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Are You Ready to ‘Adult’?
The commonly used word, ‘adult,’ has had a makeover in recent years. A person is considered a chronological adult at the age of 18 or 21, depending on when they could vote, drink legally or be drafted. The concept of ‘adulting,’ spills over into the realm of behavior. It could take the form of holding down a job, keeping appointments, being in integrity with one’s word, and paying the bills on time. There are moments when even the most responsible among us desire someone else who is ‘adultier,’ to take charge. This 59-year-old recovering Type A, overachiever with a solid work ethic...
Source: World of Psychology - February 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Brain and Behavior Children and Teens College Creativity Habits Perfectionism Personal Students clutter Growing Up Healthy Habits Independence Organization Procrastination Young Adulthood Source Type: blogs

8 Reasons to Make Time for Fun
“Live and work but do not forget to play, to have fun in live and really enjoy it.” – Eileen Caddy When was the last time you recall having fun? Not merely feeling somewhat pleased, but fully enjoying yourself? The truth is we often feel guilty even thinking about having fun, let alone actively engaged in something we consider fun. Yet, there’s good evidence supporting the recommendation to carve out some time to do just that. Here are eight reasons why. You must work, so “Do it well, make it fun.” If you’re not independently wealthy, you must secure gainful employment and bring ho...
Source: World of Psychology - February 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Creativity Happiness Memory and Perception Self-Help Stress Fun joy stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: February 24, 2018
Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net dives into how to combat isolation when you work from home, an upcoming all-star mental health charity concert, why a “good enough” relationship is what you need, and more. How to Fight Isolation When You Work from Home: Working from home definitely has its perks, but it has its downfalls, too. Isolation — which can lead to depression — is all too common among folks who work from home. Here are a few ways to combat isolation (many of which can even boost your mental and physical health!). Harvard Psychologist Steven ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Celebrities Communication Depression Health-related Policy and Advocacy Psychology Around the Net Research Students Suicide Billy Idol Billy Morrison Corey Taylor Courtney Love Dave Navarro Hiv Isolation mental health chari Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Improve Communication with Your Partner for Joy, Peace, and a Deeper Relationship
So often, one or both members of a couple are shocked to discover their beloved partner has become a stranger. And sometimes it’s even more distressing — we wake up and find that not only does our partner, boyfriend, or girlfriend not just seem to be a stranger … but someone with whom we can’t imagine ever having joyfully coexisted. The truth is, this is not an uncommon experience. And more importantly, it’s not a sign that your relationship is doomed or over. It doesn’t mean you married the “wrong” person, and it doesn’t mean you’re a failure in romance. It doe...
Source: World of Psychology - February 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Communication Family General Happiness Marriage and Divorce Psychology Relationships Self-Help Stress Dating Intimacy Source Type: blogs

Why So Many Women Don ’t Report Sexual Harassment and Assault
When women started coming out of the woodwork stating that they too had been sexually harassed or assaulted by a man, people wondered, “Why did they wait so long to report it?” and “Why didn’t they speak up at the time?” As a psychotherapist who has specialized in working with former victims of abuse for nearly forty years, I have found that there are actually many reasons why women don’t report sexual harassment and sexual assault, including: Denial and minimization. Many women refuse to believe that the treatment they endured was actually abusive. They downplay how much they have been...
Source: World of Psychology - February 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beverly Engel, LMFT Tags: Anger Criminal Justice General Men's Issues Policy and Advocacy PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression Women's Issues #MeToo abuse of power Denial lack of support minimization Privilege self-blame Sexual Assault Sexual Haras Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: February 23, 2018
In Sound True’s Insight at the Edge podcast with Gabrielle Bernstein, she explains a thought-provoking view-that judgment is a form of addiction, something that starts with a temporary high and ends with an emotional hangover. “I think I can see for myself, before doing this process I felt justified in my judgment. I felt like they were protecting me. It was a false sense of protection. But when I really started to dig into it, I could see how detrimental the behavior was, and how it was really bringing me down. The reason I believe that judgment is an addictive pattern is that the same way we would use drugs, ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

