OCD and Multiple Sclerosis
Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a complicated illness, and the cause, or causes, remain unknown. Research has shown that OCD is seen more frequently than usual in those with various physical disorders, such as muscular dystrophy. An October 2018 study published in Frontiers in Immunology highlights a connection between OCD and another disease — multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating autoimmune disorder, where the body’s immune system goes haywire and attacks healthy cells. It affects over two million people worldwide and has no known cure. Patients with multiple sclerosis and other autoi...
Source: World of Psychology - December 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Health-related OCD Research Compulsions Multiple Sclerosis Obsessions Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Source Type: blogs

Are Most of Our Problems Self-Created?
Are life’s difficulties the result of overwhelming external circumstances? Or are unpleasant situations self-created? A viewpoint that is popular in some spiritual and New Age communities is that we are responsible for whatever happens to us. When something goes awry, we’re invited to ask, “How did I create that?” Perhaps unfortunately, we are not as powerful as we might think. Five billion years from now, the sun will explode in a supernova, frying all life on earth. No one will be around to debate whether we created that. And forgive me for reminding you, but before that fateful day we will perish...
Source: World of Psychology - December 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Friends General Habits Happiness Mindfulness Psychology Relationships Self-Help Spirituality Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 15, 2018
Would you be more successful if you had a pet? Why does visiting a place from your past bring back more vivid memories? Does a significant salary difference matter when it comes to the success of a relationship? Let’s find out all and more in this week’s Psychology Around the Net! Does Sharing Your Life with Pets Make You More Successful? I’m just going to go ahead and guess yes. How Returning to a Prior Context Briefly Heightens Memory Recall: It’s probably not news to you that visiting an old haunt — say, your childhood home, your high school, or basically anywhere significant happenings&hel...
Source: World of Psychology - December 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Health-related Memory and Perception Military Money and Financial Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Success & Achievement Memories mental hacks Pets soldiers The Independence Fund Veterans Health Administration Source Type: blogs

How to Tell a New Partner You ’ ve Been Divorced
It might be a little risky. When a divorce is done and over with, the next thing a new divorcee typically does is meet and date new people — not necessarily to get into another marriage but to find intimacy, companionship, and friendship. After all, everyone gets beat up in the face of the separation, negotiation, and fight. So knowing how to get a guy to like you, a newly divorced woman, can be challenging. And learning how to tell your new boyfriend about your recent divorce — without scaring him off — is a big deal! Basically, if you mess it up, you’re in for more heartbreak. Dating after divorce...
Source: World of Psychology - December 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Marriage and Divorce Publishers Relationships YourTango Companionship Dating Friendship Intimacy Source Type: blogs

Neuromyth: Most People Use About 10 Percent of their Brains
One of the most prevalent myths in the popular press is that we use only 10% of our brains. This has been mentioned in more articles out to debunk myths than any other.[1] Unfortunately, despite efforts to eliminate the myth, even college-educated students believed this myth.[2] The Skeptical Inquirer[3] writes: That tired Ten-Percent claim pops up all the time. Last year, national magazine ads for U.S. Satellite Broadcasting showed a drawing of a brain. Under it was the caption, ‘You only use 11 percent of its potential.’ Well, they’re a little closer than the ten-percent figure, but still off by about 8...
Source: World of Psychology - December 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Tags: Minding the Media Neuromyths 10 percent 10 percent of your brain Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 14, 2018
I’m listening to probably my third or fourth online summit this year. It’s amazing how much research there is on alternative ways to heal including information on various contributors to illness. Everything from what we put in our bodies to what we put on it can affect our mental and physical health. If you’re struggling with your health, the good news is there is a lot of hope out there. Experts tout the benefit of simple, small changes from switching off your phone at night or eating more veggies. For more health tips, keep reading. You’ll learn how to protect yourself from a narcissist this holid...
Source: World of Psychology - December 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

On the Front Lines of Homelessness and Mental Health
Officers Armond and Dodson, whose personal histories uniquely qualify them for this outreach effort, have personally gotten 49 people off the streets and into drug and alcohol treatment. As someone with an extensive rap sheet, it was strange for me to be voluntarily climbing in the back seat of a police vehicle with two officers sitting up front. Twenty-five years sober, and I still don’t recognize my own life at times. For example, I work for my son’s non-profit, an organization that gives out quality tennis shoes to those in need. Who would have ever thought that this could be me? Certainly not me The seed fo...
Source: World of Psychology - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Publishers The Fix Alcohol Drugs Homeless police sober Treatment Source Type: blogs

You Can ’t Always Get What You Want
Children sometimes have meltdowns when they don’t get what they want. Some adolescents can feel destitute when their wishes aren’t granted. When you feel confident about your plans and they don’t turn out the way you hoped, what is your response? As we run into bumps and storms in life, we may need to detour, delay, or completely cancel our plans. When we were young, we may have used words such as “It’s not fair,” and soon enough we found out this was true more often than not. Still, we protest, get mad, and blame others or ourselves for not obtaining our desires. When this happens, man...
Source: World of Psychology - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Habits Happiness Holiday Coping Mindfulness Self-Help Coping Skills Disappointment Emotion Regulation Failure self-soothing Source Type: blogs

Podcast: A Delicious Ritual to Reduce Stress
 Living in our fast-paced world, many of us find ourselves stressed out, and many others don’t even realize how stressed they’ve become. Many people choose to ignore their stress, others use meditation, exercise, or other endeavors to reduce stress. This episode shares the story of a woman whose solution to stress involves regularly making challah, a traditional Jewish bread. Not only does the ritual of the making of the bread reduce stress, but the history and tradition of the bread are also important to her. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Beth Ricanat...
Source: World of Psychology - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Mindfulness Stress The Psych Central Show Beth Ricanati challah Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

How to Stop Your Shadow Self from Controlling You
When we keep our shadow hidden, it runs the risk of controlling us. In this complicated life we lead, there are aspects of ourselves we don’t feel able to meet. Often it’s because society does not make space for them, or because we don’t have the tools to sit with the discomfort of difficult emotions. It could be shame, guilt, anger, or grief. According to Robert A. Masters, it could also be our inner child, our inner saboteur, or our resistance. Masters, a therapist and psychospiritual guide, offers a path to working with your shadow in his new book Bringing Your Shadow Out of the Dark: Breaking Free fro...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Self-Help Spirituality & Health Emotions shadow self Shadow Side shadow work Source Type: blogs

Are You Really as Young as You Feel?
In this study, the scientists examined 68 healthy adults between the ages of 59 and 84. Grey matter volume in different regions of the brain was measured, and cognitive testing was conducted. Participants also answered questions about how old they felt and if their subjective age was younger or older than their chronological age. Those who reported feeling younger than their age scored higher on memory tests, felt physically healthy and were less likely to feel depressed. What was most significant is that those participants who reported feeling younger than their actual age had more grey matter in critical regions of the b...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Aging Memory and Perception Personal Research Elderly Mind Body Wellness Senior Health youth Source Type: blogs

How Cleaning Clutter Could Clear Your Mind
We are acquisitive beings. We collect items that show the world who we are and what we value. As I look around my home, I see books. Lots and lots of books. Nearly each room contains them. Clearly, they matter to me. I have more of them than any other item. I have read most of them cover to cover and some await perusal, for pleasure and work. My home is light and airy, colorfully and creatively decorated, kind of like its owner. Unlikely that anyone would call me a hoarder, unless they lived in Zen simplicity, but there are certainly areas in my house that have needed cleansing and purging. Following the destruction of ou...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Habits Happiness Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal clutter Organization Personal Growth personal possessions Relaxation Source Type: blogs

