Yes, the VA is without doubt the model for American healthcare
Well, let’s consider their actual track record: Shot: The Pentagon reported Friday that 265 active-duty service members killed themselves last year, continuing a trend of unusually high suicide rates that have plagued the U.S. military for at least seven years. http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/04/01/us-military-suicides-remain-stubbornly-high/82518278/   Chaser: A VA suicide hotline designed to help distressed vets, at times instead sent their calls to a voicemail message, provided no immediate assistance, and did not even return some calls, according to a new report. … The crisis center w...
Source: GruntDoc - April 4, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: GruntDoc Tags: Medicine public-health Source Type: blogs

Virtual doctors and patients, roleplaying the patient experience
With the shift to value and the elevation of the patient experience as one arm of the Triple Aim, we’re seeing the emergence of a burgeoning marketplace for tools and services that address this critical piece of the healthcare puzzle. Health systems and providers are scrambling to meet new qualitative objectives and foster patient engagement, and need all the help they can get on these fronts. Drug and device manufacturers are eagerly looking for pill-plus solutions that can help differentiate their products by improving adherence and patient outcomes. Ideas that might have languished in a lab a few years back are fi...
Source: ePharma Summit - March 3, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: #ePharma16 Change Talk Digital pharma DRG eDoctor eHealth ePatient ePharma Summit ePharma Summit 2016 health mobile app healthcare start up Kognito virtual doctor Source Type: blogs

Getting Beyond Baby Blues: The Importance of Screening for Postpartum Depression
In January, when attention focused on the need for postpartum depression screening because of a recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel of physicians and epidemiologists that develops recommendations for clinical preventive services, I was both relieved and concerned. As a women’s health advocate and educator I worried that screening could contribute to further pathologizing women’s experiences, especially when they are connected to their reproductive lives. I also feared that Big Pharma wanted to cash in, and that fetal effects from antidepressant medication might be und...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Childbirth Women's Health Postpartum depression United States Preventive Services Task Force Source Type: blogs

What’s New and In the Queue for Academic Medicine
What’s New: A Preview of the February Issue The February issue of Academic Medicine is now available! Read the entire issue online at academicmedicine.org or on your iPad using the Academic Medicine for iPad app. The issue includes a cluster of articles on entrustment; other highlights include: Health Care Transformation: A Strategy Rooted in Data and Analytics In this New Conversations piece, Koster and colleagues review three examples of the transformational force of data and analytics to improve health care and examine academic medicine’s vital role in guiding the needed changes. Amending Mill...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 1, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Issue Preview big data cognitive disabilities faculty development medical errors professional identity formation residency veteran-centered care Source Type: blogs

The benefits of trauma-informed care in the NICU
When my twin sons were born prematurely at 26 weeks’ gestation, my family’s lives were thrust into the whirlwind of the NICU and living daily with the reality of the babies (William and Elliott) being on life support. Having had no prior intense and prolonged experiences with the hospital, and watching helplessly and fretfully as my tiny two-pounders fought for their lives, it’s almost impossible to put into language what the experience was like — it’s as though my memory, in the interest of making me functional again, took away the words to describe many of the sensory and emotionally overwhe...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 29, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Intensive care Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

“Nearly 30 years ago, Lilly Love lost her way. The day...
"Nearly 30 years ago, Lilly Love lost her way. The day after she completed her 5-year tour of duty in the Alaska-based @uscg, the helicopter she had flown in for the previous 3 years crashed, killing 6 of her former crewmates. It was 15 years before Lilly formally received a diagnosis of severe post-traumatic stress disorder. She credits catching sight of the parrots housed at Serenity Park — a work-therapy program that bonds traumatized veterans with damaged birds — as the reason she's still alive today. "I see the trauma, the mutual trauma that I suffered and that these birds have suffered, and my h...
Source: Kidney Notes - January 29, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Medications, Parrots, and Crazy Virginia Laws
For today's post, I'd like to send you around the web.First, Pete Earley has a piece up by Robert Whitaker of Mad in America. Whitaker clarifies his position on antipsychotic medications and how their use should be avoided or minimized  in Robert Whitaker Explains his Research after being Pigeon-holed as Anti-Medication.  Let me add my bias: I didn't like Whitaker's book Anatomy of an Epidemic where he concluded that anti-psychotics cause psychiatric disability.  His point was correlational -- as anti-psychotic use went up, so did SSDI (government disability) claims. It's not that easy -- there are other fac...
Source: Shrink Rap - January 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Enduring Effects of Trauma in Newtown and Beyond
By JOAN COOK and MARJORIE S. ROSENTHAL This month’s Sundance Film Festival, a 10-day salute to movies that are often hailed as tapping into the national zeitgeist, have two films this year on gun violence: Katie Couric’s “Under the Gun” and Kim Snyder’s “Newtown.” Both will be screened by influential audiences this week with a plan for larger distribution over the year. And both will no doubt question what we as Americans should do to prevent mass shootings and to heal afterward. The ripple effects of mass shootings are immense. Earlier this month school leaders in Newtown t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Joan Cook Marjorie Rosenthal Source Type: blogs

“What does a parrot know about PTSD? Tango, the green-wing...
"What does a parrot know about PTSD? Tango, the green-wing macaw pictured here, lives alongside other abandoned — and deeply traumatized — former pets at Serenity Park, a #parrot sanctuary in West Los Angeles. Abandoned pet parrots are twice-traumatized beings: denied first their natural will to flock and then the company of the humans who owned them. But as part of a work-therapy program at Serenity Park, which was founded by a psychologist, damaged birds are bonding with traumatized veterans. As the 2 outcasts of human aggression help each other to find their way again, they could reveal surprising insig...
Source: Kidney Notes - January 28, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

10 Things Med Students Shouldn’t Do
This is my first year of being a senior resident and it is only January; and yet I have seen all these things happen. Sadly, this has all led me to the grim realization of why I got such good evals as a medical student: it wasn’t because I was some sort of social genius. (And yes, I really thought I might have been a social genius.) No, it was because I did not do the following things, ALL OF WHICH I HAVE SEEN WITH MY OWN EYES. Seriously, if you don’t do these things, don’t worry. You will be fine. Your residents will love you. Do not claim to be late to rounds because you had a “Cat...
Source: Action Potential - January 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Action Potential Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

10 Things Med Students Shouldn ’t Do
This is my first year of being a senior resident and it is only January; and yet I have seen all these things happen. Sadly, this has all led me to the grim realization of why I got such good evals as a medical student: it wasn’t because I was some sort of social genius. (And yes, I really thought I might have been a social genius.) No, it was because I did not do the following things, ALL OF WHICH I HAVE SEEN WITH MY OWN EYES. Seriously, if you don’t do these things, don’t worry. You will be fine. Your residents will love you. Do not claim to be late to rounds because you had a “Cat...
Source: Action Potential - January 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Action Potential Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

This Neuroimaging Method Has 100% Diagnostic Accuracy (or your money back)
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0129659.g003Did you know that SPECT imaging can diagnose PTSD with 100% accuracy (Amen et al., 2015)? Not only that, out of a sample of 397 patients from the Amen Clinic in Newport Beach, SPECT was able to distinguish between four different groups with 100% accuracy! That's right, the scans of (1) healthy participants, and patients with (2) classic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), (3) classic traumatic brain injury (TBI), and (4) both disorders..... were all classified with 100% accuracy!TRACK-TBI investigators, your 3T structural and functional MRI outcome measures are obsolete.NIMH, th...
Source: The Neurocritic - January 21, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Best of 2015: The Exposing the Silence Project
Photo credit: Lindsay Askins, www.spotofserendipity.com Today’s best of 2015 posts comes from our Maternal Health Series spearheaded by our fabulous summer intern Allison Kaye. The full series can be seen here. “Well, at least you have a healthy baby!” is one of the most common phrases a mother who went through a traumatic birth experiences hears. While the friend or family member may mean well and simply be trying to show optimism, he or she is often isolating the deep pain the mother may be going through. As part of my research on maternal health, I came across the photography and advocacy project Expos...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Children Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review #209
Welcome to the 209th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The St Emlyns podcast speak to Youri Yordanov in this moving account of managing the mass casualty situation in the recent and tragic events in Paris. There’s lots in here for us all to ponder and reflect on with regards to our setup and ab...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 6, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

What physicians call burnout, others call PTSD
“Gunshot wound to chest, pulseless, 20 minute ETA.” When that’s the EMS report, it gets your attention.  Despite the wonderful theatrics of modern medical shows, and the best efforts of real-world, sweat-drenched paramedics, those of us who have done this long enough can translate that report.  For the layperson it means:  “Dead.” I saw that last week. And the week before I saw another tragic, unexpected death in a man not much older than me. Twice I walked into a small room, looked into someone’s face and said, “I’m sorry, but he died.”  Twice there...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 23, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Could the Doula Model Work for Women Seeking Mental Health Care and Support through the Veteran’s Administration, Especially After Rape or Sexual Trauma?
Elayne Clift, M.A. Her first experience with childbirth was traumatic. Repeated “checks” to determine how near she was to giving birth seemed like unnecessary invasions. When she questioned their frequency she was silenced, as she was when she asked why she had to remain in bed attached to an IV. Labeled a “failure to progress” after only seven hours in labor she was given a C-section “to ensure a healthy baby.”  During her second pregnancy she chose a medical practice that included nurse-midwives and allowed for vaginal birth after Caesarean. Then she “hired” a voluntee...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - November 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Childbirth Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List
Editor’s note: “Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List” is a monthly roundup where we share some of the most compelling health care narratives driving the news and conversation in recent weeks. Why Doctors Need The Humanities Danielle Ofri, a physician at Bellevue Hospital and associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine, has made a name for herself as a doctor who writes—and writes well—with four books published and a slew of narrative medicine publications in the lay press and scholarly outlets. Yet when she was starting out as an attending physician at a te...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 30, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bylander Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Equity and Disparities Health Professionals Narrative Matters On Our Reading List personal stories Physicians poetry Source Type: blogs

The Exposing the Silence Project
Photo credit: Lindsay Askins, www.spotofserendipity.com “Well, at least you have a healthy baby!” is one of the most common phrases a mother who went through a traumatic birth experiences hears. While the friend or family member may mean well and simply be trying to show optimism, he or she is often isolating the deep pain the mother may be going through. As part of my research on maternal health, I came across the photography and advocacy project Exposing the Silence: Documenting Birth Trauma and the Strength of Women across America. The project brings to light a little noticed group of women– women who ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Childbirth Source Type: blogs

Inside EMS Podcast: Provider Mental Health Edition
In this week’s episode of Inside EMS, co-host Chris Cebollero and I discuss the recent suicide of a Pennsylvania EMT, and how we might better support our colleagues with PTSD and depression. In our Guest Table segment, we talk with Donnie Richard of Brattleboro Retreat and their Uniformed Services Program aimed at specialized mental health ... (Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver)
Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver - August 8, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ambulancedriverfiles Tags: EMS Health & Safety Inside EMS Podcasting Source Type: blogs

You’ve probably got dysbiosis: An excerpt from Wheat Belly Total Health
Here’s an excerpt from chapter 9, Full Recovery From Post-Traumatic Grain Gut Syndrome, of Wheat Belly Total Health about the exceptionally common issue of dysbiosis: “Up to 35 percent of people with no other gastrointestinal disease and no symptoms have bacterial overgrowth (dysbiosis) or other distortions of bowel flora composition. Even though many doctors regard irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) as a benign condition, 30 to 85 percent of people with IBS have varying degrees of dysbiosis at the time of their diagnosis–it is not benign. Overgrowth of unhealthy bacteria is common in people who have low stom...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 17, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora gluten grains health microbiota Source Type: blogs

Military Security Contractors Get PTSD, Too
Largely absent from the conversation about the use of military security contractors are the parallel issues of mental health and the deployment-related stress contractors can face. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - June 12, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

If my patients know I am human, they don’t ask for me to be superhuman
“I want to tell you my story now,” a patient recently told me, a woman who suffers from many physical and emotional ailments.  She had the diagnosis of PTSD on her problem list, along with hospitalizations for “stress,” but I never asked beyond that. “OK,” I answered, not knowing what to expect.  “Tell me your story.” She paused for about 30 seconds, but I knew not to interrupt the silence.  “I killed my husband,” she finally said. OK.  Unexpected. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your onlin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 9, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Don’t Just Integrate, Innovate—When It Comes to Mental Health
The sheer number of people living unsupported with some form of psychological or emotional pain suggests that the traditional laws of supply and demand are not working in the mental health arena. As we close on May, as Mental Health Awareness Month, it is important that we raise public awareness of individuals struggling alone with poor mental health and acknowledge the need for a new paradigm that aligns society’s needs with widely available technological and social connectivity. Today, nearly one in every five adults – over 40 million Americans – experience some form of mental illness in any given year....
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - May 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Life Is Complicated
By ROB LAMBERTS, MD “I want to tell you my story now,” a patient recently told me, a woman who suffers from many physical and emotional ailments.  She had the diagnosis of PTSD on her problem list, along with hospitalizations for “stress,” but I never asked beyond that. “OK,” I answered, not knowing what to expect.  “Tell me your story.” She paused for about 30 seconds, but I knew not to interrupt the silence.  “I killed my husband,” she finally said. OK.  Unexpected. She went on to explain a horrible set of circumstances involv...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Unfriendly Skies, Or Post-Traumatic Airlines Syndrome
(Source: Autism's Edges)
Source: Autism's Edges - May 16, 2015 Category: Child Development Tags: airlines autism autism families family life travel vacations Source Type: blogs

Keeping it to Yo'self: Dblog Week Day #2
Many of us share lots of aspects of our diabetes lives online for the world to see. What are some of the aspects of diabetes that you choose to keep private from the internet? Or from your family and friends? Why is it important to keep it to yourself? (This is not an attempt to get you out of your comfort zone. There is no need to elaborate or tell personal stories related to these aspects. Simply let us know what kinds of stories we will never hear you tell, and why you won't tell them.) (Thank you Scott E of Rolling in the D for this topic.)Good rule of thumb: if something could potentially damage the reputation (or oth...
Source: The D-Log Cabin - May 11, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Authors: HVS Source Type: blogs

Keeping it to Yo'self: Dblog Week Day #2
Many of us share lots of aspects of our diabetes lives online for the world to see. What are some of the aspects of diabetes that you choose to keep private from the internet? Or from your family and friends? Why is it important to keep it to yourself? (This is not an attempt to get you out of your comfort zone. There is no need to elaborate or tell personal stories related to these aspects. Simply let us know what kinds of stories we will never hear you tell, and why you won't tell them.) (Thank you Scott E of Rolling in the D for this topic.) Good rule of thumb: if something could potentially damage the reputation (or o...
Source: The D-Log Cabin - May 11, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Authors: HVS Source Type: blogs

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Associated With Shorter Telomeres, Greater Incidence of Age-Related Disease
Researchers have in the past determined that psychological stress is associated with shorter telomere length as measured in immune cells from a blood sample, and greater ill health in general, but there remains considerable uncertainty over the mechanisms involved. There is also a fair degree of research demonstrating associations between personality traits such as conscientiousness and measures of aging. To what degree is this outcome biological versus being based on factors such as failing to take good care of your health? This review of data on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) looks at much the same question: PTSD ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 11, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Working smart, the key to a bigger brain, and PTSD dropout: the F1000 round up!
The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as other interesting picks from around Twitter. Continue reading → (Source: Naturally Selected)
Source: Naturally Selected - May 8, 2015 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Adie Chan Tags: Tweet stuff Source Type: blogs

The road to health care for veterans is baroque
Read the voices of Service: this discussion  thread is a show and tell of what women veterans have to go through to get care. It also demonstrates some traits of women warriors: generosity, tenacity , wisdom , guts and extreme moxie. It is unconscionable that those who served have to come home and fight more battles. Shame on us. Alana Vollmer-Bland Question…..I have a 30% rating for PTSD from Afghanistan. I told the shrink at the VA at the beginning of the claims process and then another counselor at the VA here about the sexual assault while I was on active duty. She spent 6 weeks doing intake on me and waffl...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Hospitals Help Families With Illness' Psychological Toll
When a child becomes ill with a serious disease, they and their families face a number of issues that can cause emotional distress, including financial troubles, child-care problems and post-traumatic stress. (Source: WSJ.com: The Informed Patient)
Source: WSJ.com: The Informed Patient - April 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: FREE Source Type: blogs

Nickson Would be Celebrating Life if it Weren’t for Vaccines
Conclusion Parents need to be able to choose what goes into their child’s body, especially when their babies are not born full-term or have any underlying health problems at birth. When a product such as a vaccine is injected into a child, known to be associated with severe risks, including death, there should be a standard protocol in place for these families to get needed support when the risks outweigh the benefits. No one can predict how a vaccine will negatively affect a person. Lindsey and other families going through this, suffering the loss of a child likely caused by the vaccine(s) given to them, when no oth...
Source: vactruth.com - April 9, 2015 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Augustina Ursino Tags: Augustina Ursino Human Top Stories National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP) Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) vaccine court Vaccine Death VAERS Source Type: blogs

Glimpse of 12th Annual World Health Care Congress
Conclusion The 12th Annual World Health Care Congress event delivered expert content, rich conversations and meaningful connections. I hope to attend the 13th Annual World Health Care Congress event. One recommendation I would make is to add Patient Opinion Leader to the “Who Should Attend?” area of the website and reserve a select number of compensated passes for real-world, experienced Patient Opinion Leaders to attend. We are often not salaried or sponsored. I owe a debt of gratitude to Disruptive Women in Healthcare for the opportunity to strengthen my knowledge and network. Though I can’t walk a mile...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Consumer Health Care Cost Coverage Policy Health Reform Mental Health Source Type: blogs

heARTspeak
© Susan Avila-Smith © Regina Vasquez The girl © Gena Smith​ There is a girl. The girl loves to paint and read and write stories. The girl believes that the world is basically a good place. The girl believes people are basically good. The girl met a boy and falls in love. The girl is frustrated. The boy she loves goes to war. The girl waits, and listens, and is fearful of the death of the boy. The girl goes to college and works two jobs while the boy is away. The girl needs to stay busy. The girl marries the boy when he returns home. The girl is afraid of the boy and his anger. The girl feels trapped and a...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

The Safety Nets Have Gaping Holes – Our Sewing Kit!
Anne Klee & Laurie Harkness In our country, two words that should never be spoken or written in the same sentence are Veteran and homelessness.  Yet all too frequently we hear this is the case.   Ten years ago there were estimated to be 250,000 homeless Veterans on the streets of America each night.  Today through the multi-pronged efforts of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), many state Governor’s, state agencies, and community agencies and partners, there are now less than 50,000 homeless Veterans each night.  Veterans ar...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Destruction of Lives with the Stroke of a Pen
Protect Our Defenders is a non-profit human rights organization that honors, supports and gives voice to the brave women and men in uniform who have been raped or sexually assaulted by fellow service members.  Nancy Parrish Paula Coughlin Men and women serving in our military who are raped or sexually assaulted face overwhelming obstacles in order to receive adequate health care. Instead of assuring victims that their distress about their attacks is a normal response, the Department of Defense (DoD) has a record of mistreating victims by labeling them with errant diagnoses of personality or adjustment disorders. Based...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

