Can Mental Patients Also Be Experts?
Who do you think understands more about bipolar disorder: a psychiatrist or a patient with the illness? In this Not Crazy podcast, we discuss whether a patient can be considered a mental health expert without all the credentials after their name. Today we invite writer and bipolar advocate Natasha Tracy — who also has bipolar disorder — to the show to give her opinion. Would you seek advice from a patient? Join us for an in-depth discussion on mental health patients as experts. (Transcript Available Below) Subscribe to Our Show! And Please Remember to Rate & Review Us!   Guest Information for &lsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - September 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Interview Not Crazy Podcast Policy and Advocacy Source Type: blogs

Politics, Elections, and the Post-Truth Era
Let’s talk politics and lies. Why are they so rampant today? In today’s Psych Central Podcast, our host speaks with author and communications expert Tim Ward who explains why the truth matters so much — especially regarding our elected officials. They discuss our cognitive biases, like the “halo” and “anchoring” effects, that can cause us to turn a blind eye and believe the lies we hear. Learn about the different types of lies politicians tell and learn how can we avoid being the victims of fake news.  Click on the player above to listen now!   We want to hear from you! P...
Source: World of Psychology - September 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Ethics & Morality Minding the Media The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

What is (and Do You Have) Imposter Syndrome?
 Do you have a constant feeling of self doubt or fraudulence despite evidence to the contrary? You may have a very common condition: Imposter syndrome. In today’s Not Crazy podcast, we discuss what this syndrome is and why so many people feel like they are swindling others with their personal success. What is the difference between imposter syndrome and negative self-talk? And how can we start thinking more positively about ourselves? Join us for a great discussion. Click on the player below to listen now! Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe...
Source: World of Psychology - September 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Not Crazy Podcast Peer Support Perfectionism Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

Dealing With Anxiety in the Time of COVID-19
Now that we’re in the middle of a pandemic, more people than ever are experiencing anxiety, especially those who struggled with mental health issues before COVID-19. And to make things even worse, many of our coping mechanisms, like going to the gym or hanging out with friends, have been taken away. In today’s show, our host, Gabe Howard, talks with Dr. Jasleen Chhatwal, who helps explain why so many people are having anxiety symptoms and what we can do about it. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic below! SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest informati...
Source: World of Psychology - September 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Love, Dating, and Marriage with Schizophrenia
Can people with schizophrenia fall in love? Can they date or even get married? In today’s episode, host Rachel Star Withers (a woman who lives with schizophrenia) and co-host Gabe Howard review their own past romantic experiences. They also interview Andrew and Stephanie Downing, authors of Marriage and Schizophrenia: Eyes on the Prize. Listen to learn about their incredible journey of overcoming schizophrenia and building a healthy, rewarding, and happy marriage. Computer Generated Transcript of “Love, Dating, Marriage with Schizophrenia” Episode Editor’s Note: Please be mindful that this trans...
Source: World of Psychology - September 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Marriage and Divorce Motivation and Inspiration Podcast Relationships Sexuality Source Type: blogs

Imposter Syndrome: Why You Have It & How to Stop It
“I have written eleven books, but each time I think, ‘Uh oh, they’re going to find out now. I’ve run a game on everybody and they’re going to find me out.” – Maya Angelou Any minute now they would find out. I scanned the large conference room. The twenty-six project team members around the table discussed data analysis. Their voices were muffled by the thick fog of my anxiety. My own throat tried to choke me, and my chest refused to expand. Sweat trickled down my side. Breathe, just breathe. It’s going to be okay. My eyes met my boss’s and he smiled at me across the roo...
Source: World of Psychology - August 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Tiny Buddha Fraud imposter syndrome self-worth Source Type: blogs

