Phone Fears And Dolphin Directions: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
We reported earlier this week on the similarities between dolphin and human personalities — but do dolphins also have “handedness” like humans? Past work had suggested that the aquatic mammals showed behavioural asymmetries in their movements, preferring to spin rightward. But a new study casts doubt on those findings, writes researcher Kelly Jaakkola at Scientific American. “Mini-brains” — brain organoids grown from stem cells in the lab — are used to study the development of the human brain, though they are far more primitive than real brains. But researchers have reported...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

Six Reasons Why Cancer is an Emotional Diagnosis Too
By Cynthia Hayes, Author, The Big Ordeal: Understanding and Managing the Psychological Turmoil of Cancer No matter when you hear the words, “You’ve got cancer,” you are bound to have an emotional reaction. The news is devastating, and the physical challenges that lie ahead are very real. But, unfortunately, that is only half the story. Cancer is an emotional diagnosis too, and our psychological and physical responses to the disease and its treatment are intertwined, coloring the entire experience. Why is cancer so emotional? We fear we will die For millennia, cancer has been a death sentence. So ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cynthia Hayes Tags: featured health and fitness philosophy psychology self-improvement cancer healing illness pickthebrain self improvement Source Type: blogs

In Times Of Anxiety and Low Mood, Focusing On Past Successes Could Improve Decision-Making
By Emily Reynolds When you’re going through a period of anxiety or depression it can be difficult to make decisions, whether those are significant life changes or more mundane, everyday choices about prioritising tasks or time management. And those with generalised anxiety disorder or mood disorders often report feeling uncomfortable with or distressed by feelings of uncertainty — which doesn’t help when you need to make a decision, big or small. Now in a new study in the journal eLife, Christopher Gagne from UC Berkeley and colleagues find that people with higher levels of anxiety and depressi...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Decision making Mental health Source Type: blogs

Next: Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy?
How ecstasy and psilocybin are shaking up psychiatry (Nature): … The Imperial study was one of a spate of clinical trials launched over the past few years using illicit psychedelic drugs such as psilocybin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and MDMA (3,4‑methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as molly or ecstasy) to treat mental-health disorders, generally with the close guidance of a psychiatrist or psychotherapist. The idea has been around for decades — or centuries in some cultures — but the momentum has picked up drastically over the past few years as investors and scientists have begun to champi...
Source: SharpBrains - February 4, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Books lysergic acid diethylamide MDMA mental health disorders psilocybin psychedelic psychiatrist psychotherapist Psychotherapy Source Type: blogs

Supposed Benefits Of Psychedelic Microdosing To Mental Health May Actually Reflect Strong Placebo Response
By Matthew Warren An increasingly large body of work suggests that many illicit psychoactive drugs could be useful as treatments for certain mental health problems. Studies have found, for instance, that the psychedelics psilocybin (from magic mushrooms) and LSD can reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression, while MDMA may be useful in treating PTSD.   It’s a different story for a practice known as “microdosing”, however. This involves taking a small quantity of a psychedelic substance — normally too little to produce any perceptible effects — repeatedly over a period of time (...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Drugs Mental health Source Type: blogs

Confronting Stigma From Opioid Use Diorder in Cancer Care
by Fitzgerald Jones, Ho, Sager, Rosielle and MerlinHave you ever been so distressed by a perspective piece that it kept you up at night? The type of rumination that fills you with so much angst that you have no choice but to act. This is exactly how we felt when we read theAAHPM Quarterly Winter 2020 Let ’s Think About It Again.1 (member paywall)The column, which is structured as a sort of written debate in which two authors argue a clinical question, describes a case of a 45-year-old man with severe substance use disorder (SUD) recently diagnosed with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. He was offered ...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - January 30, 2021 Category: Palliative Care Tags: ftigerald jones ho merlin rosielle sager Source Type: blogs

Confronting Stigma From Opioid Use Disorder in Cancer Care
by Fitzgerald Jones, Ho, Sager, Rosielle and MerlinHave you ever been so distressed by a perspective piece that it kept you up at night? The type of rumination that fills you with so much angst that you have no choice but to act. This is exactly how we felt when we read theAAHPM Quarterly Winter 2020 Let ’s Think About It Again.1 (member paywall)The column, which is structured as a sort of written debate in which two authors argue a clinical question, describes a case of a 45-year-old man with severe substance use disorder (SUD) recently diagnosed with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. He was offered ...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - January 30, 2021 Category: Palliative Care Tags: ftigerald jones ho merlin rosielle sager Source Type: blogs

What a Year! | Pandemic Teaching & More | A Reflection | TAPP 86
Discussions that matter. In our private space, we can have the vulnerability needed for authentic, deep discussions. Discussions not limited to a sentence or two at a time.No ads. No spam. No fake news. No thoughtless re-shares. Just plain old connection with others who do what you do!Privacy. The A&P Professor community has the connectivity of Facebook and Twitter, but the security of a private membership site. None of your information can be shared outside the community, so you can share what you like without it being re-shared to the world. Like your dean, for instance. In our community, you can share your frustrati...
Source: The A and P Professor - January 27, 2021 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

When Will Coronavirus Be Over – 2021 Update
2020 has brought previously unseen challenges upon humankind. A virus that, due to globalisation, spread at an unprecedented speed, stormed the entire planet and there is only one thing that can stop it as it is now: a vaccine. And as I wrote in The Medical Futurist vaccine pledge, if you worry about the long-term consequences (which no data indicate for now after having tested the vaccine on tens of thousands of people and vaccinating already millions), you might want to wait out. But then we’ll be in lockdown for years. Over the past year several lockdowns have taken place. We adopted new habits, learned and wor...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 26, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Pranavsingh Dhunnoo Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Telemedicine & Smartphones ptsd healthcare systems data privacy tracking coronavirus covid19 immunity passport vaccine research lockdown Source Type: blogs

When Will COVID-19 Be Over – 2021 Update
2020 has brought previously unseen challenges upon humankind. A virus that, due to globalisation, spread at an unprecedented speed, stormed the entire planet and there is only one thing that can stop it as it is now: a vaccine. And as I wrote in The Medical Futurist vaccine pledge, if you worry about the long-term consequences (which no data indicate for now after having tested the vaccine on tens of thousands of people and vaccinating already millions), you might want to wait out. But then we’ll be in lockdown for years. Over the past year several lockdowns have taken place. We adopted new habits, learned and wor...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 26, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Pranavsingh Dhunnoo Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Telemedicine & Smartphones ptsd healthcare systems data privacy tracking coronavirus covid19 immunity passport vaccine research lockdown Source Type: blogs

FDA releases first Artificial Intelligence (AI) regulatory plan to promote responsible digital health innovation
FDA Releases Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning Action Plan (FDA press release): Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released the agency’s first Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning (AI/ML)-Based Software as a Medical Device (SaMD) Action Plan. This action plan describes a multi-pronged approach to advance the Agency’s oversight of AI/ML-based medical software … The AI/ML-Based Software as a Medical Device Action Plan outlines five actions that the FDA intends to take, including: Further developing the proposed regulatory framework, including through issuance of draft guidance on a pr...
Source: SharpBrains - January 25, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation artificial intelligence digital health digital health innovation FDA Food and Drug Administration machine-learning regulatory framework software Source Type: blogs

Meru New Standards for Mental Health: Exclusive with CEO Kristian Ranta
2020 has been a challenging year in many ways, including for everyone’s mental health. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a spike in mental health problems with cases tripling in the number of adults experiencing depression. Existing sentiments and situations drag on now into 2021. Today, the mental health care system is not very efficient and in many cases, broken, due to a shortage of access for patients and a lack of lasting results. Following the increasing mental health problem trends, a study published in JAMA Network Open in September 2020 offered one of the first nationally repre...
Source: Medgadget - January 20, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Informatics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

“VRx”: A Medgadget Book Interview with Author Dr. Brennan Spiegel
In the recently released science-fiction novel Ready Player Two, protagonist Wade Watts spends the majority of the book inside a virtual reality universe called the “OASIS”. Though the OASIS is merely a simulation consisting of computer-generated imagery, immersive sound, and gesture-based interaction, it has a profound impact on reality. It’s a place where one loses the sense of time, both physical and emotional pain is identified and eased, and users can confront and overcome their deepest longings and fears. The OASIS may be fictional, but some of its seemingly therapeutic effects are factual, b...
Source: Medgadget - December 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A brain fitness graduate comes home
A couple of weeks ago, Jerry Emmons shared his story with Posit Science. It seems that the 84-year-old was spending much of each day re-living old, painful World War II memories. He had been the only survivor in his crew and the horror was haunting him more and more. “Post-traumatic stress disorder,” said his doctor. And it was getting worse. PTSD was just one of Jerry’s cognitive challenges. He was losing control: getting lost while driving and walking, feeling afraid of going out, having difficulty remembering everyday things that were crucial to his welfare, and causing his wife Marline no end of wor...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - December 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Aging and the Brain Alzheimer’s Brain Fitness Brain Trauma, Injury BrainHQ Cognitive impairments Posit Science Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, et alia Source Type: blogs

RWJF Emergency Response Challenges Video
On November 19, 2020 Catalyst @ Health 2.0 hosted the finals of the RWJF Emergency Response Challenges, one for tools for the General Public and the other for the Health System. The promise of the tools that have been built as part of these challenges is immense in the battle against this COVID-19 pandemic and the ones yet to come. The finalists for the General Public challenge were: Binformed Covidata– A clinically-driven comprehensive desktop + mobile infectious disease, epidemic + pandemic management tool targeting suppression and containment of diseases such as COVID-19. The presenter was veteran health IT ex...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: COVID-19 Health Tech Binformed covidsms RWJF Innovation Challenge Source Type: blogs

The latest on Brain Health and Resilience, plus a few fun Brain Teasers
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring fascinating neuroscience findings and tips, combined with fun brain teasers. #1. To celebrate this quite-challenging Thanksgiving, here are five fun brain teasers that readers have enjoyed the most this year so far. It is always good to learn more about (and appreciate) that most precious resource we all (yes, all) have up there! Five fun brain teasers to thank evolution for our human brains and minds #2. Want more? Ready, Set, Go! A few brain teasers to flex those cognitive muscles #3. “[Breathing techniques] are allowing you to consciousl...
Source: SharpBrains - November 30, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain Teasers Brain/ Mental Health Education & Lifelong Learning Peak Performance Technology & Innovation anxiety BCI biomarker Breathing cognitive engagement cognitive-reserve disorders doctors EIT European Institute of Innova Source Type: blogs

RWJF Emergency Response Challenge Results!
by MATTHEW HOLT Yesterday Catalyst @ Health 2.0 hosted the finals of the RWJF Emergency Response Challenges, one for tools for the General Public and the other for the Health System. It was a great session, sadly virtual and not at a conference with cocktails afterwards. But the promise of the tools that have been built as part of these challenges is immense in the battle against this COVID-19 pandemic and the ones yet to come. The finalists for the General Public challenge were Binformed Covidata– A clinically-driven comprehensive desktop + mobile infectious disease, epidemic + pandemic management tool targ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Tech Binformed Catalyst @ Health 2.0 COVID-19 covidsms FreshEBT Pathcheck Propel Qventus RWJF Innovation Challenge Tiatros Source Type: blogs

FDA grants clearance for NightWare app designed to reduce PTSD-related nightmares
FDA grants De Novo clearance to prescription Apple Watch app for nightmare disorder (MobiHealth News): The FDA granted Minneapolis-based NightWare a De Novo clearance on Friday for its Apple Watch and iPhone app designed to improve the sleep quality of those experiencing nightmare disorder and nightmares related to PTSD. The digital therapeutic – which received breakthrough designation from the agency last year – uses the Watch’s sensors to track the heart rate and movement of users as they sleep. After establishing a baseline profile for the patient within one or two nights’ sleep, the machine lear...
Source: SharpBrains - November 16, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation Apple Watch De Novo clearance digital therapeutic FDA heart-rate iPhone app machine-learning nightmares NightWare prescription PTSD sleep quality Source Type: blogs

#Healthin2Point00, Episode 166 | $100 million, scandal, & more
Today on Health in 2 Point 00, we have scandal, drama, intrigue, $100 million and murder! Wait, no; not murder. On Episode 166, we catch up on more deals before Jess gets carried away again. The $100 million goes to Carbon Health in a Series C, which is another Bay Area-based primary care startup; they’re doing a lot of work in COVID testing and growing fast. Next we have many health plans uniting with Cigna Ventures, Humana, and Anthem all investing in Buoy Health which just raised $37.5 million in a Series C. That leads us to a scandal with the former CEO of Navigating Cancer suing Merck’s Global Health Innov...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health in 2 Point 00 Health Tech Jessica DaMassa Matthew Holt Anthem Apple Watch Buoy Health Carbon Health Cigna Ventures Humana Navigating Cancer NightWare Source Type: blogs

There's Help for Veterans with Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders
Many post-9/11 veterans who have PTSD or depression also struggle with substance use. There are clinically proven treatments to help break the cycle of the co-occurring disorders, but the VA and other facilities need guidance on how to expand and enhance treatment opportunities for these veterans. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - November 4, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

My 2020 Election Prediction
Here’s my prediction for the U.S. election, which is just 4 days away… and also some predictions for what I think will happen in the months after that. I expect that Biden is going to win by a landslide and that it’s not even going to be close. Yes, Trump and the Republicans will continue doing their best to suppress the vote, especially in the swing states, but I don’t think it’s going to make enough of a difference to change the election outcome. The fact that they’re doing this at such an unprecedented scale is a sign of incredible desperation. Even with such overt attempts to ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

A call to action for wounded healers
I used to work with veterans who sought mental health care. Many developed PTSD after witnessing their comrades get injured, blown up, and die. Some of these veterans had visible wounds, as one would expect, but almost all of them had invisible wounds. The latter were worsened by survivor ’s guilt or shame that they failed […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 27, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nesrin-abu-ata" rel="tag" > Nesrin Abu Ata, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Telepsychology During COVID-19: It All Depends On How You Look At It
The global lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic has opened the door to the deepest fears of humanity in this interconnected world: isolation. A worldwide scale of anxiety, loneliness and fear, associated with worrying about the virus, unemployment, social isolation and uncertainty added up to a mental state we may even start to call as “depidemic.” Research shows that about half the population has been or is facing mental health issues since the outbreak. Preserving mental health thus has been an increasing topic over the past months.  We know from the fact that working from home is linked with incr...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 27, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Lifestyle medicine Digital Health Research E-Patients Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Medical Education Telemedicine & Smartphones depression psychology anxiety remote remote care telepsychology Source Type: blogs

The tragedy of the post-COVID “ long haulers ”
Suppose you are suddenly are stricken with COVID-19. You become very ill for several weeks. On awakening every morning, you wonder if this day might be your last. And then you begin to turn the corner. Every day your worst symptoms — the fever, the terrible cough, the breathlessness — get a little better. You are winning, beating a life-threatening disease, and you no longer wonder if each day might be your last. In another week or two, you’ll be your old self. But weeks pass, and while the worst symptoms are gone, you’re not your old self — not even close. You can’t meet your responsibi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anthony Komaroff, MD Tags: Brain and cognitive health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Fatigue Source Type: blogs

The hidden long-term cognitive effects of COVID-19
This study also found that a number of patients with COVID suffered strokes. In fact, COVID infection is a risk factor for strokes. A group of Canadian doctors found that individuals over 70 years of age were at particularly high risk for stroke related to COVID infection, but even young individuals are seven times more likely to have a stroke from this coronavirus versus a typical flu virus. Autopsy data from COVID patients in Finland suggests that another major cause of brain damage is lack of oxygen. Particularly worrisome is that several of the patients who were autopsied did not show any signs of brain injury during t...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew E. Budson, MD Tags: Brain and cognitive health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Memory Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs

PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Are a Vicious Cycle for Veterans
It is not uncommon to see a co-occurrence of PTSD and heavy use of substances, which can rise to the level of a substance use disorder. It may be necessary to challenge how the needs of veterans are addressed to remove barriers to care that make treating these co-occurring disorders simultaneously so difficult. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - September 14, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Michael Richardson; Roger Brooks; Eric R. Pedersen; Terri Tanielian Source Type: blogs

How to get PTSD. Twice. Worse.
I just read disturbing comments by a highly respected University of California doc Karen Seal [who screens and treats returning veterans from Iraq or Afghanistan at San Francisco’s famous Ft. Miley Veterans Administration Hospital, one of our premier VA Research Hospitals] about the redeployment of young soldiers treated for PTSD and other neurological and psychatric problems back to Mid-East war zones [http://www.military.com/features/0,15240,136020,00.html]. Effective last December, service members with a “psychiatric disorder in remission, or whose residual symptoms do not impair duty performance” may ...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - September 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Brain Fitness Brain Trauma, Injury BrainHQ Cognitive impairments Posit Science Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, et alia Source Type: blogs

Can what you eat worsen your ADHD?
An excerpt from This Is Your Brain on Food: An Indispensable Guide to the Surprising Foods that Fight Depression, Anxiety, PTSD, OCD, ADHD, and More. Suzy was a bright and hardworking student. However, even though she was conscientious and generally cheery, her grades began to fall during her senior year, and she started to feel […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/uma-naidoo" rel="tag" > Uma Naidoo, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Nutrition Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Your brain and PTSD: biomarkers and high-stress states
If you ’re reading this, you’re probably stressed. Whether it’s related to work, household chores, parenting, school, politics, or, yes, COVID, stress is a normal part of life. Because stress is a normal part of life, our bodies have adapted to react to stress through a series of neurophysiological r esponses. Once the stressor or threat has […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 27, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/samoon-ahmad" rel="tag" > Samoon Ahmad, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?
Today’s show takes a good hard look at police culture as a whole. What type of personality is drawn to a career in law enforcement? What are officers taught in the academy? Why do they receive so little mental health care when they face so much trauma on the job? These are just a few of the areas that our guest, mental health advocate Gabriel Nathan, lays bare. Join us as we discuss the basic foundations of law enforcement and how Gabriel believes the profession needs to evolve to keep up with the times. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic above! SUBSCRIBE &a...
Source: World of Psychology - August 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Policy and Advocacy The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Police (CIT) Crises Training Needed?
A mentally ill man is standing in your yard yelling at the mailbox. What do you do? You call the police, right? Not so fast, according to today’s guest, mental health advocate Gabriel Nathan. There is a better way to do things. Gabriel believes that rather than training police officers to de-escalate people in mental health crises, the police shouldn’t be called at all in these situations. Our host Gabe has a different take on things, as he is an advocate for training police officers in crisis intervention practices. Join us for an enlightening and nuanced conversation regarding the role of the police when it ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Interview Not Crazy Podcast Policy and Advocacy Source Type: blogs

How to Keep Yourself from Cheating
It can be tempting to cheat, I know. After over 40 years as a therapist, I’ve heard many, many reasons that people (even people who say they love their partner) give for cheating. There’s the thrill of the forbidden, the notion that what’s out there may be better than what you’ve got, the affirmation that comes from feeling attractive to someone else — especially when self-esteem is shaky, the satisfaction of someone preferring you to the partner they’ve got, and the itch to explore what could have been or could be sexually with someone else. Whatever rationalization you tell yourself, c...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Marriage and Divorce Relationships Self-Help Breakups Cheating Infidelity Insecurity Midlife Crisis Source Type: blogs

How the Pandemic Is Taking Its Toll on Our Mental Health
The year 2020 will go down in history as one of the most devastating in history. Hundreds of thousands have died and millions have been hospitalized due to the novel coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19 has changed the lives of so many. No matter where you live, dealing with the effects of economic and physical lockdowns in a community leads to multiple mental health challenges. After months of living with the coronavirus, many people are getting tired, burned out, and more and more frustrated. In America, we face a particular challenge. Our federal government has chosen to take a backseat during the pandemic. Instead of leadin...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Source Type: blogs

Sex Differences And Happy Relationships: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Researchers have reported on the unusual case study of a man, known as RFS, who could read letters but not numbers. When RFS saw numbers, they appeared as a jumbled up mess, writes Sam Kean at Science. Yet he could see the shape of an “8” once it was turned on its side, suggesting that the problem wasn’t a visual deficit, but something specific to number processing. A study has found sex differences in the volume of grey matter in certain areas of the brain — differences which may be related to the expression of genes on...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

I can ’t tolerate CPAP, what can I do?
Continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, is the most common treatment prescribed for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). CPAP involves wearing a mask that fits into the nostrils, underneath or over the nose, or over the nose and mouth, through which pressurized air is delivered via tubing from a machine to keep the upper airway open during sleep. CPAP is recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) as the initial treatment for moderate or severe OSA, and in mild cases of OSA when associated with insomnia, disrupted sleep, or excessive daytime sleepiness. When used consistently, and when treatment is effecti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melanie Pogach, MD Tags: Ear, nose, and throat Sleep Source Type: blogs

Forgiveness: Yes? No? Maybe?
“My step-father abused me, and my mother is always telling me to forgive and forget.” Jodie shook her head ruefully. “And how is that going for you?” I ask. “Not so good,” Jodie replies, “I’m not doing a good job at all.” Alex shares, “My counselor told me if I don’t forgive my uncle for raping me, then I’m allowing him to live rent-free in my head.” “And how is that going for you?” I ask. “Not so good,” Alex cries, “I feel like I’m failing at recovery!” Both Jodie and Alex — and countless other sur...
Source: World of Psychology - July 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Abuse PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression Anger Forgiveness Rape Resentment Sexual Abuse Sexual Assault Sexual Trauma Source Type: blogs

2020: Jumanji Or Dystopia
“There’s No Going Back to ‘Normal’”, crudely proclaims the headline of a June piece from The Atlantic. “The Terrible Consequences of Australia’s Uber-Bushfires” reads a recent Wired article. One of our own April articles was titled “Will Medical Workers Deal With PTSD After COVID-19?”. If it wasn’t clear, an article published earlier this year in The Conversation rightly asks: “Are we living in a dystopia?”.  Indeed, what was once relegated to the fertile minds of fiction novelists has become daily occurrences. Many are drawing similariti...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Science Fiction Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality black mirror dystopia coronavirus covid19 jumanji Death Stranding video games bushfires Source Type: blogs

How PTSD Can Cause Learning Disabilities
Conclusion Researchers are still exploring potential links between PTSD and learning disabilities, but further studies will likely expand on what we know. Understanding how PTSD affects our ability to learn will help treat people with both conditions and lead to better outcomes for these patients. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - July 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amanda Levison, M.S., LMHC, LPC, CCBT Tags: Children and Teens Psychology PTSD Trauma associative learning learning disability Neuroscience Stress Hormones Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 20th 2020
This study was the first to demonstrate a causal relationship between glial senescence and neurodegeneration. In this study, accumulations of senescent astrocytes and microglia were found in tau-associated neurodegenerative disease model mice. Elimination of these senescent cells via a genetic approach can reduce tau deposition and prevent the degeneration of cortical and hippocampal neurons. Most recently, it was shown that clearance of senescent oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in AD model mice with senolytic agents could lessen the Aβ plaque load, reduce neuroinflammation, and ameliorate cognitive deficits. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

In Rats, Navitoclax Removes Senescent Chondrocytes that Contribute to Osteoarthritis
In this study, we examined the ability of the senolytic drug ABT263 to clear SnCs and further evaluated the therapeutic effect of ABT263 on post-traumatic osteoarthritis. A destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) rat model was established for in vivo experiments. We found that ABT263 reduced the expression of inflammatory cytokines and promoted cartilage matrix aggregation by inducing SnC apoptosis. Moreover, osteoarthritis pathological changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone in post-traumatic osteoarthritis rat were alleviated by ABT263 intra-articular injection. These results demonstrated that ABT263 not only ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

5 Reasons Why Games are Good for Mental Health
About a year ago, I started feeling stuck on where I wanted to go next in my career. It was a unique window for me to start something new, but the anxiety of staring into the unknowing was overwhelming.  I found myself playing solitaire, a game I loved growing up, as a way to escape the stress of thinking about what comes next. After playing I felt less anxious, and even recharged. It made me realize that games are a powerful tool to address mental health. In fact, games allow people to exercise their minds, develop social skills, and in some cases, build up hand-eye coordination and physical fitness. There a...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - July 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Neal Taparia Tags: featured internet culture psychology self-improvement focus games mental health motivation Source Type: blogs

Building a Therapeutic Alliance with a Dreamer: Trials and Tribulations of an Undocumented Immigrant
This article is a reminder to be compassionate towards your peers, even if you do not know about their immigration status. Be sensitive and understanding of the hardships associated with immigration status. More importantly, advocate for the undocumented immigrants to have access to mental health care. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alif Ahmed, MS Tags: Abuse Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy PTSD Relationships Stigma Trauma Abandonment C-PTSD DACA Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Health Insurance healthcare Immigration Insecurity Source Type: blogs

What should you do during a psychiatric medication shortage?
You have finally found a medication to treat your depression that your body tolerates well. It has taken your psychiatrist months to find the optimal dose (after two failed medication trials). The COVID-19 pandemic hit, but in spite of your new daily stressors, you seem to be doing relatively well. That is, until you hear that your antidepressant medication is now in short supply. What can you do? Mental health treatment during COVID-19 With the increased stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, prescriptions for medications to treat mental illnesses have increased more than 20% between February and March 2020. Sertraline, or Zolo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephanie Collier, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Source Type: blogs

July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month
July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. This awareness day was named after mental health activist and author Bebe Moore Campbell - and focuses on building awareness about the importance of mental wellness and effective mental health care for minorities. According to research, minorities are less likely to receive a mental health diagnosis, less likely to receive treatment for mental illness, have less access to and availability of mental health services and often receive a poorer quality of mental health care. More specifically:The percentage of Black and Latinx chi...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - July 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns mental health Source Type: blogs

Psychologists Are Mining Social Media Posts For Mental Health Research — But Many Users Have Concerns
This article contains discussion of suicide and self-harm In 2014, the Samaritans launched what seemed like an innovative new project: Radar. Designed to provide what the charity described as an “online safety net”, users could sign up to Radar to receive updates on the content of other people’s tweets, with emails sent out based on a list of key phrases meant to detect whether someone was feeling distressed. In principle, this meant people could keep an eye on friends who were vulnerable: if they missed a tweet where somebody said they felt suicidal or wanted to self-harm, for example, Radar would send ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Facebook Feature Mental health Twitter Source Type: blogs

Sexual Abuse and Eating Disorders: What ’s the Connection?
What is the connection between sexual abuse and developing an eating disorder? Why does bingeing, purging, starving and chronic dieting become a “solution” for the abuse? Abuse shatters the sacred innocence of a child and often becomes a primary trigger for an eating disorder. The survivor of sexual abuse becomes plagued with confusion, guilt, shame, fear, anxiety, self-punishment, and rage. She (or he) seeks the soothing comfort, protection, and anesthesia that food offers. Food, after all, is the most available, legal, socially sanctioned, cheapest mood altering drug on the market! And emotional eating is a m...
Source: World of Psychology - June 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Abuse Eating Disorders Trauma Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Sexual Abuse Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Addiction a Disease?
  What is the link between addiction and mental illness? Is addiction a choice? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss whether addiction should be classified as a disease and whether or not it should require medical treatment. Gabe also shares his personal story of addiction and how it tied in with his bipolar disorder. What’s your take? Tune in for an in-depth discussion which covers every angle of this often controversial topic. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning...
Source: World of Psychology - June 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs

The Unique Benefits of Teletherapy
Teletherapy is seen as an inferior alternative to in-person therapy. But while it has some drawbacks, online therapy has plenty of pluses, too. First the drawbacks: Some clients miss their therapist’s office, which they associate with safety and healing, said Jodi Aman, LCSW, a psychotherapist in Rochester, N.Y. Technical difficulties—from poor internet connections to visibility issues–can interrupt sessions. Finding a private, quiet space at home can be challenging. Still, many people prefer teletherapy. As psychologist Regine Galanti, Ph.D, pointed out, the biggest myth about teletherapy is that it&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - June 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Psychotherapy Treatment teletherapy Source Type: blogs

Repetitive negative thinking may increase (or perhaps be caused by) cognitive decline and Alzheimer ’s pathology
This article was originally published on The Conversation. The Study in Context: Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical disease Report: 35% of worldwide dementia cases could be prevented by modifying these 9 modifiable risk factors Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - June 16, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Conversation Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness aging Alzheimer's disease prevention Alzheimers-disease anxiety behavioural marker brain health Brain-Fitness chronic-stress cognitive behavioural therapy Cognitive Debt cognitive decline Source Type: blogs

Living in the Now while Dealing with Distress
As a chronic worrier, ongoing anxiety warrior, and general wary-of-what’s-going-to-happen-next kind of person, I know how healing it can be to practice the art of living in the present. As simple as that goal seems, though, it sometimes proves a lot harder than it sounds.  I’ve read numerous articles and books on the subject, including Eckhart Tolle’s The Power of Now, which offers specific practices on how to connect to the outer world and, even more importantly, to the stillness of our inner being to help anchor ourselves in the present moment. As Tolle points out, people can cope with whatever ari...
Source: World of Psychology - June 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Anxiety and Panic Books Self-Help Eckhart Tolle Living in the Now Meditation Stress The Power of Now Source Type: blogs