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Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: The Road to Recovery
Persistent neglect in childhood can lead you to believe that you don’t deserve to be loved or cared for. This idea begins to define you: you are a person who ought to be treated badly. When we think of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a specific list comes to mind: soldiers returning from combat zones and police officers connected to terrible incidents in the line of duty; victims of sexual trauma and women who were beaten by their partners; the families who stood on the roofs of their houses in the aftermath of Katrina and those who managed to walk away from the horrific South Asian tsunami in 2004...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Disorders Personal PTSD Publishers The Fix abuse acute C-PTSD chronic Fear Pain Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

Challenging the Stigma of Counselors with Mental Illness
My small Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum class gets out twelve minutes early. I strain to catch the eye of my classmate and friend on the other side of the room, a tall Indian woman with her hair in a sagging bob and sympathetic eyes locked on another classmate. I turn impatiently towards our classmate, who favors red lipstick and dramatic retellings of her life events. Sighing, I give up and turn around, shifting my backpack’s weight on my back and folding a paper plate in my hands, evidence of enjoying a slice of the twelve pizzas someone had dumped in our counseling center that afternoon. I step into ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Anna Lente Tags: Anxiety and Panic Bipolar Dissociative Mental Health and Wellness Peer Support Personal Professional Stigma Success & Achievement Treatment Counseling Generalized Anxiety Disorder Hospitalization Mania Mental Illness Panic At Source Type: blogs

ADHD is Real (Like All Mental Disorders Are)
I recently came across the unintentionally funny op-ed piece by John Rosemond, a family psychologist known for his controversial views on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other childhood behavioral issues. In the piece, he laments how he was dis-invited from a recent speaking invitation because of his views. In short, he says, “Those facts include that ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and bipolar disorder of childhood are not realities; rather, they are constructs.” Of course they are constructs. But so is nearly everything we’ve created to navigate human existence. Rosemond ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: ADHD and ADD Brain and Behavior Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Psychology adhd is real are mental disorders real is adhd real mental diagnoses mental illness is a myth Myth Of Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Failure Mentality: Why Small Steps Are the Key to Lifestyle Change
The desire to improve ourselves and become happier in our lives is something the majority of us experience. We’re always promising ourselves that tomorrow is the day that we’re going to start eating better, exercising more, getting organized and working harder. It’s a perpetual to-do list which states that as soon as we get our act together and transform our habits, our lives will be changed. Unfortunately, it’s also this very attitude that ensures we never actually do it. We make New Year’s Resolutions each year, and more often than not they are the same commitments, made again and again. The...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Will Williams Tags: Habits Happiness Holiday Coping Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Self-Help Confidence Failure goal-setting Habit Change Habit Formation Lifestyle Changes Meditation new years resolutions Optimism Relaxation self-compassion Source Type: blogs

6 Gifts of Borderline Personality Disorder
I was twenty-four-years-old on my way to a residential treatment center in Chicago for an eating disorder when I got what I thought was devastating news that I had borderline personality disorder (BPD). When BPD hit my brain I lashed out inside. “Not another diagnosis,” I screamed while lines of thoughts trailed rapidly through my head. These thoughts came in all shapes and sizes. Some thoughts of abandonment flew by, other thoughts of suicidal ideation zoomed by. My mood was up and down like I was on a roller coaster, and not the kiddy one. I was a lost soul living in a world of self-destructive torment w...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brianna Ricotta Tags: Borderline Personality Eating Disorders Stigma Suicide bpd Character Strengths personality treats self-compassion Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

The Critical Role Nutrition Plays in Mental Health
One of the most unrecognized factors in the development of mental health is the role of nutrition. The link between diet and mental health is growing as the field of Nutritional Psychiatry/Psychology expands. This field is becoming more impactful as epidemics continue to make headlines surrounding the health of our country and world. We know nutrition has substantial physical impacts, but it is the mental impacts of nutrition that are gaining traction with additional research and heightening awareness around this topic. Proper nutrition is what fuels our bodies and our bodies need a regular supply of fuel. Oxygen is part o...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Darren DeYoung Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Habits Health-related Diet dietary concerns Eating Habits eating healthy Mental Health Mood nutritional psychiatry sugar Source Type: blogs

