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Free Webinar: Telling Your Mental Health Recovery Story
(Please note: This free live webinar will be recorded and a copy made available to all who registered.) Words have immense power. Whether they are the inscription on the Statue of Liberty or a love letter to your sweetest and dearest, words matter, and stories move people. If you are ready (or… nearly ready) to tell your mental health recovery story, this informative and entertaining webinar by OC87 Recovery Diaries Editor in Chief Gabriel Nathan is for you. FOUR TAKE-A-WAYS FROM THIS WEBINAR: Helpful tips about the art of storytelling (yes, it is an art) Some important, general do’s and don’ts Though...
Source: World of Psychology - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Creativity Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Webinar Source Type: blogs

5 Best Practices for Maintaining Good Mental Health
Mental health rarely gets the credibility it deserves. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI, 43.8 million adults in America experience mental health issues in a given year. These millions of people are experiencing an invisible, or hidden, disability. Hidden disabilities may not be visible to the naked eye, but they still significantly impact the people who have them. Individuals with hidden disabilities often report that people question the legitimacy of the challenges they face because they aren’t obvious. Whereas individuals with visible disabilities commonly face assumptions that t...
Source: World of Psychology - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Megan Lauman, MSW Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Mental Health Awareness Month mental health month Source Type: blogs

Ep 10: Schizophrenia & Bipolar Symptoms: 2 Truths and a Lie Edition
Listener favorite Two Truths and One Lie returns, but with a twist. Gabe and Michelle each share three stories about specific symptoms they have of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (respectively). All six of these examples are believed to be factual by many people, but only four of them are accurate. After sharing the examples, Gabe and Michelle challenge each other to guess which two of their symptoms are real and which one is a lie. Subscribe to Our Show: And Please Share & Review!   “Just because you’re acting normal doesn’t mean you’re not sick.” ~ Gabe Howard Highl...
Source: World of Psychology - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Disorders General Peer Support Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

A Relationship Between Rehabilitation and Resentment
I’ve tried again and again to overcome feelings of isolation, self-loathing and disconnection from the world around me. I try to form friendships, and be a part of, with limited success and sometimes disastrous results. It took several years of clean time in a 12-step program for me to fully appreciate how much resentment I had accumulated and why I continued my relationship with resentment. I remember the first time I heard the phrase “resentments are like drinking a cup of poison and expecting the other person to die.” I was stunned by the truth of the statement. I started to realize that justified or ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Addiction Publishers Recovery The Fix Disconnection Isolation rehabilitation Resentment Self Loathing Source Type: blogs

Anxiety and Your “What If Calculator”
Some universities provide a “what if calculator” to help students project possible grades. It provides the percentage they need on each test to get their desired grade at the end of the course. Based on what they would like their final grade to be, they can decide how much work and effort to put into studying for their final exam. If we all had a what if calculator to forecast our future, life would be so much easier! We could say we all are in a possession of a what if calculator. For many of us, that amazing thought-making machine works overtime. The problem is that though our mind means well, its ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Anxiety and Panic Habits Happiness Perfectionism Self-Help Stress Avoidance Catastrophizing Rumination Worry Source Type: blogs

Everyone Has Superpowers. How Are You Using Yours?
Comic books and movies are full of superheroes with magical powers. But we too have superpowers that can be activated anytime and help us live a conscious and intentional life. Here are some of them… The Superpower of Self-Awareness This power enables you to have insight into your own inner processes: how you tick, your conscious and subconscious beliefs and values, your strengths, skills and weaknesses. When you know and appreciate what makes you uniquely You — even if you are not like others, don’t conform to common norms or are often less than perfect — you will be able to walk your own path w...
Source: World of Psychology - May 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Christiana Star Tags: General Habits Happiness Mindfulness Perfectionism Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Confidence Decision Making Discernment Expectation Self Awareness Self Regulation Source Type: blogs

Become More Likeable with This Psychology Trick
How many times have you heard the phrase “You are what you eat”? The idea behind this now-infamous diet mantra is that in order to be fit and healthy, you have to eat nutritious food. The take-home message? Your actions have direct ramifications for your body and your mind. Now, consider this spin: “You are what you say.” Fair or not, what you communicate to others can lead others to make assumptions about your character — a concept called spontaneous trait inference. This psychological phenomenon holds that people are perceived as possessing traits they describe in others. Several e...
Source: World of Psychology - May 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melody Wilding, LMSW Tags: General Personality Source Type: blogs