5 Signs of Emotional Abuse in Your Relationship
They are tempting to overlook but toxic over time. Over the past few months, many readers have contacted me after seeing my posts on the signs of emotional abuse in controlling relationships and how to begin to extract yourself from one. It is startling the number of otherwise “normal” people who are trapped in a long-standing abusive relationship that might make most people’s hair stand on end. Even more subtle, however, are the toxic behaviors that a lot more of us have come to consider as “normal.” Your relationship may be far from a classically controlling one, but there could still be ind...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Relationships YourTango Emotional Abuse toxic hehavior Toxic Relationships Source Type: blogs

The Difference Between Narcissism & Narcissistic Personality Disorder
People throw around the term “narcissism” all the time. And that’s not surprising, in an age where our technology (e.g., social networks and social media) reinforce narcissistic behaviors through social comparisons. What can get confusing is understanding the difference between a personality trait — narcissism — and a full-blown personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder. Let’s dive into understand the similarities and differences between these two related psychological concepts. Some narcissism — called healthy or normal narcissism — can be perfectly normal and...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Personality Psychology healthy narcissism Narcissistic Personality navel gazing NPD Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 11, 2018
For a season that’s supposed to be “the best time of the year,” many of us are filled with grief, anxiety and depression. The whirlwind of activities, death of a loved one or feeling alone are enough to engender sadness. If Christmas music, family gatherings and holiday decorations are getting you down, our top posts this week will not only help you understand why you’re having a hard time this season, but will give you tips, activities and suggestions for how to cope. Powerful Ways to Care for Yourself When Sadness Surfaces (Weightless) – If you’re sinking into sadness this holiday, the...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

The Most Intensive Therapy for OCD: The Bergen Treatment
My son Dan suffered from obsessive-compulsive disorder so severe he could not even eat. He spent nine weeks at an intensive world-renowned residential program where he learned techniques through the use of exposure and response prevention (ERP) therapy. These skills have allowed him to live a happy and productive life. Well, at least I thought it was an intensive program. At Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway, there is a treatment program for OCD that is truly intensive. And short. Four full days. There are many people who spend years of their lives suffering with OCD; it can be a cruel, insidious disorder. Ho...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Caregivers OCD Personal Research Treatment Source Type: blogs

Parenting in the Present: 8 Questions Effective Parents Ask Regularly
Parenting is a demanding role and one that requires constant reflection and adaptation. Children change and what worked in one stage of development most likely won’t work in the next stage. Redirecting a 2-year-old is effective, but try that strategy on a moody teenager. Now add siblings and we have a dynamic that can make your head spin when you consider important parenting responsibilities such as connection, fairness, routines, rituals, and discipline. We enter parenthood without a precise playbook, and, typically, our only intimate view of the role came from our experience of being parented. All these variables ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John C. Panepinto, PsyD, LPCS, NCC Tags: Parenting Child Development Effective Communication Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Can People With Mental Illness Be Happy?
 Those of us with mental illness are asked many questions about our feelings. For a lot of us, the most difficult one to answer is, “Are you happy?” It’s a difficult question to answer because happiness isn’t an easily defined concept. Most people assume that in order to be in recovery from mental illness a person must be happy. But is that really the case? Listen in to this episode to hear our thoughts on happiness, regret, and even a side story about Gabe’s first marriage.   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “People just want to be happy and normal, but there is no actual def...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Depression Happiness Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Keep Your Spiritual Practice Strong During Difficult Times
Your spiritual practice is more essential now than ever before. Recently, someone told me she was so riled up about our current political climate that she can’t meditate. She’d grown increasingly irritated, angry, and despondent, and now, after the unspeakable violence in Pittsburgh, the pipe bombs that mercifully failed to go off, and the daily vitriol of the midterm election campaign, she says she is so agitated that she can’t settle down, and she feels so compelled to hear the latest news that she won’t take the time for a valued practice she’d been doing for more than twenty years. “...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Mindfulness Publishers Spirituality Spirituality & Health anxiety breathwork Contemplation Despair devotional rituals Inner Peace Meditation Mindfulness Exercises Prayer Spiritual Practice yoga asanas Source Type: blogs

