Cancer
I sometimes like to open my posts with a joke. But not this time. There isn't a joke for this.Mrs. Dalai has cancer.How's that for a kick in the ass? I am neither vain nor arrogant enough to think that I could write the ultimate treatise on dealing with a loved one's cancer. There are any number of engaging stories out there on Caring Bridge and the like. You don't want to read a tear-jerker anyway, nor do you want to endure every last boring and/or gory detail. Mrs. Dalai would be very upset with me if I shared all that. Hell, she's probably going to be upset with me for writing this at all. She is a very private per...
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - September 4, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Libertarians Have Been Right about Marijuana Legalization Thus Far
Lachlan MerskyIn anarticle National Review published this month, the author chronicles the alleged negative effects of marijuana legalization, yet his claims are dubious. Marijuana is only legal in18 states, and it is still a federally illegalSchedule I substance, so it is far too early to make any conclusions on legalization. That said, the preliminary data we do have can tell us a lot about what marijuana legalization might look like on a broader scale, and given what we know, this article missed the mark.The author ’s primary argument for prohibition is that “weed is unhealthy,” cit...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 26, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Lachlan Mersky Source Type: blogs

To lower stress levels (ours and others ’), practice cognitive reframing instead of venting
We all get upset from time to time—some of us more than others. Whether we’re sad about the loss of a loved one, angry at friends or family, or fearful about the state of the world, it often feels good to let it all out. That’s because sharing our emotions reduces our stress while making us feel closer to others we share with and providing a sense of belonging. When we open up our inner selves and people respond with sympathy, we feel seen, understood, and supported. But “sharing” covers a lot of different modes of communication. Are some healthier than others, over the long run? Science sugge...
Source: SharpBrains - August 19, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning cognitive needs cognitive reframing emotional needs Emotions human-brain neural pathways Stress venting Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery: miscarriage
A report of research by Tommy'sreporting PTSD as a result of miscarriage.A personal story, reported in a Guardian opinion piece, and apodcast by the same writer.I retweet items of interest as #whatsnewinmidwifery.  I may include those items on the blog, but quite possibly I may not. (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - August 16, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Promote brain plasticity and keep your mind at ease by taking your daily “exercise pill”
This article was originally published on The Conversation. News in Context: Can you grow your hippocampus? Yes. Here’s how, and why it matters To harness neuroplasticity, start with enthusiasm Three ways to protect your mental health during –and after– COVID-19 Exploring the human brain and how it responds to stress (1/3) The post Promote brain plasticity and keep your mind at ease by taking your daily “exercise pill” appeared first on SharpBrains. (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - July 14, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Conversation Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Education & Lifelong Learning anxiety BDNF brain-cells Brain-Plasticity cognitive-performance exercise exercise pill hippocampus memory function neurobiology Neurons neuroplasticity neuroscientist neurotr Source Type: blogs

3 Ways To Add To Your Mental Health Toolbox
Mental Health is a hot topic right now, as it should be.  Celebrities coming out and openly talking about struggles, depression, and anxiety are getting more vocalized by the masses. But what happens after these brave steps?  Unfortunately, you don't suddenly become healed, and the world is all rainbows and unicorns. I am not a therapist, nor have I gone to school for any mental health training, but I am a regular person like you who has struggled with PTSD symptoms after an extremely tough breakup. Also, severe depression and anxiety after watching my father wither away from Parkinson's and then sudd...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul Marlow Tags: featured happiness health and fitness psychology self-improvement anxiety depression empowerment mental health pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

On building better brains at any age, treating Depression vs. Dementia, emerging neurotechnologies, psychedelics, and more
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring eleven new research findings and innovative resources for lifelong cognitive and brain health. #1. Debate: Are depression and dementia two sides of the same coin? And, if they are, how to best approach treatment? #2. Either way, the earlier the better, but it’s never too late: New book outlines the five lifestyle pillars to “build a better brain at any age” #3. “If I were a cardiologist evaluating a patient’s chest pain, for instance, I would speak with the patient, but then I would listen to their heart and measure ...
Source: SharpBrains - May 28, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Education & Lifelong Learning Technology & Innovation brain health cognitive cognitive healthcare cognitive--disorders cognitive-health Cumulus Neuroscience dementia depression neurotechnologies psychedelics Source Type: blogs

