Podcast: Using Death as Motivation to Live
 How often do you think about death? If you’re like most people, you probably try to keep it in the back corners of your mind. But according to today’s guest, Kate Manser, remembering you might die tomorrow is the best inspiration to live today. Kate asserts that when we incorporate a certain level of mortality awareness into our daily lives, it motivates us to value life so much more and to live each day with intention. We start to find joy in the small things and live in a way that makes a positive outward ripple for all of humanity. So how do we manage to think about death without falling into fear? Tune...
Source: World of Psychology - April 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Death & Dying General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Interview LifeHelper Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: March 28, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net dissects the psychology of comfort TV, tips on how to protect yourself from others’ negative energy, ways to take care of your mental health while working from home, and more. Why You Can’t Stop Streaming Seinfeld. Or Frasier. Or Bones: On the Psychology of Comfort TV: No doubt you’re familiar with comfort television, but is your idea of comfort TV the same as your mom’s or dad’s? Sister’s or brother’s? What about your spouse’s or significant other’s? College roommate’s? You might have answered “yes” or &ldq...
Source: World of Psychology - March 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net comfort TV First Responders Journaling MDMA methylenedioxymethamphetamine military Negative Energy PTSD Veterans Source Type: blogs

Minimizing the Risks of PTSD from the COVID-19 Pandemic
It is a stressful time. Many have begun feeling the emotional and psychological effects of being quarantined. People are being told to stay indoors, to limit leaving their home except for necessities and to skip socializing altogether, if possible. Supermarket shelves are empty; toilet paper and hand sanitizer are sold out. Many communities are placing restrictions on where people can go. Buzzwords like “social distancing” and “martial law” are in the news in recent weeks. Hospitals are overcrowded and staff are overworked. Many playgrounds, amusement parks, hotels and beaches have been closed until...
Source: World of Psychology - March 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness PTSD coronavirus COVID-19 quarantine traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Coping with the coronavirus pandemic for people with anxiety disorders
These days, we all have to accept the anxiety inherent in living in the time of the coronavirus pandemic and COVID-19. If there was a way to dispel all anxious feelings, I’d tell you, but there isn’t. The one exception might be someone who could summon such a degree of denial that they carry on as if everything was normal. And that, as I’m sure you can see, would prove to be very, very unwise. Anxiety helps us prepare to respond in a more adaptive and healthy way. Some people find it possible to tolerate some degree of discomfort and can manage their anxiety in a healthy manner. Often that’s because...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Sharp, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Infectious diseases Mental Health Source Type: blogs

The Memory of Trauma in the Body
Keith hadn’t thought about his father in many years. Though he had some good times with his dad, one of his most vivid memories was not so good. He was 10 years old and his father was determined to teach him how to dive. He remembers feeling pressured to get on the diving board and just do it. He remembers trying, really trying but he just couldn’t take the plunge. “Let’s go, boy,” his dad yelled. “Just do it. Don’t be a wimp! It’s no big deal. Jump!” Keith wished it was no big deal, but for him it was. He felt terrified as he listened to his dad shouting and saw the ot...
Source: World of Psychology - March 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: PTSD Trauma Breathing Exercise Childhood Trauma Memory Post Traumatic Stress stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Childhood Emotional Neglect and the Coronavirus
Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN) impacts individuals in a wide variety of ways. But in this unprecedented time of social distancing, working remotely, and even quarantine, CEN can exacerbate the responses that so many of us already experience in “normal” times. It’s important for those of us who are having feelings that are more heightened than usual, or which seem disproportionate to the situation, to know that we are not alone. Our reactions, however extreme or confusing, are a natural response to childhood events over which we had little or no control There are a myriad of effects of growing up with C...
Source: World of Psychology - March 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Robin Schwartz Tags: Abuse PTSD Trauma childhood emotional neglect Childhood Trauma Codependence Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 fight or flight Resilience scarcity of necessities social distancing Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Schizophrenia in Men
Men and women experience schizophrenia differently; from the age of onset to symptoms and how society treats those with mental disorders.  Schizophrenic, Rachel Star Withers and co-host Gabe Howard continue the discussion of the differences from the last episode but change the focus to men.  Jason Jepson, an author who has schizophrenia joins for a man’s perspective and Dr. Hayden Finch returns to explain the clinical side of the issues. Highlights in “Schizophrenia in Men” Episode [01:30] Age of onset [04:00] Symptoms in men vs women [05:00] Interview with Jason Jepson [07:30] Jason discusses ...
Source: World of Psychology - March 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Men's Issues Psychiatry Psychology Living With Schizophrenia Mental Disorder Mental Health Mental Illness Symptoms Of Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Finding Resilience in the Midst of Challenges
“A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him.” – David Brinkley One thing is certain, and that is that each day presents new challenges. It isn’t the fact that challenges occur that is most important, however, but how well an individual is able to adapt and bounce back from setbacks and go on to face daily challenges. The secret is resilience, yet a little known fact is that it is possible to find and tap into a wellspring of resilience even in the midst of challenges.  A common misconception for many people is to wonder if we’re up for ...
Source: World of Psychology - March 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Coping Skills Resilience Source Type: blogs

