20 Medical Technology Advances: Medicine in the Future – Part I
As there are so many amazing things going on worldwide in medicine and healthcare, a shortlist of some of the greatest ideas and developments would give us a glimpse into the future of medicine. It is always a challenge to detect the projects with the biggest potential to be used in everyday medical practices, but here are the most promising candidates for fulfilling this notion. Here are the first 10 of the top 20 future medical technologies.   1) Augmented reality The digital contact lens patented by Google aims to change the course of diabetes management by measuring blood glucose levels from tears....
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 14, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: TMF Tags: Augmentation in Medicine Cyborgization Future of Medicine bionic GC1 google glass Healthcare Innovation List ptsd social media Surgery Source Type: blogs

JAMA Got It Wrong: Giving Prognostic Information to Families of Critically Ill Patients Is Not the Same as Palliative Care
by Elizabeth LindenbergerI know I am not alone in my disappointment this week with the authors’ conclusions in “Effect of Palliative Care-Led Meetings for Families of Patients with Critical Illness: A Randomized Clinical Trial.” The study intervention involved the provision of an informational brochure and two focused meetings specifically designed to provide families with information about prognosis. The study found no difference in most outcomes between usual care and the intervention, and PTSD symptoms were in fact increased in the intervention group. The authors concluded that "these findings do ...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - July 11, 2016 Category: Palliative Care Tags: communication families family JAMA Lindenberger palliative prognosis prognosticate Source Type: blogs

Bad Apple or Bad Orchard? - A Narrative of Alleged Individual Research Misconduct that Sidestepped the Pharmaceutical Corporate Context
Conclusion So it seems that in this case a study which may not have been conducted according to research standards was likely a pharmaceutical sponsored, designed, and controlled Phase II trial done as part of an effort to seek approval for a new drug.  Hence this case was not only about allegations of individual research misconduct, but about yet more problems with the implementation of commercially controlled human experiments designed to ultimately further marketing as well as science.  Yet none of the public discussion so far of this case was about whether Pfizer had any responsibilities to assure the quality...
Source: Health Care Renewal - July 7, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: anechoic effect clinical research integrity clinical trials New York University Pfizer pharmaceuticals Source Type: blogs

Adding mindfulness to the PTSD therapist’s toolkit
—– Soldiers who return home in casts and caskets are not the only ones struck down by the trauma of war. Many young military men and women carry emotional wounds far beyond the battlefield in the form of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This psychologically crippling condition cannot be treated with bandages or surgery, and often lasts for years on end. But new research has now demonstrated that mindfulness—a non-judgmental awareness of our thoughts and feelings—might be a useful tool for veterans battling PTSD. Rather than being stuck in disturbing memories and negative thoughts, they can use...
Source: SharpBrains - July 7, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness behavior-therapy brain brain-activity exposure therapy meditation mindfulness post-traumatic-stress-disorder psychological Psychology PTSD Source Type: blogs

JellyBean 040 with a man called Rusty
Sometimes Jellybeans are very bloody serious. I am a big supporter of paramedics. BIG. They do a difficult job in an unpredictable environment. Bad things can happen. Bad things do happen. Let me introduce Rusty; a brave paramedic that has something important to say. It is relevant to us all. Expect the unexpected in this Brave Jellybean recorded at SMACC in Dublin. There are so many different types of bravery. Big and obvious or small and subtle. Different flavours. Different arenas. This is one for the Paramedics, the EMS Providers and everyone else in critical care too. Rusty and I talk about that curious and sometimes...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 6, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean Kate Granger Paramedic PTSD Rusty Source Type: blogs

What’s the harm? Cupping edition
There are so many ridiculous alternative medicine treatments being “integrated” via “integrative” medicine into medicine, no matter how ridiculous they are, that it’s not only hard to believe, but it’s hard to keep track. Homeopathy is, of course, the most ridiculous, although “energy medicine” definitely gives homeopathy a run for its money in the Department… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - July 1, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Homeopathy Naturopathy Quackery acupuncture burn cupping PTSD traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