Stigmatizing Narcissists & Narcissism: Are They the Secondhand Smoke of Our Time?
The thing about smoking cigarettes is that the behavior is something we wanted to stigmatize, in order to decrease its frequency in people. At its height in the 1950s and 1960s, 2 out of every 5 people smoked in the U.S. It’s a huge health hazard, decreasing lifespan and increasing health problems in smokers. But smoking doesn’t just impact the person who smokes. Through decades’ worth of research findings, we now understand the smoking also affects the people around smokers, causing health problems and decreasing lifespans through secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke, therefore, is also something people se...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Narcissism Personality Policy and Advocacy Relationships Stigma Narcissistic Personality Disorder second-hand smoke secondhand smoke Source Type: blogs

How Empathic People Can Set Effective, Loving Boundaries
You’re a highly empathic person. You fully and intently listen to others. You tend to focus on others’ emotions, often feeling them more so than your own. In fact, it’s like you feel someone else’s pain deep inside your bones. It’s that visceral. And you frequently find yourself utterly exhausted because tending to others comes more naturally to you than tending to yourself, according to Joy Malek, a marriage and family therapist who specializes in working with people who are intuitive, empathic, creative and highly sensitive. And this struggle includes setting boundaries. Your discomfort with...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Empathy Highly Sensitive Person Personal Boundaries Source Type: blogs

How the Opioid Epidemic Affects Chronic Pain Patients
“It is borderline genocide,” said DeLuca, 37. “You are allowing [chronic pain patients] to go home and essentially suffer until they kill themselves.” Last year, Lauren DeLuca went to the emergency room in the middle of the night, violently ill and in pain with a pancreatic attack. Despite the fact that she was passing out and vomiting profusely, DeLuca said that she received little help. “I was essentially turned away,” she told The Fix. “Everywhere [I went] I was being accused of lying, accused of making it up.” Over the next three weeks, DeLuca lost 20 pounds, unable to ea...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Disorders Health-related Medications Publishers Substance Abuse The Fix Chronic Pain opioid addiction Opioids Source Type: blogs

MeToo and Its Challenges
Perhaps you’ve been there, too. Quietly watched one more survivor come forward, seen one more perpetrator publicly held accountable. Perhaps you breathed a sigh of relief that this type of crime is receiving the attention it deserves. Perhaps you felt vindicated, even if only a tiny bit. Or maybe you were furious. At first you weren’t sure why, at least this was the case for me. Then I thought about it, and came up with this: 1. The Glorification of a Trend Confessing MeToo is currently in style. It’s the brave, self-revealing, glamorous thing to do. That’s the way it comes across at times. It feel...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elspeth Roake Tags: Celebrities Sexuality Trauma Women's Issues #MeToo Abuse Scandal Rape Sexual Abuse Sexual Trauma women's rights Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 8, 2018
Do you know what a psychiatric advance directive is? How mental health apps make money from your information? Why you need to fail before you can succeed? Don’t worry! This week’s Psychology Around the Net has these answers and more! Giving Patients a Voice in Their Mental Health Care Before They’re Too Ill to Have a Say: Could psychiatric advance directives help transform the mental health system? Specifically, how mental health patients are treated when their symptoms overwhelm them? A psychiatric advance directive (PAD) allows a patient with serious mental illness to specify the kinds of treatment he ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Industrial and Workplace Psychology Psychology Around the Net Success & Achievement Technology evolutionary psychology Failure goals mental health apps nature vs nurture psychiatric advance directives Social Psychology workplace me Source Type: blogs

4 Reasons Why Appearance Matters in Relationships
Talking about appearance is a touchy subject. No one wants to be judged solely by the way they look, nor should they. Attractiveness is defined by many things that go beyond the superficial. That being said, there are certain things about appearance that are quite important. No matter how shallow it sounds, looks do matter, but not in the way you may be thinking. No one is suggesting that you need to be a Size 2 or have biceps like the Hulk. And even if you are nearly the perfect physical specimen, there are a number of less obvious things that can take your attractiveness quotient down several notches. So why is it that...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC Tags: Health-related Marriage and Divorce Relationships Dating Sexual Attraction Source Type: blogs

