3 Questions for Deeper Connections with Your Partner
It will be worth it. Trust. Happy, healthy relationships don’t just happen. They develop over time as the result of regular and sustained effort on the part of the men and women involved. And this doesn’t have to mean hard work if you and the person you love commit to asking each other three deep but simple questions every single day. It’s never too late to get on the right path toward a more fulfilling relationship, and the best way to do that is by learning communication skills and the best questions to ask your boyfriend, girlfriend, husband or wife in order to stay on firmly on the same page. You migh...
Source: World of Psychology - October 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Communication Publishers Relationships YourTango Conversations support Source Type: blogs

How to Create Greater Meaning and Purpose in Our Daily Lives
Sometimes we can learn very helpful life lessons from unexpected places. I had an interesting conversation with one of my nieces about her acting class, and began thinking about how the skills she is working on there might apply to all of our lives.  She was sharing with me how she is learning to (1) identify and develop her character’s motivation before she begins any scene; and (2) use techniques to make each scene completely fresh, as if it was unfolding in the moment and not coming from a well-rehearsed script. Perhaps there is some wisdom in this for all of us to consider. First, in terms of identifying ou...
Source: World of Psychology - October 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beth Kurland, Ph.D. Tags: Books Creativity Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Acceptance And Commitment Therapy Contentment Existential Question Personal Values purpose Source Type: blogs

Listen to This if You ’ve Ever Been Depressed (or Know Someone Who Has)
 Depression is an inconsiderate illness. It doesn’t care whether you have nothing going on or a lot going on. It will strike whenever it feels like it. Depression doesn’t care if you have a home filled with people, family obligations, or even a podcast to record. If this symptom of mental illness wants out, it’s coming out. In this episode of A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast, our hosts attempt to record an episode, but Gabe breaks down and confides to Michelle that he isn’t doing well. The recorder was running and Gabe’s attempt at faking it until he makes it backfired. However, a...
Source: World of Psychology - October 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Depression Source Type: blogs

How Do You Have Fun in Your Sobriety?
I love my job; I adore writing. But that doesn’t necessarily mean I’m having fun. If anything, it shows me how much of my life is work. I arrived at my therapist’s office earlier this year in a state of complete burnout. My adrenals weren’t producing sufficient cortisol to get me through the day, inflammation was rampant throughout my body, and my immune system had given up. As a writer who specializes in recovery and wellness, I couldn’t understand how this had happened to me. I worked out four days a week and ate well. I had also uprooted my life and moved to America, where I’d been wo...
Source: World of Psychology - October 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Addiction Happiness Publishers Recovery The Fix Fulfillment Having Fun life sense of joy Work Work Life Balance Source Type: blogs

Feel Like You Live for the Weekend? Small Ways to Recharge During Your Week
So many people feel like they just need to get through their workweek so they can finally relax and unwind on the weekend. They feel like they’re running on a treadmill they can’t get off from Monday to Friday, and on Saturday and Sunday, they can finally collapse on the couch or actually have fun. One reason we feel this way is that we don’t have clear boundaries between work and home, so the weekend is when we let ourselves be “off,” said Alicia Hodge, Psy.D, a licensed psychologist and speaker in Maryland whose work centers around assisting people to overcome anxiety, gain new perspectives ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Personal Time Rejuvenation Relaxation Weekend Source Type: blogs

A Therapist ’ s Advice on How to Save Money on Therapy
The saying “You get what you pay for” is true when it comes to mental health services. Older more experienced therapists are usually the best and so they simply charge more. Therapists who provide sliding scale are typically newer and trying to build up their practice. Clinics are cheap but usually have newer clinicians or those who can’t sustain a private practice for whatever reason. So, if you want someone good, it will cost you more up front but less long term. Some one good means someone who can help you reach your goals sooner and more effectively. Fewer sessions means fewer dollars. First, choos...
Source: World of Psychology - October 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Lee Glass, MA Tags: Money and Financial Treatment Affordable Care Mental Healthcare Saving Money Source Type: blogs

