The Top 5 Practical Digital Health Technologies in the Fight Against COVID-19: An Infographic

We reported on how digital health came to the spotlight early on. As we learn more about the disease, we see digital health technologies increasingly getting adopted in this context. We created an infographic to summarize all the digital health tech efforts against this pandemic.  This will help caregivers and policymakers understand how we can rely on technologies in the fight against the novel coronavirus; and which sectors and phases of healthcare are aided by digital health. In our infographic, listed on the Y-axis are the technologies making a significant impact in the fight against the pandemic. Indicated with dots on the X-axis are all the fields that the respective technology supports from diagnosis through staff training to information provision. Take a closer look by yourself below: 1. 3D-printing: when demand meets innovation As the medical staff experience an unprecedented number of cases on a daily basis, healthcare institutions worldwide face a worrying shortfall of medical equipment. With lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) and even failing respirators, these shortages are putting at risk both healthcare personnel and patients. But as the saying goes, “necessity is the mother of invention”. To meet these demands in medical supplies, the maker community banded together with their 3D-printers. From garage hobbyists to established companies, people are 3D-printing equipment from face shields through swabs to ventilator part...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality digital health infographics covid covid19 Source Type: blogs

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Exp Ther Med. 2021 Oct;22(4):1162. doi: 10.3892/etm.2021.10596. Epub 2021 Aug 11.ABSTRACTSince its outbreak, in December, 2019, in the Chinese city of Wuhan, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has evolved into an ongoing global pandemic. Due to the novel antigenic properties of this virus, the world population could not develop immunity effectively and this led to the subsequent spread of COVID-19. This caused an unprecedented emergency situation with significant negative effects on health and well-being both on an individual and societal level. Apart...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeThe novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, emerged from Wuhan, China, causing a pandemic. Access to outpatient psychiatric care was limited. We conducted a pilot study of telepsychiatry during a national shutdown. Adult patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) participated via Zoom. Patient preference comparing televisits to face-to-face visits was assessed.Recent findingsTelemedicine has emerged as new technological tool in the evolution of the patient-physician relationship, changing the way we interact. Physicians and patients now have access to the electronic medical record, remote point-of-care testi...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This report points to the importance of oc cupation as a risk factor but also to the availability and use of appropriate personal protection to mitigate the risk of becoming infected. In addition, well-established socio-economic factors of health inequalities intermingled with occupations at risk, demonstrated by the fact that most taxi driv ers belonged to the same ethnic group and that taxi drivers had higher mortality rates when residing in London (5). These findings are mirrored in a recent preprint publication from the US state of California, reporting that relative excess mortality was particularly high among food/ag...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
OBJECTIVE: The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus  2 (SARS-Cov-2) and its associated illness, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has led to a global health crisis burdening frontline emergency departments, including orthopedic and...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
This study aims to provide a better understanding of what to expect in terms of alcohol consumption, risk factors for excessive use, and its potential consequences during this pandemic based on previous experiences. We investigated how traumatic events related to alcohol consumption. Studies on mass traumatic events (i.e., terrorism as 9/11), epidemic outbreaks (i.e., severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS] in 2003), economic crises (such as 2008's Great Recession), and COVID-19 were selected. The main keywords used to select the studies were alcohol use, drinking patterns, alcohol use disorders, and alcohol-related conse...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study computed the percentage of sample that reported clinically significant levels of psychiatric symptoms. Cohen’s d was used for comparing mental health outcomes of health care workers directly involved in addressing pandemic emergency with a control group that was not directly exposed to such conditions. Pooled effect sizes (dw) were estimated whenever at least three independent studies yielded data. Heterogeneity of findings and bias of publication were estimated as well.FindingsFifteen studies have been selected for a total of 7,393 HCWs. From 9.6% to 51% of HCWs reported symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Suppose you are suddenly are stricken with COVID-19. You become very ill for several weeks. On awakening every morning, you wonder if this day might be your last. And then you begin to turn the corner. Every day your worst symptoms — the fever, the terrible cough, the breathlessness — get a little better. You are winning, beating a life-threatening disease, and you no longer wonder if each day might be your last. In another week or two, you’ll be your old self. But weeks pass, and while the worst symptoms are gone, you’re not your old self — not even close. You can’t meet your responsibi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Coronavirus and COVID-19 Fatigue Source Type: blogs
Little is known about the mental health consequences of severe COVID-19 illness because it is caused by a new coronavirus. Previous outbreaks caused by other coronaviruses (severe acute respiratory syndrome, SARS, and Middle East respiratory syndrome, MERS) may provide insights into ongoing problems after recovery from severe illness. Researchers looked at reports of psychiatric problems during SARS and MERS outbreaks and compared this to early data from the COVID-19 pandemic. Delirium (sudden confusion) was common while patients were in hospital with any of the coronavirus infections (SARS, MERS or COVID-19). Later, once ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Infection-triggered perturbation of the immune system could induce psychopathology, and psychiatric sequelae were observed after previous coronavirus outbreaks. The spreading of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic could be associated with psychiatric implications. We investigated the psychopathological impact of COVID-19 in survivors, also considering the effect of clinical and inflammatory predictors. We screened for psychiatric symptoms 402 adults surviving COVID-19 (265male,meanage58), at one month follow-up after hospital treatment. A clinical interview and a battery ...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Behav Immun Source Type: research
“There’s No Going Back to ‘Normal’”, crudely proclaims the headline of a June piece from The Atlantic. “The Terrible Consequences of Australia’s Uber-Bushfires” reads a recent Wired article. One of our own April articles was titled “Will Medical Workers Deal With PTSD After COVID-19?”. If it wasn’t clear, an article published earlier this year in The Conversation rightly asks: “Are we living in a dystopia?”.  Indeed, what was once relegated to the fertile minds of fiction novelists has become daily occurrences. Many are drawing similariti...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Science Fiction Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality black mirror dystopia coronavirus covid19 jumanji Death Stranding video games bushfires Source Type: blogs
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