Impact of the Immune System on the Brain and Mental Health
Most are aware that neurons send neurotransmitter signals to each other in circuits within the brain. My new book, The Secret Language of Cells, shows that similar conversations occur among all the cells in the body and these wide ranging conversations determine all physiological functions. While there are numerous examples of this cellular communication in the book — such as capillary cells sending directional signals for white blood cells to find an infection and capillaries instructing stem cells how to produce particular cells for the brain, this article will focus on a few ways that cellular conversations among ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jon Lieff, MD Tags: Books Brain and Behavior Cognitive Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

How to Grieve the Death of Someone You Don ’ t Know
Grief is healthy. The death of a loved one is an inevitable, certain, unavoidable, and inexorable part of life. Surviving family and friends experience an emotional cascade of grief, regardless of how their loved one passed. Bereavement has no formula, no time limit, or right or wrong. Grieving is an important part of the process of healing. Each of us grieves in our own time and way. Neither wisdom nor understanding makes it easier, because those are rational thoughts. Grief is not rational or linear. In grief, the rationale is useless. Emotions are dictated by the limbic system in your brain, which is the seat of your e...
Source: World of Psychology - August 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Grief and Loss Publishers YourTango grieving Mourning Source Type: blogs

Working Hard or Hardly Working? Working from Home and Boundaries in 2020
Unprecedented does not begin to describe the times we are currently living in. Working from home has become the norm for many Americans across the U.S. Though there are many benefits, including staying safe from COVID-19, working from home also presents its challenges and may be more complex than we once thought. You may find yourself either working nonstop or not being as productive as you were in the office. Skipping lunch or having a hard time finding the motivation to work and not lounge around. It’s okay to feel this way. No one could have predicted this abrupt shift in our lives. But, there is a way to work fro...
Source: World of Psychology - August 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ingrid Gonzalez, LMHC Tags: Industrial and Workplace Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Is It Possible to Be Too Empathetic? (And How to Cope if You Are)
Ever since I can remember, other people’s pain — both physical and emotional — seemed to infiltrate straight into my own body and mind. As a kid, whenever someone fell on the playground, my stomach lurched up and down like an erratic elevator. Even if someone just talked about getting hurt, my belly reeled in empathy. To this day, my body still reacts the same way whenever I see or hear someone in distress (watching the news can oftentimes bring on a feeling of physical pain and panic).  The emotional absorption, though, hasn’t always been so clear-cut, as feelings like depression, fear, and an...
Source: World of Psychology - August 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Personal Relationships Codependence Codependency Source Type: blogs

Art Therapy of the Past: Finding Comfort & Consolation in Art
Art therapists today help their patients cope with anxiety, addiction, illness, or pain. Therapists might encourage clients to explore their emotions by drawing, for example, or to reflect on a difficult experience through painting. Art is used to help people express themselves and explore their emotions. In past centuries, however, art therapy took a substantially different form. Maybe it’s time to bring this practice of the past into the present—as a way to move into the future. The Isenheim Altarpiece is a 16th century sculpted and painted work housed in an old convent-turned-museum in the medieval city of ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Spirituality & Health art Art Therapy Isenheim Altarpiece Source Type: blogs

The Parent ’s Balancing Act: Using the Word ‘ No ’
Among many other things, parenthood inherently carries a significant responsibility for guiding the child’s unruly behavior into positive outlets. This is important not only for the child to become a functional and productive adult in society, but also to engage the child’s potential to find success and fulfillment. It is no small order for parents to find a way to allow their child to develop freely and independently, while also helping them adhere to societal expectations and develop a sense of morals and ethics that will ensure fewer barriers of resistance in life. One way parents must accomplish this is to ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Boundaries Child Development Positive Psychology Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 29, 2020
Before we get on with this week’s Psychology Around the Net, I need to let you know that this will be the last one. Healthline has purchased Psych Central and content production stops August 31, 2020. Dr. John Grohol, Psych Central’s founder and our fearless leader, recently shared his reflections and gratitude. Additionally, many of our talented and knowledgeable contributers have shared goodbye posts, and invitations to follow their new blogs. Now, let’s see what’s new in the world of mental health this week! The Psychology Behind Why Some College Students Break COVID-19 Rules: According to deve...
Source: World of Psychology - August 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Burnout College Students coronavirus COVID-19 Fatigue Happiness Life Satisfaction Mood pandemic Source Type: blogs