It’s OK Not To Be OK
Happy Medic has some wise words for responders dealing with stress, PTSD and depression. Go. Read. Get help if you need it. (Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver)
Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver - February 26, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ambulancedriverfiles Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Inside EMS Podcast: Peer Support for PTSD and Depression
Paramedic Greg Turner of Edmonton took his life on-duty on January 26. Last weekend, paramedic Debbie Crawford of Denver Health Paramedics took her life as well, mere hours after working a fatal train vs pedestrian accident. Debbie co-founded and chaired a committee aimed at helping paramedics deal with PTSD and depression, yet for her, even ... (Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver)
Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver - February 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ambulancedriverfiles Tags: Code Green Campaign EMS Health & Safety Inside EMS Podcasting Source Type: blogs

Women Who Serve: Who We Are
The concept of women as the gentler sex is hard to square with the military warrior culture.  Husband hunter, lesbian, s., whore, manipulator, or too dumb to do anything else are the historical characterizations of women who serve and are changing far too slowly.   No one is more surprised with this rancor than the young, naïve and innocent women who join the military with an eye on what the future may bring. I wanted a chance at a better life. I wanted to be more than my surroundings dictated to me. I felt a duty to my country; to protect and preserve all the things I loved. My time in the Army was one...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - February 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Women Veterans Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Cookbook medicine
This was a criticism levelled at evidence based medicine, when it became a way of thinking some years ago.  The criticism was that your doctor would diagnose you, and then look up what to do and do just that.  There was no place for expertise or experience.   Present day diagrams of evidence based medicine include, of course, professional expertise and patient experience, as well as the research evidence. I don't think that was ever a fair criticism, but having had a head injury in September (I fell off my bike), and been in receipt of doctors' advice, I think it misses the point.  The di...
Source: Browsing - February 1, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: EBP Source Type: blogs

It’s All In Your Head
The following post originally ran on Disruptive Woman to Watch Lisa Suennen’s blog Venture Valkyrie on January 26th. “Mental health needs a great deal of attention. It’s the final taboo and it needs to be faced and dealt with.” That quote is from the great philosopher and clinician, oh wait I mean 80’s post-punk rocker Adam Ant. Seriously. But he is so right on. Back in 1998 I was part of the management team of a company called Merit Behavioral Care, also once known as American Biodyne. The company was the first of its kind: a company that delivered what we now know as population health for p...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - January 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Top 10 PTSD Blogs of 2014
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often is linked to military veterans, but it can affect anyone following a traumatic event. There are five subtypes: normal stress response, acute stress disorder, uncomplicated PTSD, comorbid PTSD and complex PTSD. Sleep disturbances and flashbacks, where the sufferer relives the trauma, are hallmarks of the disease. PTSD has several other symptoms, some of which overlap with other disorders. These include a loss of interest in regular activities, feeling depressed, anxious and difficulty concentrating. A person with PTSD may find it difficult to relate to loved ones. Instead they are...
Source: World of Psychology - January 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Kim Lyon Tags: Best of the Web Brain and Behavior Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Military Psychology PTSD Stress Trauma Violence and Aggression abuse best ptsd blogs combat veterans Complex post-traumatic stress disorder Postt Source Type: blogs

Healthier and Happier
By: Alexandra Norcott, MD, second-year internal medicine resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital and member of the West Haven Veterans Affairs Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCE). She plans to pursue a career in general internal medicine with subpecialization in patient safety and quality improvement. “On average, how much alcohol do you drink?” I questioned the sixty-three year-old veteran. “About fifty beers a week,” Nate nonchalantly retorted. I noticed his cherry cheeks, accented by the red sailboats on his Hawaiian shirt. “OK. For about how long?” “About a...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - January 22, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education health care teams interprofessionalism patient centered care Source Type: blogs

Interfering With Traumatic Memories of the Boston Marathon Bombings
The Boston Marathon bombings of April 15, 2013 killed three people and injured hundreds of others near the finish line of the iconic footrace. The oldest and most prominent marathon in the world, Boston attracts over 20,000 runners and 500,000 spectators. The terrorist act shocked and traumatized and unified the city.What should the survivors do with their traumatic memories of the event? Many with disabling post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) receive therapy to lessen the impact of the trauma. Should they forget completely? Is it possible to selectively “alter” or “remove” a specific memory? Stud...
Source: The Neurocritic - January 18, 2015 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

STATES OF GRACE: Disability and Chronic Pain as a Bioethical Issue
STATES OF GRACE is a “must watch” film for health care providers. It deals with the health of caregivers, professionals and families, as well as that of persons who have become disabled. In STATES OF GRACE, Dr. Grace Dammann, is a revered physician who signed more than one thousand death certificates during the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In 2008, just before memorial day, while commuting from work, another driver crashed head-on into her car as she crossed the Golden Gate Bridge. After seven weeks in a coma and twelve surgeries, Grace regains consciousness, her cognitive abilities surprisingly intact...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 2, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: September Williams, MD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Part I: THE IMITATION GAME meets HOW I CAME TO HATE MATH/Comment j’ai détesté les Maths, Moral Relativism vs Beneficence and Justice: Moral Injury, War and Computer Science
THE IMITATION GAME Alan Turing was a Cambridge trained mathematician, wonderfully portrayed by Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) in the WWII bio-historical thriller, THE IMITATION GAME. The film directed by Morten Tyldum and written by Graham Moore was screened at the 36th annual Mill Valley Film Festival 2014. It is an adaptation of a book by Andrew Hodges, Alan Turing: The Enigma While a fellow at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics in 1990, it was this writer's profound good luck to meet and spend time with the late Dr. Stephen Toulman, a British born physicist, mathematician, philosopher and communic...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 16, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: September Williams, MD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

GOING THE DISTANCE meets SURFING FOR LIFE
Bioethical issues in Traumatic Brain Injury GOING THE DISTANCE: JOURNEYS OF RECOVERY is a documentary film about the lives of survivors of Traumatic Brain Injury. Directed by multi-Emmy Award winning filmmaker David L. Brown, the project is seeking funding for its finishing phase. This film has had multiple previews in collaboration with brain injury advocates.  It has also been used in therapeutic TBI groups to gauge the communities' take on their depiction. An earlier film by the same director, SURFING FOR LIFE, reinforces that Brown, like any good film auteur, finds different ways of telling stories whose...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 16, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: September Williams, MD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Narrative Matters: Shining A Light On Child Health
Last month, a group of writers, clinicians, policy makers and other experts gathered at Airlie House in Warrenton, Virginia, for the 2014 Narrative Matters Symposium. About an hour outside the city, the scenic fall setting—rolling farm land and trees with auburn and gold leaves—was the perfect backdrop to take attendees outside of their normal day-to-day work and introduce them to others who also are deeply passionate about improving the health of vulnerable children. The focus of this year’s symposium was “Vulnerable Children: Using Stories to Shine a Light on Child Health.” Manuel Pastor, pr...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 15, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bylander Tags: All Categories Children Narrative Matters Personal Experience Policy Source Type: blogs

Chicago Brain Death Case Now Federal Lawsuit
Randall R. Bainchi was a 22-year old United States Marine, who served his Country in war zones in both Afghanistan and Iraqi.  As a result of his service, Bainchi suffered from PTSD, received inadequate mental health treatment, and acqui... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 11, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, December 4, 2014
From MedPage Today: Men on ADT Skipping Out on Bisphosphonates. Few men in Canada receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer have simultaneous bisphosphonate treatment to prevent fractures. What Every ED Should Have. The emergency department (ED) is one of the highest risk areas of any institution. Both the fast-paced environment and high patient volume and acuity contribute to this phenomenon. In addition, minimal information regarding the medical history of patients is known at the time of presentation. Even Without Concussion Football Players May Have Brain Changes. High school football playe...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 4, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Endocrinology Neurology Source Type: blogs