Feeling Lost in Life: A Learning Opportunity
I am convinced that one of our missions in life is to learn what we need to become better versions of ourselves. That is why we find ourselves in situations we don’t have the tools to handle. When we don’t know what to do with the circumstances and the associated emotions, we are presented with a learning opportunity. Many times, I’ve found myself in situations where I feel lost, not knowing what to do or where to start. They are mostly life changing situations, events that demand us to make life defining decisions, even though we don’t even understand what is really going on. For some people is the...
Source: World of Psychology - May 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Viviana Vethencourt, M.S. Tags: General Grief and Loss Happiness Perfectionism Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: May 19, 2018
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers how a parent’s mental health and parenting styles can affect the child’s ability to maintain friendships, reactions to the second season of Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why, why it’s important CEO’s share mental health challenges they faced climbing the success ladder, and more. (Oh, and maaaaaaaybe a little something about a certain couple’s wedding today!) Meghan Markle’s Mom Quits Job at Mental Health Clinic: OK, OK, OK, I admit it. This isn’t exactly mental health news, per se, but cut me some slac...
Source: World of Psychology - May 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Depression Industrial and Workplace Parenting Psychology Around the Net Research 13 Reasons Why Bipolar Disorder Cognitive Function Cognitive Impairment Emma McIlroy Entrepreneurs M Source Type: blogs

10 Easy Ways to Increase Your Energy Levels Naturally
“You are responsible for the energy that you create for yourself, and you’re responsible for the energy that you bring to others.” – Oprah Winfrey I’m all about doing what I can do in a better way. This includes taking proper care of my health and watching my energy levels throughout the day. There’s no denying that a busy lifestyle contributes to a drain on how much energy you feel you have, yet there are natural ways to boost your energy levels that are easy and relatively quick to do. After doing my research, I’ve discovered that science backs up the merits of the following 10 e...
Source: World of Psychology - May 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Exercise & Fitness Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

Women ’ s Empowerment: Validation Comes from Within
In my work as a clinical psychologist, I often observe successful and accomplished women struggling with issues surrounding feelings of self-worth and self-esteem. My patients, many of whom are young adults, often express unwarranted feelings of doubt and insecurity that conflict with reality. Common invalidating phrases that my clients regularly share include “I don’t know but…” or “I know this is silly but…” Why do so many women feel the need to put themselves down and invalidate themselves? I’d like to examine this tendency and suggest some practical behavioral changes ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marisa Mahler, Psy.D. Tags: Anxiety and Panic Policy and Advocacy Self-Esteem Self-Help Stigma Stress Women's Issues #MeToo approval seeking disempowerment Inadequacy Insecurity self-confidence Self-Doubt Validation womanhood Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 18, 2018
There’s one thing you can do now to improve almost every area of your life. Strengthening your intuition, developing a strong inner knowing and then listening to it can help minimize relationship problems, foster better physical and emotional health and keep you from disastrous situations. If you’re struggling this week with your emotions, self-esteem, or your relationship, you’ll benefit from a few moments of stillness. Tap into that inner voice. Listen. Then, read our posts to give you extra support and advice, and see which one seems fit for your situation. Stop the Drama: 4 Steps to Manage Emotions (A...
Source: World of Psychology - May 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Meeting Drug Users Where They ’ re At: US Safe Injection Sites Coming Soon
Amid piles of evidence that the “War On Drugs” approach did little to address Substance Use Disorder (SUD), Americans are beginning to signal that they’re ready to try something different. This month, that signal for something different came in loud and clear from New York City, where Mayor Bill de Blasio championed a plan to open the nation’s first legal safe injection site for intravenous drug users (Neuman, 2018). While de Blasio’s endorsement made a splash in the new cycle, his city is not the only one to seriously consider the approach. Philadelphia, Seattle, Denver and Ithaca, New York ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Erin Gilday Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Recovery Research Substance Abuse Treatment Disease Model Drug Abuse Harm Reduction Heroin Addiction intravenous drug abuse Mayor Bill de Blasio Naloxone nee Source Type: blogs

When True Kindness Means Saying ‘ No ’
“Saying ‘No’ does not always show a lack of generosity and that saying ‘Yes’ is not always a virtue.” – Paulo Coelho To follow up on an earlier post, I wanted to take the time to address one of the most common myths surrounding saying “no”: that being generous or kind means saying yes to people. As I see it, the opposite is often true. This is true in several different contexts: 1. Sometimes giving people what they want is not what they need or is not in their best interest. We’ve all likely been in situations where people ask us to help them with something or do ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pratibha Anand Tags: General Habits Mindfulness Self-Help anxiety Forgiveness Generosity Obligation Personal Time Self Care self-compassion Worry Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Finding Strength & Unity in Our Differences
Listen to part one of the first ever LIVE Psych Central Show, recorded on location at HealtheVoices 2018, an annual event that brings together online advocates from across various health conditions for an opportunity to learn, share and connect. In this show, you will meet four advocates who join our hosts on stage for a panel discussion on a variety of advocacy issues, including lupus, inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, and breast cancer. You’ll hear about how being diagnosed affected their lives in ways they didn’t expect, and what made them become advocates. The second half of this show will be posted next wee...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Advocacy Source Type: blogs

Here ’ s How to Handle Your Social Media-Induced FOMO
The grass always looks greener on the other side. Most of us can attest to feeling like we live in a fishbowl these days — especially if you view or post on social media often. There have been studies and data that say we are more unhappy when we spend lots of time on social media versus out in real life. Why? Because when people post their fantastic times online, it gives you glimpses into a world that you’re not a part of. Hence the term the “fear of missing out,” or #FOMO. Why You Need to Spend Time With Your Other Friends Are we going on vacation to relax, or to take awesome photos that make ou...
Source: World of Psychology - May 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Family Friends LifeHelper Publishers Relationships Self-Help Technology YourTango fear of missing out Fomo social media Source Type: blogs

When Your Child ’s Normal Emotions Are No Longer Normal
If there’s one thing that you can be sure about, it’s that if you have kids they will throw tantrums. Emotions can be overwhelming at any age, and when young kids have big emotions they are unable to manage, their inability to process these emotions is often manifested in behavior such as tantrums, meltdowns and acting out. What is easily defined as misbehavior is often the manifestation of a child’s inability to deal with his or her emotions in an appropriate way. In other words, tantrums and meltdowns often mean that your child hasn’t yet learned to deal with emotions, and there is evidence to su...
Source: World of Psychology - May 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sanya Pelini, PhD Tags: Agitation Anger Brain and Behavior Bullying Children and Teens Parenting Psychology Research Students Anger Management Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder Emotion Regulation Emotional D Source Type: blogs

What to Do If You Get Easily Embarrassed
The clients that see Brooklyn-based psychotherapist Emmy Kleine, LMHC, tend to feel embarrassed about three things: money, sex and their bodies. And they assume these issues are unique to them. They assume their behavior isn’t normal. Lena Aburdene Derhally’s clients tend to feel most embarrassed at work or in social situations — where they also tend to feel most judged by others. They feel embarrassed about making mistakes. They ruminate about whether they said the wrong thing at a get-together. Maybe you get embarrassed about the same things. Or maybe your embarrassment is triggered by tiny things (whic...
Source: World of Psychology - May 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bullying General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Embarrassment Guilt Insecurity Rumination Self-Doubt Shame shaming Social Anxiety Source Type: blogs

The Roller Coaster Ride of Grief
I was talking with someone recently about grief when she said that it felt like being on a roller coaster ride. This person is facing the impending death of a loved one even as there is no definitive timeline per the treatment team. We spoke of the dynamic of anticipatory grief and the ways in which it impacts the process of letting go of this person as she plans her future in the face of his eventual absence. I have found both in my therapeutic practice and in my personal life, that anticipatory grief genuinely effects mourners, although a 2006 article published in the Counseling, Psychology, and Health Journal quest...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Aging Family Grief and Loss Health-related Interview Peer Support Personal anticipatory grief Cancer grieving Mourning widow widower Source Type: blogs