Study finds MDMA-assisted therapy to be safe and highly effective to treat severe PTSD
We report the findings of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-site phase 3 clinical trial (NCT03537014) to test the efficacy and safety of 3,4‑methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-assisted therapy for the treatment of patients with severe PTSD, including those with common comorbidities such as dissociation, depression, a history of alcohol and substance use disorders, and childhood trauma. After psychiatric medication washout, participants (n=90) were randomized 1:1 to receive manualized therapy with MDMA or with placebo, combined with three preparatory and nine integrative therapy sessions … The...
Source: SharpBrains - May 18, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Clinical-Trial Ecstasy MDMA MDMA-assisted therapy methylenedioxymethamphetamine Molly post-traumatic-stress-disorder psychedelics Psychotherapy PTSD severe PTSD Source Type: blogs

A Game That Fades Away Traumatic Thoughts
The therapy was effective for 16 of the 20 patients in the study. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - May 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: PTSD Source Type: blogs

How can we help our brain-traumatized soldiers and vets? Nancy raises a ‘ call for ACTION ’ .
Nancy Martin-Crisco wrote a heart-rending response to a blog I posted  (“How to get PTSD. Twice. Worse.”) that you all should read. Her son Christopher was diagnosed with PTSD after service in Afghanistan. After a few months stateside, he was redeployed to Baghdad. It was NOT good for him. Addiction, divorce, separation from his child, depression, anxiety, anger management issues, problems with relationships, poor focus, still PTSD, a feeling of worthlessness and shame because he’s here, with us, discharged because of his addiction after 10 years in the Army, instead of with his fellow soldiers, who ...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - May 1, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Brain Fitness Brain Trauma, Injury BrainHQ Cognitive impairments Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, et alia Source Type: blogs

Shape your environment, shape your mind
One of the biggest contributors to our happiness is something we barely pay attention to: the voice inside our own heads. As psychologist Ethan Kross describes in his new book Chatter, that voice is constantly analyzing the situations we’re in, reflecting on the past and future, and telling us who we are. While sometimes friendly and optimistic—it’s OK, everything’s going to work out!—it can also be critical and downbeat. Our inner voice can berate us for mistakes or decide our life is ruined. It can ruminate on negative emotions and experiences, dredging them up without any kind of constructi...
Source: SharpBrains - April 23, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning book brain calmer mind chatter clutter declutter environment Ethan Kross feelings nature rumination thoughts Source Type: blogs

What Would The Ideal Hospital Look Like?
If your imagination could run wild, how would you envision the future of hospitals? Hi-tech big machines, physicians analysing data obtained from patients’ devices, LED screens greeting visitors by their names using facial recognition, virtual patient visits, and robots leading operations… Well, experts have pretty much the same idea. Recently we wrote a lot about the future of hospitals. We emphasised the importance of good design both inside and outside the point of care. We imagined that these institutions will become “health centres for patients for preventing diseases, for acute care patients and fo...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 20, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Lifestyle medicine Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Digital Health Research E-Patients Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Medical Education Personalized Medicine Po Source Type: blogs

Anti-Asian racism: Breaking through stereotypes and silence
Like the rest of the country, I awoke on Wednesday, March 17 to the horrific news of a mass shooting in Atlanta that killed eight people. Six were Asian women, ranging in age from 44 to 74. I immediately went numb. Lulu Wang, the Chinese American filmmaker and director of The Farewell, gave voice to my pain on social media: “I know these women. The ones working themselves to the bone to send their kids to school, to send money back home.” The fact is, I’ve been in a state of numbness for much of the past year. On top of the unprecedented strains that COVID-19 has placed on all of us, Asian Americans like ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Chen, MD, MPH Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Mental Health Parenting Relationships Safety Source Type: blogs

Sexual Assault: How It Relates to Substance Use
Sexual assault is a serious matter and frankly can be difficult to talk about. The fact of the matter is, one...The postSexual Assault: How It Relates to Substance Use appeared first onCliffside Malibu. (Source: Cliffside Malibu)
Source: Cliffside Malibu - April 15, 2021 Category: Addiction Authors: Cliffside Malibu Tags: Substance Abuse assault depression PTSD Source Type: blogs

Why Traumatic Events Turn Into PTSD For Some People (M)
How is it that some people continue to suffer flashbacks and anxiety for a much longer period, while others recover quickly? → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - April 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: PTSD subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Thinking about frailty like slow-moving PTSD
A week after surgery, I removed my splint to take a shower. Now, unprotected, my wrist was made of glass. With my splint on, I was clumsy, but invincible. I did not feel frail until I removed my splint. The shower floor did not feel very different from the ice on the lake. My thoughts […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 3, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mary-braun" rel="tag" > Mary Braun, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Geriatrics Source Type: blogs

5 Tips Against Zoom Fatigue In Telemedicine
It was almost exactly a year ago when we first wrote about the rise of telemedicine amidst COVID-19. Similarly, it was almost a year ago we first brought up the issue of PTSD of medical personnel due to the virus. We did not expect the two to intertwine. At one point over the past twelve months, we all noticed an extreme level of tiredness after a full workday spent in front of a computer. But it wasn’t tiredness: it was fatigue. While tiredness can be easily cured with rest and sleep, fatigue is a whole different issue. It may lead to chronic diseases, burnout and ill mental and physical health, and its cure requ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 1, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Digital Health Research Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Medical Education Telemedicine & Smartphones WHO cdc zoom fatigue online learning chronic diseases Bryan Vartabedian APA Edit Katona Source Type: blogs

Tip for digital health start-ups: To navigate regulatory gray areas, “engage early and engage often” with the FDA
FDA’s enforcement discretion for digital health is more ambiguous than ever in 2021 (MobiHealthNews): The digital health ecosystem has swelled to encompass a broad range of products over the years. On one end of the spectrum is software-as-medical-devices (SaMD) and prescription digital therapeutics, product categories for which a comprehensive regulatory strategy and engagement with the FDA are mandatory. On the other are wellness apps and other low-risk digital tools that likely spend more time worrying about oversight from the Federal Trade Commission than the health regulator. However, a growing number of compani...
Source: SharpBrains - March 22, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation 510(k) clearance artificial intelligence digital health enforcement discretion FDA Federal Trade Commission SaMD software-as-medical-devices wellness apps Source Type: blogs

Numb from the news? Understanding why and what to do may help
In the spring of 2020, the pandemic catapulted many of us into shock and fear — our lives upended, our routines unmoored. Great uncertainty at the onset evolved into hope that, a year later, a semblance of normalcy might return. Yet not only do people continue to face uncertainty, but many of us have also reached a plateau of fatigue, resignation, and grief. We are living through a time of widespread illness, social and political unrest, economic fractures, and broken safety nets. Whether each of us experiences the ravages of this time close to home or as part of a larger circle, the symptoms of collective trauma are...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard F. Mollica, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Fatigue Mental Health Source Type: blogs

How Wonder and Awe help us transcend self, regulate stress, and improve well-being
What is awe? We have all experienced it, even if we didn’t know what to call it. Whether we’re overlooking a beautiful view after a challenging hike or watching a new leaf grow on the plant we’ve been nurturing in lockdown, the feeling we get in that moment—amazed, inspired, transported—is what researchers call awe. In his new book, Awestruck, psychologist Jonah Paquette explains the process underlying the experience of awe and uncovers both its complexity and its value to our well-being. Walking readers through various scientific findings, he shows that awe helps improve our relationships, de...
Source: SharpBrains - March 10, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning awe Awestruck be happier book decrease stress Jonah Paquette positive emotions stress-levels Source Type: blogs

Phone Fears And Dolphin Directions: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
We reported earlier this week on the similarities between dolphin and human personalities — but do dolphins also have “handedness” like humans? Past work had suggested that the aquatic mammals showed behavioural asymmetries in their movements, preferring to spin rightward. But a new study casts doubt on those findings, writes researcher Kelly Jaakkola at Scientific American. “Mini-brains” — brain organoids grown from stem cells in the lab — are used to study the development of the human brain, though they are far more primitive than real brains. But researchers have reported...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

Six Reasons Why Cancer is an Emotional Diagnosis Too
By Cynthia Hayes, Author, The Big Ordeal: Understanding and Managing the Psychological Turmoil of Cancer No matter when you hear the words, “You’ve got cancer,” you are bound to have an emotional reaction. The news is devastating, and the physical challenges that lie ahead are very real. But, unfortunately, that is only half the story. Cancer is an emotional diagnosis too, and our psychological and physical responses to the disease and its treatment are intertwined, coloring the entire experience. Why is cancer so emotional? We fear we will die For millennia, cancer has been a death sentence. So ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cynthia Hayes Tags: featured health and fitness philosophy psychology self-improvement cancer healing illness pickthebrain self improvement Source Type: blogs

In Times Of Anxiety and Low Mood, Focusing On Past Successes Could Improve Decision-Making
By Emily Reynolds When you’re going through a period of anxiety or depression it can be difficult to make decisions, whether those are significant life changes or more mundane, everyday choices about prioritising tasks or time management. And those with generalised anxiety disorder or mood disorders often report feeling uncomfortable with or distressed by feelings of uncertainty — which doesn’t help when you need to make a decision, big or small. Now in a new study in the journal eLife, Christopher Gagne from UC Berkeley and colleagues find that people with higher levels of anxiety and depressi...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Decision making Mental health Source Type: blogs

Next: Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy?
How ecstasy and psilocybin are shaking up psychiatry (Nature): … The Imperial study was one of a spate of clinical trials launched over the past few years using illicit psychedelic drugs such as psilocybin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and MDMA (3,4‑methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as molly or ecstasy) to treat mental-health disorders, generally with the close guidance of a psychiatrist or psychotherapist. The idea has been around for decades — or centuries in some cultures — but the momentum has picked up drastically over the past few years as investors and scientists have begun to champi...
Source: SharpBrains - February 4, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Books lysergic acid diethylamide MDMA mental health disorders psilocybin psychedelic psychiatrist psychotherapist Psychotherapy Source Type: blogs

Supposed Benefits Of Psychedelic Microdosing To Mental Health May Actually Reflect Strong Placebo Response
By Matthew Warren An increasingly large body of work suggests that many illicit psychoactive drugs could be useful as treatments for certain mental health problems. Studies have found, for instance, that the psychedelics psilocybin (from magic mushrooms) and LSD can reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression, while MDMA may be useful in treating PTSD.   It’s a different story for a practice known as “microdosing”, however. This involves taking a small quantity of a psychedelic substance — normally too little to produce any perceptible effects — repeatedly over a period of time (...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Drugs Mental health Source Type: blogs

Confronting Stigma From Opioid Use Diorder in Cancer Care
by Fitzgerald Jones, Ho, Sager, Rosielle and MerlinHave you ever been so distressed by a perspective piece that it kept you up at night? The type of rumination that fills you with so much angst that you have no choice but to act. This is exactly how we felt when we read theAAHPM Quarterly Winter 2020 Let ’s Think About It Again.1 (member paywall)The column, which is structured as a sort of written debate in which two authors argue a clinical question, describes a case of a 45-year-old man with severe substance use disorder (SUD) recently diagnosed with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. He was offered ...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - January 30, 2021 Category: Palliative Care Tags: ftigerald jones ho merlin rosielle sager Source Type: blogs

Confronting Stigma From Opioid Use Disorder in Cancer Care
by Fitzgerald Jones, Ho, Sager, Rosielle and MerlinHave you ever been so distressed by a perspective piece that it kept you up at night? The type of rumination that fills you with so much angst that you have no choice but to act. This is exactly how we felt when we read theAAHPM Quarterly Winter 2020 Let ’s Think About It Again.1 (member paywall)The column, which is structured as a sort of written debate in which two authors argue a clinical question, describes a case of a 45-year-old man with severe substance use disorder (SUD) recently diagnosed with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. He was offered ...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - January 30, 2021 Category: Palliative Care Tags: ftigerald jones ho merlin rosielle sager Source Type: blogs

What a Year! | Pandemic Teaching & More | A Reflection | TAPP 86
Discussions that matter. In our private space, we can have the vulnerability needed for authentic, deep discussions. Discussions not limited to a sentence or two at a time.No ads. No spam. No fake news. No thoughtless re-shares. Just plain old connection with others who do what you do!Privacy. The A&P Professor community has the connectivity of Facebook and Twitter, but the security of a private membership site. None of your information can be shared outside the community, so you can share what you like without it being re-shared to the world. Like your dean, for instance. In our community, you can share your frustrati...
Source: The A and P Professor - January 27, 2021 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

When Will Coronavirus Be Over – 2021 Update
2020 has brought previously unseen challenges upon humankind. A virus that, due to globalisation, spread at an unprecedented speed, stormed the entire planet and there is only one thing that can stop it as it is now: a vaccine. And as I wrote in The Medical Futurist vaccine pledge, if you worry about the long-term consequences (which no data indicate for now after having tested the vaccine on tens of thousands of people and vaccinating already millions), you might want to wait out. But then we’ll be in lockdown for years. Over the past year several lockdowns have taken place. We adopted new habits, learned and wor...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 26, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Pranavsingh Dhunnoo Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Telemedicine & Smartphones ptsd healthcare systems data privacy tracking coronavirus covid19 immunity passport vaccine research lockdown Source Type: blogs

When Will COVID-19 Be Over – 2021 Update
2020 has brought previously unseen challenges upon humankind. A virus that, due to globalisation, spread at an unprecedented speed, stormed the entire planet and there is only one thing that can stop it as it is now: a vaccine. And as I wrote in The Medical Futurist vaccine pledge, if you worry about the long-term consequences (which no data indicate for now after having tested the vaccine on tens of thousands of people and vaccinating already millions), you might want to wait out. But then we’ll be in lockdown for years. Over the past year several lockdowns have taken place. We adopted new habits, learned and wor...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 26, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Pranavsingh Dhunnoo Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Telemedicine & Smartphones ptsd healthcare systems data privacy tracking coronavirus covid19 immunity passport vaccine research lockdown Source Type: blogs

FDA releases first Artificial Intelligence (AI) regulatory plan to promote responsible digital health innovation
FDA Releases Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning Action Plan (FDA press release): Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released the agency’s first Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning (AI/ML)-Based Software as a Medical Device (SaMD) Action Plan. This action plan describes a multi-pronged approach to advance the Agency’s oversight of AI/ML-based medical software … The AI/ML-Based Software as a Medical Device Action Plan outlines five actions that the FDA intends to take, including: Further developing the proposed regulatory framework, including through issuance of draft guidance on a pr...
Source: SharpBrains - January 25, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation artificial intelligence digital health digital health innovation FDA Food and Drug Administration machine-learning regulatory framework software Source Type: blogs

Meru New Standards for Mental Health: Exclusive with CEO Kristian Ranta
2020 has been a challenging year in many ways, including for everyone’s mental health. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a spike in mental health problems with cases tripling in the number of adults experiencing depression. Existing sentiments and situations drag on now into 2021. Today, the mental health care system is not very efficient and in many cases, broken, due to a shortage of access for patients and a lack of lasting results. Following the increasing mental health problem trends, a study published in JAMA Network Open in September 2020 offered one of the first nationally repre...
Source: Medgadget - January 20, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Informatics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

“VRx”: A Medgadget Book Interview with Author Dr. Brennan Spiegel
In the recently released science-fiction novel Ready Player Two, protagonist Wade Watts spends the majority of the book inside a virtual reality universe called the “OASIS”. Though the OASIS is merely a simulation consisting of computer-generated imagery, immersive sound, and gesture-based interaction, it has a profound impact on reality. It’s a place where one loses the sense of time, both physical and emotional pain is identified and eased, and users can confront and overcome their deepest longings and fears. The OASIS may be fictional, but some of its seemingly therapeutic effects are factual, b...
Source: Medgadget - December 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A brain fitness graduate comes home
A couple of weeks ago, Jerry Emmons shared his story with Posit Science. It seems that the 84-year-old was spending much of each day re-living old, painful World War II memories. He had been the only survivor in his crew and the horror was haunting him more and more. “Post-traumatic stress disorder,” said his doctor. And it was getting worse. PTSD was just one of Jerry’s cognitive challenges. He was losing control: getting lost while driving and walking, feeling afraid of going out, having difficulty remembering everyday things that were crucial to his welfare, and causing his wife Marline no end of wor...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - December 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Aging and the Brain Alzheimer’s Brain Fitness Brain Trauma, Injury BrainHQ Cognitive impairments Posit Science Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, et alia Source Type: blogs

RWJF Emergency Response Challenges Video
On November 19, 2020 Catalyst @ Health 2.0 hosted the finals of the RWJF Emergency Response Challenges, one for tools for the General Public and the other for the Health System. The promise of the tools that have been built as part of these challenges is immense in the battle against this COVID-19 pandemic and the ones yet to come. The finalists for the General Public challenge were: Binformed Covidata– A clinically-driven comprehensive desktop + mobile infectious disease, epidemic + pandemic management tool targeting suppression and containment of diseases such as COVID-19. The presenter was veteran health IT ex...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: COVID-19 Health Tech Binformed covidsms RWJF Innovation Challenge Source Type: blogs

The latest on Brain Health and Resilience, plus a few fun Brain Teasers
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring fascinating neuroscience findings and tips, combined with fun brain teasers. #1. To celebrate this quite-challenging Thanksgiving, here are five fun brain teasers that readers have enjoyed the most this year so far. It is always good to learn more about (and appreciate) that most precious resource we all (yes, all) have up there! Five fun brain teasers to thank evolution for our human brains and minds #2. Want more? Ready, Set, Go! A few brain teasers to flex those cognitive muscles #3. “[Breathing techniques] are allowing you to consciousl...
Source: SharpBrains - November 30, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain Teasers Brain/ Mental Health Education & Lifelong Learning Peak Performance Technology & Innovation anxiety BCI biomarker Breathing cognitive engagement cognitive-reserve disorders doctors EIT European Institute of Innova Source Type: blogs

RWJF Emergency Response Challenge Results!
by MATTHEW HOLT Yesterday Catalyst @ Health 2.0 hosted the finals of the RWJF Emergency Response Challenges, one for tools for the General Public and the other for the Health System. It was a great session, sadly virtual and not at a conference with cocktails afterwards. But the promise of the tools that have been built as part of these challenges is immense in the battle against this COVID-19 pandemic and the ones yet to come. The finalists for the General Public challenge were Binformed Covidata– A clinically-driven comprehensive desktop + mobile infectious disease, epidemic + pandemic management tool targ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Tech Binformed Catalyst @ Health 2.0 COVID-19 covidsms FreshEBT Pathcheck Propel Qventus RWJF Innovation Challenge Tiatros Source Type: blogs

FDA grants clearance for NightWare app designed to reduce PTSD-related nightmares
FDA grants De Novo clearance to prescription Apple Watch app for nightmare disorder (MobiHealth News): The FDA granted Minneapolis-based NightWare a De Novo clearance on Friday for its Apple Watch and iPhone app designed to improve the sleep quality of those experiencing nightmare disorder and nightmares related to PTSD. The digital therapeutic – which received breakthrough designation from the agency last year – uses the Watch’s sensors to track the heart rate and movement of users as they sleep. After establishing a baseline profile for the patient within one or two nights’ sleep, the machine lear...
Source: SharpBrains - November 16, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation Apple Watch De Novo clearance digital therapeutic FDA heart-rate iPhone app machine-learning nightmares NightWare prescription PTSD sleep quality Source Type: blogs

#Healthin2Point00, Episode 166 | $100 million, scandal, & more
Today on Health in 2 Point 00, we have scandal, drama, intrigue, $100 million and murder! Wait, no; not murder. On Episode 166, we catch up on more deals before Jess gets carried away again. The $100 million goes to Carbon Health in a Series C, which is another Bay Area-based primary care startup; they’re doing a lot of work in COVID testing and growing fast. Next we have many health plans uniting with Cigna Ventures, Humana, and Anthem all investing in Buoy Health which just raised $37.5 million in a Series C. That leads us to a scandal with the former CEO of Navigating Cancer suing Merck’s Global Health Innov...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health in 2 Point 00 Health Tech Jessica DaMassa Matthew Holt Anthem Apple Watch Buoy Health Carbon Health Cigna Ventures Humana Navigating Cancer NightWare Source Type: blogs

There's Help for Veterans with Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders
Many post-9/11 veterans who have PTSD or depression also struggle with substance use. There are clinically proven treatments to help break the cycle of the co-occurring disorders, but the VA and other facilities need guidance on how to expand and enhance treatment opportunities for these veterans. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - November 4, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

My 2020 Election Prediction
Here’s my prediction for the U.S. election, which is just 4 days away… and also some predictions for what I think will happen in the months after that. I expect that Biden is going to win by a landslide and that it’s not even going to be close. Yes, Trump and the Republicans will continue doing their best to suppress the vote, especially in the swing states, but I don’t think it’s going to make enough of a difference to change the election outcome. The fact that they’re doing this at such an unprecedented scale is a sign of incredible desperation. Even with such overt attempts to ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