7 Ways to Find Happiness After Depression
Feeling sad can actually be a good sign. Depression is a clinical term used to label a group of behaviors and internal experiences associated with a depressed mood. It is also a clinical diagnosis. Depression is different than being sad. Sadness is a normal part of life and, as long as you are not feeling it all the time, it is actually a healthy thing for you to feel. It is important to realize that learning how to be happy again after depression looks slightly different for everyone. Sometimes, we battle our way through a bad bout of depression and come out on the other side, only to find ourselves still feeling sad. Wh...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Depression Disorders Happiness Publishers YourTango Sadness Source Type: blogs

It ’s Not the Wedding — It ’s the Marriage!
Mia found wedding planning stressful. Her mother’s was obsessing over the invitations, flowers, color scheme, favors, hors d’oeuvres, guest list, and other details — so much that it seemed like she was the one getting married. Exasperated as her mother droned on about ice sculptures and chocolate fountains, Mia wished she had decided to elope. She finally blurted out: “It’s not the wedding, Mom! It’s the marriage.” Many couples have their priorities mixed up. They stage elaborate, over-the top-weddings, thinking they’re fostering a successful marriage. Yet research reveals ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marcia Naomi Berger, MSW, LCSW Tags: Family Happiness LifeHelper Marriage and Divorce Personal Relationships Self-Help Spirituality Commitment Intimacy Vows wedding Source Type: blogs

The Importance of Extending School Lunch Periods
In conclusion, schools are doing a disservice to their students by forcing them to gulp down their food.  I say give kids a chance to unwind, eat, socialize, learn the value of “waste not, want not” and prepare for the next half of the day.  Everyone, including the teachers, will prosper from this important change.   References https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/24/439487395/kids-who-are-time-crunched-at-school-lunch-toss-more-and-eat-less https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/12/04/248511038/these-days-school-lunch-hours-are-more-like-15-minutes (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Children and Teens Habits Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Policy and Advocacy Stress Students Success & Achievement childhood nutrition down time emotional processing extracurricular activities food waste Good Habits Makin Source Type: blogs

Embracing and Savoring an Imperfect Holiday Season
“This year will be different,” author and mom of four Alexandra Kuykendall inevitably tells herself every year as she pulls out her Christmas decorations. This year she won’t be tired or stressed. This year she won’t be ready for the holidays to be over. And this year it is different, because she’s vowed to focus on loving her actual Christmas, to be present in her life as it really is. Which she documents in her new book aptly titled, Loving My Actual Christmas: An Experiment in Relishing the Season. As she writes in the book, “When I consider what I want to remember, or what I want my...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Family Friends General Happiness Holiday Coping Self-Help Stress Christmas Family Gatherings Hannukah Holiday Season Holiday Shopping Holiday Stress Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 9, 2017
Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at what “self-care” actually means for many people with mental illnesses, the different types of depression and anxiety a new study has identified, which people are more prone to sleep paralysis, and more. Let’s go! This Twitter Thread Perfectly Sums Up What Self-Care Is Like for People With Mental Illnesses: Author and blogger Jenny Trout drops some eye-opening truth bombs about what “self-care” means for many people with mental illness. (HINT: It’s ain’t Instagram-worthy bubble baths...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Anxiety and Panic Depression Disorders Mindfulness Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology Around the Net Research Sleep Stress Technology American Psychiatric Association anhedonia anxious arousal general axie Source Type: blogs

Subtle Tools of Unconscious Power
Conclusion The insights gleaned from neuroscience and embodied cognition teach us that direct impressions have “tangible” effects on higher brain functioning. (So does the use of objects in a particular way, such as writing.) The more we learn about sensual effects on the mood and mind, the more we discover that the human head cannot be severed from the rest of the body. Whether it’s clutching a comforting keepsake, or destroying a page of harmful words, the emotions react in kind. Conscious thoughts create a small outer fragment of the brain’s inner iceberg, a structure so vast and deep that it&r...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John DiPrete Tags: Brain and Behavior Creativity Ethics & Morality Habits Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Calmness Embodied Cognition Emotional Balance Guilt Mood Stabilizer Neuroscience Relaxation Sensation Shame Tactile Experien Source Type: blogs

Coping with Bipolar Disorder & Depression Around the Holidays
The holidays bring a special challenge to people who live with bipolar disorder or depression. The challenge is a combination of the increased stress that the holiday season often brings along with the symptoms — such as mania or depression — of these disorders. As a result, people who live with bipolar disorder or those who live with depression might dread the upcoming holidays. Whether you’re stressing about money, family issues, remembering a loss or loved one who’s gone, or just feeling lonely, there’s a few things you can do to help better cope around the holidays. A person who lives wit...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Bipolar Depression General Holiday Coping Self-Help Bipolar Depression Coping Skills coping with bipolar disorder Coping With Depression help with the holidays Holiday Season Holiday Stress Mania Manic Episode Mood Disorder s Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 8, 2017
Everything is harder when you have an illness. It feels like you’re always trying to catch up. You can barely get by during the rest of the year, which makes the holiday season especially hard. If that wasn’t difficult enough, your illness, mental or physical, may be invisible so it doesn’t warrant the concern, attention or understanding of others. Loved ones might expect you to attain a certain level of normalcy or be the you before your illness. Acquaintances or strangers may personalize and mis-take your shortness for a bad attitude. All of this can weigh heavy on your heart. One thing you can do to li...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Drama Addiction: Are You Stuck in a Toxic Cycle?
Everything always going wrong? Ask yourself these questions. Do you think that your life should be a reality TV show since it’s just a series of dramas every year? Are your friends and family in a position of constantly getting you out of some sort of actual or emotional crisis? If you said yes, life must be tiring for you and people around you. Actually, it seems mostly tiring for others because you must be gaining some thrill out of all the drama, or you would re-evaluate your decision-making process to stabilize your life. For example, Denise is 30 years old. She has gone through one relationship per year for the...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Agitation Anger Anxiety and Panic Personality Publishers Relationships Self-Help Stress YourTango Assumptions behavior Beliefs Chaos complaints Conflicts Drama Emotions Family Friends thoughts Source Type: blogs

Dealing with Disappointment
You didn’t do everything on your to-do list. You let a loved one down. You yelled at your spouse, or your six-year-old. Or both. You still haven’t gotten over your ex. You thought someone else would make you happy but they didn’t. You received a bad performance review. Your Thanksgiving dinner didn’t turn out the way you planned. Nothing has turned out the way you planned. And you’re disappointed in yourself. You’re disappointed in your circumstances. Deeply disappointed. What were you thinking? How could you do such a thing? Why are you still being so ridiculous? Why does this always ha...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Coping Skills Disappointment let down Resilience self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Your Autistic Teen and Family Holiday Gatherings
This article is intended only as a friendly reminder of what to consider as you decide whether and how to participate in family get-togethers during this holiday season. You know your child: Choose and adapt these ideas according to your child’s very individual personality, development, and needs. You know yourself: Making a thoughtful decision can reduce any anxieties you may have about attending family events with your child. First, review if this is a good year to visit the relatives. Yes, we live in a culture that celebrates family togetherness at Christmas. But the needs and development of the child are more imp...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Autism Children and Teens Family Holiday Coping Parenting Adolescence Autism Spectrum autistic teens exit plan holiday gathering Holiday Season Holiday Stress Holidays overwhelm self-management Sensory Overload Unrealistic Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Bipolar Advocate Jessie – More Than Just Glenn Close ’ s Sister
    In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales welcome Jessie Close, sister of acclaimed actress Glenn Close. Jessie shares the story of her son’s diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder, followed by her own diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Spurred by a desire to make people more aware of the stigma surrounding mental illness, Jessie reached out to Glenn for help. The result of this was the founding of Bring Change to Mind, a nonprofit organization dedicated to encouraging dialogue about mental health, and to raising awareness, understanding, and empathy. Jessie tell...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Bipolar Celebrities General The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Spouses Who Volunteer Create Awesome Marriages
You cannot love someone maturely and try to control him (or her). The behaviors of both partners should be voluntary. As you discuss the kind of life you want to have together, focus on what really fits for you. Ideally, before marriage, you will discuss how you would like to handle money, chores and responsibilities, parenting (or step-parenting) concerns, if applicable, where you want to live, and so on. Do Not Agree to an Unreasonable Demand   Some people, eager to tie the knot, will agree to a demand, request, or assumption that doesn’t fit for them. A man says that the deal is off unless you agree to move ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marcia Naomi Berger, MSW, LCSW Tags: Ethics & Morality Family Marriage and Divorce Men's Issues Relationships Self-Help Women's Issues Communication Compromise Cooperation Generosity Give and take Intimacy Marital Bliss Resentment Sacrifice Teamwork values Source Type: blogs

Is Your Internet Use Killing Your Productivity and Making You Depressed?
We’ve expanded our minds. It’s no longer contained inside our heads — it now includes our devices, social media, and essentially anything digital. While the connectedness available to us today has opened a number of doors, it’s not always a good thing. We no longer have time to think and create our own ideas. In fact, too much digital connectedness can be a bad thing — for our mental health as well as our creative ventures. Constant surfing and intake of bite-sized information crowds out time for contemplation. Because of neuroplasticity (which is the ability for our brains to change), the mor...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Depression Habits Happiness Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Minding the Media Psychotherapy Technology attention Cognition Facebook Loneliness Memory Loss Reflection Sadness social media Twitt Source Type: blogs

Free Live Webinar: Leading People to Accept the Facts
Seemingly reasonable people deny reality all the time. Indeed, a four-year study by LeadershipIQ.com found that 23 percent of CEOs who got fired did so because they denied reality, meaning refusing to recognize negative facts about the organization’s performance. Other findings show that professionals at all levels suffer from the tendency to deny uncomfortable facts in professional settings. People deny reality in relationships, politics, and other areas all the time, something that scholars term the “ostrich effect.” Dealing with truth denialism — in business, politic...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Professional Success & Achievement Career Goals Compartmentalization Coping Skills Delusion denialism facing facts Positive Reinforcement Self Sabo Source Type: blogs

Why Empaths and Sensitives Must Take Special Care of Their Energies
A finely tuned perception is one of the main characteristics of empaths and sensitives. They pick up on very subtle non-verbal clues, feeling the energy and emotions of others, even if they are not obviously displayed. Body language, facial expressions or simply the energy of a person are enough to perceive what is really going on. Sensitives notice when someone is inauthentic and are not easily fooled by outward appearances. Empaths and sensitives don’t necessarily have to work things out in their mind. Often they just know. They may not be able to pinpoint how they know, but their inner radar receives information ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Christiana Star Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Anxiety and Panic Friends Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Relationships Self-Help Stress Aura Boundaries chakra Empath Empathy energy Highly Sensitive Perso Source Type: blogs

4 Ways to Fight Back When Family Questions Your Career Choices
With the holidays around the corner, dinner table conversations about work are bound to come up. It’s common to feel anxiety at the thought of explaining what you do for a living to a skeptical audience, especially when your job title can’t be summed up simply or straightforwardly. Don’t panic yet. It may seem difficult to get Aunt Sue to understand what the heck a Digital Strategist is or to convince Dad that you’re able to support yourself just fine thank you, but it’s not impossible. Use these strategies to navigate tricky, sometimes triggering career conversations this holiday season....
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melody Wilding, LMSW Tags: Anger Bullying College Family General Happiness Holiday Coping Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Money and Financial Professional Relationships Self-Help Career Choices Criticism Defensiveness Family Gathe Source Type: blogs

Caring for Yourself When Caring for Elders During the Holidays
If you are caring for an elderly family member, you are not alone. A 2015 report by National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP (2015) shows more than 34 million people are providing significant care to an adult over age 50. Most of this unpaid care is provided by women. Further, most of these women are doing double and even triple duty, caring for their own families and children and working while also providing care for a parent or parent-in-law. Balancing all those responsibilities is a huge challenge. Studies show that the average caregiver spends 20 or more hours a week doing everything from basic hygiene care to ad...
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Aging Family Holiday Coping elder care elderly parents Exhaustion Holiday Season Holidays Self Care stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 5, 2017
I’ve been listening to Karla McLaren’s The Language of Emotions. One of the jewels from the program is discovering how each of our emotions have a purpose. Even boredom teaches us how we may be burying our emotions and using distraction to deal with it. Anger and rage also have its place. It reveals in intensity how good of a job we’re doing at setting and maintaining our boundaries. Those of us who are perpetually angry, she says, are the humanitarians of the world. They feel all of it and need an outlet to divert their anger to action. The next time you’re experiencing an emotion, instead of tryin...
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

How to Stay in Control When Recovering from Eating Disorders
If you have struggled with an eating disorder like anorexia, you most-likely know how to plan. By extracting a very basic human need, the brain must use a maximum amount of energy to deny instinct. Calorie counting, eating only at certain times of the day, obsessing over exercise routines, and meticulously shopping for the “right” kinds of food, are all examples of how an eating disorder can shape time. Most people who struggle with eating disorders are ambivalent about recovery.  They may want to have a life that doesn’t follow such rigidity, but worry about losing control.  There are many reas...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Impulse Control Self Control Source Type: blogs

Managing Your Grief This Holiday Season
According to our favorite holiday movies and books we should be serene, happy and peaceful throughout the holidays. This is rarely the case, however, for those who may be grieving the loss of a loved one. Holidays are hard when you are consumed with grief, no matter how long ago you experienced your loss. We all experience grief differently and there is no right way to do it. The same is true for coping with a loss. How one person manages may not be the same as the next. The key to grief is patience and compassion. Grief can make often make us feel lost and confused. Here are some suggestions on how to manage your grief ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Grief and Loss Holiday Coping Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Bereavement grieving Holiday Season Holiday Traditions Holidays Source Type: blogs

How Revisiting Your To-Do List Can Be a Good Thing
“We have to start putting ourselves on the to-do list.” – Giuliana Rancic I don’t know about most people, but I’m an inveterate list-maker. I have to-do lists for pending bills, lists for appointments for myself and separate ones for other family members, lists of groceries to buy at different stores, lists of deals to take advantage of, lists of family and friends’ birthdays, anniversaries and other important life events, lists of TV shows to record on the DVR, lists of new TV shows or movies to check out, lists of websites (so I don’t forget them or can’t retrieve them in c...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Brain and Behavior Habits Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Christmas with Nana: The Joys of Giving and Giving Back
We called our grandmother on my mother’s side “Nana.” Nana was a widow for most of my life. Back in 1965, my grandfather died when I was about two-years-old. Nana supported herself after that, and although she worked a full-time job, she was poor. She lived in a one-bedroom apartment overlooking Lake Erie. She enjoyed the simple pleasures: watching the boats float on the water, entertaining her family on the weekends, swimming alone at midnight in the apartment’s tiny swimming pool. How did we know Nana was poor? She didn’t have enough money to do her laundry at the laundromat, so she did it i...
Source: World of Psychology - December 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Family Holiday Coping Personal Charity Christmas Family Bond family memories giving back Grandmother Holidays Source Type: blogs

6 Expert Tactics for Talking with Kids in Multiple Situations
Parents talk to their kids a lot. In a single day, they can issue a multitude of instructions, orders and requests as they converse with their children. Rarely do they stop to wonder if their kids understand what they are saying. What most parents fail to realize is that their kids are constantly looking to them for cues on how to act and behave. The way you speak to your children shows how you want them to speak back to you and it greatly determines whether they’ll listen and respond to what you say. Additionally, research shows that conversations among adults and children not only enhance the latter’s vocabul...
Source: World of Psychology - December 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Children and Teens LifeHelper Parenting Research Self-Help attention Communication Discipline Positive Reinforcement setting an example Source Type: blogs

20 Sweet Ways to Make Someone ’s Day
Even the smallest compassionate gestures can have significant impact. A kind act can do everything from make someone smile to turn their day around to instill a sincere sense of hope—an emotion they might’ve not felt in a very long time. Plus, kindness often has a domino effect: When people see you performing compassionate acts, they feel inspired to be kind, too. And in today’s fast-paced, go, go, go society, this is powerful. It is precious, and it is needed. Below you’ll find a range of sweet, compassionate deeds for supporting someone and making their day from the thoughtful, suggestion-packed b...
Source: World of Psychology - December 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity General Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Source Type: blogs

OCD and Virtual Reality
Exposure and response prevention (ERP) therapy is the evidence-based psychological treatment of choice for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Basically, the person with OCD is exposed to his or her obsessions, encouraged to feel the anxiety, and asked to refrain from engaging in rituals (compulsions) to reduce the fear. I hear from many people with OCD who say that while they understand what ERP therapy is, and even how it could be helpful to many people, they don’t think it would work for their type of OCD, and therefore they don’t pursue treatment. This is indeed unfortunate as ERP can truly benefit all those who...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: OCD Psychology Research Treatment Compulsions ERP Exposure and Response Prevention Obsessions Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Therapy virtual reality Source Type: blogs

Why Too Much Self-Control Can Be a Bad Thing
Self-control refers to our ability to restrain acting on momentary urges, impulses, and wants in favor of longer term goals. Who doesn’t want more of that?  Most of us think that it’s important to have a lot of willpower, to be able to resist temptation. We all hope that we’ll be able to avoid giving into that impulse to eat more ice cream, keep ourselves from expressing anger at a loved one, or make ourselves finish an important project even though we don’t feel like it. And generally, self-control is a good thing. Society needs people with high levels of self-control, those who can inhibit th...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jason Luoma, Ph.D. Tags: Anorexia Anxiety and Panic Depression Eating Disorders Habits Happiness Personality Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships Stress Treatment Dbt Impulsive Behavior Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy Reactivity Self Source Type: blogs

Talking to Your Children about the Threat of Nuclear War
In conclusion, if your child is afraid of an international threat this holiday season, offer them age-appropriate conversation so that they can air their fears. If they’re old enough, enlist them in writing their members of congress and helping you put together an emergency nuclear supply kit full of, among other things, water and food. What should you do now? Write and send letters to your members of congress about restricting president’s power during wartime. Then, read what the government published about surviving a nuclear attack — https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-blast. And try to have a happy holiday. ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Children and Teens Ethics & Morality Family Holiday Coping Minding the Media Parenting Personal Childhood Anxiety Fear North Korea nuclear threat nuclear war Trauma World War Worry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 2, 2017
Happy Saturday, Psych Central Readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers the successes (more specifically, lack thereof) of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, how mental illness might be passed down from generation, the #speakthesecret campaign for postpartum women, and more. Enjoy! Health Insurers Are Still Skimping On Mental Health Coverage: Although it’s been almost a decade since the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act passed (an act that’s supposed to make it just as easy to get treatment for substance abuse and mental health problems), patients are still struggl...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Depression Disorders Family Health-related Parenting Policy and Advocacy Psychology Around the Net Research Technology Treatment childhood adversity Dan Harmon Diet dna epigenetic change Source Type: blogs

What Is a Mood Journal and Why Should You Keep One? (Includes Video)
  General Transcript For “Mood Journal” Video My name is Gabe Howard. I’m the host of The Psych Central Show Podcast, and I am also a person that lives with bipolar disorder. Managing bipolar disorder takes a lot of time, and people often ask me, “Gabe, what are some hints and tips to help manage my bipolar disorder? Or my depression? Or my mental illness?” Well, I keep a diary. Let me tell you a little story because I think it is funny. When I was 25 years-old, and was first diagnosed with bipolar disorder, I went to therapy a lot. I was learning different things, skills, and a woman wh...
Source: World of Psychology - December 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Creativity Disorders General Peer Support Personal Self-Help Video Journaling Mood Journal Mood Swings mood tracking writing exercise Source Type: blogs

Navigating the Holiday Hustle and Bustle as a Highly Sensitive Person
The holidays are often a meaningful time for highly sensitive people (HSPs). But they also can be tough. For starters, there’s the overstimulation, according to marriage and family therapist Joy Malek: “overcrowded shopping, dazzling displays, and aggressive commercial advertising. HSPs take in more detail about their environments than most people, and while this can be overwhelming at any time, the crowded atmosphere of the holidays can be particularly fatiguing.” The world also moves quicker during the holidays, Malek said. There’s more traffic, and people are more impatient. There are more tasks,...
Source: World of Psychology - December 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Family Friends General Happiness Holiday Coping Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Stress anxiety Chronic Depression Empath Highly Sensitive Person Holiday Blues Holiday Season Holiday Stress Hsp Inhibitio Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 1, 2017
No matter how much you want it, you can’t will someone to say the words you’ve always wanted to hear. Words like: “It’s okay. You did the best you could.” “I’m sorry. You deserved better.” “What do you need from me right now?” “I love you.” Instead of putting ourselves in unhealthy situations for the chance that person will utter these words, we can simply and lovingly say it to ourselves. While you’re busy navigating the season with all its expectations and family gatherings, do yourself a favor and speak those words of compassion and love to yo...
Source: World of Psychology - December 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