Five Qualities Needed in Rebuilding Trust after Infidelity
Rebuilding the trust lost in a marriage after one’s spouse has been unfaithful is hard work and can be very challenging. Trust can be rebuilt and the relationship can be even stronger, if you take time and have patience. A highly trained Marriage Therapist can facilitate the work needed after such a significant breach of trust. Trust is an important part of a healthy relationship. Without trust in oneself and one’s partner, you can never be truly certain that your relationship is true and authentic. Trust allows you to be able to have the deepest level of confidence in your spouse and their feeli...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Staci Lee Schnell, MS,CS,LMFT Tags: Communication Family Grief and Loss Marriage and Divorce Relationships Extramarital Affair Infidelity Trust Issues Source Type: blogs

What ’ s a Group Home Like? This First-Person Account Will Open Your Eyes
One of the reasons that stigma around mental illness persists in society is because people oftentimes have little understanding of what it’s like to live with mental illness. Sites like The Mighty and OC87 Recovery Diaries offer thoughtful glimpses into living with depression, living with bipolar disorder, and even what living with schizophrenia is like. But part of the problem comes, too, with understanding how treatment for mental illness works. Like what happens in a group home, when we as a society seek to empty psychiatric hospitals of their longtime patients? How does a group home in a community actually work?...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy american snake pit Dan Tomasulo mental health month Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 15, 2018
Mother’s Day has come and gone. If you’re still grieving over the past holiday, it’s okay. Give yourself time to mourn the loss of your mother or the one you never had. This week we’re explaining one of the root causes of challenging Mother’s Day holidays. We’re also looking at how to perceive our flaws differently, what you can do to get yourself out of the rut of repetitive relationship arguments and how to help your kids who struggle with attachment. Why Parents of R.A.D. Children Always Look Like A**holes (Childhood Behavioral Concerns) – If your child didn’t receive app...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Music Offers Many Cognitive, Emotional and Physical Benefits to Young and Old
“Music is therapy. Music moves people. It connects people in ways that no other medium can. It pulls heart strings. It acts as medicine.” — Macklemore Much research over the years has centered on the potential, perceived and realized benefits of music. In fact, the area of study has blossomed, growing from the preliminary findings of earlier studies to recent ones that built upon them. What’s exciting is the widespread and diverse benefits that music offers to everyone, young, old and in-between. Musical training gives babies’ brains a boost. Even before babies can walk or talk, they can benef...
Source: World of Psychology - May 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Brain and Behavior Creativity Happiness Health-related Motivation and Inspiration Research Self-Esteem Stress Coping Emotional Support Music Therapy musical therapy Source Type: blogs

Can Cheating Ever Be Okay?
How you answer the question “Is cheating ever okay?” may depend upon whether you are the cheater or the one being cheated on. And perhaps by your own moral compass. Some look at cheating as a black and white issue and others as one with many shades of grey. These differing viewpoints can cause big problems in any relationship. The question as to whether cheating is ever justified is both an ethical and moral one. The general answer for most is, “no”, it is never okay. How does that explain the fact that it continues to happen then? Is it just poor impulse control? Yes, in many cases it probably is. ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kurt Smith, Psy.D., LMFT, LPCC, AFC Tags: Communication Ethics & Morality Family Inspiration & Hope Marriage and Divorce Relationships Cheating Extramarital Affair Infidelity trust Source Type: blogs

Ep 9: Celebrities Out About Mental Illness: Helpful or Not?
More and more famous people are coming out about their own mental health issues. Everything from bipolar, depression, OCD, and anxiety. The struggles of living with bipolar and schizophrenia are something our hosts know a lot about. In the wake of all this media attention, Gabe and Michelle wonder if this has had a positive or negative impact on their cause. They discuss celebrities like Mariah Carey and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. The conversation meanders around positives, negatives, and they dive deep into whether celebrities are the heroes in mental health advocacy or a distraction. Subscribe to Our Show...
Source: World of Psychology - May 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Minding the Media Stigma Source Type: blogs

OCD and the Need for Perfectionism
Is it a good thing to be a perfectionist? To answer this question, it’s important to understand the difference between adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism. Adaptive, or healthy, perfectionism is characterized by very high standards — not only for yourself but others as well. Those who display adaptive perfectionism are persistent when faced with hardship or adversity and are extremely conscientious. Goal-directed behavior and good organizational skills are usually associated with this type of perfectionism, and those who possess adaptive perfectionism view it as a positive aspect of their lives, often helpi...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: OCD Perfectionism Source Type: blogs

Defiant? Passive-Aggressive? Learn How to Tone It Down
When people envision a defier’s stance, they typically imagine a hostile person staring you down, barking out refusals, clenched fists shaking in the air. And it’s true. Some deifiers do present that type of body language. Others, however, present quite contrasting images: a pleasing face, open arms suggesting cooperation, a nodding head communicating agreement. This passive form of defiance we call passive-aggressive. And it can drive people nuts. Why? Because passive-aggressive people say “yes” but make little or no effort to follow through on their agreement. They shake on it but don’t act ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Agitation Anger Communication Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Thriving with an Invisible Chronic Illness
You have a chronic illness that is debilitating and requires meticulous management. Which is hard enough. But you also have an invisible illness—like fibromyalgia, diabetes, Lyme disease, IBS, or something very rare. On the outside, on most days, you look fine, even perfectly healthy. But on the inside, you’re struggling with unbearable migraines, knock-you-off-your-feet fatigue, dangerous digestive issues, severe pain and much more. Because people don’t see these symptoms, they misunderstand what’s going on, which leads you to feel judged and lonely. And these people might include everyone from med...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Health-related Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Chronic Illness Chronic Pain Coping Skills Resilience Source Type: blogs

How Being Open about Bipolar Disorder Affects Friendships
Bipolar disorder can have many co-occurring diagnoses. Today I am going to discuss just two of my co-occurring diagnoses and give you an example of each of them and how they would have affected my friendships, if I wasn’t open about having bipolar disorder with my friends. I think you will agree with me that the fact that I am open about having bipolar disorder with my close friends is something that has benefited me on my path to recovery for mental health. I have bipolar delusions. Bipolar delusions are a tricky thing. They change your perception and the way you see the world, and others around you. They make you ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tosha Maaks Tags: Bipolar Friends Personal Relationships Stigma bipolar delusions Bipolar Disorder Communication Depressive Episode Friendship losing friends Making Friends Manic Episode Paranoia Perception Separation Anxiety uncommon sympto Source Type: blogs

Being a Motherless Daughter and a Mother on Mother ’s Day
It is thirty three years since my mother died. She died before I had any children of my own. I was blessed with a beautiful and very much loved stepmother who lived overseas, so I didn’t get to see her very often. She died two years ago. The thought of Mother’s Day can quite easily trigger old memories, flashbacks, and put added stress and strain onto already high expectations of how “Mother’s Day should be.” Mother’s Day for me, has always brought about mixed emotions. I have three beautiful young adult children whom I am endlessly proud of, and still I feel a twinge of emotional pain ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Clare Sillence Tags: Children and Teens Grief and Loss Holiday Coping Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Parenting Women's Issues Bereavement Female Role Models grieving Motherhood Mother\'S Day Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: May 12, 2018
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net is packed with the latest on WOOP’ing (yep, you read that correctly), the psychology of apologizing and how Starbucks’ CEO Kevin Johnson nailed it, why believing people tend to get happier as they get older isn’t just wishful thinking, and more. A Study of 7,000 Workers Showed the Standout Trait of Productive People Can Easily Be Learned: Do you know how to “WOOP”? This “more nuanced version of positive thinking” could help boost your productivity. The Psychology of Apology: How Did Starbucks’ CEO Kev...
Source: World of Psychology - May 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Aging Books Borderline Personality Children and Teens Disorders Habits Happiness Psychology Around the Net Research Apology Bad Habits boderline personality disorder symptoms Borderline Personality Disorder Kevin Johnson Medica Source Type: blogs

3 Ways to Outsmart Self-Doubt
Tell me if you can relate to any of the following: You feel like you’re not qualified for your job or cut out for the work you do. You’re uncomfortable when praised for your success, because you feel like you haven’t earned it. You fear you’ll be “found out” and exposed for the fraud you are. If these sound like thoughts that run through your head, you may be experiencing something called Impostor Syndrome. And you wouldn’t be alone: over 70% of people report experiencing Impostor Syndrome at some point in their career. Impostor Syndrome refers ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melody Wilding, LMSW Tags: College Communication Creativity General Happiness Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Money and Financial Perfectionism Professional Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Student Therapist Students Succe Source Type: blogs

Shushing Your Pessimistic Inner Voice
Some folks are obviously pessimistic. Others seem to be anything but — until you get a sneak peek at their inner voice. If you are one of those closet pessimists, don’t you wish you could wipe out every negative thought you have? Rid your brain of its tidal wave of worries? Sorry, probably won’t happen; I’m not a magician. But, I do have some tricks up my sleeve that will help you become a more upbeat person. So, here goes. Five great ideas to shush your pessimistic inner voice: Instead of asking “what if” questions (i.e. “What if I fail the test?”), then jumping to the wor...
Source: World of Psychology - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Anxiety and Panic Habits Happiness Motivation and Inspiration Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 11, 2018
I was at the hospital and heard a boy scream. He was getting his hand stitched. Over and over again, the nurses and his mom said, “You have to do this.” There’s one thing I learned from kids that can make anything harder. Feeling forced. Believing we don’t have a choice can make us feel helpless, terrified and victimized. Although they were only trying to help, the mindset of, “You can do this,” instead of, “You have to,” can go along way empowering someone especially in a situation where they feel helpless and out of control. If you’re feeling forced about your situati...
Source: World of Psychology - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

A Filmmaker Finds Her Freedom: A Tale of Resilience
Flora Zanfrisco is a multi-tattooed, outspoken social activist who wears her heart and art on her sleeve both in front of and behind the camera. She is one of those people whose energy precedes her when she enters a room. She is a talented storyteller whose tales unfold when she turns on her camera. Our paths crossed several years ago via a mutual friend, and I was astonished by the resilience exhibited by this filmmaker and mother of twin 16-year-old daughters. Her company is called Freedom Films. She chose the name for her business after leaving a full-time job and she felt such a sense of emancipation from the stress i...
Source: World of Psychology - May 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Creativity Happiness Inspiration & Hope Interview Parenting Stress Trauma Women's Issues career chance Creative Expression Resilience risk-taking Source Type: blogs

A Mother ’ s Day Guide to Cultivating a Better Mother-Child Relationship
An Emotion- and Trauma-Informed Perspective I am a psychotherapist specializing in emotions, trauma and relationships. Over the years I have been in practice, I have really come to appreciate the complexity of feelings around family, especially mothers. I know that personally, before I learned to work with my emotions, I had a very limited capacity to deal with conflicts other than to blame my parents for the ways they failed me or blame myself for not being a better daughter. Now, I view blame as a way to avoid the underlying core emotions like sadness and anger, which naturally arise from being hurt by one’s mother...
Source: World of Psychology - May 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hilary Jacobs Hendel, LCSW Tags: Agitation Anger Children and Teens Communication Holiday Coping Parenting Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Students Trauma Women's Issues abuse Aging Parents Coping on Mother's Day Guilt Trip mother child relationship Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Understanding and Preventing “Not In My Back Yard” Opposition
In this second installment of a two-part feature on NIMBYism, guest Steve Fields of The Progress Foundation shares his views and experiences in dealing with community opposition to facilities like The PEER Center, featured in the previous episode. In addition to offering his views on the Center’s situation, he also shares his method for preventing community opposition before the opening of a facility. He also offers his opinions on why people are so afraid of such facilities, how to minimize or eliminate that fear, and reflects on the emotional impact of such opposition, which often can’t help being interpreted...
Source: World of Psychology - May 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: General Stigma The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard NIMBY Opposition Psych Central Show Podcast Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Living with Panic Disorder: A Therapist ’s Perspective
Picture this, you are driving on the highway and your hands begin to sweat, your heart begins to race. Your feet become numb and you can’t feel the brakes. You feel like you are losing control and do not feel yourself. You think you are having a heart attack. Although you may be experiencing many of the physical symptoms of a heart attack, in actuality, what you are experiencing is a panic attack. Panic attacks are intense and plain dreadful; and they can strike when you least expect it. Their exact cause is unknown, but we do know that they are typically hereditary. So, if say your mother, father, aunt, uncle or gr...
Source: World of Psychology - May 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie Galiñanes, MSW, LCSW Tags: Anxiety and Panic Personal Stress Treatment Panic Attacks Panic Disorder Worry Source Type: blogs

7 Tips to Maintain a Work-Life Balance During a Relationship
With your busy lifestyle, putting the relationship with your partner first could be challenging. Today, many people feel like they are always “on,” and thus aren’t able to devote enough attention to their personal and romantic relationships. In fact, it is common for people to suffer from workplace stress and then carry that stress home with them into their relationships. Research suggests that checking your workplace stress at the door is one of the best ways to more fully engage with your partner at home. However, you may need a few more tips to help restore the balance between your work life and the r...
Source: World of Psychology - May 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Manpreet Lehal, LPCS Tags: Agitation Anger Communication Industrial and Workplace Marriage and Divorce Money and Financial Relationships Self-Help Stress Boundaries Intimacy money woes overwhelm Present Moment Self Care Workaholic Workplace Stress Source Type: blogs

Why Sadness Can Be Good for Your Children
Our daughter adores cats, and not in the cute way children often love small animals, but in an all-consuming, almost obsessive way. At home, we have a lot of animals, including two aging cats, a kelpie puppy, and an assortment of farm animals, but it’s the cats that are our daughter’s favorite. Her bedroom is decorated like a shrine for all things ‘cat’, with cat-themed wallpaper, curtains, bedding, and an ever-growing ornament collection. Even when we travelled overseas in 2016, our daughter managed to find every cat within a one mile radius, or so it seemed anyway. When people ask what the best ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie Yates Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Personal Child Development Coping Skills Emotional Regulation Emotional Resilience Sadness Source Type: blogs

The Collaborative Nature of Psychotherapy
“I don’t believe in psychotherapy.”  “Therapy is for crazy people; you’re not crazy.” “Therapy is for narcissists who just like to hear themselves talk.” “Therapy is for weak wimps who can’t solve their own problems.” “Therapy is for whiners who complain about everything.” “Therapy is like talking to a friend; why pay someone when you can talk to me?” These beliefs are what stops many people from seeking out psychotherapy. Too bad. For when therapy is humming, the possibilities for growth are endless. Instead of honing in only...
Source: World of Psychology - May 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Psychology Psychotherapy Stigma Treatment Character Strengths Coping Skills Personal Growth Therapeutic Alliance Therapeutic Approach Source Type: blogs

When You ’re Overwhelmed with Being an Adult
Working, paying bills, making meals, managing a household, running errands, making important decisions….adulthood isn’t for the faint of heart. Responsibilities regularly pile up. And it becomes a lot to juggle and handle on a regular basis. And there isn’t exactly a class we take that prepares us for the nitty gritty of the day to day. In fact, many of us go off to college with little to no training about how to handle the basics—like bills, budgeting and taxes. Psychotherapist Alyson Cohen, LCSW, works with many young adults who have a hard time “adulting.” In particular, her clients ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Adulthood anxiety overwhelm Responsibility Worry Young Adulthood Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 8, 2018
It’s difficult to untangle the web of negativity and fear. With the internet, it’s easy to stay up all night getting infested in all that doubt, anxiety and constant questioning. A symptom could easily become a self-diagnosis. A worry could easily slide into anxiety. A small thing can be like a black hole sucking you into the void. Or you could simply decide to turn it off and notice what’s working instead of what’s not right. You could move your attention to the trees, and the flowers. You could remember there are people who love you, things to look forward to, and eventually this will pass. Need s...
Source: World of Psychology - May 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

‘ I ’ ll Never Be that Kind of Person ’ : What You Resist Calls to You
Resistance is a very important part of what makes us who we are. As I have gotten older I have noticed more and more how the cycle of resistance yields personal growth and change. When we look out at the world and see something that, in a sense, hurts us we often have a natural tendency to resist that, to fight against it. When I speak of “hurt us” here we have to take a very liberal approach to that word. We all need different lessons in order to be more in balance with our spiritual selves so we have to broaden our idea of “hurt” to try and include everyone. I had a resistance, for many years, to...
Source: World of Psychology - May 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: MartinJon Tags: General Habits Mindfulness Personal Personality Self-Esteem Fear Hatred identity Inner Peace Judgment nonjudgment Personal Growth Ram Dass Resistance self-worth Spirituality Source Type: blogs

The Stress Reaction Cycle
It may seem like stress is an external force — something that happens to you, such as a rude driver, a work deadline, or the illness of a loved one. As a result, it may seem like there’s really nothing you can do about your stress, but this simply isn’t the case. You may not be able to shape the world so that nothing stressful ever happens to you again, but you can change the way you respond to stress, and that can make all the difference in how you feel.   The most fundamental thing to understand about stress is that it isn’t a one-time event with one cause and one reaction. It’s actuall...
Source: World of Psychology - May 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melissa Samartano, PhD.,LMHC, RYT Tags: Habits Happiness LifeHelper Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress Coping Skills Cortisol fight or flight homeostatis neuroception Reactivity Self Medication Stress Hormone stress reduction Stress Response Sympathetic Source Type: blogs

Ep 8: Common Questions Asked of a Bipolar and a Schizophrenic
  We answer listener questions in this episode of A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast. Gabe and Michelle both have stories of their experiences with mania, and also discuss which they feel is worse, mania or depression. When does Michelle tell the people she dates that she has schizophrenia? A listener wants to know why Michelle doesn’t act like the stereotypical schizophrenic. Michelle has the most fantastic response, according to Gabe. Hear them share what it’s like in recovery living with bipolar and schizophrenia. Finally, the age old question is asked: How can I get my loved one to be doing as ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Disorders Peer Support Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

OCD and Death Obsessions
As some of us know, obsessive-compulsive disorder can take on many shapes and forms, limited only by the imagination of the person with OCD. In general, OCD likes to attack whatever it is we most value: our families, relationships, morals, accomplishments, etc. In short — our lives. So it shouldn’t come as a big surprise that some people with OCD are obsessed with death. What better way for OCD to attack what is most important to us than telling us our lives are all for naught as we’re just going to die anyway? It is not unusual for people to think about death. Personally, the thought comes into my mind o...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: OCD Personal Compulsions Death Thoughts Fear Hypochondriasis Obsessions Phobia Worry Source Type: blogs

Want to Be Happier? Try Changing the Conversations You Have
Like many of you no doubt, I’ve spent a long time thinking I was simply no good at networking. In fact, I’ve spent a long time thinking I was no good at socializing full stop. Then I realized, the main reason I was finding it so painful was because I was being asked the wrong questions, and in turn I was asking the wrong questions. So, what do you do? The typical question when meeting new people, friends of friends, or work acquaintances is that standard fare — so, what do you do? It’s a minefield question in itself. Do you answer by the job you’re paid to do or the unpaid, freelance work...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elaine Mead Tags: Agitation Communication Family Friends Happiness Industrial and Workplace LifeHelper Motivation and Inspiration Relationships Meaningful Conversation Negativity Optimism Personal Growth Pessimism small talk Source Type: blogs

How to Inspire Your Writing (and Your Life) Every Day
There are various clever quotes about why inspiration is unnecessary for writing. After all, writing is work. After all, plumbers don’t need to be inspired to do their jobs; they just do their jobs. The same goes for electricians, attorneys, and doctors. And if we wait to write until we’re hit by some magical wand of inspiration, we might never start in the first place. This is true. Being able to work whether you feel inspired or not is important. It’s a great skill. And yet inspiration is critical, too. In a piece entitled “Why Inspiration Matters,” Scott Barry Kaufman writes, “Inspira...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity General Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Success & Achievement aesthetics Motivation writing Source Type: blogs

Influencing Your Inner Critic
Here’s the thing: we all talk to an inner voice — sometimes longer than we talk to other people. This inner voice learns its language from one’s past, especially from the traumatic, hurtful, and distressing parts. As a result, this inner voice usually becomes a person’s own villain, discourager, or critic. Some may argue that a positive outlook is enough to disarm the inner critic. If you’re a believer of this, I highly advise that you stop reading and just revel in your protons. But if you’re someone like me who has tried and still tries positivity yet continues to battle with this ten...
Source: World of Psychology - May 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rose Jane dela Cruz Tags: Habits Happiness LifeHelper Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Perfectionism Self-Help Criticism deduction Disappointment Discouragement Expectations Failure Inner Critic overwhelm Present Moment Resilience Self-Estee Source Type: blogs