How Imposter Syndrome Sinks Its Claws into Multiracial People
At MHAScreening.org, we know that among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) that take a mental health screen, people who identified themselves as multiracial were the most likely to screen positive or at-risk for alcohol/substance use disorders, anxiety, depression, eating disorders, and psychosis. There’s research that shows that multiracial people have more behavioral health problems than their monoracial counterparts. They face unique stressors, and often find that it is difficult to connect with others – even with other multiracial people. More often than not, the parents of multiracial people wi...
Source: World of Psychology - August 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Mental Health America Publishers Racism imposter syndrome multiracial Source Type: blogs

3 Tips to Regain Work-Life Balance After Working from Home for 6 Months
With many of us working from home due to the pandemic, we’ve had to adjust our work routines to fit the new normal and carry on in our professional responsibilities. Working from home has come with its own set of benefits and drawbacks; maybe you’re seeing a noticeable increase in workload, or finding it difficult to adjust your working practices to manage what you need to get done. Whatever your situation, if you find the “new working normal” is starting to negatively affect your emotions outside of working hours, you’re not alone.  The good news is that there are measures to put in pla...
Source: World of Psychology - August 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Seth Chisholm, MSW, RSW Tags: Industrial and Workplace Self-Help coronavirus COVID-19 work from home Source Type: blogs

Is Your Brain Tired? You May Be Mentally Fatigued
It seems like everyone I talk to lately is tired, and not because they’re suddenly more active or more productive than usual. In fact, most of them can’t tell you exactly why they’re so tired, they just are. This isn’t to say people aren’t busy, they are — just in new and taxing ways. But these new kinds of busyness and the “new normal” brought on by the coronavirus is causing many of us to feel mentally fatigued. Mental fatigue is something that occurs when your brain goes into overdrive. You can’t stop thinking, worrying, anticipating, planning, etc., and this consta...
Source: World of Psychology - August 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC Tags: Anxiety and Panic Self-Help Sleep brain fog Coping Skills coronavirus Mental Exhaustion Mental Fatigue Prolonged Stress Rumination Worry Source Type: blogs

Learning from Your Regrets
Is there anybody in this world who has not regretted a decision they’ve made or a path they’ve taken? I doubt it. Yet, how people respond to their regrets varies considerably.  Some people easily shrug off their regrets; no problem!  Others review their regrets, seek to make amends, resolve to do better next time.  Still others are riddled with regret, ruminating over and over again about what they should have done differently. What do you do most often? As you may have guessed, the best way to deal with regrets is to acknowledge what you did wrong or didn’t do well, then learn from...
Source: World of Psychology - August 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Self-Help regret Source Type: blogs

Parenting the Highly Sensitive Child
A friend of mine was telling me about how she discovered she may be a Highly Sensitive Person. Through our discussion of what this means, she pointed out that my oldest child may be highly sensitive, which changes the ever evolving lens through which I parent him.  Parents are inundated with messages about the best way to raise their children. What I have found to be true in real life is that what works one day may not the next day. Children are growing through many different stages at a staggering pace and so the best advice I can give parents is just to get to know their child, maintain an open and affectionate bon...
Source: World of Psychology - August 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Emotional Regulation Highly sensitive kids Highly Sensitive Person Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?
Today’s show takes a good hard look at police culture as a whole. What type of personality is drawn to a career in law enforcement? What are officers taught in the academy? Why do they receive so little mental health care when they face so much trauma on the job? These are just a few of the areas that our guest, mental health advocate Gabriel Nathan, lays bare. Join us as we discuss the basic foundations of law enforcement and how Gabriel believes the profession needs to evolve to keep up with the times. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic above! SUBSCRIBE &a...
Source: World of Psychology - August 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Policy and Advocacy The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