What Does Conduct Disorder Look Like?
A conduct disorder involves both behavioral and emotional problems found in children who do not adhere to what is socially acceptable. Kids who understand, but choose not to follow rules, can often fall into the category of conduct disorder. Teachers frequently reprimand these children more often than others from an early grade. There is no known cause of conduct disorder. While it was originally thought to have been a product of poor parenting, the general consensus has changed. There are multiple factors that may play a role in this particular development. The most common areas of concern are: genetics, environment, and...
Source: World of Psychology - November 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Anger Bullying Children and Teens Criminal Justice Parenting Personality Research Anger Management Civil Disobedience Conduct Disorder Impulse Control Impulsivity Misbehavior school problems Source Type: blogs

Do You Know the Signs of Stress?
“Stress is an alarm clock that lets you know you’re attached to something that’s not true for you.” – Byron Katie As a run up to the holidays, doesn’t it seem like everyone’s rushing around trying to cram too much into too little time? Crazed to find a parking space in an overcrowded lot, racing to get into the elevator before the door closes or hitting the door-close button so no one else can get in, exhibiting uncharitable, rude and potentially unhealthy behavior when trying to snatch the last sale item and so much more are all signs of stressed-out individuals. Is it any wonder...
Source: World of Psychology - November 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Brain and Behavior Creativity Happiness Holiday Coping LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Coping Mechanisms Coping Skills Relaxation stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Rachel Star: Stunt Girl, Schizophrenia Advocate
In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales welcome as their guest, Rachel Star, a stunt girl and YouTube sensation who lives with schizophrenia. Rachel had schizophrenia as a child, but was not diagnosed until her early twenties. She describes what it was like as a child and the moment she realize that the things she saw weren’t seen by others. Later in life, as an early adopter of online media, she began posting videos of herself doing outlandish things. The videos became quite popular, even being studied in classes at universities! And yes, she talks about being set on fi...
Source: World of Psychology - November 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: General Schizophrenia Success & Achievement The Psych Central Show Advocacy Stigma Source Type: blogs

Scrupulosity OCD and the Sin of Certainty
When religious and faithful individuals are told that the unremitting thoughts that they are trying to get rid of are due to their OCD, they have difficulty accepting it. They may remember how and where their symptoms began, and may attribute their sinful thoughts to Satan or being cursed somehow somewhere. They may eventually acknowledge the symptoms as OCD but continue to doubt their worthiness. As they question their thoughts and actions, uncertainty persists. They believe they may find surety if they make a more exerted effort. For example, they may say, “If I pray longer, the intrusive thoughts will stop. Perha...
Source: World of Psychology - November 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Anxiety and Panic OCD Spirituality Compulsions Coping Skills Guilt impure thoughts Intrusive Thoughts Obsessions Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Perfectionism Scrupulosity OCD Uncertainty Worry Source Type: blogs

Why You Need a Strong Sense of Self and How to Boost It
When life is busy or challenging, most people get so caught up in what goes on in their head that they forget all about the rest of their body. But problems and difficulties are best addressed with the whole of you. If you focus on your issues with a strong sense of self — rather than only your mind — your confidence and inner compass have a solid base for operating in the world. This is enhanced by being fully present in the here and now — rather than dwelling on the past or projecting thoughts into the future. The term “sense of self” relates to the perception you have of yourself, your self...
Source: World of Psychology - November 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Christiana Star Tags: Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personality Self-Esteem Self-Help Assertiveness Boundaries Codependency Individuality sense of identity Source Type: blogs

Parenting Fails that Won ’ t Doom Your Kids Life
Parenting is really tough and despite our best intentions, no parent gets it completely right 100% of the time. When it comes to parenting, we have to accept that embarrassing gaffes are just par for the course. The upside — other than having that adorable bundle of mischievous energy in your life — is that these goofs are comedy gold that make your parenting journey utterly delightful. Fortunately, kids are more resilient than we parents give them credit for. So if you are guilty of any of these parenting fails, quit beating yourself up — especially if everyone turned out just fine: Family photos gone wr...
Source: World of Psychology - November 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Children and Teens Creativity Parenting Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Act to Overcome Fear
“Thinking will not overcome fear — but action will.” – W. Clement Stone Those who have ever felt paralyzed by fear can take comfort in the knowledge that there is a proactive way to overcome it. This involves a willingness to act — to make some kind, almost any kind of action. The problem, however, is that the mere saying that acting will help overcome fear is difficult to absorb. There are so many preconceived and misinformed notions that keep us from fully comprehending and believing that we have the power to do something about the fear that has held us in its clutches — perhaps ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety and Panic Habits Self-Help Stress Fear risk-taking Worry Source Type: blogs

How Parents Can Overcome the Consumerism Trap This Holiday Season
Consumerism and materialism can be challenging for parents at this time of year as the holiday season is approaching. Many people experience a pressure to buy gifts, sometimes in excess of what they might be financially comfortable doing. Kids often have high expectations for receiving gifts based on how many gifts their friends are getting and messages from the media telling them that they need more and better.   Without mindful awareness, we as parents can easily fall into the trap of going on automatic pilot and doing what we think we “should” to keep up with the societal expectations instead of making ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beth Kurland, Ph.D. Tags: Children and Teens Ethics & Morality Family Holiday Coping Money and Financial Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Self-Help Consumerism Family bonding Finances Holiday Gifts Presents Quality Time Shopping Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: November 28, 2017
‘Tis the season for overindulging and overdoing, when everyone comes together to buy into a belief that makes us sick, sad and stressed. We believe getting the best present is more important than our presence. We want our families to be happy so we people please, which leaves us resentful and upset. We do favors, help others and drive around in traffic when we’re tired and depleted. No wonder many of us are more scrooge than angelic. We can turn things around by doing the hard stuff. Saying, “No.” Taking stock of what really matters. Letting go of should. And being open to new ways of celebrating th...
Source: World of Psychology - November 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Stigma: A Doctor Who Has Been in Your Shoes
Your doctor may relate to your mental health concerns more than he or she can say. Imagine you are sitting with your primary care doctor sharing your symptoms of depression, anxiety, ADHD or anorexia. Imagine in that difficult and lonely moment, your doctor makes the decision to self-disclose that she not only understands your symptoms from a professional standpoint, but also personally as someone who also struggles with a similar diagnosis. What would you think? My friend Eliza just finished her medical residency and explains that this scenario has played out in her head plenty of times, but never in person. She explains ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maggie Boyle Tags: ADHD and ADD Anorexia Anxiety and Panic Depression Eating Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Personal Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychotherapy Stigma Treatment compartmentalize general physician Mental Healthcare Proj Source Type: blogs

Your Diagnosis Does Not Define You
I’ve been diagnosed, at one point or another, with depression, anxiety, PTSD and ADHD. It’s an annoying characterization of myself because my medical ‘diagnosis’ does not define me. Yet it has also been incredibly helpful to me as it explains certain behaviors and reactions, and gives me the tools I need to research and manage them. But let me be clear. What I ‘have’ does not equate to who I am. As despite the challenges, we can all thrive. I can say this now, as I’m in a new chapter in my life with success under my belt. My first consumer product turned into a 35 million doll...
Source: World of Psychology - November 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Addiction ADHD and ADD Anxiety and Panic Creativity Depression Habits Happiness iFred Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Professional PTSD Recovery Stigma Diagnosis Entrepren Source Type: blogs

Coping with Failure and Rejection When You ’ re a Perfectionist
Any creative person knows that pursuing meaningful work also means climbing aboard an emotional rollercoaster. One moment, you’re on top of the world, stepping out onto a stage, or hitting “publish” on a post. Then a disappointing email or a critical comment about your work sends you plunging into despair. As a perfectionist with an honor-student complex trying to navigate the real world, I know these feelings very well. Those of us who pride ourselves on being goal-oriented can get so emotionally wrapped up in success that the results of our efforts start to dictate our happiness. We begin to over-identi...
Source: World of Psychology - November 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melody Wilding, LMSW Tags: Creativity General Habits Happiness Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Professional Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement anxiety Failure Perfectionism Perfectionist Personal Growth Rejection Resilience Source Type: blogs