What ’ s the harm? Cupping edition
There are so many ridiculous alternative medicine treatments being “integrated” via “integrative” medicine into medicine, no matter how ridiculous they are, that it’s not only hard to believe, but it’s hard to keep track. Homeopathy is, of course, the most ridiculous, although “energy medicine” definitely gives homeopathy a run for its money in the Department… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - July 1, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Homeopathy Naturopathy Quackery acupuncture burn cupping PTSD traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Victim Services Unit Police Dog Lucca
The Vancouver Police Department’s Victim Services Unit has a new member – service dog Lucca. This specially trained therapeutic dog helps victims of traumatic incidents by accompanying them to court, interviews, and other situations where an empathetic furry friend can help comfort someone as they go through a difficult legal process. Lucca was able to join the Victim Services Unit thanks to funding from the Vancouver Police Foundation. Photo by CPOA (Source: Channel N)
Source: Channel N - June 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: sandra at psychcentral.com (Sandra Kiume)Sandra Kiume Tags: All Documentary brain CanCon crime police ptsd service dog therapy dog trauma video Source Type: blogs

PTSD was the illness I couldn’t see
I grew up thinking an “illness” was either a fever or croup. Illness was a stuffy nose — a sick day, an excuse to miss a day of school. At 18 years old, “illness” took on an entirely different meaning. Illness meant waking up from a coma, learning that my stomach exploded, I had no digestive system, and I was to be stabilized with IV nutrition until surgeons could figure out how to put me back together again. Illness meant a life forever out of my control and a body I didn’t recognize. What happened to me physically had no formal diagnosis. I had ostomy bags and gastrointestinal iss...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 25, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Patient Patients Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

I am reminded
of December 6, 1989 at Montreal’s Ecole Polytechnique. I am reminded of February 5, 1981 – Toronto’s bath house raids, the catalyst for my coming out. I am reminded of stolen innocence as a child at the hands of a stranger. I am reminded of the “flu” I couldn’t shake in May […] (Source: My journey with AIDS)
Source: My journey with AIDS - June 15, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Kenn Tags: activism anti-LGBTQI violence gay-bashing grief homophobia homophobia/transphobia homosexuality PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) sexual orientation Source Type: blogs

“20 Minutes of Action”: A Father’s Response To Dan Turner’s Statement
This article was written by Kyle Suhan and originally appeared on Christine Suhan’s blog on June 6, 2016.   Sex is always intentional, and [my sons] are going to understand that even consensual sex needs to be cared for with the utmost delicacy.“That is a steep price to pay for 20 minutes of action out of his 20 plus years of life. The fact that he now has to register as a sexual offender for the rest of his life forever alters where he can live, visit, work and how he will be able to interact with people and organizations. What I know as his father is that incarceration is not the...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - June 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Parenting Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Dialog: Doubling Down on Dropping Out
Dr. Wible and her young colleague have responded to my previous post: [Cross posting with her comment section, to share the clicky love as we continue the dialogue] A few corrections to your blog Lucy: 1) I do NOT have a subscription practice. I see all-comers and I take insurance. 2) I have never turned anyone away for lack of money. I don’t believe in a two-tiered health care model. 3) Diet and nutrition is not woo (and is certainly not taught in med school). There are HUGE problems with allopathic medicine which does not prepare us to care for patients in an outpatient setting when it comes to prevention, lifestyl...
Source: Musings of a Dinosaur - June 10, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: notdeaddinosaur Tags: Medical Source Type: blogs

Kinder is Stronger: The Case for Self-Compassion
When you have experienced a traumatic event or developed post-traumatic stress disorder, it is difficult to have self-compassion. The wounds and untreated symptoms from living with trauma are frustrating, making it hard to go easy on yourself. Yet, developing self-compassion is an important part of overcoming the past and living fully and with meaning in the present. Most of us want to avoid painful memories, but doing so does not make them go away. If the sound of a car backfiring makes you re-experience a traumatic event like being shot or hitting another car in a car crash, being near roads will likely make you nervous...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - June 7, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: Constance Scharff, PhD Tags: Abuse Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Current Events Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Mental Health addiction treatment center alcohol ab Source Type: blogs