Coping with COVID-19: Resources for Managing Mental Health
Despite coronavirus, Trump keeps shaking hands(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Don't shake hands. Maintain a distance of 6 feet. Don't touch surfaces that could contain respiratory droplets. Don't touch your face. [It'svery hard tonot touch your face.]When your leaders fail to follow the most basic guidelines forpreventing the spread of COVID-19, trust and confidence are eroded.Trump coronavirus press conference an exemplar of what not to do  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)The coronavirus pandemic has raised (nearly) everyone's level of anxiety and stress. Rampant panic buying, superstore shelves emptied of toilet pap...
Source: The Neurocritic - March 15, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Stealing Cinderella (A True Story)
 Would you risk everything for love? Even your life? In today’s podcast, Gabe interviews Mark Diehl, author of Stealing Cinderella: How I Became an International Fugitive for Love. Mark’s book is his true-life story of growing up with an emotionally unstable mother, his resulting rebellious streak and drug use, and the wild ride of his forbidden love affair with a South Korean woman. The story details the couple’s narrow escape from her rich, abusive family in a journey where they almost lost their lives. Tune in for a true-life fairy tale that’s stranger than fiction. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW G...
Source: World of Psychology - March 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Motivation and Inspiration Podcast Relationships The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Male Survivors of Sexual Assault and Abuse
 Did you know one in six males are sexually assaulted before their 18th birthday? Unfortunately, many victims are reluctant to come forward due to cultural conditioning. In today’s podcast, Gabe speaks with two psychologists about this very common but somewhat taboo issue. They tackle the prevalent myths surrounding male sexual assault and discuss why so many victims suffer in secrecy. What can be done? Where can survivors reach out for help? Join us for an in-depth talk on this very important and under-discussed topic. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW Guest information for ‘Male Sexual Assault’ Podcast Episo...
Source: World of Psychology - March 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Abuse Children and Teens General Interview Men's Issues Podcast The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Why does Generation Z require so many workplace accommodations?
Recently the Wall Street Journal reported on how many young people are now seeking“accommodations” at work for their anxiety, PTSD, depression, and other mental conditions. The article provoked a lively discussion split largely on age lines. While older people accuse Gen Z members of being“emotional hemophiliacs,” Gen Z members often say they have […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/martha-rosenberg" rel="tag" > Martha Rosenberg < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Postpartum Psychosis Warning Signs
Having a baby is a wonderfully happy time, right? For many women, it certainly is, but estimates show that 1 in 5 women who give birth will suffer from some type of perinatal mental illness, such as depression, anxiety, OCD or psychosis. Chances are, this includes someone you know. In today’s podcast, Dr. Katayune Kaeni, a psychologist who specializes in perinatal mental health and a sufferer herself, discusses these often confusing and debilitating disorders, particularly postpartum psychosis, a more rare and severe form of perinatal mental illness. Who is at risk? What does perinatal psychosis look like? And what ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Children and Teens Disorders General Interview Parenting Podcast Pregnancy The Psych Central Show Women's Issues Source Type: blogs

Top Ways Digital Health Helps Deal With Anxiety
Saying ‘calm down’ totally calmed me down, thank you so much – said no one ever. Just like in the case of anger- suggesting taking it easy doesn’t help people suffering from anxiety either. It can even make people feel more separated and lonelier than before. They may feel their loved ones don’t understand them and that’s a stress factor for everyone. So, is there a better, modern way to manage anxiety? This would be a short and sad article if there wasn’t – so here is the good news: there sure is… Source: uniquemindcare.com Let’s see some facts Anxiety ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 27, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: szandra Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers digital health e-patient ecg VR meditation telemedicine mental health mental wellbeing stress management anxiety cyberchondria Source Type: blogs

First Noninvasive Cortisol Detector to Monitor Stress, Mental Conditions
Stress related to our mental well-being, including that associated with depression, anxiety, and PTSD, is difficult to measure in practice. Levels of cortisol, a steroid hormone, are closely linked to changes in one’s mental state and blood tests are available to measure cortisol. But a blood test can raise a person’s stress level itself and it can’t be done frequently, nor without a medical professional. Now researchers at Caltech are reporting on the first noninvasive, wearable sensor that can detect changes in cortisol levels directly from sweat in the skin. It’s made of graphene, a layer of c...
Source: Medgadget - February 26, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Diagnostics Materials Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

What is the Definition of Alcoholism?
The definition of alcoholism is physical dependence on alcohol to the extent that stopping alcohol use would bring on withdrawal symptoms. Alcoholism may also be used to refer to ingrained drinking habits that cause health or social problems. Alcohol dependence can have many serious effects on the brain, liver, and other organs of the body, some of which can lead to death. Individuals who suffer from alcoholism can differ from each other in many ways. However, there are recognizable symptoms of alcoholism, high-functioning alcoholism, and a means to diagnose alcoholism. Symptoms of Alcoholism Alcoholism symptoms differ fo...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - February 25, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates alcohol abuse alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcohol use Source Type: blogs

Were You Raised to Be Afraid?
“I was raised to believe that being frightened meant being alive. Timeo, ergo sum. That being scared is not a frailty but a skill. That I displayed intelligence by shunning whatever displayed itself as welcoming or wild. That the scariest time-bomb in the world was me.” Some of us were raised to seek out scary things. Not in a fun way. Not like skydiving or watching horror films. Some of us were taught to expect and detect threats in every circumstance. Anticipating every buffet, ballgame and block party, every crosswalk, cough and conversation—we were taught to wonder: What could possibly go wr...
Source: World of Psychology - February 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Disorders Family General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Psychology Publishers Spirituality & Health childhood fear fearful parenting Source Type: blogs

Parental Awareness Tools that Reduce Childhood Trauma
Since we are living in a time of extremely high statistical occurrences of childhood anxiety, depression and even suicide (which is happening at even younger ages), we need to look at the causes that are behind these difficult challenges that children, teens and young adults are facing today. Whether it be parental influences, interactions with abusive outsiders, school bullying, or something else, mental illnesses are growing at a rampant rate.  When mental illness is not alleviated, it can create C-PTSD (compound or complex PTSD), so it’s critical to reverse it early. What sometimes keeps the underlying factor...
Source: World of Psychology - February 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maria Bogdanos Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Trauma adverse childhood experiences Childhood Trauma Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Has a Moral Injury
By KIM BELLARD The term “moral injury” is a term originally applied to soldiers as a way to help explain PTSD and, more recently, to physicians as a way to help explain physician burnout.  The concept is that moral injury is what can happen to people when “perpetrating, failing to prevent, or bearing witness to acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations.”   I think healthcare generally has a bad case of moral injury.   How else can we explain physicians practicing surprise billing, hospitals suing patients, hea...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Hospitals Medical Practice Patients Physicians Burnout Healthcare system hospital gowns Kim Bellard moral injury US Healthcare system Source Type: blogs

The Connection Between Childhood Trauma and Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Numerous studies have been done on the implications of childhood trauma on mental health. Although the general consensus is that trauma does affect an individual in many ways, very little research has been done to narrow the investigation into the possible links between childhood trauma and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). One 2013 study, Childhood Maltreatment is Associated with Larger Left Thalamic Gray Matter investigated the relationship between GAD and childhood maltreatment by examining the brain scans of individuals with a history of GAD and trauma. As a person with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Complex ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sue Morton Tags: Abuse Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Trauma Anxiety Disorder Childhood Trauma Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Caring for My Bipolar Mother
When parents struggle with severe mental illness, their children can fall into the role of caregiver. What is this like from the child’s point of view? How does it affect their school life, their friendships or their worldview? Today’s guest, mental health advocate and author Michelle E. Dickinson, experienced this firsthand as the child of a woman with bipolar disorder. From a very young age, Michelle remembers her mother’s manic highs and deep lows. She recalls the happy shopping sprees on “good” days, followed by the overwhelmingly sad days when her mother would cry and cry and Michelle wou...
Source: World of Psychology - January 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Bipolar Children and Teens Disorders Family General Interview Mania Parenting Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Comorbidity with Schizophrenia
Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional conditions co-occurring with a primary condition. In this episode, host schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers with her cohost Gabe Howard will be discussing comorbidity with schizophrenia. Comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, more complex clinical management and increased health care costs. Occupational therapist and host of the podcast Occupied, Brock Cook, will be joining us to discuss ways that he works with people with schizophrenia to manage multiple health issues.  Highlights from “Comorbidity with Schizophrenia” Episode [01:28] What ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Antipsychotic Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia comorbid comorbid psychiatric conditions Comorbidities Comorbidity Diagnosis Of Schizophrenia Livi Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: January 18, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net explores how anxiety looks in children, how managers can work with employees dealing with depression, why young girls are struggling more with mental health issues than their male counterparts, a new bill that would make mental health a priority for first responders, and more.     Anxiety is Different for Kids: Do you have a child who struggles with anxiety? Would you even recognize it? According to the author, anxiety disorders in children can manifest in a variety of ways, and kids typically don’t display symptoms in the same way that adults do. Michigan-based ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Depression Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Students Trauma Childhood Anxiety Childhood Trauma First Responders girls' mental health Source Type: blogs

Rehabilitation post Traumatic Brain Injury
Dr Oliver Flower Rehabilitation post Traumatic Brain Injury The rehabilitation of people who have cognitive impairment after TBI should be based on an understanding of what is the likely cause of that impairment. Des Gorman (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Oliver Flower Tags: Clinical Crit Care SMACC19 Des Gorman TBI Traumatic Brain Injury Source Type: blogs

Treating Social Anxiety Disorder with Mindfulness
It’s completely normal to feel anxious in social situations. Be it giving a speech or talking on the phone, social anxiety affects a surprisingly large percentage of the population. However, when one experiences considerable distress and an impaired ability to function in parts of their daily life, it is likely they will be diagnosed as social anxiety disorder.1 Many people with social anxiety disorder do not know that they have it. They may recognize that there is something “wrong,” but do not know what it is or what to do about it. This is where mindfulness can help. By being mindful, aware of the prese...
Source: World of Psychology - January 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Paul Jozsef Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Jon Kabat Zinn Meditation secular mindfulness Social Anxiety Source Type: blogs

Starting Therapy: Where to Begin
Taking the steps to go to therapy can feel ambitious, especially when you are struggling with an emotional or mental issue. It takes a lot of courage to speak to someone about your problems and go through the learning process to endure and grow into a stronger person. With Nearly half of American households having had someone seek mental health treatment, it is important that we make the therapy process known. In this blog we are going to talk about what are some types of therapy, how to find a therapist and what to ask the therapist during your first appointment.  Let’s start by looking at some types of therapy...
Source: World of Psychology - January 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Boyle Tags: Psychology Treatment Entering therapy therapy basics Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Transforming Trauma Into Wholeness and Healing
 Trauma eventually comes for all of us.  It isn’t just stereotypical things like war or assault that are traumatic, there is also the everyday realities of things like illness or job loss. As painful as it is, trauma can be an invitation to a process of growth and change. Join us as today’s guest, Dr. James Gordon, explains some of the techniques of trauma healing, including some surprising ones, like laughter and spending time with animals. Dr. Gordon also shares with us how he personally handles his own trauma and the programs most often used by the Center for Mind-Body Medicine. SUBSCRIBE & REVI...
Source: World of Psychology - January 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Are You Pushing Your Own Emotional Buttons?  Learn How to Stop
In conclusion, it’s all about becoming more aware of how and when push our own emotional buttons and how we can replace old, reactionary behavior with positive, life-affirming actions. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - January 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Anxiety and Panic PTSD Self-Help Habit Change Negative Emotions Source Type: blogs

Computational Psychiatry, Self-Care, and The Mind-Body Problem
Schematic example of how the “mind” (cerebral cortex) is connected to the “body” (adrenal gland) - modified from Fig. 1 (Dum et al., 2016):“Modern medicine has generally viewed the concept of‘psychosomatic’disease with suspicion. This view arose partly because no neural networks were known for the mind, conceptually associated with the cerebral cortex, to influence autonomic and endocrine systems that control internal organs. ”Psychosomatic illnesses are typically seen in pejorative terms — it's all in your head so it must not be real! Would a known biological mechanism...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 31, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Medgadget ’s Best Medical Technologies of 2019
Wrapping up this year and looking back on the particularly interesting developments in medical technology, we at Medgadget are impressed and very excited about the future. We’re lucky to cover one of the most innovative fields of research and one that improves and saves lives. Having a constant eye on what’s new in medtech, we present what we believe are the most novel, smart, and medically important technologies we encountered in this passing year. As in years past, a few trends have emerged. Opiod Overdose Treatment Opioid addiction, and accompanying overdoses, have become disturbingly common lately. A ...
Source: Medgadget - December 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Listening with the Ears of the Heart
I am a privileged listener, like cab drivers, clergy, bartenders and hair stylists. My ability has been long-honed, as a career therapist with over 40 years under my belt. It started way before I set foot on campus in 1977 at Glassboro State College (now Rowan University) in Glassboro, NJ. I figure it began when I was a kid and my friends would come to me for advice. Back then, I didn’t have the benefit of the education to offer anything of substance. I did learn the art of nodding, smiling and saying, “um, hummm,” while I held space. Apparently, it was what they needed, since they kept coming back for mo...
Source: World of Psychology - December 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Personal Professional Source Type: blogs

Opioid Overdose: Causes, Signs, and What to Do
Opioid Overdose: Signs, Symptoms, and What to Do Any individual who uses opioids runs the risk of overdosing. Overdoses can be fatal. In fact, more than 130 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids every day. This makes it important to know what causes an opioid overdose, the signs that an opioid overdose is occurring, and what to do in the event of an opioid overdose. Opioid Overdose Causes In 2017, the CDC reported that more than 15,000 individuals died from drug overdoses involving heroin in the United States. That’s almost 5 deaths for every 100,000 Americans. However, there are some people who...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 27, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Painkiller drug overdose opiate addiction opioid opioids Source Type: blogs

Why Do People Drink Alcohol?
Alcohol is a dangerous substance. It is addictive, can deteriorate one’s health, and puts innocent people in danger. However, it is embraced and celebrated in society and there are many opportunities throughout life to try alcohol. Knowing that alcohol is dangerous and addictive can leave many people wondering, “why do people drink alcohol?” Soothe an Underlying Mental Health Condition One of the major reasons that individuals who suffer from alcohol use disorder drink are because they are suffering from an underlying mental health condition and are using alcohol to self-medicate. This condition can be e...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 27, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center Source Type: blogs

Mindfulness Versus Microdosing: Get High on Being Present
Microdosing has become very popular, and many people believe it’s a life changer. It involves taking a small amount — a fraction of a dose — of a hallucinogenic drug to achieve psychological benefits while minimizing any undesirable side effects. Most microdosers ingest LSD (lysergic acid diethyl amide) or mushrooms (psilocybin), which are psychedelics that can create profoundly intensified sensory perception. These drugs became popular in the 1960s and ’70s, and for anyone who used them then, they too espoused the drugs’ mind-altering effects. The difference back then was that people weren&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - December 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ora Nadrich Tags: Addiction Medications Mindfulness Hallucinogens LSD lysergic acid microdose psilocybin Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 21, 2019
This article lists 8 simple things we can do to help minimize anxiety during the holidays. Grounding Techniques for Holiday Gatherings: During the holiday season, even the most healthy individuals can become destabilized — when your internal sense of calm and confidence is unexpectedly thwarted. And if you struggle with mental health issues, your chances for destabilization increase even more. In this article, the author shares four simple ways we can ground ourselves when we’re feeling unhinged. Lonely, Burned-Out, and Depressed: The State of Millennials’ Mental Health Entering the 2020s: The mental heal...
Source: World of Psychology - December 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: Anxiety and Panic Depression Disorders General Holiday Coping Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Around the Net Research Stress Body Dysmorphic Disorder grounding techniques Holiday Stress Holidays Millennials Pollution Se Source Type: blogs

The Top Digital Health Technologies Helping Refugees Around the World
“Refugees are persons who are outside their country of origin for reasons of feared persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or other circumstances which have seriously disturbed public order and, as a result, require international protection,” writes the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). However, refugees’ plea isn’t limited to people leaving their home country en masse following atrocious wars or political instability, but can be that of anyone else, like you and me, following unforeseen calamities, be it natural or man-made, leading to similar situations. The November ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Telemedicine & Smartphones digital health technology digital technology digital innovation refugee Source Type: blogs

Opioids and Mental Health
Opioids are a group of very strong pain relievers used to relieve pain after a surgery or traumatic injury. They are much more effective than over-the-counter pain relievers, however, they are also highly addictive. People who suffer from mental health conditions are much more likely to become addicted to opioids, making it important to understand the link between opioids and mental health. The Connection Between Addiction to Opioids and Mental Health People with mood and anxiety disorders are twice as likely to use opioids as people without mental health disorders They are also more than three times as likely to misuse ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 11, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Mental Health mental health costs mental health coverage mental illness opiate addiction opiates opioid opioid crisis opioids Source Type: blogs

A Disruptive Treatment Promises New Hope to PTSD Patients: Will Physicians Be Willing to Use It?  
Millions of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — from veterans to rape survivors — have new hope because of a watershed study showing that the injection of an anesthetic to a bundle of nerves in the neck can relieve their symptoms in a clinically significant way. The treatment is known as the stellate ganglion block, or SGB. Used since 1925 for problems such as pain in the arm and shingles, it is safe and effective. In the newly released, eight-week, U.S. Army-funded clinical trial of 108 active-duty service members with PTSD, the nonprofit research institute RTI International found that patients...
Source: World of Psychology - December 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Eugene Lipov, MD Tags: Personal PTSD Research Treatment Hyper Vigilance Neuroscience Neurotransmitter Norepinephrine Posttraumatic Stress Disorder pruning Source Type: blogs

Three evidence-based ways to develop a resilient mind
___ Life throws chaos at us on a regular basis—whether it’s our finances, our relationships, or our health. In the work world, around 50 percent of people are burned out in industries like health care, banking, and nonprofits, and employers spend $300 billion per year on workplace-related stress. In response, we just keep on pushing through, surviving on adrenaline. We overschedule ourselves; we drink another coffee; we respond to one more email. If we stay amped up all the time, we think, we’ll eventually be able to get things done. But all that does is burn us out, drain our productivity, and lead to ex...
Source: SharpBrains - December 4, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness adrenaline Breathing coffee creativity Decision-making exhaustion Mindfulness-Training productivity relaxed state-of-mind Stress Stress Response workplace Source Type: blogs

Podcast | Chronic Illness and Depression
 After receiving two chronic illness diagnosis by the age of 24, it really was no surprise that host Jackie Zimmerman also started to experience depression. Unable to tackle both, Jackie chose to focus on her physical health, letting her mental health deteriorate quickly — and dangerously. In this episode, we discuss the mind-body connection and how when your body is sick, your mind can quickly follow.   (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular b...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Antidepressant Depression Medications Not Crazy Podcast Stress Suicide Trauma Source Type: blogs

Podcast | Psychiatric Ward: First Hand Account (Part 2 of 2)
 In part two of this series, we go into more detail about Gabe’s inpatient hospital stay and focus on what he was thinking while he was hospitalized and what he learned after he was discharged.  We talked about what to do if you feel like you need to be hospitalized, the steps you need to take in order to be admitted and the obstacles involved with getting the help you may need. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Bipolar Depression Not Crazy Podcast Trauma Treatment Source Type: blogs

Concerning Findings About Cannabis Use
While recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states as of November 2019, more states gravitating toward legalizing the recreational use of the substance, and 33 states allowing medical marijuana, there’s apparently no stopping this trend. Cannabis, in the form of marijuana, hemp, and cannabidiol (CBD)  is being used for pain relief, to alleviate stress, cope with anxiety, and a number of other mental health disorders and addictions. Yet, there’s a dearth of clinical studies that have been conducted on the overall effects on a user’s health. Clearly, as Crain’s Detroit Business points out, more ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Medications Substance Abuse Cannabis Marijuana Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: November 2, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net focuses on how turning your to-do list into an action plan can help you become more productive, why nightmares can be beneficial to your mental health, how your brain type affects who you are, and more. How Nightmares Could Be Good for Your Mental Health: Typically, we don’t view nightmares as pleasant experiences, but they might be positive ones. Well, have positive benefits, that is. Research shows that nightmares can help relieve stress, offer insight into our suppressed emotions, and prepare us for real-life threats. According to Harvard University’s Dr. Deirdre...
Source: World of Psychology - November 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Abusive Relationships Adhd brain types Mothers Nightmares Romantic Relationships Self Destruction Self Sabotage Teens Source Type: blogs

Free Live Webinar: Trauma Bonding (Why People Bond With Their Abusers)
(Please note: This free live webinar will be recorded and a copy made available to all who register.) Trauma bonding, as the name suggests, has to do with attaching to someone via a traumatic event and/or ongoing treatment. Often referred to as “Stockholm Syndrome,” wherein hostages bond with their captors — sometimes even assuming their captors’ views. Trauma bonding is common with abused children, who cry for their abusive parents when taken away by Children Services, victims of abuse often develop a strong sense of loyalty towards their abuser, despite the fact that the bond is damaging to them. ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Webinar abuse complex PTSD Domestic Violence Emotional Attachment trauma bonding Traumatic bonding Source Type: blogs

Making young minds resilient to disasters
As a pediatrician and a parent, I often think about what I’d do to keep my children safe if we were hit by a storm like Hurricane Dorian, which reduced whole towns in the Bahamas to rubble. Or by a wildfire, like the Camp Fire that burned the town of Paradise, California to the ground. Or how we’d deal with this year’s record-breaking rains that flooded scores of towns throughout the Mississippi River Basin. Disasters like these — which may be getting more dangerous with climate change — can directly harm a child’s body. But what’s less well appreciated is how they can harm our chi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aaron Bernstein, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Children's Health Environmental health Source Type: blogs

10 Ways to Boost Self-Care and Happiness When You ’ re Single
A lot of people feel guilty when they put themselves first. If you’re single and looking to learn how to take care of yourself and be happier, there are a few self care ideas and tips that can help. Self-care is the beginning of learning how to be happy with your life, even when you’re single. When you think of self-care, you may think of getting a massage or a mani-pedi. That’s alright because there’s nothing wrong with getting those things. But, learning how to take care of yourself means learning how to take care of your mind, body, and soul. Creative Ways To Be Happy & Confident When You&rsq...
Source: World of Psychology - October 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Happiness Publishers YourTango happy Self Care single Source Type: blogs

20 Medical Technology Advances: Medicine In The Future – Part I
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs

Top 7 Evidence-Based Mental Health Apps
According to a recently-published interview with John Torous, MD, MBI, Director of the Digital Psychiatry Division at the Department of Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, there are seven great evidenced-based mental health apps you should consider. Evidence-based means they’ve met the minimum requirements by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or have at least one randomized clinical research study that supports their use and effectiveness. The recommendation for these evidence-based mental health apps comes in an interview with Dr. Torous found in the Oct. 2019 issue of The Carlat Psychiatr...
Source: World of Psychology - October 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Self-Help Technology evidence-based mental health apps Smartphone Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Joker Movie and Mental Illness
Did the movie Joker portray mental illness correctly and does it matter? We passionately go over the movie Joker from the lense of people living with mental illness and discuss whether or not there are implications of making a movie like this. Does it help us or hurt us? What if it does both? Listen in to hear Gabe’s freakishly good recollection of scenes from the movie as Jackie struggles to separate entertainment from reality.  Spoiler Alert: You don’t need to see Joker to appreciate this conversation but we do go over the plot and reveal some important scenes from the movie. (Transcript Available Below)...
Source: World of Psychology - October 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Antidepressant Antipsychotic Depression Minding the Media Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child
You're reading How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Sometimes, it seems like our kids aren’t learning anything from us—but that’s simply not the case. Kids absorb all the information around them and learn by example. While that can be a good thing, it can also be a problem if you don’t want to pass on certain behaviors you’re modeling for them, like anxiety. If you’re struggling with anxiety, first remember that...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SarahDaren Tags: depression family featured psychology self improvement Source Type: blogs