3 Ways to Stop Taking Things Too Personally
Taking things personally is a reaction, not an emotion. Your friend insists that she gives you money for giving her a ride, a driver flips you the bird, a stranger asks you if you are expecting, or my favorite (not): you are out with a group of friends and they suddenly start making their list of recipes for the party you were not invited to. Yup, these things have happened to all of us at some point and I will be the first to admit, it is hard not to take them personally. For the most part, I have tried everything from ignoring, to judging to venting (well, maybe gossiping) to a friend or colleague. I have attempted to be...
Source: World of Psychology - October 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Habits Happiness Publishers Self-Help Spirituality & Health Defensive Attitude emotional detox Emotions reactions taking things personally Source Type: blogs

Walking the Tightrope of Anger
If nothing else was evident in the recent hearing for Judge Brett Kavanaugh (regardless of where you stand on the political spectrum) was that he verbalized quite vociferously the emotional state he was in. To even the most obtuse observer, the vocabulary he used, his choice of words, the decibel level at which he spoke, his facial expressions and the energy he radiated, made it clear that he was not in control of his emotions. Anger was running the show. What he was experiencing could be referred to as emotional hijacking, a term that was coined by Daniel Goleman, PhD, who wrote the book entitled Emotional Intelligence. H...
Source: World of Psychology - October 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Anger Minding the Media Stress Women's Issues Anger Management Brett Kavanaugh Disillusionment Frustration Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: October 13, 2018
Want to know more about how employers can better understand their employees with mental health issues? The thought processes behind making snap moral judgments of others? Why depression and trauma can make you age faster? Well, you’re in luck with this week’s Psychology Around the Net! Workplace Mental Health In Crisis: A Survivor’s Story: Anabela Figueiredo, Head of Strategy Enablement for HSBC Holdings PLC, shares the story of how her struggles with panic attacks drastically altered — and almost took — her life; how she developed and implemented a plan to manage her panic; and offers five ti...
Source: World of Psychology - October 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Aging Celebrities Children and Teens Depression Happiness Health-related Industrial and Workplace Psychology Around the Net Research Suicide Trauma abuse Childhood Trauma Closure employees employers Lady Gaga Moral Judgme Source Type: blogs

5 Steps to Find the Willpower to Reach Your Goals
Conclusion These five strategies—chunking, confidence, perception, identity, and high-level thinking—are all tools to add to your tool box to help you alleviate negative emotional triggers, increase willpower, and ensure you reach your goals. These techniques have helped me through some very tough times, but they will help you with any goal in life that requires persistence and dedication. Implement these tools in your life today and see how much they help you! Let me know how this works for you—leave a comment in the comments section below! This post is courtesy of Tiny Buddha. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Inspiration & Hope Publishers Self-Help Tiny Buddha Confidence Depression emotional triggers empowered goals high-level thinking Hopeful hopeless identity Insecurity paralysis by analysis Perception Resistance Self-Doubt Source Type: blogs

The Appeal of Benevolent Sexism
Stories of sexual abuse and allegations have been front and center in our news for a while now. From the Me Too movement to the Catholic Church abuse cases to the recent Kavanaugh Hearings, we are faced with the harsh reality of how common sexual abuse really is in our society. But we are starting to talk about it and that is a good thing. My heart goes out to all those whose lives have been affected by sexual abuse. For many well-meaning men and women, these times are fraught with tension and confusion. A man might examine how he treats women and wonder if he should change his behavior. A woman might feel ambivalent towar...
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Ethics & Morality Men's Issues Minding the Media PTSD Stigma Trauma Women's Issues #MeToo benevolent sexism Brett Kavanaugh flattery Prejudice sexist attitude Social Psychology stereotyping Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: October 12, 2018
With everything going on, it’s easy to feel disconnected. “Us versus them” thinking runs rampant. We’re at a threat to grow increasingly disengaged. On a small scale, there are things we can do to feel less alone. While we can’t agree politically with everyone in our lives. We can find tiny cracks where the sunlight gathers. These cracks are the commonalities we share like our fears, dreams and annoyances. I’ve tried this by simply making small talk with every cashier I meet. I don’t know what their political beliefs are but I know his wife is going on a cruise and that she just mo...
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Procrastinate Better
What does “procrastinating better” look like? Hint: Sometimes it looks like laziness, then you take action and turn it around. “I can’t do this,”Louisa complained. “It’s too hard.” Any task that seems too hard, Louisa doesn’t do. Push her and she’ll just yell at you, “get off my back.” Hence, all kinds of tasks, from cleaning out a closet to revising her resume remain undone. Now let’s look at Ann. “I can’t do this,” Ann sighed. “It’s too hard; it will take  forever. I’m so busy, but ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Habits Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Anxious Thoughts cultivating optimism Laziness overwhelm procrastinate Source Type: blogs