An open letter to Macklemore about the opioid epidemic
Dear Macklemore, Recently, you — the white-rapping, thrift-shopping, LGBT-activist-ing, Grammy-winning 2013 phenom — teamed up with President Obama to deliver a message to the country about the current opioid epidemic. Now let me preface this by saying, I like you, Macklemore. I like the mixture of equal parts political, earnest and downright goofy that you bring to your music. I like that you seem genuinely self-reflective and even a little uncomfortable with the chart-topping success your appropriation of black music has enjoyed. And I believe that the rampant opioid abuse and overdoses happening now in our c...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 4, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Pain management Source Type: blogs

Euthanasia for Reasons of Mental Health
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. An article in the (UK) Daily Mail this week focused on a Dutch woman who chose euthanasia “after doctors decided her post-traumatic stress and other conditions were incurable.” Under Dutch euthanasia laws, a physician can end a patient’s life with a lethal injection for mental suffering. Her life was ended last year. Euthanasia is when a physician delivers the substance that ends a patient’s life. This is distinct from physician/doctor/provider-assisted suicide (often called aid-in-dying) where a physician makes the means to end life available (often through a prescription) b...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Informed Consent Psychiatric Ethics euthanasia Source Type: blogs

CONCUSSION: Bioethics, Foot Ball and Post Traumatic Lies.
Concussion is a documentary biography about medical science’s triumph over a social and corporate conspiracy to suppress evidence of a serious preventable disease. Forensic pathologist, Bennett Omalu, MD, discovered a pathognomonic sign confirming chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). He happened to find it in a cluster of professional football players during autopsies. Concussion was written and directed by Peter Landesman, who managed a riveting story pace, despite most of the visuals occurring in the inglorious world of microscopes and morgues —done to death on television. Will Smith’s Dr. ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 11, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: September Williams, MD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Inside EMS Podcast: Grab Bag Edition
In this week’s episode of Inside EMS, co-host Chris Cebollero and I discuss the merits of the hybrid, flipped EMS classroom, legislation recognizing PTSD as an occupational illness, and ketamine use guidelines. Give us a listen, and share your thoughts. (Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver)
Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver - April 9, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ambulancedriverfiles Tags: EMS Health & Safety Inside EMS Podcasting Source Type: blogs

Yes, the VA is without doubt the model for American healthcare
Well, let’s consider their actual track record: Shot: The Pentagon reported Friday that 265 active-duty service members killed themselves last year, continuing a trend of unusually high suicide rates that have plagued the U.S. military for at least seven years. http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/04/01/us-military-suicides-remain-stubbornly-high/82518278/   Chaser: A VA suicide hotline designed to help distressed vets, at times instead sent their calls to a voicemail message, provided no immediate assistance, and did not even return some calls, according to a new report. … The crisis center w...
Source: GruntDoc - April 4, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: GruntDoc Tags: Medicine public-health Source Type: blogs

Virtual doctors and patients, roleplaying the patient experience
With the shift to value and the elevation of the patient experience as one arm of the Triple Aim, we’re seeing the emergence of a burgeoning marketplace for tools and services that address this critical piece of the healthcare puzzle. Health systems and providers are scrambling to meet new qualitative objectives and foster patient engagement, and need all the help they can get on these fronts. Drug and device manufacturers are eagerly looking for pill-plus solutions that can help differentiate their products by improving adherence and patient outcomes. Ideas that might have languished in a lab a few years back are fi...
Source: ePharma Summit - March 3, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: #ePharma16 Change Talk Digital pharma DRG eDoctor eHealth ePatient ePharma Summit ePharma Summit 2016 health mobile app healthcare start up Kognito virtual doctor Source Type: blogs

Getting Beyond Baby Blues: The Importance of Screening for Postpartum Depression
In January, when attention focused on the need for postpartum depression screening because of a recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel of physicians and epidemiologists that develops recommendations for clinical preventive services, I was both relieved and concerned. As a women’s health advocate and educator I worried that screening could contribute to further pathologizing women’s experiences, especially when they are connected to their reproductive lives. I also feared that Big Pharma wanted to cash in, and that fetal effects from antidepressant medication might be und...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Childbirth Women's Health Postpartum depression United States Preventive Services Task Force Source Type: blogs

What’s New and In the Queue for Academic Medicine
What’s New: A Preview of the February Issue The February issue of Academic Medicine is now available! Read the entire issue online at academicmedicine.org or on your iPad using the Academic Medicine for iPad app. The issue includes a cluster of articles on entrustment; other highlights include: Health Care Transformation: A Strategy Rooted in Data and Analytics In this New Conversations piece, Koster and colleagues review three examples of the transformational force of data and analytics to improve health care and examine academic medicine’s vital role in guiding the needed changes. Amending Mill...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 1, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Issue Preview big data cognitive disabilities faculty development medical errors professional identity formation residency veteran-centered care Source Type: blogs

The benefits of trauma-informed care in the NICU
When my twin sons were born prematurely at 26 weeks’ gestation, my family’s lives were thrust into the whirlwind of the NICU and living daily with the reality of the babies (William and Elliott) being on life support. Having had no prior intense and prolonged experiences with the hospital, and watching helplessly and fretfully as my tiny two-pounders fought for their lives, it’s almost impossible to put into language what the experience was like — it’s as though my memory, in the interest of making me functional again, took away the words to describe many of the sensory and emotionally overwhe...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 29, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Intensive care Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

“Nearly 30 years ago, Lilly Love lost her way. The day...
"Nearly 30 years ago, Lilly Love lost her way. The day after she completed her 5-year tour of duty in the Alaska-based @uscg, the helicopter she had flown in for the previous 3 years crashed, killing 6 of her former crewmates. It was 15 years before Lilly formally received a diagnosis of severe post-traumatic stress disorder. She credits catching sight of the parrots housed at Serenity Park — a work-therapy program that bonds traumatized veterans with damaged birds — as the reason she's still alive today. "I see the trauma, the mutual trauma that I suffered and that these birds have suffered, and my h...
Source: Kidney Notes - January 29, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Medications, Parrots, and Crazy Virginia Laws
For today's post, I'd like to send you around the web.First, Pete Earley has a piece up by Robert Whitaker of Mad in America. Whitaker clarifies his position on antipsychotic medications and how their use should be avoided or minimized  in Robert Whitaker Explains his Research after being Pigeon-holed as Anti-Medication.  Let me add my bias: I didn't like Whitaker's book Anatomy of an Epidemic where he concluded that anti-psychotics cause psychiatric disability.  His point was correlational -- as anti-psychotic use went up, so did SSDI (government disability) claims. It's not that easy -- there are other fac...
Source: Shrink Rap - January 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Enduring Effects of Trauma in Newtown and Beyond
By JOAN COOK and MARJORIE S. ROSENTHAL This month’s Sundance Film Festival, a 10-day salute to movies that are often hailed as tapping into the national zeitgeist, have two films this year on gun violence: Katie Couric’s “Under the Gun” and Kim Snyder’s “Newtown.” Both will be screened by influential audiences this week with a plan for larger distribution over the year. And both will no doubt question what we as Americans should do to prevent mass shootings and to heal afterward. The ripple effects of mass shootings are immense. Earlier this month school leaders in Newtown t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Joan Cook Marjorie Rosenthal Source Type: blogs

“What does a parrot know about PTSD? Tango, the green-wing...
"What does a parrot know about PTSD? Tango, the green-wing macaw pictured here, lives alongside other abandoned — and deeply traumatized — former pets at Serenity Park, a #parrot sanctuary in West Los Angeles. Abandoned pet parrots are twice-traumatized beings: denied first their natural will to flock and then the company of the humans who owned them. But as part of a work-therapy program at Serenity Park, which was founded by a psychologist, damaged birds are bonding with traumatized veterans. As the 2 outcasts of human aggression help each other to find their way again, they could reveal surprising insig...
Source: Kidney Notes - January 28, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

10 Things Med Students Shouldn’t Do
This is my first year of being a senior resident and it is only January; and yet I have seen all these things happen. Sadly, this has all led me to the grim realization of why I got such good evals as a medical student: it wasn’t because I was some sort of social genius. (And yes, I really thought I might have been a social genius.) No, it was because I did not do the following things, ALL OF WHICH I HAVE SEEN WITH MY OWN EYES. Seriously, if you don’t do these things, don’t worry. You will be fine. Your residents will love you. Do not claim to be late to rounds because you had a “Cat...
Source: Action Potential - January 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Action Potential Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

10 Things Med Students Shouldn ’t Do
This is my first year of being a senior resident and it is only January; and yet I have seen all these things happen. Sadly, this has all led me to the grim realization of why I got such good evals as a medical student: it wasn’t because I was some sort of social genius. (And yes, I really thought I might have been a social genius.) No, it was because I did not do the following things, ALL OF WHICH I HAVE SEEN WITH MY OWN EYES. Seriously, if you don’t do these things, don’t worry. You will be fine. Your residents will love you. Do not claim to be late to rounds because you had a “Cat...
Source: Action Potential - January 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Action Potential Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

This Neuroimaging Method Has 100% Diagnostic Accuracy (or your money back)
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0129659.g003Did you know that SPECT imaging can diagnose PTSD with 100% accuracy (Amen et al., 2015)? Not only that, out of a sample of 397 patients from the Amen Clinic in Newport Beach, SPECT was able to distinguish between four different groups with 100% accuracy! That's right, the scans of (1) healthy participants, and patients with (2) classic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), (3) classic traumatic brain injury (TBI), and (4) both disorders..... were all classified with 100% accuracy!TRACK-TBI investigators, your 3T structural and functional MRI outcome measures are obsolete.NIMH, th...
Source: The Neurocritic - January 22, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Best of 2015: The Exposing the Silence Project
Photo credit: Lindsay Askins, www.spotofserendipity.com Today’s best of 2015 posts comes from our Maternal Health Series spearheaded by our fabulous summer intern Allison Kaye. The full series can be seen here. “Well, at least you have a healthy baby!” is one of the most common phrases a mother who went through a traumatic birth experiences hears. While the friend or family member may mean well and simply be trying to show optimism, he or she is often isolating the deep pain the mother may be going through. As part of my research on maternal health, I came across the photography and advocacy project Expos...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Children Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review #209
Welcome to the 209th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The St Emlyns podcast speak to Youri Yordanov in this moving account of managing the mass casualty situation in the recent and tragic events in Paris. There’s lots in here for us all to ponder and reflect on with regards to our setup and ab...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 6, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

What physicians call burnout, others call PTSD
“Gunshot wound to chest, pulseless, 20 minute ETA.” When that’s the EMS report, it gets your attention.  Despite the wonderful theatrics of modern medical shows, and the best efforts of real-world, sweat-drenched paramedics, those of us who have done this long enough can translate that report.  For the layperson it means:  “Dead.” I saw that last week. And the week before I saw another tragic, unexpected death in a man not much older than me. Twice I walked into a small room, looked into someone’s face and said, “I’m sorry, but he died.”  Twice there...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 23, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Could the Doula Model Work for Women Seeking Mental Health Care and Support through the Veteran’s Administration, Especially After Rape or Sexual Trauma?
Elayne Clift, M.A. Her first experience with childbirth was traumatic. Repeated “checks” to determine how near she was to giving birth seemed like unnecessary invasions. When she questioned their frequency she was silenced, as she was when she asked why she had to remain in bed attached to an IV. Labeled a “failure to progress” after only seven hours in labor she was given a C-section “to ensure a healthy baby.”  During her second pregnancy she chose a medical practice that included nurse-midwives and allowed for vaginal birth after Caesarean. Then she “hired” a voluntee...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - November 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Childbirth Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List
Editor’s note: “Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List” is a monthly roundup where we share some of the most compelling health care narratives driving the news and conversation in recent weeks. Why Doctors Need The Humanities Danielle Ofri, a physician at Bellevue Hospital and associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine, has made a name for herself as a doctor who writes—and writes well—with four books published and a slew of narrative medicine publications in the lay press and scholarly outlets. Yet when she was starting out as an attending physician at a te...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 30, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bylander Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Equity and Disparities Health Professionals Narrative Matters On Our Reading List personal stories Physicians poetry Source Type: blogs

The Exposing the Silence Project
Photo credit: Lindsay Askins, www.spotofserendipity.com “Well, at least you have a healthy baby!” is one of the most common phrases a mother who went through a traumatic birth experiences hears. While the friend or family member may mean well and simply be trying to show optimism, he or she is often isolating the deep pain the mother may be going through. As part of my research on maternal health, I came across the photography and advocacy project Exposing the Silence: Documenting Birth Trauma and the Strength of Women across America. The project brings to light a little noticed group of women– women who ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Childbirth Source Type: blogs

Inside EMS Podcast: Provider Mental Health Edition
In this week’s episode of Inside EMS, co-host Chris Cebollero and I discuss the recent suicide of a Pennsylvania EMT, and how we might better support our colleagues with PTSD and depression. In our Guest Table segment, we talk with Donnie Richard of Brattleboro Retreat and their Uniformed Services Program aimed at specialized mental health ... (Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver)
Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver - August 8, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ambulancedriverfiles Tags: EMS Health & Safety Inside EMS Podcasting Source Type: blogs

You’ve probably got dysbiosis: An excerpt from Wheat Belly Total Health
Here’s an excerpt from chapter 9, Full Recovery From Post-Traumatic Grain Gut Syndrome, of Wheat Belly Total Health about the exceptionally common issue of dysbiosis: “Up to 35 percent of people with no other gastrointestinal disease and no symptoms have bacterial overgrowth (dysbiosis) or other distortions of bowel flora composition. Even though many doctors regard irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) as a benign condition, 30 to 85 percent of people with IBS have varying degrees of dysbiosis at the time of their diagnosis–it is not benign. Overgrowth of unhealthy bacteria is common in people who have low stom...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 17, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora gluten grains health microbiota Source Type: blogs

Military Security Contractors Get PTSD, Too
Largely absent from the conversation about the use of military security contractors are the parallel issues of mental health and the deployment-related stress contractors can face. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - June 12, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

If my patients know I am human, they don’t ask for me to be superhuman
“I want to tell you my story now,” a patient recently told me, a woman who suffers from many physical and emotional ailments.  She had the diagnosis of PTSD on her problem list, along with hospitalizations for “stress,” but I never asked beyond that. “OK,” I answered, not knowing what to expect.  “Tell me your story.” She paused for about 30 seconds, but I knew not to interrupt the silence.  “I killed my husband,” she finally said. OK.  Unexpected. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your onlin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 9, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Don’t Just Integrate, Innovate—When It Comes to Mental Health
The sheer number of people living unsupported with some form of psychological or emotional pain suggests that the traditional laws of supply and demand are not working in the mental health arena. As we close on May, as Mental Health Awareness Month, it is important that we raise public awareness of individuals struggling alone with poor mental health and acknowledge the need for a new paradigm that aligns society’s needs with widely available technological and social connectivity. Today, nearly one in every five adults – over 40 million Americans – experience some form of mental illness in any given year....
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - May 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Life Is Complicated
By ROB LAMBERTS, MD “I want to tell you my story now,” a patient recently told me, a woman who suffers from many physical and emotional ailments.  She had the diagnosis of PTSD on her problem list, along with hospitalizations for “stress,” but I never asked beyond that. “OK,” I answered, not knowing what to expect.  “Tell me your story.” She paused for about 30 seconds, but I knew not to interrupt the silence.  “I killed my husband,” she finally said. OK.  Unexpected. She went on to explain a horrible set of circumstances involv...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Unfriendly Skies, Or Post-Traumatic Airlines Syndrome
(Source: Autism's Edges)
Source: Autism's Edges - May 16, 2015 Category: Child Development Tags: airlines autism autism families family life travel vacations Source Type: blogs

Keeping it to Yo'self: Dblog Week Day #2
Many of us share lots of aspects of our diabetes lives online for the world to see. What are some of the aspects of diabetes that you choose to keep private from the internet? Or from your family and friends? Why is it important to keep it to yourself? (This is not an attempt to get you out of your comfort zone. There is no need to elaborate or tell personal stories related to these aspects. Simply let us know what kinds of stories we will never hear you tell, and why you won't tell them.) (Thank you Scott E of Rolling in the D for this topic.)Good rule of thumb: if something could potentially damage the reputation (or oth...
Source: The D-Log Cabin - May 12, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Authors: HVS Source Type: blogs

Keeping it to Yo'self: Dblog Week Day #2
Many of us share lots of aspects of our diabetes lives online for the world to see. What are some of the aspects of diabetes that you choose to keep private from the internet? Or from your family and friends? Why is it important to keep it to yourself? (This is not an attempt to get you out of your comfort zone. There is no need to elaborate or tell personal stories related to these aspects. Simply let us know what kinds of stories we will never hear you tell, and why you won't tell them.) (Thank you Scott E of Rolling in the D for this topic.) Good rule of thumb: if something could potentially damage the reputation (or o...
Source: The D-Log Cabin - May 12, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Authors: HVS Source Type: blogs

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Associated With Shorter Telomeres, Greater Incidence of Age-Related Disease
Researchers have in the past determined that psychological stress is associated with shorter telomere length as measured in immune cells from a blood sample, and greater ill health in general, but there remains considerable uncertainty over the mechanisms involved. There is also a fair degree of research demonstrating associations between personality traits such as conscientiousness and measures of aging. To what degree is this outcome biological versus being based on factors such as failing to take good care of your health? This review of data on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) looks at much the same question: PTSD ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 11, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Working smart, the key to a bigger brain, and PTSD dropout: the F1000 round up!
The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as other interesting picks from around Twitter. Continue reading → (Source: Naturally Selected)
Source: Naturally Selected - May 8, 2015 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Adie Chan Tags: Tweet stuff Source Type: blogs

The road to health care for veterans is baroque
Read the voices of Service: this discussion  thread is a show and tell of what women veterans have to go through to get care. It also demonstrates some traits of women warriors: generosity, tenacity , wisdom , guts and extreme moxie. It is unconscionable that those who served have to come home and fight more battles. Shame on us. Alana Vollmer-Bland Question…..I have a 30% rating for PTSD from Afghanistan. I told the shrink at the VA at the beginning of the claims process and then another counselor at the VA here about the sexual assault while I was on active duty. She spent 6 weeks doing intake on me and waffl...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Hospitals Help Families With Illness' Psychological Toll
When a child becomes ill with a serious disease, they and their families face a number of issues that can cause emotional distress, including financial troubles, child-care problems and post-traumatic stress. (Source: WSJ.com: The Informed Patient)
Source: WSJ.com: The Informed Patient - April 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: FREE Source Type: blogs

Nickson Would be Celebrating Life if it Weren’t for Vaccines
Conclusion Parents need to be able to choose what goes into their child’s body, especially when their babies are not born full-term or have any underlying health problems at birth. When a product such as a vaccine is injected into a child, known to be associated with severe risks, including death, there should be a standard protocol in place for these families to get needed support when the risks outweigh the benefits. No one can predict how a vaccine will negatively affect a person. Lindsey and other families going through this, suffering the loss of a child likely caused by the vaccine(s) given to them, when no oth...
Source: vactruth.com - April 9, 2015 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Augustina Ursino Tags: Augustina Ursino Human Top Stories National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP) Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) vaccine court Vaccine Death VAERS Source Type: blogs