The Fallacy of Positive and Negative Emotions  
For too long, Western psychology has explored psychopathology without much inclusion of the positive aspects of being human, which may leave us with a bleak or stern view of psychology. Fortunately, being interested in wellness, personal growth, and positive psychology is a growing trend. In an attempt to explain things simply, there is often a distinction made between positive and negative emotions. Positive emotions are considered to be pleasant feelings such as joy, pleasure, love, gratitude, or contentment. Negative emotions may include anxiety, anger, sadness, loneliness, fear, or other uncomfortable or undesirable fe...
Source: World of Psychology - August 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: General Happiness Mindfulness Psychology Self-Help Positive Psychology Source Type: blogs

How Can You Be Right and Wrong at the Same Time?
This has been a very divisive year for the United States. From how to handle the pandemic and political agendas to racial injustice and redefining our institutional principles, almost every topic that comes across your social media newsfeed or passes in conversation has two sides and you better know which one you are on. More than the important and controversial issues our society faces, what I have been most disturbed by is the criticism and judgment passed from either side of any discussion. It seems an “Us versus Them” mentality has surfaced in the universal mind and we get quite busy looking for evidence t...
Source: World of Psychology - August 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Anger Books Communication coronavirus divisiveness Politics Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Cope with Parenting Stress  
The uncertainty in the world may be getting on your nerves, and the problem is that you are not the only one you need to worry about. Your children can also feel your stress and that can create stressed kids. If you and your children were struggling with anxiety before the pandemic, it has now probably heightened. Summer may have provided some respite, but new worries may be cropping up. What’s a parent to do when there are so many issues to worry about and no chance of knowing with certainty that your feared outcomes won’t come true? Here are a few questions to help you gauge your current stress level:  ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Agitation Parenting Self-Help Stress anxiety coronavirus Relaxation self-compassion stress reduction Worry Source Type: blogs

How My Husband ’s Chronic Depression Forever Changed Our Family — for the Better
I promise to choose you, in good times and in bad. Till death do us part. I was in my early twenties when I pledged those words to my husband. Like many young brides, I promised these things without having experienced a lot of life. Difficult times did come: a miscarriage, health scares, layoffs, losing two parents to long illnesses, and more. But we plowed through and came out on the other side stronger, proudly wearing our scars; living proof that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. It felt like there was nothing we couldn’t handle. We are bullet proof, he always says. Then, something hap...
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Christine Uniacke Tags: Depression Personal Source Type: blogs

What I Wish I Had Said about Mental Health and Suicide
Thirty years ago, the atmosphere surrounding mental health and suicide was very different than it is today, especially in some areas. Even today, where you live could affect the information, help, and reactions you receive. Since that time, I’ve learned a better way to respond when a loved one struggles. If someone you care about changes in some way, something may be wrong. The difficulties go beyond available support. According to statistics, most people who ultimately end their lives are dealing with a mental illness or behavior disorder — whether they realize it or not — though this is not always true....
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Depression Personal Suicide Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Police (CIT) Crises Training Needed?
A mentally ill man is standing in your yard yelling at the mailbox. What do you do? You call the police, right? Not so fast, according to today’s guest, mental health advocate Gabriel Nathan. There is a better way to do things. Gabriel believes that rather than training police officers to de-escalate people in mental health crises, the police shouldn’t be called at all in these situations. Our host Gabe has a different take on things, as he is an advocate for training police officers in crisis intervention practices. Join us for an enlightening and nuanced conversation regarding the role of the police when it ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Interview Not Crazy Podcast Policy and Advocacy Source Type: blogs

Back to School and Cognitive Dissonance
The term cognitive dissonance means to have conflicting feelings, beliefs, or behaviors that cause internal discomfort. It can also describe the feeling of disappointment one feels when things do not go as anticipated. With schools across the country returning to their own personal version of a new academic year this month, students, teachers, staff, and parents collectively face the potential for repeatedly experiencing different forms of cognitive dissonance.  The rural Georgia county I reside in is fortunate to have a low number of local cases and our school system has returned in person, with the option to go onli...
Source: World of Psychology - August 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Children and Teens College Parenting Students Back To School Cognitive Dissonance coronavirus COVID-19 online education virtual learning Source Type: blogs

Are There Potentially Positive Outcomes from COVID-19?
In dealing with COVID on a daily basis and continually bemoaning its effects on us as individuals and a society, we wistfully anticipate a return to “normal,” though arguably a normal that will be noticeably different than our past. What we miss is that it may be worth considering the potential positive impact of COVID. One of the largest impacts may be felt in the mental health field. We know that COVID has increased the incidence and intensity of anxiety and depression.1 Clearly that burdens the current mental health care system. However, it also means that many more people are becoming aware of the realities...
Source: World of Psychology - August 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Colleen Donnelly Tags: Anxiety and Panic Depression Stigma coronavirus COVID-19 social distancing teletherapy Source Type: blogs

5 Mindful Recovery Steps for Self-Observation
In early recovery, there is value in filling your space and time with meetings and various distractions to fill in the space that was once consumed with substances and addictive behaviors. There is also value, at some point, to create unfilled space for your presence and attention. Creating space to be present for your presence is a key to sustainable long-term recovery.  Creating Space vs Filling Space The practice of mindfulness; being there, being present, paying attention, and learning to be there for yourself starts with the process of letting go. Letting go of substances and addictive behaviors is a gr...
Source: World of Psychology - August 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura C Meyer Tags: Addiction Mindfulness Recovery Alcoholism Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs

After the Fight — Repairing Your Relationship
Emotions run high during a fight. Yet sometime later, we may have forgotten what triggered our rage in the first place. We recall fighting, but what was it about anyway?  Lauren later remembered the details about a fight with her husband because she’d written about it in her journal. “Though I don’t like the word ‘fight,'” she said, “because we don’t hit or anything like that. But I was so furious it felt like a fight.” The Fight Lauren had told Jim a number of times not to interrupt her while she was praying. Praying was a sacred time for her, like meditation. Whatever ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marcia Naomi Berger, MSW, LCSW Tags: Relationships arguments Conflict Resolution Dating Source Type: blogs

How Mindfulness Can Reframe Body Image
Please note that this post discusses eating disorders. Weight — the loss of it, the gain of it, the way our bodies fill out our clothes or take up space in public — is a concept that can completely occupy our thoughts. For some of us, obsessing about weight is a daily reality. The perfect size seems ever out of reach, and I don’t think there’s anyone out there who truly feels their body is the perfect size and shape. I struggled with an eating disorder when I was in my teens. I never felt thin enough—even when my BMI was in the flashing-red-lights-get-this-girl-a-sandwich-before-she-passes-ou...
Source: World of Psychology - August 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Eating Disorders Mindfulness Publishers Spirituality & Health Body Image Weight Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 22, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at the mental health care treatment barriers LGBTQ teens and young adults face, what business owners can do to cope with the mental stress brought on by COVID-19, how older adults with pre-existing depression are exhibiting resilience during the pandemic and quarantine, and more. Entrepreneurship Was Tough Before COVID-19. Now It’s Testing Founders’ Mental Limits: Jocelyn Kung, CEO of The Jung Group, discusses the research her company has been doing regarding how business leaders have been dealing with their own mental stresses brought on by the coronavi...
Source: World of Psychology - August 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net business coronavirus COVID-19 inspiration porn LGBTQ pandemic virtual healthcare Source Type: blogs

Giving Your Partner the Right Kind of Support in Troubled Times
Why backing off (for a bit) may be better for your relationship. Attention, married women: If your husband seems angst-ridden or huffy, you might want to hold off on the advice in favor of a simple hug. And guys, despite how it may bruise your ego, you’ve got to continue being attentive even when your wife cruelly shoots down your attempts at making her feel better. According to a series of 2010 studies published by the University of Iowa, an excess of incorrectly-expressed support is worse for your marriage than neglect — shocking, right? A related study showed that husbands were more satisfied when they rece...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Relationships YourTango Emotional Support informational support self-esteem support tangible support Source Type: blogs

Losing Empathy After Traumatic Brain Injury
A traumatic brain injury (TBI) can occur at any time and can have a profound impact on the lives of those affected. While protected by the skull, the human brain is highly susceptible to physical trauma. In some cases, a severe injury can lead to changes in the affected person’s behavior and relationships. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 2.8 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury each year and approximately 56,000 people die. The most common causes of TBIs are falls, automobile accidents, and sports-related injuries. Brain trauma can lead to a host of potential issues, including: Mood swings...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Coral Link, LPC Tags: Brain and Behavior Memory and Perception Alexithymia Empathy Traumatic Brain Injury Source Type: blogs

How to Keep Yourself from Cheating
It can be tempting to cheat, I know. After over 40 years as a therapist, I’ve heard many, many reasons that people (even people who say they love their partner) give for cheating. There’s the thrill of the forbidden, the notion that what’s out there may be better than what you’ve got, the affirmation that comes from feeling attractive to someone else — especially when self-esteem is shaky, the satisfaction of someone preferring you to the partner they’ve got, and the itch to explore what could have been or could be sexually with someone else. Whatever rationalization you tell yourself, c...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Marriage and Divorce Relationships Self-Help Breakups Cheating Infidelity Insecurity Midlife Crisis Source Type: blogs

The Power of Self-Compassion to Heal Pandemic Eating
During this time of quarantine and lockdown from the coronavirus, people with emotional eating problems have found themselves increasingly overeating, bingeing, and dieting. It makes sense: we are more bored, depressed, anxious, and less active. Cultivating self-compassion may be the single most important ingredient to get your eating back on track. If you binged last night should you still be compassionate to yourself this morning? Or if you didn’t work out yesterday like you promised to do should you still have self-compassion? Shouldn’t you punish yourself for your bad behavior with harsh talk so you learn y...
Source: World of Psychology - August 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders Bingeing Body Image coronavirus COVID-19 dieting Emotional Eating Positive Psychology self-compassion Self-Talk Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Are Social Media Friends Real?
Whether we like it or not, social media is now a big part of our culture. In today’s show, Professor Tim Bono, Ph.D., an expert in psychological health and happiness, shares how we can keep a balanced perspective regarding social media and not let it lead to depression, addiction or envy. How is social media like a casino slot machine?  How do online friendships compare to in-person friendships? Join us for the answers to these questions and much more. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic above! SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest information for &lsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - August 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Psychology Technology The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

How to Create an ICU for Mind and Body
The importance of healing is often overlooked in modern society, yet some of the most effective strategies are simply achieved and inexpensive or free. Best of all, they work. In fact, they may seem, at first glance, to be so easy they couldn’t possibly help. During grief, after trauma, or for general well-being, these practices can help you create your own intensive care unit for your mind and body. Recognize the need for time apart from your normal routine. Investing time in yourself is important for everyday wellness and for giving yourself a chance to heal from specific emotional or physical wounds. Rare is the ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Grief and Loss Self-Help Stress grieving Journaling Self Care Source Type: blogs

Why People Might Not Like You
Everybody says I’m such a disagreeable man! And I can’t think why! – Gilbert and Sullivan, “If You Give Me Your Attention” lyrics Amidst floundering approval numbers, President Trump is baffled about why people don’t like him. “It can only be my personality,” he surmised. Well, maybe. But perhaps there’s more to it than that.  It got me wondering how many people feel similarly. We want to be liked and respected, but no matter how hard we try, we find ourselves feeling isolated and dumbfounded as to why other people may not like us. See if the following applies to y...
Source: World of Psychology - August 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Ethics & Morality Friends General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Perfectionism Personality Psychology Relationships Self-Help Personal Growth Respect Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Medical Model Errors and Omissions in Treating Mental Illness
  From lobotomies to pharmaceutical advertising to forced treatment, let’s discuss some of the more taboo topics in the history of psychiatry. While some of these approaches are obviously terrible (especially in hindsight) others are in the gray area. Should pharmaceutical companies be able to advertise directly to the patient? Is it OK to force psychiatric treatment in certain cases? What do you think? Tune in to today’s Not Crazy episode for a great discussion on the more controversial topics in the field of psychiatry. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Re...
Source: World of Psychology - August 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Not Crazy Podcast Psychiatry Treatment Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Our Fear of Emotional Vulnerability  
The word “vulnerability” has been labeled as many things in recent years. For example, vulnerability has been expressed as being a necessary part of the human experience. It has been argued as being the driving force behind authentic human connection as well as being coined a necessary ingredient for lasting relationships.  Perhaps most notably, Dr. Brene Brown has coined vulnerability as, “…emotional risk and exposure to uncertainty that fuels our daily lives as the most accurate measurement of courage.”  However, this was not always the case. As recently as a couple decades ago a ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Have You Caught an ‘Emotional Virus’?
Have you ever found yourself suddenly ill at ease? You might feel flustered or agitated. Your heart starts to race, or you catch yourself darting toward the door or to the kitchen to do some mindless comfort eating. The next time this happens, reflect and ask yourself: Who is in the room with me? Who did I just talk with? What did I just experience? What’s going on around me? Negative emotions from the people around us — including fear, worry, anxiety, and stress — pass from one person to another quickly, often with few or no words, like a highly contagious virus. If you spend an evening, for instance, ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Paul Napper, PsyD and Anthony Rao, PhD Tags: Anxiety and Panic Habits Self-Help Stress Alcoholism Binge Eating Contagion Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 drinking habits Eating Habits Source Type: blogs

How the Pandemic Is Taking Its Toll on Our Mental Health
The year 2020 will go down in history as one of the most devastating in history. Hundreds of thousands have died and millions have been hospitalized due to the novel coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19 has changed the lives of so many. No matter where you live, dealing with the effects of economic and physical lockdowns in a community leads to multiple mental health challenges. After months of living with the coronavirus, many people are getting tired, burned out, and more and more frustrated. In America, we face a particular challenge. Our federal government has chosen to take a backseat during the pandemic. Instead of leadin...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Source Type: blogs

Suicide After Suicide: What We Must Do to Break the Cycle
Each day, from every corner of the world, people left in the devastating aftermath of suicide call out to other survivors of such loss wherever they gather. It is helpful to connect with people who have experienced similar tragedies and are trying to make sense of what happened to their lives. Another, more painful reason they seek comfort from strangers is this: in the case of suicide, those who knew them best often withdraw or are unable to help because of misunderstanding and fear. Most do survive and go on to rebuild, but some experience multiple suicides and a few follow loved ones by ending their own lives. As a sur...
Source: World of Psychology - August 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Depression Grief and Loss Suicide Suicide contagion suicide loss survivor Survivor Guilt Source Type: blogs

The Emotional Life of Boys: One Size Does Not Fit All
Emotional intelligence (EQ) has gained a favorable space alongside IQ as findings continue to reveal connections to overall well-being and positive developmental outcomes. The EQ dialogue can now be found at all stages in the lifespan as theories and resources have emerged to “download” emotional competence.  And it starts early.  EQ education can be a worthy endeavor especially given the core of EQ is self and other awareness. The challenge becomes evident when we consider the diverse expression of the emotional life of individuals. While we all have emotions and feelings, they can feel and present d...
Source: World of Psychology - August 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John C. Panepinto, PsyD, LPCS, NCC Tags: Children and Teens Communication Men's Issues Parenting boys Child Development Cognitive Neuroscience Emotional Dysregulation Emotional Intelligence Emotional Regulation Nonverbal communication social sensitivity Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Keep Communication Fresh and Stimulating
What do you say to your partner when you’ve run out of things to say? Perhaps you are both working from home now, and you have the chance to check in with each other throughout the day. By dinnertime, you have run out of things to say to each other. There might not be much left to report, except to note something trivial like: “The strawberries are getting moldy.” Or perhaps you used to go out several times a week to concerts or dinner with friends, happily conversing and catching up. But now, it’s just the two of you most of the time, and here you are. Crickets. Comedian and author David Sedaris d...
Source: World of Psychology - August 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Spirituality & Health Conversation Starters partners Relationships Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 15, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net looks at young people and mental health support (or lack thereof) during the coronavirus pandemic, tap into one psychiatrist’s mind regarding psychedelic experiences and their effects on a person’s mind, thoughts, and behaviors, why sleep problems might actually nudge you toward your entrepreneurial goals, and more. ‘Feels Like the World Is Against You’: Young People Struggle With Finding Mental Health Support Amid COVID-19 Pandemic: According to a recent survey, depression among college students has increased since the coronavirus pandemic shut down camp...
Source: World of Psychology - August 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Adhd altered states Childhood Trauma College Students coronavirus COVID-19 economic struggles emotional validation External Validation mitochondria pandemic Parents Personality Disorders psychedelic th Source Type: blogs

It ’ s Time to Find Your Sense of Self
Having a strong sense of self provides us with emotional fortitude and personal empowerment. Life is better when we experience life as sovereign beings. Having a sense of self allows us to navigate the world with confidence and autonomy. What if we have yet to find our true self? Can we gain a sense of self while surrounded by global turbulence? Can we find our center and take charge of our spiritual journey when the world is spinning? Many of us are feeling anxiety, despair, and hopelessness because we are energetically connected to each other and to the world. Our collective consciousness is reflecting our fears, attitu...
Source: World of Psychology - August 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Spirituality & Health identity Sense Of Self Source Type: blogs

Reflections on Psych Central ’ s Next 25: In the Helpful Hands of Healthline
Like someone building a house in the 1800s, I started Psych Central on my own. You could do that back in 1995, because the web was simple and easy to code. I actually taught classes on building your own website to mental health professionals throughout the 1990s. Eventually, though, you need help to keep building your house. You can’t easily hoist up roof rafters on your own. So when the site became profitable, I hired someone to help out in 2006. Over the years, those numbers have increased as more and more help was needed. I’ve worked with some amazing, talented people over the years, many of whom I acknowle...
Source: World of Psychology - August 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media healthline Psych Central Source Type: blogs

10 Ways to Deal with the Stress of Life During a Chronic Crisis
Is living in a constant crisis bringing you down? This spring and summer feel a bit like we’re permanently stuck in line at a theme park. Every time we round another corner, certain it’s finally our turn to have some fun (or make any progress or plans), we face another packed set of snaking queue barriers. And there’s no end in sight! Argh! Staying Positive About Your Love Life’s Future in Uncertain Times Living in a constant, chronic crisis is difficult beyond belief. How do you deal with crisis? Are you just stuck feeling burned out? The year marches on… And we’ve lost count of the d...
Source: World of Psychology - August 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers YourTango chronic crisis COVID-19 Racism Stress Source Type: blogs

Self-Care to Lower Anxiety
In today’s world, self-care is not a luxury, it is a necessity. Although we may not be able to control what is happening outside of us, we can take steps each day to stay grounded and connected to our center. If you are looking for some at-home self-care practices to help you lower anxiety, alleviate stress, and feel calmer on a day-to-day basis, you’ve come to the right place. The practices below will help to anchor you in the present moment, quiet your fears, and calm a spiraling mind. Implement these practices on a regular basis to see lasting effects in your life.  However, with this being said, if yo...
Source: World of Psychology - August 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nancy Ryan, LMFT Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Self-Help Breathing Exercise Self Care Sleep Hygiene Source Type: blogs