How to Avoid Passing on Your Anxiety to Your Child
It is said that an apple never falls far off from the tree. This has been proven wrong on many occasions. Having a murderer for a father does not condemn you to become a murderer. Having a depressed parent doesn’t necessarily mean that depression will stalk you all your life, lurking around the corner and waiting to strike as soon as you let your guard down. You are not doomed to a life of misery just because your parents were miserable. Still, there are many occasions on which the apple does fall close to the tree. One such occasion is related to anxiety. Anxiety is a crazy thing. It follows entire generations and d...
Source: World of Psychology - October 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sanya Pelini, PhD Tags: Anxiety and Panic Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Habits Parenting Avoidance childhood anxious Modeling Source Type: blogs

TPCS Podcast: The Paradoxes of Masculinity
   Blue is for boys and pink is for girls, right? That depends on what generation you live in. Today, many people disregard such silly color assignments, or at least go for “gender neutral” colors. But a hundred years ago, all the top fashionistas insisted that pink was a masculine color and blue was feminine. Masculinity has long had an identity complex. How much “girly” stuff can a man enjoy without being viewed as non-masculine? Women have redefined femininity, so why can’t men redefine what it means to be masculine? Listen to this week’s episode and you might begin to underst...
Source: World of Psychology - October 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Men's Issues The Psych Central Show Women's Issues Gabe Howard Masculinity Psych Central Show Podcast Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Mental Coping Strategies During Hurricane Season and Other Natural Disasters
The anxiety and distress for people living in the path of a hurricane can be overwhelming. Uncertainty about living arrangements, work schedules and other life tasks increase when people are evacuated. Legitimate concerns about damage and destruction to homes, streets and infrastructure accelerate in the midst of constant news about the storm. An important step is to recognize common emotional reactions while physically preparing for impending changes. On the 29th of August, 2005 Hurricane Katrina made landfall in New Orleans. I was a first responder to the disaster, and arrived in the area a week after the storm. I foun...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Priscilla Dass-Brailsford, EdD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Depression Psychology PTSD Self-Help Stress Trauma bedwetting Coping Skills hurricane Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Michael hurricane season Natural Disaster Nightmares Posttraumatic Stres Source Type: blogs

How to Really Get Important Things Done
You start researching something important online and find that 20 minutes later you’re on some stranger’s Facebook page, scanning their photos and reading the comments. You’re writing an article, and before you know it, you’ve picked up your phone and started scrolling Instagram. You’re working on a presentation, and every 2 minutes you refresh your inbox. You also send a few texts, and see what’s on clearance on your favorite clothing site. It’s all-too easy to get distracted—even when we’re doing interesting, rewarding work. Which is tough because the most powerful re...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Success & Achievement Beating Procrastination Personal Priorities Productivity Source Type: blogs

My Journey to Wholeness: How I Learned to Embrace My Flaws to Create a Joyful Life
I believe there is not enough dialogue out there about soul-sickness, especially among wealthy communities. We are taught to believe from a young age that once we have the perfect partner, house, car, children, and careers, we will be happy. And often times this is not the case; the happiness does not come. There is an insatiable need for more. Because there is no dialogue about this, most people think, I am the only one, something is wrong with me, or no one understands me. This leads to deep despair and usually a diagnosis of depression and medication. I ruined my life searching for peace. I pushed away everyone and ever...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Renee Linnell Tags: Books Happiness Personal Spirituality Trauma Violence and Aggression Cult Members Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PTSD spiritual abuse Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Stop Relationship Anxiety and Paranoia
When you’ve been burned in the past. Nothing kills new relationships more quickly than relationship anxiety and obsessively wondering, “Does he like me?” Let’s say you’ve started dating someone, and you like them a lot. After a few great dates, they said they’d call you on Saturday … but they haven’t yet. At first, you didn’t mind. But, then, it starts to preoccupy your mind and you start feeling anxious and wonder if he still likes you. Warning Signs Your New Romance Is About to Turn Into a Nightmare Does this sound familiar? One minute, you’re a 30-year-old in ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Anxiety and Panic Publishers Relationships Trauma YourTango Abandonment Dating Emotional Baggage Paranoia relationship anxiety triggers Source Type: blogs

​National Bullying Prevention Month: Help Your Kids Understand The Difference Between Bullying & Teasing
What makes a bully? Is it a malicious desire to hurt another person? A person lashing out because of problems at home? A need to seem tough in a world that is out of their control? There is no single formula for those we have come to see as bullies and the definition is pretty broad. The facts about bullying are less vague. According to Stop Bullying, as many as one in three children has reported being bullied at some point in their life. While some of this is done in elementary and high school, the bulk of it seems to be in those middle years of junior high.  More alarming is the impact. The National Institute of He...
Source: World of Psychology - October 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Bullying Children and Teens Communication Depression Policy and Advocacy Self-Esteem Stigma Student Therapist Students Suicide Trauma Violence and Aggression ​National Bullying Prevention Month Cyberbullying school bully sc Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: October 9, 2018
Tomorrow is World Mental Health Day. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), “Half of all mental illness begins by age 14.” Work needs to be done to bring awareness to its normalcy. Programs and services are needed to address and prevent mental illness in our youth. The World Health Organization says you can wear a green ribbon or anything green and upload a photo to social media for #WorldMentalHealthDay. If you’re doing something locally, please share it with us here. The Highly Sensitive Person In An Emotionally Neglectful Family (Childhood Emotional Neglect) – Find out why an emot...
Source: World of Psychology - October 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Comorbidity: Treating Bipolar Disorder and Substance Abuse at the Same Time
Conclusion Comorbidity with substance use disorder is often found in patients suffering from bipolar disorder. Clinicians should conduct a thorough assessment of patient history to uncover substance use disorder, as the treatment of one disorder will be incomplete without fully addressing the other. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - October 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Boyle Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Research Addiction Recovery Alcohol Abuse Bipolar Disorder comorbid Depressive Episode Drug Abuse Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs

The Importance of Distraction-Free Parenting
Parents today are generally aware of why it is a problem to let their kids constantly be on phones, computers and TVs. They know it impacts kids’ sleep, that it is a factor in childhood obesity, that it is associated with delayed language development in babies and delayed social skills development in children and teens. They know that too much time of screens is a predictor of academic problems and social anxiety and that it is linked to attention, emotional and conduct problems. Nonetheless, many parents find it difficult to limit their kids’ use of devices. Partly it’s because they have become so common...
Source: World of Psychology - October 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Children and Teens Communication Family Habits Parenting Technology Active Listening better communication Smartphone social media Source Type: blogs

Listen to This if You ’ve Ever Fibbed and Said You’re OK When You’re Not
 People are constantly labeling people who live with mental illness as dramatic, liars, and actors. Society, in general, often thinks people who live with bipolar, schizophrenia, and depression are being insincere when it comes to their illnesses. The reality is that people with mental illness are often being misleading, just not in the way most people think. They will say they are “fine” when they are not. They say they’ll be okay, when they don’t believe that at all. These people don’t want to lose friends or alienate people, and they are afraid of being judged. By saying they are okay ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Ethics & Morality General Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

How Cool Dudes Become Grumpy Old Men
In his 20’s and 30’s, Brad was a cool dude. In his 40’s, and 50’s, Brad was a busy business man (with a wife and 3 kids). In his 60’s and 70’s, Brad retired and became a grumpy old man. What the heck happened? And what’s a grumpy old man anyway? Brad became a grumpy old man (without realizing it) when his comments began to consist primarily of complaints. He’s become moody, quick to anger, intolerant of everyday annoyances, and upset with the world changing around him. Now that he no longer has his work to focus on, he’s not sure how to spend his time.  And so he f...
Source: World of Psychology - October 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Aging Agitation Alcoholism Anger Depression Men's Issues Cynicism Hormones Negativity Retirement Testosterone Source Type: blogs

When You Crave Control of Everything
You like to have things under control. Your home has to be organized in a particular way, and so does your schedule. You get stressed out when your days don’t go as planned — your child gets sick and misses daycare, you run into terrible traffic, a client cancels a meeting, your partner doesn’t want to attend the party. Often it doesn’t take much for you to feel frustrated, frazzled and downright overwhelmed. Any disturbance to the status quo feels unbearable. Maybe you like to control how others perceive you, so you show a very specific image: You are calm, collected, poised and put together, but o...
Source: World of Psychology - October 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Perfectionism Self-Help Stress Control Letting Go Source Type: blogs

(Re)Defining Family — On Your Terms
“How’s your family doing?” a well-meaning acquaintance asks. “Are you excited to return home to Des Moines to see them?” I grit my teeth, pushing out a brusque, “They are fine. Maybe I’ll see them; I am not really sure” before quickly changing the subject. Since my mother’s passing, my relationship with my immediate family has been strained. Irregular communication — interspersed with icy recriminations about some past misdeed — is the norm. Exacerbating the familial strife, my father and brothers sued me over a real estate issue that, I believe, could hav...
Source: World of Psychology - October 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Loeb Tags: Family Personal estranged family Estrangement Family Feuds Resentment Source Type: blogs

On Positive Motivation and Accountability
“Positive” motivation arises from the need to seek out what can be experienced, in contrast to “negative” motivation that is born out of the need to avoid something. In many ways, negative motivation is like being pushed from the behind (the past) while positive motivation is like being pulled by the future. Accessing meaningful motivation — not simply the kind of motivation that gets us to work each morning (which, believe me, is still incredibly important!) — is a lifelong challenge, commitment, and practice. A self-responsible person is motivated to be fully alive and to be...
Source: World of Psychology - October 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pratibha Anand Tags: Ethics & Morality Habits Motivation and Inspiration Perfectionism Source Type: blogs

Why Do We Forgive?
This study, the first to elucidate the cumulative effects of severe stress and forgiveness on mental health, led authors to suggest development of a more forgiving coping strategy may be beneficial in reducing stress-caused disorders and conditions. We Choose to Forgive Considered a forgiveness trailblazer by Time Magazine and other media, Robert D. Enright, professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and president of the International Forgiveness Institute at UWMadison, is the author of Forgiveness Is a Choice: A Step-by-Step Process for Resolving Anger and Restoring Hope. In this self-help book, Enrig...
Source: World of Psychology - October 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Ethics & Morality Family Friends Inspiration & Hope Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: October 6, 2018
This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at college students and mental health, a new mental health startup app from former Uber executive Andrew Chapin, whether or not a reverse psychology video is effectively getting younger people to vote, and more. Massive Survey Finds 1 in 3 College Freshmen Struggle with Mental Health: Research from the World Health Organization surveyed close to 14,000 college freshmen from eight countries and found that 35% struggled with mental illnesses, the two most common being major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. The lead researcher, Columbia University ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Alzheimer's College Happiness Industrial and Workplace Policy and Advocacy Psychology Around the Net Research Technology Alzheimer's disease college freshmen college mental health Insurance Companies Mental Health Parity and Addict Source Type: blogs

9 Questions to Ask When You Feel Like a Failing Parent
Because we’ve all been there. Parenting is probably the most significant challenge you will take on in life, and as you strive to figure out how to be a good parent, you’ll encounter many deep psychological questions to ask yourself about how you want to raise your kids along the way. Being a parent can be rewarding and challenging at the same time. No child comes with instructions. Every child is different and there are many ways to be a good parent. You are not perfect, and that is okay. To be human is to be imperfect — it doesn’t mean you’re a bad parent. 5 Ways to Be the Parent Your Child ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Children and Teens Family Parenting Publishers YourTango Dad kids Mom Parents Source Type: blogs

How Working Parents Can Regularly Reconnect and Strengthen Their Relationship
In 2016 author Jessica Turner surveyed 2000 working moms. Two-thirds said that marriage or making time for their partner was a challenge. For instance, one working mom wrote: “My husband and I are so busy and tired that we ‘forget’ to pay attention to each other.” Another wrote: “My husband and I find it difficult to find time to have any sort of conversation outside of work and kids.” Another working mom expressed: “I feel as if I have become a roommate to my husband. I love and adore him, but I have no energy left after taking care of the kids. I miss him dearly, but I feel as if...
Source: World of Psychology - October 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Family General Happiness Marriage and Divorce Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Stress Family bonding Family Time Motherhood Parenting Working Parents Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: October 5, 2018
With the state of the world today, it’s hard not living in a constant stream of anger, fear and immense helplessness. But I also think it’s a call. Instead of sitting in the sidelines and watching it all unfold, we can do something. We can start groups, connect with others and find ways to help those in need. It’s easy to get lost in our own stuff. There is an unlimited amount of to-dos to fill a day. But that’s how people in power get away with things. They count us to be too busy to make change. I know you already have a lot on your plate. If you’re a regular reader here, that might be an un...
Source: World of Psychology - October 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Thought Watching Exercises to Increase Awareness & Reduce Anxiety
We often go about our lives without noticing what our mind is telling us because we are too busy attending to our hectic lives. Blithely unaware, we comply with the advice our mind dictates to us all day long. Some of you may say, “What’s wrong with that?” Well, there is nothing wrong if the advice is helpful, and it moves us closer to our values and goals by following it. But when we are unaware of what our mind is saying, we can end up making unwise choices. For example, if you experience social anxiety, your mind may provide advice that to stay home from a social event is the best option. You believe...
Source: World of Psychology - October 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Anxiety and Panic Happiness Mindfulness Self-Help Acceptance And Commitment Therapy Anxious Thoughts Avoidance awareness overwhelm Source Type: blogs

How Saying No Can Save Your Relationship
This article explains how sometimes saying no actually improves the closeness of your relationships. Why Not Saying No Hurts Sometimes, you have to say “no.” We all have a limited amount of time, energy and patience to give. When you avoid setting limits, you avoid speaking your truth. This actually hurts your relationships because when you can’t be honest, relationships become less intimate. It’s not possible to feel close to someone when you can’t be completely open about what you need. Intimacy stems from authenticity, not pretending. Also, when you give too much, your needs get put on the ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Michelle Farris, LMFT Tags: Family Friends General Habits Psychology Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help energy Honesty Intimacy Resentment Respect Self Care self-compassion Self-Talk Truth Source Type: blogs

TPCS Podcast: Living Well With Bipolar Disorder
 Bipolar disorder is an often misunderstood (and misdiagnosed) disorder. Our guest this week is a psychotherapist who has worked with many individuals with this diagnosis. He discusses the nature of the disease, therapy plans for treatment, and the multi-phase stabilization process. He also talks about the “Grand Bargain” between the bipolar person and his/her family, which helps keep everyone informed. Most importantly, he makes it very clear that bipolar disorder is a very manageable disease that will not prevent someone from leading a stable, satisfying life, on one’s own terms, rather than the term...
Source: World of Psychology - October 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Bipolar General The Psych Central Show Treatment Gabe Howard Psych Central Show Podcast Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Alcoholics (Not So) Anonymous: A Mental Health Roadmap?
Maybe I should become an alcoholic. Before you wonder whether I have had one too many gin and tonics, let me explain. I have an uncle who has battled alcohol and drug issues for decades. When he believe a relapse is imminent, he attends an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. For him, AA has been a lifesaver, providing stability and support during particularly tumultuous times. In fact, he credits AA with his current sobriety. For mental health sufferers, where is our “Alcoholics Anonymous?” More specifically, where is our support group for struggling individuals mired in the throes of a depressive episode? Or a re...
Source: World of Psychology - October 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Loeb Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Anxiety and Panic Depression Personal Recovery Addiction Recovery Alcoholics Anonymous Group Therapy Substance Abuse support Source Type: blogs