The Secret to Practicing Truly Nourishing Self-Care
There are myriad ways to practice self-care. Meditating. Stretching. Reading. Running. Getting a massage. Taking a long, hot bath. Taking a walk. Going to your favorite restaurant. Dancing. Deep breathing. Writing. Taking a break. Taking a trip. But, at its core, the secret to practicing truly nourishing, supportive self-care is to know yourself. As psychotherapist Kirsten Brunner, MA, LPC, said, “self-care can look very different depending on the temperament and needs of the person.” Brunner, a perinatal mental health and relationship expert based Austin, Texas, asks clients to think about the activities that ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Stress down time Relaxation Self Care self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 7, 2018
I’m reading a phenomenal book by Dr. Joe Dispenza called, “Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon.” There are so many pearls of wisdom in it and statements full of hope for anyone suffering from physical or mental illness. So far, this is one of my favorites: “The only thing I can assure you of is this: The unknown has never let me down.” Dispenza says we often get stuck in the same routine, ways of thinking, and feelings that keep us in the past. The way to change is to open up to the unfamiliar, putting your attention on how you want to be versus what you don’t...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

The Psychology Behind Instilling a Sense of ‘Home’
Home can be your childhood roots and the pizzeria around the corner. Home can be the house you grew up in and the familiar sights, sounds, tastes, and smells that are as familiar to you as the sun rising each day and setting each night. It can be the physical place you reside and the community it bestows.  Home can be the conversations with loved ones at the dinner table about anything and everything. It can be talking with your friends over a cup of hot tea or coffee. It can be vacations we adored and memories we will always cherish. It can be places that become a part of us. I think many of us have so many defi...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lauren Suval Tags: Personal Psychology Family Friendship home Homesickness Memories Moving Source Type: blogs

Portion-Control in Social Media? How Limiting Time Increases Well-Being
“Today, spend a little time cultivating relationships offline. Never forget that everybody isn’t on social media.” – Germany Kent If you find yourself anxiously checking the posts of your social media contacts to see what’s going on in their world and can’t seem to curb the urge to stay riveted to your feed, new research on the negative effect of too much social media on well-being may be worth your time to review.1 Researchers Find Causal Link Between Social Media Time and Loneliness and Depression In a 2018 study published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, research...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Habits Happiness Memory and Perception Research Self-Help Technology Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Growing Up With a Mentally Ill Parent
 Growing up with a mentally ill parent can be a traumatic experience for any child. For Ally Golden, her mother’s mental illness was major depression, later diagnosed as borderline personality disorder. Ally’s book, A Good Soldier, chronicles her life growing up in this environment, with a mentally ill mother who frequently threatened suicide, and the psychological trauma that resulted for her. Decades later, her mother carried out her threat. Listen to hear Ally’s fascinating story. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Ally Golden is the author ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Borderline Personality General Relationships The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard Suicide Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Does America Need Therapy? Our Nation ’s Curious Resistance to Gun Reform
Does America need therapy? I don’t know about you, but I am perplexed by the millions of Americans who each and every day, continue to disregard facts, reject scientific proof, obstruct progress and deny the truth about a lot of things. This massive group also includes many of our supposedly best educated and well-informed politicians. What’s going on here? The popular wave of anti-intellectualism rolling through Washington is no longer merely pervasive — it’s aggressive. And lately it has overtaken the usual rhetoric we’ve come to expect from the conservative side of the chamber. Especially i...
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Tsilimparis, MFT Tags: Anger Anxiety and Panic Criminal Justice Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Cognitive Distortions Gun Control gun reform mass shooting mental filtering School Shooting Source Type: blogs

Expert Strategies for Taming Your Toddler ’ s Tantrums
As the parent of a toddler, you are all-too familiar with tantrums. They’re part of the landscape of your day. Maybe they happen at the same time every day. Maybe they feel random. Maybe it’s a bit of both. Either way, they’re exasperating and draining. And they also can be jarring—thanks to your toddler’s seemingly endless ear-splitting sobs and screams. Which, of course, stresses you out even more. Tantrums are actually tough to define. According to Rebecca Schrag Hershberg, PhD, a clinical psychologist and founder of Little House Calls Psychological Services, “Just as no two kids are ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Children and Teens General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help chid development emotion dysregulation Emotion Regulation Learning Tantrum Toddler Source Type: blogs

The Joys of Solitude and the Power of Silence
Our world is a busy place these days. There is hustle and bustle everywhere you turn. And, for many, it’s only going to get busier now that we are in the holiday season. There are work parties and family get-togethers, parades, concerts, cookie exchanges, and the list goes on. Even when you aren’t physically with people, it can be difficult to find solitude and quiet. With modern technology, we can stay connected to others at all hours of the day. By simply logging on to social media we can have hundreds of “friends” at our fingertips and plenty of ways to connect with strangers too. But, is t...
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Holiday Coping Mindfulness Self-Help alone time Mediation Self Care Silence Solitude Source Type: blogs

Key Factors in Being a Better Leader
Leadership is not about your hierarchical role — parent, boss, teacher, elected official. It is not about being better or smarter than anybody else, nor is it about comparing oneself in relation to anybody else in any way. It is about how you act. People who practice the following actions naturally become better leaders. That is to say, others will look to them in a healthy way. On the flipside, even people who possess some type of hierarchical authority may struggle to be effective if they ignore these steps. Leaders inspire the trust, vision, and action of those around them. Here are some important and applicable w...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pratibha Anand Tags: Industrial and Workplace Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Esteem Self-Help Leadership Success Source Type: blogs

Coping During the Holiday Season if You Have C-PTSD or PTSD
For those who have a history of trauma, the holiday season can present difficult challenges. Holidays carry a full load of triggers, across the full range of our senses. Food, song, sight, family gatherings, and rituals associated with the holidays can trigger stress and difficult emotions. If you have experienced childhood interpersonal trauma (C-PTSD), it may be that holidays mean spending time with the people who hurt you. If you are suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by a traumatic event such as exposure to military combat, car accident or natural disaster, sometimes the sheer chaos of the hol...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Alcoholism Family Holiday Coping PTSD Trauma C-PTSD complex PTSD Complex trauma Holiday Season Holidays traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 4, 2018
The holidays can be a time to look forward to and it can be a time to dread. For this in the latter category, can you find a way to carve out time for yourself? Think of it as sifting through the unnecessary stuff to find the jewels of the holidays or create your own holiday. Maybe it’s the holiday lights or cuddling up with a good book and hot cup of cocoa. Maybe it’s the time of year when you decide to volunteer. Maybe it’s about scheduling self-care sessions that involve things like meditating, having coffee with a friend or seeking therapy. The holidays can be stressful. But it can also be fun, joyful...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Thinking About Dumping Your Psychiatrist? You Might Not Need To
It’s tempting. I’ve been there. You hit a rough patch with your psychiatrist and you think, “I’m outta here.” There may be some things you can do to not only get your relationship back on track but also give it a turbo boost. I want to explore just a few of the things we can do to improve our relationships with our doctors. First some basic facts. Psychiatry is a rare discipline of medicine and the population of psychiatrists is aging and not being replaced quickly enough by younger physicians. There are many areas of the country, small town and rural particularly, that have few to no psychiat...
Source: World of Psychology - December 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tova Feinman Tags: Bipolar Communication Personal Psychotherapy PTSD Schizophrenia Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Therapists Share Their Favorite Meaningful Self-Care Tips
Self-care has many different definitions. It simply depends on who you ask. But what usually doesn’t differ is that self-care is about nourishing ourselves—and it’s absolutely vital. As psychotherapist Emily Griffiths, LPC, said, “The opposite of self-care is self-neglect.” And “neglecting our emotional and physical health leads to increased anxiety, depression, and physical illness.” She noted that self-care is about knowing our limits and not depleting our nervous system. “When we lose sight of our self-care practices, we can experience burn-out,” which “sets ou...
Source: World of Psychology - December 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity General Habits Happiness Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Stress Personal Growth Self Care self-compassion Source Type: blogs

PODCAST: Why People With Mental Illness Should Remove Toxic People From Their Life
 Living with mental illness means accepting that some things are out of our control. It also means tolerating annoyances like pillboxes, regular doctor visits, and the symptoms we just can’t quite get under control. But, does living with mental illness mean we have to keep toxic people around us? Do we, as people who are managing a severe and persistent illness, just have to take the abuse that people heap on us because at least we aren’t alone? In this episode, Gabe & Michelle explore tolerating toxic people and whether or not it’s a good idea. Listen now!   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW &ld...
Source: World of Psychology - December 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Friends Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Pragmatism and the Healthcare Debate
Opinions abound about healthcare in the United States. But while people with competing ideologies retreat into their corners, people in poverty with mental illness suffer needlessly. The debate rages over whether or not healthcare is a human right, and we’ve ended up with a patchwork of private providers and public assistance. It seems no one is happy. For those of us with coverage from an employer it’s still difficult. My family faced open enrollment this month and it took hours, and a spreadsheet, to choose between options. I gave up, poured a bourbon, and sat staring out the window at an early snow, while m...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: George Hofmann Tags: Ethics & Morality Health-related Minding the Media Personal Policy and Advocacy Stigma affordable care act chronic mental illness Entitlement healthcare Medicare Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Common Communication Challenges Women Face —And How to Effectively Navigate Them
Many women face challenges in how we communicate, whether it’s with our partners or our colleagues. The specifics of the situation don’t really matter, but the results are the same: We’re left feeling resentful and frustrated. For instance, according to relationship specialist Amy Kipp, LMFT, we often have a hard time expressing our needs and asking for them to be met. We fear that we’ll be seen as needy, or we’ll be inconveniencing people, she said. We fear that others will think we’re high-maintenance, said Elizabeth Gillette, LCSW, an attachment-focused therapist, who specializes in w...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Women's Issues Active Listening Assertiveness Effective Communication Gender Bias Source Type: blogs

The Benefits of Mindfulness Meditation for Teens
Life is a lot more complicated for teenagers than most adults give them credit for. Many teenagers are balancing schoolwork with part-time jobs, sports, and an active social life. There are plenty of studies out there that have found teenagers are even more stressed out than adults. And it’s a growing problem. Statistics show that there is a higher percentage of teenagers who experience stress, anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts than in the past. There are many different theories on why this is happening but regardless of the reason, it’s important that teenagers learn ways to effectively handle s...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Children and Teens Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Parenting Adolescence Mind Body Wellness Yoga Source Type: blogs

When a Therapist and Journalist Comes Clean About Her Self-Doubt
As a career therapist since 1979 who decided to traverse a professional writing path beginning a bit less than a decade later, I have blended two of my passions; guiding people on their own journeys and communicating the thoughts that insist on being documented for posterity. Lofty pursuits? Perhaps. Fraught with challenges and responsibility for integrity? Absolutely. Thus, this article. A week ago, Psych Central published a piece called, “How the President’s Communication Style Is Like That Of An Abusive Parent”. Like much that I write, I couldn’t NOT do it. Some concepts are ripe for the picking...
Source: World of Psychology - December 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Aging Minding the Media Personal Trauma Authenticity Politics Self-Doubt Stigma Trauma Informed care Vulnerability Source Type: blogs

How to Reduce Mental Clutter That ’s Keeping You Stuck
Do these statements sound all-too familiar? I’m too old for that. I’ve never been good at that. I don’t have the time. I just can’t do it. They may sound all-too familiar because these kinds of sentences run through your mind any time you want to try something new, any time you have a goal, any time you want to make a change. Any time, there’s an inkling of “I’d like to try that,” a similar soul-crushing thought pops up, and stomps on your desire before it ever takes flight. You think you’re simply being rational or realistic. You’re just being sensible and pragm...
Source: World of Psychology - December 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity General Habits Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Assumption clutter Motivation Personal Growth risk-taking Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 1, 2018
This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at what you should ask yourself before you forgive someone, whether or not the #MeToo movement could hurt women’s health care, a new mental health care facility located in a Walmart, and more. Should I Forgive Him? Should I Forgive Her? Here’s What You Should Ask Yourself First: Forgiveness is often more about yourself than it is the person you’re forgiving (or not forgiving), and because of that, you might accidentally create a “problem” that doesn’t require forgiveness. Could #MeToo Hurt Women’s Health Care? University of T...
Source: World of Psychology - December 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Disorders Health-related OCD Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Substance Abuse Women's Issues #MeToo beacon health options Culture Forgiveness Mental Health Clinic modern psychiatry modern psychology Source Type: blogs

Top Brain-Based Habits to Elevate Your Relationships
Relationships are crucial to having a healthy and caring life with those who you value the most. Enhancing interpersonal skill has proven effective in reducing anxiety, depression, and stress. It can also improve both business success and marital satisfaction.  In world-renowned psychiatrist Dr. Daniel G. Amen’s latest book, Feel Better Fast and Make It Last, he introduces techniques from research in the field of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). The acronym RELATING, as outlined below, will help you remember the essential relationship habits that will help you live a more fulfilling life with your lo...
Source: World of Psychology - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Books Psychology Relationships Active Listening Communication Forgiveness Source Type: blogs

The Mental Health Gift Giving Guide from Psych Central
Christmas, the biggest gift-giving holiday of them all, will be here in less than a month — which means that gift buying season is currently in full force. Unless you are my sister — who is already done shopping and wrapping — you are probably just now starting to think about what gifts you want give your loved ones. Many people have no idea what to give certain people. Even my wildly efficient sister has issues finding the perfect gift for me, her picky big brother. I’ve been gifted socks and Welshcakes from relatives over the years, and I always hear my mother’s voice in my head when I...
Source: World of Psychology - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Peer Support Self-Help christmas shopping Gift Giving Stigma Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: November 30, 2018
Have you ever been told you’re overreacting, oversensitive or a hypochondriac? Sometimes it’s because you’re suffering from an illness other people can’t see. Because you look “normal” on the outside, friends and family can’t relate or understand what you’re struggling with. Whether it’s mental illness or another invisible chronic illness, such as autoimmune disease, you might want to check out Ilana Jacqueline’s Surviving and Thriving with an Invisible Chronic Illness: How to Stay Sane and Live One Step Ahead of Your Symptoms. This would also make a great ho...
Source: World of Psychology - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Out of the Closet with OCD
I came out of the closet about my OCD shortly after the release of the film, As Good As It Gets, starring Jack Nicholson in 1997. I figured if a cool (but mean) character played by Nicholson could be afflicted, why not a nice guy like me? I hasten to admit that I don’t usually confess my predicament to just anyone; on the other hand, it’s nothing to be ashamed of. It’s pure hell, of course, but it’s nothing to hide. I have read that Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder often starts between 18 and 25, but my mine predates that period and, as I recall, was particularly exacerbated by Scarlet Fever (when I wa...
Source: World of Psychology - November 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John DiPrete Tags: OCD Personal Compulsions Obsessions Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Source Type: blogs

Are You Making Your Days More Complicated in These Ways?
Life isn’t easy. But sometimes we make it a lot harder than it has to be. We engage in habits that unwittingly create problems in our lives—or exacerbate them. Sometimes, the complications we create are simple. That is, they’re straightforward, and have a clear-cut solution. Other times we need to delve deeper, so we can resolve the issue at the root. Below you’ll find examples along with some fixes and solutions. You’re making to-do lists that you know you won’t get done. Every day your to-do list inevitably includes 10-too-many tasks, each of which may or may not have multiple steps. ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Perfectionism Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Expectations Organization overwhelm Productivity Source Type: blogs