my feet and ankles. “Boy is this water cold,” I thought to myself.  Not quite ready to plunge in, I dipped my fingers and then hands into the water, surprised to discover the warmth of the water against my skin. “Wait, actually the water feels nice and warm.” This phenomenon struck me as very curious. My feet, having been in my warm shoes, would have me believe the water was cold. My hands, having been ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beth Kurland, Ph.D. Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Self-Help Stress Perspective Source Type: blogs

7 Ways to Cultivate Self-Love
Most of us seek someone to love or to love us. We don’t think about cultivating self-love or realize that love originates within. You may be seeking a relationship, but research suggests that singles are actually happier than married people, with the exception of happily married people. But even that dwindles over time. A new study shows that on average, after the first year, spouses return to their baseline state of happiness prior to the marriage. Thus, similar to the conclusions reached in the studies done on lottery winners, after marriage and after winning, we eventually return to how happy we are as individuals...
Source: World of Psychology - January 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Mindfulness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Gratitude Self Care Self Love Self Reliance self-worth Source Type: blogs