7 Helpful Tips to Get Your Kids to School on Time
It’s 7:00 am and your 10 year-old was supposed to be up 15 minutes ago but is still lying in bed. The bus leaves in 10 minutes and you are the only one concerned and stressed out that she won’t be ready on time. You drag her out of bed and throw some clothes on her while you attempt to shove a cereal bar and banana into her backpack because it’s now too late to eat breakfast at home. On top of that you find yourself constantly repeating to your 8-year-old to brush his teeth, but instead he continues to play legos in his room and ignore you. Does any of this sound familiar? Getting kids up and ready for s...
Source: World of Psychology - October 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amy Topelson, MA, MA, LPC, NCC Tags: Children and Teens College Family Habits Parenting Self-Help Student Therapist Students Success & Achievement Back To School Education Organization Productivity Time Management Source Type: blogs

​Encourage Your Teen to Practice Self-Care
We have a serious problem affecting our teens and no one is talking about it. Every year, teens are facing a crisis thanks to an increase in pressure to be perfect. Competitive college programs, unpaid internships for industry entry, mountains of homework, extra curricular activities, struggles within their social group, family and home life troubles. It is enough to make anyone teen depressed. In fact, there are disturbing statistics around teen suicide. Suicide has become the second leading cause of death among youth between the ages of 11 and 24. Stories involving children as young as 10 give heartbreaking details of a ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Children and Teens College Parenting Perfectionism Self-Help Student Therapist Students Source Type: blogs

Arm Yourself with the Skills to Cope with Criticism
Nobody likes to be criticized, but it can be particularly difficult for individuals who are self-critical and/or socially anxious. Self-critical individuals often have high levels of unhealthy perfectionism. They frequently have ongoing internal dialogues that are harshly self-judgmental. Having someone else be critical can then act like salt to the wound and trigger feelings of shame and/or anxiety at being exposed as deficient. Individuals who are self-conscious and socially anxious are fearful of being judged and often avoid situations where they are at risk of being evaluated in some way.     When judged...
Source: World of Psychology - October 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suma Chand, PhD Tags: Anxiety and Panic Bullying Communication Perfectionism Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Coping Skills Criticism Source Type: blogs

How to Deal with an Especially Cruel Inner Critic
It’s common for you to have a running commentary in your mind that sounds something like this: You’ll never get that job. You’re not smart, cool or creative enough. That fight was all your fault. You don’t belong at that party with those accomplished people. You’ll never finish that project. You’ll never achieve that goal. Who do you think you are? If you don’t get a perfect grade on that paper, it’ll confirm you’re a fraud. Scratch that. You are a fraud. You’re also a terrible mother. You also can’t do anything right. You also aren’t worthy of _______...
Source: World of Psychology - October 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Esteem Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: October 2, 2018
I don’t know about you, but all the things on the news can be especially trying when you’re battling an illness. Even if you’re not, it’s easy to get anxious or depressed about the state of the world. There is an antidote to the helplessness you feel. I heard once that feeling empathy can lead to emotional overload. But action and loving thoughts can move us towards hopefulness. This week as you navigate the stress and unpredictability of our daily lives, see if you can find pockets of change in the way you react to and understand the people in your life. 8 Toxic Ways Narcissistic Mothers Emotionall...
Source: World of Psychology - October 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

8 Tips to Curb Your Child ’s Obsessive Smartphone Use
“I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.” – Albert Einstein Amid the growing body of research pointing to the negative effects of constant smartphone use, especially among today’s youth, parents may well wonder how to act to rein in this pernicious habit in their own kids. Indeed, obsessive smartphone use has been linked to depression, insomnia, high stress and a host of other ills, not to mention a significant decline in face-to-face interaction — which may have long-term consequences for development of social skills ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Children and Teens Habits Parenting Technology Child Development Smartphone Source Type: blogs

Whom Do We Believe?
You may be thinking about it as a “she said, he said” story. But it may well be a “she remembers, he doesn’t” story. For him, the night may have been just another insignificant, inconsequential, meaningless event. One more beer party in which trying to score with a girl was the goal. Such a memory is easily forgotten, especially with an alcohol-soaked brain and a belief that you did nothing wrong. Though she terms it attempted rape, he, and his frat beer buddies, probably viewed it as nothing more than “scoring.” No big deal. He may truly have no memory of the event. Or, if he has...
Source: World of Psychology - October 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Bullying Ethics & Morality Memory and Perception Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression Women's Issues Source Type: blogs

Memories Can Be Distorted – But Not in the Way That You Think
After the recent hearings regarding Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, the recollection of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford came into question. One conservative pundit, Ben Shapiro, suggested that because we had “two believable testimonies and no corroborating evidence,” we should basically dismiss Blasey Ford’s accusation. But in a disjointed opinion piece published on Newsweek.com, Shapiro confuses the science of memory, and what it tells us about how the brain forms, keeps, or distorts memories. Let’s walk through his claims and what science actually says about memory. Ben S...
Source: World of Psychology - October 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Minding the Media Psychology Research Violence and Aggression Ben Shapiro Brett Kavanaugh False Memories Sexual Assault Source Type: blogs

BS Podcast: Help! I ’m Mentally Ill and I Want to Act Normal
 Normal. It’s one of those words that we all pretend to understand, but honestly none of us really do. People living with mental illness are usually striving to be normal, or act normal, or feel normal – but how do we know when we’ve succeeded? What is normal? In this episode of A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast, Gabe and Michelle discuss the various ways that people living with mental illness typically react to different events in their lives versus the way people living without mental illness may react. In every scenario, our hosts talk about mistakes they’ve made, do-overs they&rsquo...
Source: World of Psychology - October 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Personality Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Accountable Care Organizations and the (Lack of) Depression Remission
The average rate of depression remission at twelve months for people not receiving any mental health treatment in this country is 53 percent. But in Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), it’s only 9 percent. Mental Health America (MHA) wants to know why. ACOs were the first big innovation in the value-based payment movement. Here’s how they work: A group of providers get together and make a deal with an insurance company. If they achieve certain quality objectives and end up costing less than the insurance company expected to spend that year, they get half of the money they saved back. The idea is that then ev...
Source: World of Psychology - September 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Depression Disorders Mental Health America Publishers Research accountable care organizations ACO depression remission depression screening Source Type: blogs

Is Masturbation Bad for You?
It’s funny how many people feel awkward talking about masturbation. Because of that awkwardness, there are also a lot of false beliefs concerning the pros and cons of masturbation. Masturbation is simply the act of self-stimulation for sexual pleasure. There’s nothing mysterious or weird about it. In fact, although virtually nobody talks about it, most people have masturbated. Masturbation is a completely normal behavior associated with our own sexuality. Whether done with or without the aid of a vibrator or other sex toy, when done in moderation, masturbation is a common, healthy sexual practice. Which people...
Source: World of Psychology - September 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Relationships Sexuality help for masturbation masturbation bad masturbation good Source Type: blogs

Trial, Meet Error: The Story of a Pharmacy Regular
“Why isn’t this medication working?” me in 2002. “Why isn’t this medication working?” me in 2018. When the university nurse first prodded me to consider medication, I hesitated before eventually relenting. My reasoning: While this little white pill may not be my salvation, it surely can’t hurt. Or can it? Over the past 16 years, my medication history is longer than a typical Catholic wedding. A is for Abilify, B is for Buspar, C is for Clonazepam…and, well, you get the idea. Medication, I naively hoped, would be a cure-all — a foolproof remedy for intrusive, tor...
Source: World of Psychology - September 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Loeb Tags: Antidepressant Anxiety and Panic Depression Medications Personal Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: September 22, 2018
Sometimes when you’re stuck in your own stuff, you forget that the world is changing outside you. You zoom into what’s going wrong and that narrow focus prevents you from seeing what’s going right. Like this week, I learned that we’re predisposed to forgive, which one of four personality types I might be, and the innovative ways colleges are trying to reach students grappling with mental illness. It reminded me things are always improving. We’re getting closer to understanding ourselves and each other a little better. Isn’t that exciting? I hope you enjoy this sample of psychology offeri...
Source: World of Psychology - September 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs