11 New Jobs in the Future of Healthcare and Medicine – Part II.
The question is not whether disruptive technologies will transform the healthcare job market, but rather how and when will it happen. Healthcare navigators, augmented/virtual reality operation planners and nanomedicine engineers in the second part of my article series about future jobs in healthcare. As I am certain that the huge waves of technological change transform the medical professional palette; based on the current and prospective trends in digital health technologies I envisioned what potential new professions could appear in our lives. Don’t miss the first part of the list! If you have an idea about another...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 8, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine artificial intelligence augmented reality brain-computer interface cyborg gamification gc4 Health Innovation nanotechnology Personalized medicine psychology robotics virtual reality Source Type: blogs

Hit the Hay: Three Reasons Why Good Sleep is Crucial for Mental Health
One in three American adults don’t get enough sleep. Though Johns Hopkins Medicine reports that as many as ninety percent of North Americans respond to this chronic lack of sleep with a regular dose of caffeine, that little pick-me-up doesn’t cut it. Sleep deprivation is still having an impact on the individual’s body. Failing to get at least seven hours of sleep at night for adults can have dangerous effects on individuals’ mental health. Here are three reasons why you should prioritize quality sleep for the sake of your peace of mind. The brain needs regular cleaning. Throughout the day as the br...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 25, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: Richard Taite Tags: Richard Taite Source Type: blogs

It ’ s Bell Let ’ s Talk Day – let ’ s review
It is a measure of self-compassion on this Bell Let’s Talk Day when I can slow down and remind myself of where I am and where I’ve come from. I have a long history of, and recovery from, substance abuse – chiefly, but not solely, alcohol – begun shortly after a period of sexual abuse … Continue reading It’s Bell Let’s Talk Day – let’s review (Source: My journey with AIDS)
Source: My journey with AIDS - January 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Kenn Tags: activism AIDS and HIV autobiography Bell Let's Talk Day bipolar II Childhood trauma mental health PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) sexual abuse sexual orientation stigma Source Type: blogs

The ever-present question: Now what?
I describe myself, rightly so I think, as a long-term survivor of AIDS and HIV.  I offer as evidence my being diagnosed with HIV in 1989 and my long, slow recovery from AIDS-related Cryptosporidiosis in the early 90s – the effects of which shadow me to this day. Over the years, due to a serious accident … Continue reading The ever-present question: Now what? (Source: My journey with AIDS)
Source: My journey with AIDS - January 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Kenn Tags: AIDS and HIV autobiography bipolar II mental health PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) stigma suicide Bell Let's Talk Day Source Type: blogs

Desensitized
Today atSupport for Special Needs:Excerpt: I recently read an article that posed a question that honestly hadn't occurred to me before. Can the perhaps inevitable hyper-vigilance that comes from parenting a child with a disability result in (or manifest as a symptom of) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder? I'm mildly surprised that I'd never thought of it in those terms, since the obvious answer is yes, of course it can. And the question is more complicated because for parents of kids with disabilities, hyper-vigilance isn't necessarily an inappropriate response. Terms like " hyper-vigilance " and " helicopt...
Source: Schuyler's Monster: The Blog - January 3, 2017 Category: Disability Authors: Robert Rummel-Hudson Source Type: blogs

One Giant Step for Natkind
We just had an interesting, positive moment. Some of you know that Nat– still living at home since July –  has been exploding into rages almost daily when things go a little wrong/not his way. It passes, but it’s horrible: screaming, slapping his head hard, pleading loudly and sadly for what he wants. But he can’t always have what he wants — no one can. Things break. Too much chocolate makes you sick. Plans change. Ned and I have been working together on this problem for weeks. We’ve been focusing on getting his meds right. But I realized yesterday that all of my strategizing and ...
Source: Susan's Blog - January 2, 2017 Category: Child Development Authors: Susan Senator Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Am I Normal or Nuts?
Oh, it’s so easy for people to attach pejorative labels onto individual quirks. So, if you’ve been wondering (or been told), you’re nuts, weird or wacko, listen up! None of us is as “normal” as we seem. We all have mannerisms that are a bit quirky; traits that are a bit peculiar; idiosyncrasies that make us — us. So, are you normal or nuts? Oh wait a minute, I’ve goofed; “nuts” is not politically correct! Forgive me! Before I get a slew of hate e-mails, I’ll correct myself. Are you normal? Or, do you “suffer” from a “disorder” for which yo...
Source: World of Psychology - December 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Anxiety and Panic Habits Happiness Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Trauma Labels Mental Disorder Normality Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Perfectionism Quirks Social Anxiety Stigma Worry Source Type: blogs

The Complete Anatomy Platform: An Interview with Niall Johnston, President of 3D4Medical
3D4Medical‘s (Dublin, Ireland) award-winning Complete Anatomy digital educational platform facilitates the exploration of human anatomical characteristics that are difficult to visualize via traditional methods or without hands-on training. The system, widely employed in medical education at the university level, offers students and educators a unique opportunity to investigate bodily systems, features, and conditions virtually with unprecedented precision and interactive control. Niall Johnston, the President of 3D4Medical, was kind enough to sit down with the Medgadget team recently to discuss h...
Source: Medgadget - December 19, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Zach Kaufman Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Hey Nurse; Got Resistance?
Have you ever found yourself resisting change? Has your nursing career stalled because you're afraid of taking a risk or doing something different? Change is indeed the only constant in the universe (aside from death and taxes), so it's something that we simply need to get comfortable with---over and over again!Magical ThinkingMany nurses and non-nurses alike can engage in magical thinking at various times throughout their careers. "Oh, I don't need a BSN; they'll never close the doors on associate degree nurses. " Or maybe something like this: "Start a business as a nurse entrepreneur? I'll just tell people...
Source: Digital Doorway - December 12, 2016 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers healthcare careers nurse nurse career nurse careers nurses nursing Source Type: blogs

An Interview with Gene Saragnese, Chairman & CEO of MedyMatch Technology
MedyMatch Technology, a company based in Tel Aviv, Israel, leverages artificial intelligence, deep learning, and computer vision technologies to offer patient-specific clinical decision support. Their application helps radiologists and emergency room physicians to detect signs of intracranial hemorrhages, which are difficult to diagnose by standard analysis of imaging data alone. The Medgadget team recently had an opportunity to speak with Gene Saragnese, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of MedyMatch, to discuss their technology and its significance in depth. Prior to joining MedyMatch in January of 2016, Gene&nbs...
Source: Medgadget - December 9, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Zach Kaufman Tags: Diagnostics Emergency Medicine Exclusive Neurology Source Type: blogs

Here ’s How Stress Recalibrates Your Brain, Driving Alcohol Consumption
Here’s How Stress Recalibrates Your Brain, Driving Alcohol Consumption Stress creates feelings that we sometimes deal with in maladaptive ways. A long wait at the post office might stress you so much that you choose to stay home with pizza and a movie instead of going to the gym. Caring for an ailing parent might start you on a path of drinking every night. Responses to stress vary, but fall within a set of norms. Skipping the gym or feeling compelled to go out for a drink are the kind of responses we accept without question. It’s natural to want to “indulge” after a bad day, conventional thinking g...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 6, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: Constance Scharff, PhD Tags: Abuse Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Current Events Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Mental Health Source Type: blogs

In the Company of Death; In Consortium Mortis
By Mark Ligorski#1. BeginningsJust like in superhero movies, there is always a back story. This is mine.After graduating medical school in 1981, I went to work at St. Vincent ’s Medical Center on Staten Island for the next two years, the first spent in rotating through the different areas of medicine and surgery and then a year of Internal Medicine. 100 hour work weeks were typical, with on call shifts every 3rd or 4th night.People stayed in hospital for weeks at a time; there were still wards with four to six patients. Intensive and cardiac care units were still pretty new. TheKaren Ann Quinlan c...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - December 3, 2016 Category: Palliative Care Tags: advanced directives code status CPR ligorski respirator Source Type: blogs

Caring for Trauma Survivors and Caring for Yourself in the Process: Everyday Tips for Non-Professionals
Elise just told me about her past. I knew she had been through a lot, but not all that. She said her mom hit her and left bruises when she was a kid, her neighbor touched her where she didn’t want to be touched, and I guess her brother was alcoholic. There was a lot of other stuff, too. It has gotten better in the last couple years so that is good. I have known their whole family for a long time and never knew any of that. What do I do now? I want to help somehow, but is there anything to do? I don’t know if I should tell someone. I feel sad. We hope abuse and trauma never happen to ourselves or someone we love...
Source: World of Psychology - November 27, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Grace Watt Tags: Family Friends Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope PTSD Self-Help Trauma Healthy Boundaries Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Self Care self-compassion Sexual Abuse Sexual Assault Source Type: blogs

Signs of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Today
It’s clear that people from every socio-economic status today have experienced one or more life events that have caused emotional trauma, thus creating PTSD. It’s not just the “veteran’s ailment” and is gaining growing and needed recognition in the psychotherapeutic healing community. PTSD is caused by childhood trauma, financial disasters, recession, loss of employment, loss of a relationally close family member, divorce, loss of home, sudden shift in life responsibilities as having to be a primary caretaker for an elderly family member, physical and chronic pain, loss of health and many othe...
Source: World of Psychology - November 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maria Bogdanos Tags: Bullying PTSD Trauma Child Abuse Domestic Abuse Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Psychological Trauma Self Care trauma recovery Traumatic Childhood Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Care 14 Holiday Communication Tips for Caregivers and Families
Alzheimer's and dementia care are difficult during the Holidays. The big question - Should you take your loved one living with dementia to Holiday celebrations outside the home? Our memory care expert Dr. Rita A. Jablonski-Jaudon says yes.By Rita A. Jablonski-JaudonAlzheimer's Reading RoomThis week marks the beginning of theholiday season— and the beginning of the onslaught of telephone messages from families, asking me the same question —Should Mom or Dad living with dementia attend celebrations during the Holidays?10 Commandments of Alzheimer's CaregivingMy answer is yes.The MINDSET study is an FDA Approved C...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 22, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer communication alzheimer's care alzheimer's caregiving care of dementia patients dementia care health help alzheimer's help with dementia care lifestyle memory care facility Source Type: blogs

Guest entry: Advocating for canine training programs that benefit veterans
A number of my students at Keuka College have been working on policy and advocacy projects that I wanted to share.  The students researched a topic of their interest, met with their legislators, and developed a broad action plan to increase awareness of their topics.  This information is provided courtesy of Nina Fusco, a graduate student who is interested in increasing awareness to HR 3016, particularly those sections that support canine training programs that would benefit veterans who have PTSD and other conditions." The Veterans Employment, Education, and Healthcare Improvement Act is a federal bill...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - November 20, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Tags: OT practice policy Source Type: blogs

An Open Letter to Steve Jobs Where Ever He May Be: My iPhone 7 Fiasco
Please note that while this is usually a psychiatry blog, today I am using it to vent for my own personal psychotherapy.  Please feel free to offer words of support, to make helpful interpretations to improve my insight, or if you know CBT techniques that may help me, I'm open to that.  Is there a 12 step group for iPhone users?  Medications to treat Post Traumatic iPhone Seven Disorder?  Maybe just a gin and tonic.  In addition, let me tell you that there are some other stressful things going on in my life: When you shower in my bathroom, it rains in the kitchen.  This has led to 6 weeks...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

An Open Letter to Steve Jobs Where Ever He May Be: My iPhone 7 Fiasco
Please note that while this is usually a psychiatry blog, today I am using it to vent for my own personal psychotherapy.  Please feel free to offer words of support, to make helpful interpretations to improve my insight, or if you know CBT techniques that may help me, I'm open to that.  Is there a 12 step group for iPhone users?  Medications to treat Post Traumatic iPhone Seven Disorder?  Maybe just a gin and tonic.  In addition, let me tell you that there are some other stressful things going on in my life: When you shower in my bathroom, it rains in the kitchen.  This has led to 6 weeks...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

My Neverending iPhone 7+ Fiasco
If you've already read the beginning of this, you can scroll down to the Addendum added on 1/17/17.Please note that while this is usually a psychiatry blog, today I am using it to vent for my own personal psychotherapy.  Please feel free to offer words of support, to make helpful interpretations to improve my insight, or if you know CBT techniques that may help me, I'm open to that.  Is there a 12 step group for iPhone users?  Medications to treat Post Traumatic iPhone Seven Disorder? --------------------Dear Mr. Jobs,I know you've died and left the job and I should leave you to your death in peace, but...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Why Feeling Like Shit Is Your Best Path To Happiness
Want to find your path to happiness? Then read this very cool guest post from Therese Sibon. Your day starts in hell. The train door slams in your face and moves on without you. You miss your interview. You’re stuck in traffic and a fender bender plummets you into an insurance nightmare. Your start-up has wound down. Your day starts in hell, enters a dimension of damnation and spirals out of control. It sucks. Totally. The culture-at-large counsels you to Think Positive! Be Grateful for All You Have! A Smile Changes All – Science has Double-blind Proof!! While part of you wants to bypass the misery and jum...
Source: A Daring Adventure - November 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tim Brownson Tags: Guest Posts Source Type: blogs

Are Public –Private Partnerships The Future Of Serving Veterans?
Despite hearing far too often only about the problems our veterans face, the majority of transitioning veterans return home safely—free of mental health problems—and quickly reintegrate into the communities where they will continue to serve. Unfortunately, when the media and conventional wisdom propagate the false notion that veterans as a group are broken, it contributes to the stigma many veterans feel about getting help and often prevents them from seeking care when they do need it. But when veterans do need health care—whether it’s for a physical or a behavioral health issue—they and their...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 10, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Derek Coy Tags: Featured GrantWatch Hospitals Organization and Delivery Quality Source Type: blogs

Caring for those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Are you taking care of someone who seems to be against you? This can be the experience of taking care of a family member with post-traumatic stress disorder — PTSD — and it can take a huge toll on everyone involved. At the same time, caring for a person with PTSD can be an act of love and courage. What causes PTSD? PTSD can develop when people experience massively stressful events that involve childhood physical or sexual abuse, being sexually assaulted, or narrowly escaping getting killed or severely injured, whether from accidents or violence or military combat. PTSD can also be caused by witnessing these kin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Cartreine, PhD Tags: Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Caregiving Mental Health Source Type: blogs

MOC Exam Topic: More on Aquaporin-4
My last post elicited two important comments on aquaporin-4. Since not all readers necessarily look at the comments, I am publishing them as a separate post here: Maria said...Worth mentioning that [aquaporin-4] is the most well known target in Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorders, since about 80% of patients with this syndrome will have circulating anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies. The IHC is useful when considering active NMOSD on a biopsy specimen by showing loss of staining (Neurology. 2015 Jan 13;84(2):148-58)Agent86 said...And one can only get so far without mentioning the glymphatic pathwa...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: autoimmune MOC trauma Source Type: blogs

Grief = Anxiety?
After writing my post yesterday, even though I did not want to feel any grief or really anything, it did get me to thinking about the grieving process of losing someone to suicide.I started wondering if my anxiety went from bad to unbearable about the same time I found out about his death, or even if it had gotten worse at all. I asked my husband about it. He did say definitely it had gotten a lot worse, and the timeline sounded right - it was about the same time my anxiety increased. He said he thought that I had been upset that because I had told him I found out that my friend and I had exactly the same me...
Source: bipolar.and.me - November 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trumping the Evidence - The Donald Denies Asbestos Related Disease, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy but Asserted Vaccines Cause Autism
One of the main causes of health care dysfunction identified by demoralized health care professionals in our 2003 qualitative study was threats to evidence-based medicine, and by extension, evidence-based public health and health policy.(1) Since then, we have frequently discussed threats such asmanipulation andsuppression of clinical research to further vested interests, and distortion of research dissemination, such asghost written articles, often enabled byindividual andinstitutional conflicts of interest.These and other causes of health care dysfunction which we discuss, however, have hardly been the stuff of political...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 2, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: asbestos Donald Trump evidence-based medicine health policy public health Source Type: blogs

Awesome Mental Health Resources You Probably Didn ’ t Know About
We come across a lot of announcements for this new thing or that, and most of it is garbage. We do, however, like to promote ideas that we feel offer a valuable community service to both mental health consumers and professionals alike. I’ve discovered two awesome mental health resources you probably didn’t know about, both of which are absolutely free. Whether you like mental health and psychology apps, or psychology and mental books, one of these services can have the potential to change your life. Free Psychotherapy e-Books Who doesn’t like a free book? Sure, it’s an e-book rather than a physical...
Source: World of Psychology - September 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Books General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Technology free download Free E Books help with apps mental health apps mental health e-books psyberguide review of mental health Source Type: blogs

Six Pharma Innovations Marketers Should Be Aware Of
It seems that since the start of this Century, technology has advanced faster than the speed of light. In this fast paced world of technology, healthcare innovations seem to be taking the lead. There is no telling where the next ten years will lead to but one thing is for sure, a lot of change is coming. Businesses and governments around the world are working to bring new healthcare innovations into the world in a quick and efficient manner. These disruptive technological innovations will not only decrease healthcare cost but they will also improve the quality of healthcare delivery. These advancements will have a huge imp...
Source: ePharma Summit - September 29, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: 3d printing artificial intelligence Digital Health eHealth ehealth apps ePharma med tech medical marketing mhealth mhealth sensors nanotechnology Pharma Innovation precision medicine virtual reality Source Type: blogs

What Tig Notaro ’ s New Show Gets Right about Child Sexual Abuse
In the new Amazon series One Mississippi, loosely based on the life of comedian Tig Notaro, she finds herself living back home in Mississippi following the sudden death of her mother. Staying in her childhood home with her stepfather, Bill, and her adult brother, Remy, Tig isn’t just facing the grief of losing her mother, she’s recovering from breast cancer, which resulted in a double mastectomy, and suffering from a C. diff infection. She’s also dealing with the ghosts of her past. Tig — as she’s also called on the show — was molested by her grandfather throughout her childhood. Althoug...
Source: World of Psychology - September 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Celebrities Family Grief and Loss PTSD Trauma abuse brene brown Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Childhood Trauma Complex post-traumatic stress disorder Denial Empathy Molestation Psychological Trauma Rape Shame Tig Notaro Source Type: blogs

Grief is Not Self-Pity: Joan Didion ’s The Year of Magical Thinking
by Vivian Lam“Life changes fast.Life changes in the instant.You sit down to dinner and life as you know it ends. The question of self-pity. ”When does grief become “self-pity”? What is the “proper” way to grieve?Joan Didion begins writing what would becomeThe Year of Magical Thinking a few days after her husband, John Dunne, dies from a heart attack. Coupled with the mounting health crises of her daughter, Quintana, Didion ’s world is thrown out of joint. In the ongoing aftermath of these tragedies, Didion, acclaimed novelist and literary journalist, copes by doing what she ha...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - September 28, 2016 Category: Palliative Care Tags: book Didion grief lam magical media review Source Type: blogs

The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own
It doesn’t take an encounter with a bear or a threatening gun to trigger symptoms of the fight or flight response. I experienced similar phenomena when undergoing a consultation with a surgeon for an elective, life-altering surgery. Her bedside manner exuded a cold, indifferent and detached attitude. With barely a glance at me, she entered the consulting room and settled into her chair. A few perfunctory questions and she did her due diligence by rattling off the risks involved with a robotic monotone that had been programmed into her. A few hasty and superficial parting words and the meeting ended abruptly. I und...
Source: World of Psychology - September 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Libby Simon Tags: Brain and Behavior General Health-related Motivation and Inspiration Personal Psychology Treatment fight or flight Physicians surgery Source Type: blogs

Breaking Up with My PTSD: The Reality of Recovering from Haunting Trauma
My almost life-long companion and I are actually breaking up. I should be more specific. What I’m breaking up with is more exactly known as C-PTSD, a form of PTSD. I think we’re in the final stages of our separation. It’s been a long and drawn-out breakup because that’s how it goes with C-PTSD. Once you get to know it well, you practice breaking up with it every day. Some days require more sorting out and negotiation than others. It’s been around a long time for me. My children have all become very familiar with it even though they didn’t know what they’re really seeing. Most peopl...
Source: World of Psychology - September 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Donna Syed Tags: Anxiety and Panic Inspiration & Hope Men's Issues Personal Self-Esteem Trauma Women's Issues C-PTSD Complex post-traumatic stress disorder complex PTSD Complex trauma Domestic Abuse Domestic Violence Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

Brain hacking study: Train your cingulate cortex to reduce bias and regulate emotions
———- Don’t Like Their Faces? Train Your Brain to Feel More Positive (IEEE Spectrum): “Like it or not, we often have positive or negative feelings about a total stranger based solely on the looks of his or her face…Last week, researchers described, in the journal PLOS Biology, a brain training system that can alter emotions evoked by the sight of someone’s face. With just a few days of training, study volunteers felt more positively or negatively about a photo of a stranger… The fact that the brain activity monitored over the course of the experiment was going on in the cing...
Source: SharpBrains - September 21, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning behavior brain training system Brain-Training cingulate cortex Cognitive-functions DecNef fMRI neural activation Neurofeedback Source Type: blogs

WOMEN ’S BRAIN HEALTH SERIES: The Health e-Brain Study: Reflecting on the Cognitive Health of the Caregiver
Meryl Comer Today’s post acknowledges World Alzheimer’s Day by calling attention to the caregivers. Dr. Lathan is the Founder & CEO of AnthroTronix and Meryl Comer, a caregiver who has shared her personal journey through her book, Slow Dancing with a Stranger, is President, Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’s Initiative and Founding Partner, 21st Century Brain Trust® and board member of UsAgainstAlzheimer’s.  A huge shout out to Lynn Posluns, President, Women’s Brain Health Initiative, headquartered in Toronto.  Lynn has given us permission to share today’s post which...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Brain Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

What ’s it like to be a child and your sibling is diagnosed with cancer?
By Christian Jarrett When the dreadful news arrives that a child has cancer, understandably the focus of parents and health professionals turns to supporting the sick child as best they can. But also caught up in the nightmare are the child’s siblings. Not only will they likely be consumed by shock and fear, but they must adapt to the cancer journey the whole family has to embark on. Official health guidance here in the UK and in the USA states that it’s important to provide support to the siblings of children with cancer. Yet the reality is we know relatively little about their experience. A new stud...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Cancer Health Positive psychology Qualitative Source Type: blogs

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Coping with Trauma
The original 2015 Netflix series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, starring Ellie Kemper, is pure comedy at its finest as quirky — and certainly bubbly — 29 year-old Kimmy Schmidt moves from Indiana to New York City for a fresh start. She finds a home with Titus, the dramatic and eccentric roommate looking for stardom (played by Tituss Burgess), has adventures with Lillian, the tough-as-nails and offbeat landlord (played by Carol Kane), and begins to work as a nanny for Jacqueline, a snobby but lovable socialite (played by Jane Krakowski). But underneath the literally laugh out loud dialogue and hilarity is a serious ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lauren Suval Tags: Celebrities General Psychology PTSD Trauma Women's Issues Ariel Castro bunker Childhood Trauma Ellie Kemper kidnapping Optimism Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Sexual Abuse Sexual Assault Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Source Type: blogs

Childhood Trauma: Focus on Validating Feelings
When you’re a child and you suffer abuse, whether it’s physical, sexual, or emotional, you make it your mission to find out if this is normal. You wonder if other kids experienced the same things. It’s easier to doubt your perception than it is to accept the fact that you are living in a dangerous situation. If you knew that to be true, you’d have to do something about it. You’d have to talk to a teacher, a school counselor, or a police officer. You’d have to expose something that brings you great shame and pain. You’d have to face your abuser. Even though you’re only a child...
Source: World of Psychology - September 10, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Inspiration & Hope Personal PTSD Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma Child Abuse Childhood Trauma Domestic Violence Emotional Abuse Molestation Physical Abuse self-compassion Sexual Abuse Validation Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: September 9, 2016
Autumn is here. While some anxiously await the cool respite from the summer heat, you are anxious about the upcoming fall and winter season and all that it brings. If thinking about the holidays is filling you with dread, there is something you can do to prepare. Recently, I was listening to Elizabeth Gilbert’s podcast Magic Lessons. In the episode entitled, “Dancing From the Heart,” Gilbert talks to a dancer named Penelope who continually uses the word “hard” to describe her future performance. The advice Paralympian, and author Amy Purdy gave was to soften into what was hard. That doesn&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - September 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs C-PTSD Childhood Trauma Conflict Avoidance covert narcissist Emotional Neglect Manipulation Narcissism Narcissistic abuse Narcissistic Personality Disorder Pathological Liar Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

New book on how to practice mindfulness meditation with humor and playfulness
From the outside, meditation appears to be a thoroughly serious endeavor. You have to sit down, dutifully count your breaths and rein in your wandering mind, and practice this every day whether it’s fun or not. But that isn’t Chade-Meng Tan’s approach to mindfulness. The founding chair of the Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute, which started as a mindfulness class at Google and now trains employees around the world, Tan lives by the motto that “life is too important to be taken seriously.” And he adopts the same attitude toward cultivating mindfulness—outlined in his new book, J...
Source: SharpBrains - September 2, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness book Joy meditation mindfulness mindfulness-meditation therapies Source Type: blogs

Child Sexual Abuse: Don ’ t Hide Your Head in the Sand
Right as the Summer Olympic Games started in Rio, the IndyStar reported that USA Gymnastics, the national governing body for gymnastics, ignored sexual abuse allegations filed against coaches. Complaints were reportedly filed against more than 50 gymnastics coaches, but authorities were not contacted about the complaints if they did not come directly from a victim or her parents. Three of those coaches have since been convicted, while a fourth killed himself in jail. Before I mention any details, I have to give a trigger warning to trauma survivors. This news brought up a lot of poignant, ugly feelings for me. In the case ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Newman, MA Tags: Bullying Children and Teens General Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Personal Policy and Advocacy PTSD Sports Students Trauma Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Childhood Trauma coaches Darkness to Light Source Type: blogs

Vicarious Trauma: How Much More Can We Take?
Another week, another tragedy. It’s hard to take it all in, let alone make any sense of it. How does bad news affect us? We can all be affected by vicarious trauma. That is the “one step removed” trauma that didn’t actually happen to us directly, but which still impacts us nonetheless. Obviously, for the victims’ friends and relatives the effects are acute, but for onlookers (also from the news, social media and the press) these events have a profound cumulative effect. When experiencing physical or emotional trauma first- or secondhand, our brains are affected by a perceived threat...
Source: World of Psychology - August 31, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maxine Harley Tags: Disorders General Grief and Loss Psychology PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression brain Emotion Feeling fight or flight Mass murder mass shooting Psychological Trauma ripple effect social media Terrorism Tragedy Worry Source Type: blogs

The Case for Recognizing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a Purple Heart Injury
Receiving a Purple Heart in recognition of a veteran’s bravery and sacrifice is a cherished honor among military families. Traditionally given out by the Pentagon in the name of the sitting president, Purple Hearts formally recognize the physical injuries and sacrifices an individual endures in combat, including death. But not all of the most disfiguring injuries our veterans experience during their service are physical, and the lasting effects of mental health disorders originating in combat are sorely underestimated and often ignored. If severe cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are capable of destroyi...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - August 30, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: Constance Scharff, PhD Tags: Abuse Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Current Events Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Mental Health addiction treatment center drug addic Source Type: blogs

The Denial of Trauma
“I don’t have trauma.” “What happened to me isn’t trauma.” “Trauma is something horrific.” “I should have been able to cope with it.” “It’s not sad.” “I’m not upset.” Accepting you are suffering from trauma is by far one of the most difficult aspects of recovery. I thought that admitting I was suffering from trauma suggested I couldn’t cope with the events in my life or I didn’t have the strength to deal with and process those events. I thought (and sometimes in my dark moments still think) that suffering from the ef...
Source: World of Psychology - August 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amy Kee Tags: Brain and Behavior Bullying Children and Teens Disorders General Personal Psychology PTSD Relationships Self-Esteem Trauma Child Abuse Childhood Trauma Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Reactivity Source Type: blogs

Healing Prayer and the Brain: Not a Match Made in Heaven
Activity of the medial prefrontal cortex after psycho-spiritual healing (Baldwin et al., 2016).Everything we do and feel and experiencechanges the brain. Psychotherapy, juggling, taxi driving, poverty, reading, drugs, art, music, anger, love. If it didn't we'd bedead. Why should prayer be any different? The trick is to accurately determine the structural or physiological changes that are unique to a specific activity. And when assessing the effectiveness of clinical interventions, how the changes compare to an adequately matched control intervention. Plenty of high profile studies have failed to do that, including a recent...
Source: The Neurocritic - August 27, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Dear Boston Globe Spotlight Team: Access to Care is About So Much More than Public Safety
The Boston Globe Spotlight Team -- the investigative reporting team featured in the Oscar-winning, best pictureSpotlight -- is doing a six-part series on the shambles the mental health system has become in Massachusetts.  And make no mistake, their system is a shambles.  The series is called The Desperate and the Dead, and while I understand that journalism involves sensationalism to get people to read, the emphasis on violence in these articles is striking, and unnecessarily provocative.  It's stigmatizing and distracts from the real issues.  This from an author who has abook coming out shortly about p...
Source: Shrink Rap - August 27, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 27, 2016
The latter part of August is when most kids are headed back to school in America, and while many parents take this time to post first-day-of-school photos (as well as jokingly posting a few thoughts on their kids heading back to school!), there’s one topic that’s even more serious: bullying. (Of course, I realize this is a major issue for kids around the globe.) According to StopBullying.gov, children who are often at risk for being bullied are “perceived as different from their peers,” “depressed, anxious, or have low self-esteem,” or “antagonize others for attention,” whil...
Source: World of Psychology - August 27, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Bullying Children and Teens Depression Disorders Health-related Men's Issues Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Self-Esteem Self-Help Sexuality Sleep Technology abuse Am Source Type: blogs

Surprise Diagnoses
When I was diagnosed with PTSD at the beginning of the year, it came as a surprise to me. I’d gone to this psychologist for a potential BPD diagnosis. I walked out with not only that, but four years’ worth of PTSD as well. It was surprising because in these four years I’d not once thought about this disorder; it never even occurred to me. But as I thought about it, letting it sink in, things started making sense. And since the diagnosis, I’ve had to think about what happened. Because I really didn’t deal with it; I’m still having trouble figuring out where to go from here. I know it cou...
Source: World of Psychology - August 22, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Forrest Jamie Tags: Anxiety and Panic Borderline Personality Bullying Children and Teens College Disorders General PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression battery bpd Panic Attack Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Rape Sexual Assault Sexual Trauma s Source Type: blogs

The Many Conditions that Mimic Depression
Finding the right diagnosis for any disorder requires a comprehensive evaluation. Because many illnesses share many of the same symptoms. Take symptoms such as headache, stomachache, dizziness, fatigue, lethargy, insomnia and appetite loss. There are countless conditions with these exact signs. Similarly, many mental illnesses share the same symptoms, said Stephanie Smith, PsyD, a psychologist in practice in Erie, Colo., who specializes in working with individuals with depression. Which makes “the process of diagnosing mental illness tricky, to say the least.” For instance, attention deficit hyperactivity disor...
Source: World of Psychology - August 22, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Anxiety and Panic Depression Disorders General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Self-Help Stress Beck Depression Inventory Bipolar Disorder Cancer Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Clinical Depression Source Type: blogs

8 Tips for Learning to Work with Your Stress
Feeling overwhelmed? These tips are a total game-changer. Are you stressed? I’m not going to tell you to “relax.” Instead, I’ll actually show you how to regulate it. For many people, stress is a daily occurrence. When stress overruns your life, you’re left feeling “stressed out” and depleted. You can’t get enough rest, life “comes at you” super-charged, and your ability to bounce back or be resilient to the everyday challenges of living becomes harder. 6 Ways Stress is DESTROYING Your Relationship Under too much stress, chances are you’re not coping well. ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Mindfulness Publishers Stress YourTango Amygdala anxiety balance brain Breathing Exercises Chronic Stress Cortisol Counselor Fear kinds of stress Negative Statements Nervous System Neuroscience overwhelmed Perception Source Type: blogs

We Don ’ t Always Have to Say We ’ re Fine — and That ’ s Fine
We put so. much. effort into the illusion of being fine. There’s a picture saved on my computer that I will probably never show another person. It was taken a few hours before my mother died, at my daughter’s insistence, her sweet 4-year-old smile hovering over the planes and angles cancer had carved into my mom’s face. 15 Beautiful Ways To Reclaim Your Life When You’re Broken We do weird things in death sometimes, and my mom’s left eye just wouldn’t stay closed. Neither would her mouth, hanging open with each long, slow, laborious breath. I guess if you weren’t me, this picture c...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Depression Disorders Grief and Loss Publishers YourTango Anguish Bad Day broken Cassie Fox Compassion Crying death Emotions empty energy fine Lie loving Muriel Rukeyser Pain painful Sadness strong Truth vuln Source Type: blogs

Watching someone suffer extreme pain has a lasting effect on the brain
Image via Los Alamos National Laboratory/Flickr New research suggests that witnessing extreme pain – such as the injury or death of a comrade on the battlefield – has a lasting effect on how the brain processes potentially painful situations. The research team, chiefly from Bar-Ilan University and headed up by Moranne Eidelman-Rothman, investigated the brain using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Like more widely used fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging), MEG localises which parts of the brain are more active during a particular mental activity, but it offers more fine-grained information about when this a...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Emotion Brain Source Type: blogs