​Teaching Teens Ways to Excel at School Despite Mental Illness
Two extremely upsetting statistics came out not too long ago. Reports have found that not only is there a link between absenteeism in school and mental illness, but there is also a correlation between suspensions from schools and children who have mental or neurological health concerns. These include personality disorders, depression, ADHD, autism and spectrum disorders, and other mental health issues, both treated and untreated. This is a major concern. Rather than recognizing symptoms and reaching out to provide support to the students who need it most, those children are being thrown out of the very environment that wou...
Source: World of Psychology - February 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: ADHD and ADD Caregivers Children and Teens Parenting Personal Personality Research Stigma Stress Student Therapist Students Success & Achievement Suicide Coping Skills defiant oppositional Discipline Emotional Disabilities Source Type: blogs

How Do We Assure the Children?
If polled, most parents would say it was their primary job to protect their children from harm. “Look both ways before you cross the street.” “Don’t touch a hot stove.” “Don’t go off with a stranger.” These are common instructions offered from adults to young ones. Responsible parents keep a watchful eye on those in their care. Until the past decade or so, that was sufficient. In recent years, a feeling of helplessness has overcome some. Sending your child to school in the morning didn’t fit into the worry category. In the wake of the most recent school shooting at the...
Source: World of Psychology - February 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Anger Bullying Children and Teens College Criminal Justice Students Trauma Violence and Aggression Gun Control Gun Safety mass shooting Parkland shooting School Shooting teen violence Terrorism Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Come On, Get Happy – The App
More and more apps are showing up that are geared toward mental health. One such app is called, simply, “Happy.” This simple to use app allows a user to speak with a “giver” (an emotional support individual) to discuss whatever happens to be troubling the user. In this episode, we speak with the company’s CEO, who explains how the app works, the vetting process of the givers, and plans for the future of the app. The importance of emotional support is also discussed, as are specifics on how the app works, including how a user is matched with a giver. . Subscribe to Our Show! . Happy...
Source: World of Psychology - February 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Technology The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

OCD, Learning, and Memory Problems
This study provides concrete evidence that those with OCD can present to others to help advocate for themselves. I also find this study exciting because it shows we are making progress. Slowly but surely, hard-working researchers are chiseling away at the mysteries of obsessive-compulsive disorder, helping those with OCD along the way and giving them hope. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - February 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Books Caregivers College Memory and Perception OCD Personal Cognition Cognitive Decline learning disability Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Source Type: blogs

How Psychological Abuse Damages Your Self
Psychological abuse leaves no visible marks and often remains hidden within families, romantic relationships, toxic individuals and groups, cults and organizations of various religious and non-religious orientations. However, it is at least as damaging as the more explicitly violent forms of physical and sexual abuse. Mental, emotional and spiritual abuse leaves lasting damage to a person’s sense of self, confidence and ability to navigate life successfully. It often takes considerable time for psychological abuse to be recognized for what it is. Perpetrators are masters at manipulation and creating a harmless facad...
Source: World of Psychology - February 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Christiana Star Tags: Bullying Relationships Trauma Women's Issues Emotional Abuse Manipulation Psychological abuse Self Awareness self-compassion Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

Why Won ’t Anxiety Go Away?
If you were walking through the woods and noticed a bear walking towards you, you would probably either run for your life or be so scared that you freeze. On the other hand, if your friends told you to watch out for a person dressed as a bear scaring people in the woods, you might initially get startled but would otherwise remember it was just a person. This heads up would make all the difference in your reaction. Life is like a walk through the woods. We know that anxiety is going to manifest itself because it is a part of life. At one time or another, all of us will experience mild or severe anxiety. But what happens whe...
Source: World of Psychology - February 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Anxiety and Panic Habits Happiness Mindfulness Self-Help Treatment Anxious Thoughts catastrophic thinking Catastrophizing Worry Source Type: blogs

Feeling Disgruntled? How to Change Your Mood
“Think big thoughts but relish small pleasures.” – H. Jackson Brown, Jr. Everyone experiences a bad mood from time to time. In fact, it’s considered normal to have different emotions given circumstances, physical ailments or condition, lack of sleep, too much work or other stress and a variety of other causative factors. Still, when you’re in a funk, feeling disgruntled, you want a quick way out of it. After all, feeling dissatisfied is no way to live on a continuing basis. So, how do you change your mood? Perhaps these tips will help. Shake it up. This suggestion isn’t to get jiggly, bu...
Source: World of Psychology - February 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Agitation Anger Communication Creativity Habits Happiness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Anger Management Bad Mood Friendship mood change Mood Swings moodiness Self Care self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Who Does School Shootings? Psychopaths, Not People with Asperger ’s Syndrome
When school shootings take place, especially after Newtown, Asperger’s Syndrome is often suspected. Both the Florida Sun-Sentinel and the New York Times reported comments that Parkland shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz was diagnosed with autism. It’s important to make this clear — research has shown that people with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) are no more violent than the general population. In fact, they’re much more likely to be the victims of bullying and violence. People can mistake the lack of social skills and social withdrawal of young adults with AS for hostility. Their withdrawal has little ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marcia Eckerd, PhD Tags: Aspergers Autism Bullying Criminal Justice Ethics & Morality General Minding the Media Personality Psychology Students Violence and Aggression Asperger’s Syndrome Gun Violence Hostility mass shooting Parkland shooting Sch Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: February 20, 2018
Thank you Sunny Hostin for expressing what I haven’t heard many people in the media say. If you watch The View, you might have caught the co-host’s response to the Florida shooting. She said we can’t continue to blame the shootings on mental illness and contrary to what many believe, mentally ill people are often victims of crime. Thank you Sunny and all the other people in the media including this blogger and all our bloggers this week for promoting truth. If we want to spread awareness and understanding, start with posts that provide an accurate picture of mental illness like our top posts thi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Video: I Don ’ t Have to Apologize; I ’ m Mentally Ill!
Transcript For “No Apology, I’m Mentally Ill” Video Q: Why do I have to apologize for things that I did when I was really symptomatic? I was sick, it’s not my fault! People bring this up to me a lot. For some reason they think if you have a symptom of an illness, that you have, I don’t know, immunity. I kind of look at it like this: if you’re driving your car and you pass out because of low blood sugar, and you ram into the back of somebody else’s car, the explanation for why you did that isn’t because you’re a bad person or even a bad driver. It’s because you wer...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Peer Support Relationships Self-Help Stigma Video acceptance Apology Bipolar Disorder Blame destigmatization Mental Illness Responsibility Self-Esteem Shame trust Source Type: blogs

8 Ways to Support Yourself Through Bereavement
As we age we are inevitably bereaved more often, and it is at a time of our life when we are more vulnerable. Research shows that the generation that are in their 60’s and older are the least likely to access or receive appropriate support when someone dies, and this is particularly true of men. Through my work as a bereavement psychotherapist for the last 25 years, I have learned from my clients what can help them at such a difficult time, and I have developed the concept of “pillars of strength” — these are active things we can do to help us manage the pain of loss, and build an internal structure...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julia Samuel Tags: Books Family General Grief and Loss Personal Psychotherapy Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Source Type: blogs

The Value of Talking to Each Other Out Loud
Technology has provided more ways for people to communicate than previous generations could have imagined, but one of the great ironies of our age is that we are speaking to each other less than ever. A 2014 Gallup poll conducted in the US found that text messaging was the most popular form of communication for those aged 18 to 29. When major companies such as Coca Cola and Citigroup asked employees if they wanted to eliminate voice messages, the majority agreed. Psychologist Sherry Turkle is concerned that with so much communication taking place through devices people are losing the art of conversation. Closely rela...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janine Harrison Tags: Communication Family Friends Happiness Relationships Research Technology Active Listening art of conversation Empathy Friendship Nonverbal communication Passive Aggression Shame social media Source Type: blogs

Am I in a Jealous Relationship?
Jealousy is a common problem in relationships. Romantic relationships can certainly cause jealousy, but so can family members, friends and co-workers. According to Gordon Clanton, a professor of sociology at California State University, jealousy is a protective reaction to a perceived threat to a valued relationship. Without jealousy, there may be little protection or ownership of the relationship. Too much jealousy, however, can lead to unhealthy patterns of attachment. There are several different types of jealousy. Romantic jealousy is probably the most frequently experienced. A threat to the intimacy of a relationshi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Communication Family General Men's Issues Relationships Self-Help Women's Issues competition Entitlement Envy Inadequacy Inferiority Infidelity Insecurity Jealousy Low Self Esteem romantic jealousy Self-Doubt Unhealthy Source Type: blogs

When the Rug Gets Yanked Out from Beneath You: An Interview with Joel Metzger
I have known Joel Metzger for perhaps 20 years and was told I needed to meet this resilient thriver and hear his story of rebirth following a traumatic event that forever changed his life. When we wake up each morning, we generally don’t imagine that this day could be our last on the planet. We go about our business, interacting with family, friends and co-workers, “clocking in and clocking out” on the job, assuming that another 24 hours will be granted to us or that they will be predictable. Joel was one of those who likely didn’t question that belief. He is a consistent presence in our comm...
Source: World of Psychology - February 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: General Grief and Loss Happiness Health-related Inspiration & Hope Interview Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal Trauma Car Accident grieving Recovery Resilience Traumatic Brain Injury Source Type: blogs

​The Science of Vastly Different Teens: Introverts and Extroverts
Personality is more than just how we act around others. There are deeply ingrained elements to who we are that impact every single aspect of our lives. Nowhere is this more true than when looking at the differences between extroverts and introverts. Due to the prominence of these characteristics shown on television or in internet memes, there tends to be a fundamental misunderstanding of what these terms mean and how they relate to people. An introvert is not necessarily shy, or someone who hates being around others. They simply need time alone after social or stressful situations, preferring to recharge their batteries in...
Source: World of Psychology - February 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Anxiety and Panic Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Friends Memory and Perception Parenting Personality Relationships Students Adolescence Cognition Extroversion Gratification Impulsiveness Introversion Neuroscience Soc Source Type: blogs

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Contribute to Brain Disorders?
In this study published in July 2017, researchers looked at the vitamin D levels and cognitive function in patients who experienced psychosis. They found an association between low levels of vitamin D and decreased processing speed and verbal fluency. The authors suggested the next step should be randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation in those with psychosis and vitamin D deficiency. Another study, published in Psychiatry Research in August 2017, looked at whether vitamin B12, homocysteine folic acid, and vitamin D might be connected to childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-two children an...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Brain and Behavior Health-related Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Brain Disorder Mental Illness Vitamin D Vitamin Deficiency Source Type: blogs

Empowering Our Girls: Being Part of the #MeToo Solution
Recently, a memory of an experience I had made me think about how we can empower our girls and young women in a culture that is wrought with many obstacles to do so. A number of years ago I saw a new male doctor for some medical issues I was experiencing. He was warm and friendly, but instead of putting me at ease, something didn’t feel right. In his brief exam (with my clothes on) he lingered in a way that gave me an uncomfortable gut feeling. He asked me questions about my sex life that seemed irrelevant to my issues. He sat unusually close to me and gave me a hug when I left, which no other doctor had ever done. ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beth Kurland, Ph.D. Tags: Men's Issues Mindfulness Minding the Media Peer Support Personal Policy and Advocacy Sexuality Trauma Violence and Aggression Women's Issues #MeToo abuse of power Body Image Empowerment Rape Respect Sexual Abuse Sexual As Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: February 17, 2018
Hello, Psych Central readers. For this week’s Psychology Around the Net, we’re diving into vibes and what causes us to feel them, how we can use our emotions to cause positive environmental change, ways to help children better understand and practice mindfulness, and more. I’ve chosen to not address the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida in this week’s Psychology Around the Net, as many of our Psych Central writers have already and are continuing to do so. I encourage you to browse our latest blog posts for our team’s insights. How Real Are Vibes: Th...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Addiction Children and Teens Depression Disorders Green and Environment Mindfulness Psychology Around the Net Recovery Research Substance Abuse Technology Buprenorphine Environmental Threats language Obsessive Behavior selfie Source Type: blogs

Free Live Webinar: How to Develop A Daily Practice
In this webinar, our instructor, Victoria Gigante, explains just what a daily practice is for, the different forms it can take, and how it can help each and every one of us. She gives advice on how to start one, and explores the many reasons why people think they are unable to do so. This webinar is free of charge, but registration is required. All registrants will receive a link to the recording. 4 Take-A-Ways from the Daily Practice Webinar Learn what a Daily Practice is. Learn what a Daily Practice isn’t. Learn how to develop and Daily Practice and successfully incorporate it into your life. Learn how to use you...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Habits Happiness Mindfulness Blame Complaining daily practice declutter Gratitude joy Organization Personal Growth Procrastination Responsibility Worry Source Type: blogs

Another School Shooting, Another Week in America
There are no words to express the depth of frustration, agony, and heartbreak I feel when I see in the news that there has been yet another school shooting in America. 17 dead. Seventeen lives ended before they could graduate high school, find love, go to college or learn a trade, and start a family. As humans, our inclination is to turn to the perpetrator of this crime and ask, “Why?” But as Americans, we need to stop asking this question and offering empty “thoughts and prayers.” Instead, we need to start looking for solutions to this growing epidemic of mass shootings in our country, consistently...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Criminal Justice General Psychology Students Violence and Aggression Antisocial Personality Gun Violence mass shooting Mental Illness Nikolas Cruz Parkland reducing gun violence School Shooting Source Type: blogs

Preventing and Healing from School Violence Takes a Village
As our nation reels from the devastating event of the school shooting in Florida this week (number 18 in 2018, according to CNBC and other media outlets), it’s easy to point fingers and blame the gun industry for making the guns, law makers for what they are or aren’t doing to control gun access, the perpetrator for his mental health issues and his alleged obsession with guns and knives and death, the leadership of the school, the parents….the list goes on.   But, as  Dr. Mary Schoenfeldt, renowned expert and author of numerous books on school violence prevention and school violence aftermath, ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jill L. Ferguson, M.A. Tags: Children and Teens Criminal Justice Family General Minding the Media Parenting PTSD Students Suicide Trauma Violence and Aggression Childhood Trauma Coping Skills Gun Violence Homicide Intervention Mary Schoenfeldt mass s Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: February 16, 2018
At some point in your life, you ran into someone with an illness. The problem is you know and like them. You might even love them. But this thing you don’t understand is causing cracks in your relationship, and it’s hurting you. You have two choices. You can leave the relationship or you can find ways to work through it. You just can’t do it alone. That’s why you’re here and I’m glad. It’s a good week to tune in. We’ve got posts on dealing with difficult people, signs you should say goodbye to that toxic person in your life and how to nourish yourself especially when you&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - February 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

How to Feel Normal Again
“The possibility of stepping into a higher plane is quite real for everyone. It requires no force or effort or sacrifice. It involves little more than changing our ideas about what is normal.” – Deepak Chopra When I was a young girl, I often felt as if I was not normal. It wasn’t that I had a noticeable birth defect or considered myself ugly or stupid, though. My feelings likely stemmed more from a sense that I was too sensitive or fragile or in need of protection and couldn’t stand up for myself. I had an older brother who sometimes was tough on me, yet I loved him dearly. He was my protector...
Source: World of Psychology - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: General Habits Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Awkwardness base line Comparison competition Coping Insecurity loss Normalcy Resilience self-compassion Source Type: blogs

7 More Ways to Navigate Anxiety with Art Journaling
Anxiety is an uncomfortable emotion with uncomfortable physical sensations. Our chest tightens. Our breathing gets shallow. Our stomach feels like we’re on a rollercoaster with exactly one thousand drops. We feel restless. Our thoughts are fast and furious, like a game of ping pong. Maybe we’re ruminating about everything we have to do. Maybe we’re ruminating about losing our job and not being able to pay the bills. Maybe we’re ruminating about a relationship, an upcoming project, an upcoming move, a mistake we’ve made—or many, many other things. Or maybe we’re not sure what our an...
Source: World of Psychology - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety and Panic Creativity Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress art journaling Art Therapy Worry Source Type: blogs

Podcast: More With Pulitzer Prize Finalist Pete Earley
Pete Earley returns to talk more about mental health advocacy and lots of other things. He tells of how he came to co-author a book with Jessie Close and talks of his days writing his own spy novels and several books with former Speaker of the House, Newt Gingrich. He also shares stories from his days as a reporter with the Washington Post, including being part of a “special” squad of reporters. Pete shares some information on some of his forthcoming books and projects, and finally, he advises everyone of what we can do to help advocate for mental health in our own ways. . Subscribe to Our Show! . P...
Source: World of Psychology - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Celebrities General Policy and Advocacy The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

What a Beautiful Life: The Fulfillment of Failure
Can you imagine things going right on the first try? It would be fantastically … boring! Just picture sitting down to center clay on the pottery wheel. Your hands wrap around the mud. Your foot hits the pedal. And within seconds, the job is done. Instead of clay flying out to splatter your neighbor’s face with a roar of laughter, it stays put. Instead of trying and trying and finally learning something new, you simply know how to craft a pot from the start. The sense of accomplishment would be lost. The beauty of brilliant artwork would be commonplace. Or picture instead, the art of romance. In a world free o...
Source: World of Psychology - February 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mirissa D. Price Tags: Habits Happiness Perfectionism Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Failure Personal Growth Resilience risk-taking self-worth Source Type: blogs

The Basics of Self-Love
“It’s surprising how many persons go through life without ever recognizing that their feelings toward other people are largely determined by their feelings toward themselves, and if you’re not comfortable within yourself, you can’t be comfortable with others.” – Sidney J. Harris It is very difficult to find a loving partner if you don’t love yourself. Yes, love. Love means acceptance, compassion and a general positive, even affectionate feeling about who you are. Finding unconditional love from someone else is almost impossible. Everyone has some conditions. But acknowledging ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: General Habits Happiness Holiday Coping Perfectionism Self-Esteem Self-Help Confidence Forgiveness Gratitude Loneliness Optimism Personal Growth Positivity Self Image Self Love self-compassion Unconditional Love valenti Source Type: blogs

Valentine ’s Day Exclusive: A Strengths-Based Approach to Happily Ever After — Author Interview with Suzie and James Pawelski
PC: Your book Happy Together: Using the Science of Positive Psychology to Build Love that Lasts has just come out and it shot to the top of Amazon’s new releases. Why do you think there is such a demand for this new approach and your work? S&JP: We believe people are hungry for information on how to be happy together. We wrote this book because there is so much focus in our culture on getting together rather than being together and staying together. So much emphasis on the wedding — rather than the marriage — and all the decisions we need to make for just o...
Source: World of Psychology - February 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Daniel Tomasulo, Ph.D. Tags: Books Communication Marriage and Divorce Proof Positive Relationships Self-Help Active Listening Character Strengths Couples Therapy Loving Support Marital Bliss Personal Growth Source Type: blogs

The Connection Between Obesity and the Blood-Brain Barrier
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important physiological formation tasked with protecting the brain from multiple chemicals that might circulate in our bloodstream. The BBB obstructs the exchange and movement of most molecules, cells, and proteins in and out of the central nervous system (CNS). This helps to keep the brain “cool” and unaffected by whatever we eat and the kind of infections we encounter. The BBB is formed by the blood vessels in the CNS that are lined by endothelial cells. It is a complex structure that ensures the maintenance of the metabolic and immunoregulatory homeostasis in the CNS. In ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Health-related Publishers Research BBB Blood Brain Barrier body weight feeding behavior Hormones leptin Metabolism Obesity Overweight Source Type: blogs

How to Use Writing to Ease Your Depression
After receiving another round of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which she’d been receiving every other day, Elizabeth Maynard Schaefer, Ph.D., lay in a hospital room and felt hopeless. In the past ECT had “worked wonders” in treating her deep depressions, the devastating lows part of her bipolar disorder. But lately it’d seemed futile. As she writes in her beautiful, thoughtful, inspiring book Writing Through the Darkness: Easing Your Depression with Paper and Pen, “Desperate, I reached for an empty notebook. My brain was too flat and blurred to put together sentences, so I scribbled a list ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Creativity Depression Disorders General Habits Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Creative Flow Depressive Episode Journaling Sadness writing Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: February 13, 2017
Valentine’s Day is coming up. It’s the holiday many of us have a love hate relationship with and that’s understandable. When I was single, I dreaded it. The heart-filled, chocolate covered day, only seemed to remind me of how alone I felt. I remember being in high school walking around empty-handed as I watched everyone around me filled with excitement about the gifts they got. I didn’t love it that much more when I found my husband. It was just another reason to spend money on ways to prove my worth as a partner. Along the way I realized that these were just other people’s expectations of wha...
Source: World of Psychology - February 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Effective for Children and Adolescents with OCD?
There is no question that having a child with obsessive-compulsive disorder affects the whole family. I’ve written before about how pediatric OCD results in disrupted routines, stressful social interactions for children, and poor job performance for parents. Elevated stress and anxiety levels, as well as feelings of frustration, anger, and sadness become the norm in a household dictated by OCD. I’ve also written about how important it is to get the right help as soon as possible. Even if parents or other caregivers think things are “not that bad,” the situation is likely worse than they imagine. Bec...
Source: World of Psychology - February 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Children and Teens OCD Psychology Psychotherapy Research Treatment Adolescence CBT Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Comorbidity Exposure and Response Prevention Obsessive Compulsive Disorder tic disorder Source Type: blogs

Am I Depressed or Just Lazy?
I’m often asked, “Am I depressed or just lazy?” It’s a legitimate question, in that many people who suffer from clinical depression will initially feel like they’re just being lazy, not wanting to get off the couch or out of bed. On the surface, the two — laziness and depression — appear to share some passing similarities. But dig just a little deeper and you can quickly determine whether you’re depressed, or are just being lazy. Depression is a serious, debilitating mental illness that impacts millions of Americans each year. It not only causes distress for the person suffe...
Source: World of Psychology - February 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Self-Help am i depressed am i depressed or lazy Chronic Laziness Clinical Depression depression quiz Source Type: blogs

Why It ’ s Never Too Late to Heal Your Mind
Brian had suffered for years from an intractable depression for which he had been hospitalized. He had been through cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), psychoanalytic psychotherapy, supportive therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT). He received varied diagnoses from major depression to bipolar disorder to dependent personality disorder. He had tried many medications that had been ineffective. The psychiatrist who referred him told me he was hopeless. I am a trauma therapist well versed in the science of emotions and attachment. Although change takes work, my conviction that the brain and mind heal is u...
Source: World of Psychology - February 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hilary Jacobs Hendel, LCSW Tags: Happiness Personal Psychotherapy Stories Trauma Treatment Childhood Trauma connection Coping Skills Neglect self-compassion Shame Source Type: blogs

Genealogy in the Psyche Department
Perhaps a psychological mapping of the human genome would tell us the future odds of being bullied in school, or of becoming a priest. Genes inherited from the “family tribe” contribute to the formation of self through a complicated process that incorporates a fusion of interrelated factors: genetic traits, familial relationships, societal interactions, educational opportunities, random influences, etc. Perhaps the results of male and female parenting could be likened to so-called strands of “psychological” inheritance — the maternal and paternal branches — replicated through e...
Source: World of Psychology - February 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John DiPrete Tags: Brain and Behavior Family General Mental Health and Wellness Personal Personality genealogy Genes heritable disease humane genome Inheritance Nature Versus Nurture Source Type: blogs

What Is Revenge Porn?
Break-ups can be difficult and often quite painful. But imagine that the person you loved and trusted for the duration of your relationship decided to take revenge on you for breaking it off. What does that look like? Well, there are a variety of ways that a scorned lover might express their resentment, but in today’s era of cyber-everything, revenge porn is becoming a tool of choice for many in their quest for vengeance. Revenge porn has been defined by the government as “the sharing of private, sexual materials, either photos or videos, of another person without their consent and with the purpose of cau...
Source: World of Psychology - February 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC Tags: Anger Men's Issues Sexuality Technology Trauma Violence and Aggression Women's Issues #MeToo Betrayal Breakups consent Lack Of Empathy Pornography Revenge revenge porn victimization Source Type: blogs

Reclaiming Your Life After Breaking Up
As the saying goes, breaking up is hard to do. There are few things more painful than the heartache of separating from someone who has found their way into our heart — the shock of a sudden ending and being alone again. How can we heal and move on after such a gut-wrenching trauma? A complex slew of feelings may overwhelm us after a break-up. How can we tap into inner resources that might help us heal? A psychologically savvy view of working with adversity can be drawn from the Buddha’s story of the two arrows. The first arrow strikes us with a deep sense of loss and the sudden shock of living without our part...
Source: World of Psychology - February 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Depression General Grief and Loss Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Spirituality Abandonment Blame Breakups Coping Skills Dating Failure grieving Guilt Hea Source Type: blogs

Could Marijuana Contribute to Sexual Dysfunction?
Marijuana consists of a mixture of dried plant leaves, flowers, and/or stems of the Cannabis Sativa plant. In addition, there is a resin-based version of marijuana that is called hash. Most people either smoke marijuana or vape it (warming it, but not cooking it), but it can also be ingested in oil form. The most common way to ingest marijuana is to roll it up and smoke it like you would a cigarette or cigar, or use a smoking tool like a pipe. Some users, however, consume weed by infusing foods (i.e., butter and cooking oil) or teas. What happens to your body when you ingest marijuana? THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the mos...
Source: World of Psychology - February 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Publishers Research Sexuality Substance Abuse Cannabis Climax Dopamine effects of marijuana erection Orgasm Pot Premature Ejaculation Sexual Desire Sexual Dysfunction THC types of sexual dysfunctions Weed Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Use Art Journaling to Navigate Anxiety
Anxiety can be persistent and stubborn, especially when you try to ignore. It’s like a child who refuses to take no for an answer and simply gets louder and louder, until they’re throwing a full-blown tantrum on the floor of your local Target. Anxiety also is an emotion we often despise. We see it as an adversary, as something that gets in our way, as something we must fight and defeat. Which means we don’t want anything to do with it, which means it remains unprocessed and misunderstood. What can help is art-making. Art-making gives us the opportunity to explore and process our anxiety in a non-intimidat...
Source: World of Psychology - February 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety and Panic Creativity Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress art Creative Expression Emotional Expression stress reduction Worry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: February 10, 2018
Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers! Do you think your brain works the same way as your friends’ brains? Why are college students flocking to a class aimed at making them feel happier? What does self-defeating humor do to your psychological well-being? We’re about to find out in this week’s Psychology Around the Net. Similar Neural Responses Predict Friendship: In simpler terms, your brain probably works in ways similar to your friends’ brains. Could it be that birds of a feather really do flock together? One study says so. The Mental Health and Loneliness Paradox: Whether it’s anxiety, dep...
Source: World of Psychology - February 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior College Depression Disorders Friends Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Around the Net Research Students Women's Issues brain gene activity College Students happy Isolation Jessica Porten Lon Source Type: blogs

Your Personality Type Might Help You Live Longer
Stubborn, positive personality types likely to live longer, new study says. I love reading about the oldest people in the world, because the details are so fascinating, and because the people themselves are living links to history. For example, Italy’s Emma Morano was 117 when she passed—and with her, so went a connection to an era. She was the last person born in the 19th century. What was her secret to a long life? Morano was big on eating raw eggs, though she also gave credit to good genes for her extraordinary lifespan. Japan’s Misao Okawa also made it to 117, enjoying a daily cup of coffee and ramen ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Health-related Personality Publishers Research Spirituality & Health Embracing Change Personality Types positive Positive Thinking staying active stubborn study supercentenarians Source Type: blogs

Perfectionism Among College Students Grows
For many of us, perfectionism is often confused with the genuine drive and desire to obtain excellence. What perfectionism actually is, however, is the quest for the unobtainable. In this post on perfectionism, Dr. Michael Ashworth explains: Individuals caught up in perfectionistic thinking or behavior commonly experience significant personal distress as well as chronic health and emotional problems. Such individuals can also provoke extremely negative reactions from others due to their unrealistically high standards and quest to avoid failure and rejection… Perfectionism is based on a belief that unless I am perfec...
Source: World of Psychology - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Children and Teens College Habits Happiness Perfectionism Personality Research Stress Student Therapist Students Academia Expectations grades Meritocracy Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: February 9, 2018
It’s that time again. Flu season. We get flu shots and take other preventative measures to avoid catching it. But it got me wondering how much effort is spent protecting our ongoing emotional health. Things like getting enough rest, seeing a doctor, and healing your past are all essential to keeping our mental health in check. Why not spend as much energy on protecting it as you do your physical health during flu season? You can start by reading ways to tackle insomnia (who knew sugar cravings could signal inadequate sleep?), how to effectively heal a broken heart, and to feel, not just numb your emotions with food, ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

4 Easy Steps to a Better Brain
Did you ever think that the ability for your brain to achieve its maximum superpowers resides well within you? Scientific research suggests that doing just these 4 simple things listed below will help not just preserve your brain power, but maximize it so you can feel like you are functioning well, maybe even at your very best, and feel energized no matter what your age and circumstance of life is. 1. Get moving.  Whether it is dancing, walking your dog, working in the yard, all that matters is that you simply move around. Physical activity clears out a substance called amyloid, which is believed to accumulate and &l...
Source: World of Psychology - February 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Exercise & Fitness Habits Health-related Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help amyloid Brain Health Cognitive Decline Dementia Memory Loss mental decline Neuronal Conne Source Type: blogs