A call to action for wounded healers
I used to work with veterans who sought mental health care. Many developed PTSD after witnessing their comrades get injured, blown up, and die. Some of these veterans had visible wounds, as one would expect, but almost all of them had invisible wounds. The latter were worsened by survivor ’s guilt or shame that they failed […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 27, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nesrin-abu-ata" rel="tag" > Nesrin Abu Ata, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Telepsychology During COVID-19: It All Depends On How You Look At It
The global lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic has opened the door to the deepest fears of humanity in this interconnected world: isolation. A worldwide scale of anxiety, loneliness and fear, associated with worrying about the virus, unemployment, social isolation and uncertainty added up to a mental state we may even start to call as “depidemic.” Research shows that about half the population has been or is facing mental health issues since the outbreak. Preserving mental health thus has been an increasing topic over the past months.  We know from the fact that working from home is linked with incr...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 27, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Lifestyle medicine Digital Health Research E-Patients Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Medical Education Telemedicine & Smartphones depression psychology anxiety remote remote care telepsychology Source Type: blogs

The tragedy of the post-COVID “ long haulers ”
Suppose you are suddenly are stricken with COVID-19. You become very ill for several weeks. On awakening every morning, you wonder if this day might be your last. And then you begin to turn the corner. Every day your worst symptoms — the fever, the terrible cough, the breathlessness — get a little better. You are winning, beating a life-threatening disease, and you no longer wonder if each day might be your last. In another week or two, you’ll be your old self. But weeks pass, and while the worst symptoms are gone, you’re not your old self — not even close. You can’t meet your responsibi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anthony Komaroff, MD Tags: Brain and cognitive health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Fatigue Source Type: blogs

The hidden long-term cognitive effects of COVID-19
This study also found that a number of patients with COVID suffered strokes. In fact, COVID infection is a risk factor for strokes. A group of Canadian doctors found that individuals over 70 years of age were at particularly high risk for stroke related to COVID infection, but even young individuals are seven times more likely to have a stroke from this coronavirus versus a typical flu virus. Autopsy data from COVID patients in Finland suggests that another major cause of brain damage is lack of oxygen. Particularly worrisome is that several of the patients who were autopsied did not show any signs of brain injury during t...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew E. Budson, MD Tags: Brain and cognitive health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Memory Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs

PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Are a Vicious Cycle for Veterans
It is not uncommon to see a co-occurrence of PTSD and heavy use of substances, which can rise to the level of a substance use disorder. It may be necessary to challenge how the needs of veterans are addressed to remove barriers to care that make treating these co-occurring disorders simultaneously so difficult. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - September 14, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Michael Richardson; Roger Brooks; Eric R. Pedersen; Terri Tanielian Source Type: blogs

How to get PTSD. Twice. Worse.
I just read disturbing comments by a highly respected University of California doc Karen Seal [who screens and treats returning veterans from Iraq or Afghanistan at San Francisco’s famous Ft. Miley Veterans Administration Hospital, one of our premier VA Research Hospitals] about the redeployment of young soldiers treated for PTSD and other neurological and psychatric problems back to Mid-East war zones [http://www.military.com/features/0,15240,136020,00.html]. Effective last December, service members with a “psychiatric disorder in remission, or whose residual symptoms do not impair duty performance” may ...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - September 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Brain Fitness Brain Trauma, Injury BrainHQ Cognitive impairments Posit Science Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, et alia Source Type: blogs

Can what you eat worsen your ADHD?
An excerpt from This Is Your Brain on Food: An Indispensable Guide to the Surprising Foods that Fight Depression, Anxiety, PTSD, OCD, ADHD, and More. Suzy was a bright and hardworking student. However, even though she was conscientious and generally cheery, her grades began to fall during her senior year, and she started to feel […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/uma-naidoo" rel="tag" > Uma Naidoo, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Nutrition Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Your brain and PTSD: biomarkers and high-stress states
If you ’re reading this, you’re probably stressed. Whether it’s related to work, household chores, parenting, school, politics, or, yes, COVID, stress is a normal part of life. Because stress is a normal part of life, our bodies have adapted to react to stress through a series of neurophysiological r esponses. Once the stressor or threat has […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 27, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/samoon-ahmad" rel="tag" > Samoon Ahmad, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?
Today’s show takes a good hard look at police culture as a whole. What type of personality is drawn to a career in law enforcement? What are officers taught in the academy? Why do they receive so little mental health care when they face so much trauma on the job? These are just a few of the areas that our guest, mental health advocate Gabriel Nathan, lays bare. Join us as we discuss the basic foundations of law enforcement and how Gabriel believes the profession needs to evolve to keep up with the times. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic above! SUBSCRIBE &a...
Source: World of Psychology - August 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Policy and Advocacy The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs