Why Does the Harvard Case on Asian American Discrimination in Admissions Matter for Academic Medicine?
In 2014, Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), led by activist Edward Blum, filed a suit against Harvard University, contending that the Harvard admissions process unfairly discriminates against Asian American applicants. The SFFA further argued that to remedy this outcome, Harvard must remove considerations of race and ethnicity in its holistic admissions approach. In a recent Academic Medicine Perspective, we summarized the arguments made by both the SFFA and Harvard in the case and discussed the implications for medical education admissions. We clarified the difference between claims of anti-Asian American discrimina...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective diversity and inclusion Harvard case holistic admissions Source Type: blogs

It ’s time to abolish the MCAT
The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) should be abolished. This single test — which ranks students by the science they’ve learned before going to medical school — prevents the physician population in the U.S. from looking like the population it serves. Underrepresented minority students have lower scores on all standardized tests. And the MCAT is […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/inginia-genao" rel="tag" > Inginia Genao, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

USMLE Step 1: Leveling the Playing Field – or Perpetuating Disadvantage?
By BRYAN CARMODY Let me show you some data. I’m going to show you the Match rate and mean Step 1 score for three groups of residency applicants. These are real data, compiled from the National Resident Matching Program’s (NRMP) Charting Outcomes in the Match reports. Ready? U.S. Allopathic Seniors: 92% match rate; Step 1 232.3U.S. Osteopathic Seniors: 83% match rate; Step 1 225.8International Medical Graduates, or IMGs (both U.S. and non-U.S. citizen: 53% match rate; Step 1 223.6 Now. What do you conclude when you look at these numbers? __ In the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Bryan Carmody international medical graduates Match Medical Education Medical residency Step 1 USMLE Source Type: blogs

Swimming Through Change
What do you love about swimming? For me, I’ve just always loved being in the water and playing games with my friends. Starting from when I was 7 or 8 years old, I walked to our neighborhood pool, met my friends, and we played cards during adult swim, and sharks & minnows when there were enough of us there, and I swam on the swim team until I was 15 years old.  The swimming pool was the fabric of my summer existence. During & after high school, other priorities came up, other sports, other interests, academics and eventually a job.  My first job out of college was with Voyageur Outward Bound School w...
Source: Mr. Hassle's Long Underpants - December 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doc Shazam Tags: Life Triathlon Training Source Type: blogs

Advice from a “xennial” physician to aspiring physicians
I am considered a “xennial” physician. Not quite a millennial — but also not fitting into the generation of the respected preceptors I had in medical school and residency. I took my MCAT via paper and pencil. My mini boards during my clinical rotations were on paper and pencil. All of my licensing and board […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/andrea-lauffer" rel="tag" > Andrea Lauffer, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Hospitalist Source Type: blogs

Alvaro asked a tough question: How do you define SMART?
Alvaro asked this question as a comment after a blog entry discussed recent evidence that physical exercise contributes to academic success. Alvaro, “smart”, like beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder. You do not necessarily want a computer jockey next to you in your foxhole. You do not necessarily want a great world scholar managing your finances. If I lifted you up and dropped you down into a community of Aleuts or Bedouins or Ainu, it would take a very, very long time before anyone in that community viewed you as “smart”. “SMART” IS CONTEXTUAL. We commonly define “smart” ...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - November 1, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Autism Origins, Treatments Brain Fitness Brain Science Childhood Learning Cognitive Impairment in Children Cognitive impairments Language Development Neuroscience Reading and Dyslexia Source Type: blogs

Life At the Foot of Squirrel Hill
Where else can you find a Kosher Dunkin Donuts? I live just at the bottom of Squirrel Hill. Saturday mornings my partner Michael and his 13 year old daughter have a routine of going to the (Kosher) Dunkin Donuts for breakfast then going to the climbing gym together. Normally I go with them, but I worked yesterday and today. We got the bronze alert of a system wide disaster so I know about the shooting before most of the city. However when I texted my partner…he already knew…the Dunkin Donuts is just 2 blocks from the Tree of Life Synagogue. My mothers caretaker drove past the synagogue just 30 minutes before ...
Source: Mr. Hassle's Long Underpants - October 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doc Shazam Tags: Clinical Source Type: blogs

A patient ’s open letter to aspiring physicians
As a patient who has had extensive dealings with five prestigious Manhattan medical institutions, I have taken the liberty of writing this letter from the perspective of one who has spent many long and arduous years in the underbelly of our deeply troubled health care system, and one who has seen firsthand how the doctor-patient relationship has steadily eroded over time. This relationship, so foundational to the practice of medicine, is in crisis. While doing your undergraduate degree, it is important not to spend all your time shadowing, taking science classes, and preparing for the MCAT. Study literature, history, and t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/david-penner" rel="tag" > David Penner < /a > Tags: Patient Medical school Patients Source Type: blogs

7 keys to having a medical career that serves your life
Doctors spend their early adulthood preparing for medicine. In college, we take classes to satisfy prerequisites and prepare for the MCAT exam.  Medical school has a life of its own. The volume of material to master is extensive, and the pressure mounts to be your best.  Next is the interview process for residency training and the anticipation of Match Day. Then life will begin. Maybe? Now you are in your late 20s to 30s trying to catch up with the life that your non-medical friends and family have been enjoying for years.  Does landing that ideal position guarantee that now you are living the life of your d...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/stephanie-wellington" rel="tag" > Stephanie Wellington, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Philosophical musings on tests in medical school and beyond
Yesterday I read the latest “On Being A Doctor” in the Annals of Internal Medicine.  The story – Murky Water – tells the story of a classmate who committed suicide after failing step 1 by 1 question.  Over the last 12 hours I have pondered this story as well as an article in the same issue titled The MCAT’s Restrictive Effect on the Minority Physician Pipeline: A Legal Perspective. What do standardized tests tell us?  In college, as a psychology major I took a course in Psychometrics.  I understand the principles behind designing tests that produce bell shaped curves. ...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - September 30, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Burnout doesn ’t start in medical school
Burnout affects as many as 50 percent of physicians. Interventions have been proposed at virtually every stage of a physician’s life, from medical school to residency training to professional practice. While the rigors of medical training certainly contribute to the high levels of burnout in the profession, there are indications that the trouble begins at the undergraduate level. I recently graduated from an undergraduate program geared toward students interested in medicine. Through an anonymous forum on our e-learning platform, numerous students have confessed to feeling a profound sense of inadequacy regarding the...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anna-goshua" rel="tag" > Anna Goshua < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Doctors: First, do no harm to yourself
There’s this prevailing theme in modern medicine that I don’t understand. It’s called: “Do no harm to others, but neglect yourself.” It’s perpetuated by ridiculous working hours, emotional, psychological and sometimes physical stress, minimal vacation and maximum pressure to always do a little more. Did you overwork yourself as an undergrad, watch your hair fall out during MCAT studying, then give up family and friends for a fire hydrant of information to the mouth in med school, while simultaneously volunteering, doing research and maybe even juggling a couple kids or a second degree, j...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mariam-a-molani" rel="tag" > Mariam A. Molani, DO, MBA < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Getting beyond the numbers in your medical school interview
Everyone knows that the process of applying and getting accepted into medical school is highly competitive. Last year, 51,680 people applied for seats in U.S. medical schools. Collectively, they submitted 816,153 applications — a whopping 16 applications per person on average. Only 21,338 applicants matriculated to a U.S. school last fall, or 41 percent of applicants. So how do the admissions committees evaluating all these applicants make their decisions? We know that the MCAT is one of their most important tools in identifying students with high aptitude, with GPA used also to validate past academic performance. Fo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/tiffany-ciolek" rel="tag" > Tiffany Ciolek, MBA < /a > Tags: Education Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Source Type: blogs

one flew over
So we had this bird nest in our garage. Our nanny first noticed it a few weeks ago, high up on a shelf something like eight, nine feet up, propped on a shelf against a corner, atop of a pack of Costco bulk terry cloth towels. We've had a broken window in the garage for...I don't know, probably going on a year now (don't judge), and I suppose it was only natural that at some point, a bird might find its way indoors and make itself at home." Whatkind of bird? " a few people at work asked me when I brought it up, but I couldn't really say, since I never actually saw anyonein the nest. For all I knew, the nest could ...
Source: the underwear drawer - May 29, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

I was accidentally accepted to an Ivy League medical school at 17
Want to hear a crazy story? Typical medical school students can relate tales of a college experience that includes summer research or hours spent reviewing for the MCAT. I didn’t even take the MCAT. Read on for the oddest medical school acceptance story you’ve ever heard. I was driven in high school. I’d heard for years about smart kids going off to the Ivy League, and I wanted that experience — to end up sitting on a nice New England college green, taking classes with the world’s best and brightest. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/eliza" rel="tag" > Eliza < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Trust the process of medical school admissions
For the over 6,500 candidates who applied to Canadian medical schools this cycle, the term “admissions” has taken on a whole new meaning. For some, the word has become a kind of divine judgment — a determinative force defining the individual’s value or worth. For others, a long road of struggle has led them to acceptance of the next step in their career. To most, however, the word has morphed into a menacing dragon, which many have taken on the heroic responsibility to slay. It’s no wonder that young students from as early as high school begin to prepare for this trying journey — taking ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/paul-lee-and-samuel-wu" rel="tag" > Paul Lee and Samuel Wu < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Premed? Here are 3 things to consider.
Hello, premeds! There’s so much advice out there from so many sources. Your aunt, cousin, and grandpa think they know what to do to be successful in your pursuit of medicine. All of your friends are experts — and why aren’t you a doctor already? I know, I know … This time in life is hard. You are comparing yourself, and you are hearing so many messages. So, I’ll make it simple. Here are three pieces of advice for pursuing a career in medicine while staying human and sane: 1. Concentrate on your classes. Seems easy: Go to class, study, take a test, repeat. But it’s not so simple for ever...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/candice-williams" rel="tag" > Candice Williams, MD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

First date with a medical student
Her: “So what do you do?” Him: “Well, I’m applying to medical school. If I make it, I’ll spend the vast majority of my time studying for the next four years. You and I will be able to go on cheap dates occasionally, but even then I’ll feel guilty about not studying. I won’t have any money, so you’ll have to support me on your income. Otherwise, I’ll have to take out more student loans on top of the 40 to 50 thousand per year in tuition. My parents don’t make enough to help with the enormous tuition bills, but they make too much for me to get a need-based scholarsh...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/dr-glaucomflecken" rel="tag" > Dr. Glaucomflecken < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Doctors wear white coats. But what do their spouses wear?
When we first met and got married, my husband Josh wanted to be a math teacher. Since I was also pursuing a career in teaching, I thought this was a great idea. I envisioned both of us teaching together in the same school district for forty years, becoming local superstars! We would know all the kids in town and spend our summer vacations traveling to exotic locations around the globe. But one short year into our marriage, Josh became intrigued with the idea of attending medical school. Before long, he signed up to take the MCAT, and suddenly our lives were headed on a different path than I had ever expected. As the years ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lara-mcelderry" rel="tag" > Lara McElderry < /a > Tags: Physician Source Type: blogs

Splitting hairs with hypertension
By SAURABH JHA, MD   Intrigued by many things in my first few days in the U.S., what perplexed me the most was that there seemed to be a DaVita Dialysis wherever I went; in malls, in the mainstreet of West Philadelphia, near high rises and near lower rises. I felt that I was being ominously followed by nephrologists. How on earth could providers of renal replacement therapy have a similar spatial distribution as McDonalds? After reading Friedrich Hayek’s essay, Use of Knowledge in Society, I realized why. In stead of building a multiplex for dialysis, which has shops selling pulmonary edema-inducing fried chicke...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Patients Value-Based Care Source Type: blogs

Should we encourage people to go into medicine?
Recently, a brilliant, caring and warm-hearted friend of mine approached me asking if I would help her with MCAT studying. She’d be a non-traditional medical school applicant due to a few gap years. Thus, she needed to prove to herself and prospective schools she still had the academic chops. Immediately, I froze. Over the years, I have served as mentor to medical students, interns, and residents. To be there at someone’s aha moment has always been something I’ve enjoyed, and the thought of paying it forward in homage to my mentors leaves me utterly sentimental. We’ve created a supportive community ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/millennial-doctor" rel="tag" > Millennial Doctor, MD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

#MeToo: The Life of a Lady in the Sciences
Picture a girl from Kentucky. She works hard in school, excels in her studies, and graduates from Vanderbilt with a degree in science. Picture another girl from Kentucky. She enters beauty pageants, practices with friends and family, and wins the Miss Kentucky crown in 2017 as a senior in college. You might be picturing two very separate individuals, but they are in fact the same person. Madelynne Grace Myers seems to live two separate lives, but in reality she lives the life of a true millennial; breaking the stereotypical mold for no other reason than it should not exist to begin with. Myers attended an all girls school ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - March 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Faye Nourollahi Tags: Uncategorized International Women's Day miss kentucky STEM women in science Source Type: blogs

Miss Kentucky would like you to please pay attention to the board
Picture a girl from Kentucky. She works hard in school, excels in her studies, and graduates from Vanderbilt with a degree in science. Picture another girl from Kentucky. She enters beauty pageants, practices with friends and family, and wins the Miss Kentucky crown in 2017 as a senior in college. You might be picturing two very separate individuals, but they are in fact the same person. Madelynne Grace Myers seems to live two separate lives, but in reality she lives the life of a true millennial; breaking the stereotypical mold for no other reason than it should not exist to begin with. Myers attended an all girls school ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - March 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Faye Nourollahi Tags: Uncategorized International Women's Day miss kentucky STEM women in science Source Type: blogs

What makes a great doctor: a physician reflects
I have been fortunate enough to find a home in academic medicine. Most of that time I’ve spent in oncology — working with residents, fellows, and colleagues on projects, whether they be chart-based or prospectively designed trials. I’ve lectured a ton, and written even more. Yet, my experience in academia has also allowed me to help choose future medical students, residents, and fellows, and this has perhaps been one of the most important aspects of the profession. See, each time I am asked to interview a candidate, the same question goes through my mind: What will make a good doctor? What am I looking fo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/don-s-dizon" rel="tag" > Don S. Dizon, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Medical school Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Differentiation of cognitive abilities and the Medical College Admission Test - ScienceDirect
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886917306608 (Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner))
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - November 14, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Doctor Of Osteopathic Medicine: A Growing Share Of The Physician Workforce
Conclusion The doctor of osteopathic medicine workforce is growing rapidly with no signs of decreases in the quality of students accepted or their success in matching into a residency training program, which has been steadily rising. Given the doctor of osteopathic medicine workforce’s higher likelihood of practicing in rural communities and of pursuing careers in primary care, doctors of osteopathic medicine are on track to play an increasingly important role in ensuring access to care nationwide, including for our most vulnerable populations. Note 1 Since some residencies are jointly accredited by both the ACGME an...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 23, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Edward Salsberg and Clese Erikson Tags: Health Professionals Population Health doctors of osteopathic medicine osteopaths physician supply Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 21st 2017
This study didn't measure whether receiving the cardiosphere-derived cells extended lifespans, so we have a lot more work to do. We have much to study, including whether CDCs need to come from a young donor to have the same rejuvenating effects and whether the extracellular vesicles are able to reproduce all the rejuvenating effects we detect with CDCs." Cardiac and systemic rejuvenation after cardiosphere-derived cell therapy in senescent rats Cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) therapy has exhibited several favourable effects on heart structure and function in humans and in preclinical models; however,...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Oxidative Stress and Cellular Senescence in the Progression of Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis is a common age-related degenerative joint condition in which cartilage and bone are lost, though in the earlier stages of the condition, changes in cartilage are more subtle and complicated in their effects. While not traditionally seen as an inflammatory condition, as there is no evident, visible joint inflammation as occurs in other forms of arthritis, there is nonetheless a strong case for considering osteoarthritis to be driven by localized inflammation. Recently, the increased number of senescent cells in aged joint tissue has been shown to contribute directly to the development of osteoarthritis. Inde...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 16, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Why I got into medical school and chose not to go
Imagine taking the MCAT, applying to schools, getting interviews and even being accepted into medical school. How would it feel knowing your dedication has paid off? I felt great, as I had studied hard and made sacrifices others were unwilling to make. As I saw the finish line for what would be the beginning of medical school, I began to ask myself, “Should I continue onwards toward medical school or not?” When I was in my master’s program, I made the difficult decision to not continue on my journey towards medical school because I was not fully in it anymore. I had come as far as finishing the medical sc...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/armando-quintana" rel="tag" > Armando Quintana < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Here ’s what it’s really like when your spouse is a doctor
June 30 is a date that those in the medical world know well; it’s the official end of the medical training calendar year. July 1 represents new beginnings: beginning of the academic year, an internship, a residency, or a fellowship. This year was our tenth and final passing through the medical new year. Looking back, I realize that we never would have predicted what we were going to learn and experience along the way. My husband, Lee, used to be firefighter. He worked two 24-hour shifts/week, had a union job and was respected and admired by many, especially kids. During his paramedic training, several mentors encoura...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/emily-loeb" rel="tag" > Emily Loeb < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Being Latina, a physician, a mother and a runner: by the numbers
To a runner, numbers are everything. It’s data. It’s workouts. It’s goals. It’s pace. It’s winning or losing. To a physician, numbers are everything as well. Before you get into medical school, numbers are your schedule, your GPA and your MCAT. In medical school, numbers are your grades, your board scores and your rank in the class. It goes on and on. As a practicing physician, it’s your patient’s’ lab results, your RVUs, your payments, your patient satisfaction score, and your bottom line. 1.8. It’s a number that resonates in my head. It’s a really small number. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 28, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/monica-verduzco-gutierrez" rel="tag" > Monica Verduzco-Gutierrez, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

I just lost my son to suicide. What can I do?
Dear Dr. Wible, I lost my beautiful son Evan to suicide four weeks ago. He was a second year internal medicine resident — a very smart, loving and funny man! He left a lengthy letter and in it he stated, “I do not want any attention drawn to this.” I have been crying all day reading your book and blog and I’ve seen the trailer of the film you all are making. I admire your work and if I can help one student, resident or doctor to seek help it will be worth ignoring his wishes. You see Evan was always a really bright child. He was very caring and compassionate. I never saw any signs of depression. He ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How I went from the bottom to the top 1 percentile on board exams
Most doctors are very bright people. I believe that what often sets apart those who perform well on the job and on exams isn’t raw intelligence but rather the ability to learn effectively. In the MCAT and USMLE steps 1, 2, and 3, I did poorly and barely passed. In 2009, I took my family medicine in-training exam and fell below the minimum passing score. After taking almost five years away from residency for healing and to run an orphanage in Africa, I returned to residency and quickly improved my performance to the level that I recently scored in the top 1 percent in the country on my in-training exam. My s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 24, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kenneth-acha" rel="tag" > Kenneth Acha, MD < /a > Tags: Education Residency Source Type: blogs

I ’m retired, but I’m disgusted with medical schools. Here’s why.
The year was 1976. I was graduating from a small branch of my state university with a bachelor’s in chemistry when I first applied to medical school. I was living at home and paying my own tuition. There were no physicians in my family, but I became interested in medicine after I was impressed with a surgeon who had operated on my shoulder. I had a better-than-the-medical-school-acceptance-rate average on my grades and MCAT scores, stellar recommendations and tons of extracurriculars, so I was confident. Still, I heeded the advice of a professor who advised me to apply to a graduate program where I could get a master...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 10, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/thomas-d-guastavino" rel="tag" > Thomas D. Guastavino, MD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

A Reset For Physicians?
By PAUL KECKLEY Last week, the nominee to run the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Seema Verma testified before the Senate Finance Committee. She conveyed a message akin to that of her new boss, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, a physician and House of Representatives veteran: the federal government has made life miserable for providers adding unnecessary complexity and cost. She challenged the value of electronic health records especially in small practices and rural settings and likened interoperability to a bridge too far. And she observed that Medicare and Medicaid, that cover 128 million Amer...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Caribbean medical schools: It ’s not all palm trees and sunsets
Did you know that several Caribbean medical schools provide postgraduate premed courses so students can complete their science requirements? At least one school’s nearly year-long premed curriculum includes 8 hours per day of classroom work, rudimentary general chemistry and organic labs, and a physics lab with 40-year-old equipment. The fee is more than $30,000 cash, no loans. That’s a lot to pay for courses that are not accredited and credits transferable only to other Caribbean schools. The goal of these premed programs is to prepare students to take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). However, some s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 18, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skeptical-scalpel" rel="tag" > Skeptical Scalpel, MD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

This medical student ’s biggest regret? Not watching enough college basketball.
I made it through the rigors of pre-med. I made it through (almost all of) med school, with a few scars to show for it. And now that I’m a big, bad MS4, I finally have the time and the distance to reflect on all the literal blood, sweat, and tears it took to get here. I am a loud and proud Duke Blue Devil. It was my dream school despite my born-and-raised New Yorker parents saying, “South of the Mason-Dixon line? Absolutely no way!” My four years there surpassed my wildest expectations. But I failed to live all of my Duke dreams out. I’m proud of the person that I have become as a result of persever...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 11, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/leah-croll" rel="tag" > Leah Croll < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Directions...
Wow. It's been three months since I last checked in with you, my loyal readers. All 3 of you. As you might guess from reading my ranting over the past 11-plus years, I've been in the midst of a dilemma, in this case trying to figure out what my future should hold. There are many directions to go, many options to consider, and many needs to satisfy. But I think I've got it. Finally.To be totally honest, my basic instinct was to retire completely at the end of the year. Which was my intentionlast year, but somehow I stayed on. And I will indeed continue to work for another year, although I'll cut back my weeks even more...
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - October 5, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

What this family physician learned from his dog
I, much like many others, made a terrible decision on my 21st birthday.  Mine, however, didn’t involve alcohol; I adopted a dog. She was a scruffy, brindle-coated, malnourished 30-pound terrier puppy.  So in between organic chemistry, physics, Spanish, studying for the MCAT, and multiple other classes, I had to housebreak a puppy.  Those glorious visions I had of dog ownership hadn’t included several key aspects, like cleaning up accidents, cleaning up dog hair, cleaning up more accidents, replacing roommates’ shoes, fixing carpet, buying new electrical cords, apartment pet fees, toenails r...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/justin-reno" rel="tag" > Justin Reno, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

6 actions new medical students should take
Dear Class of 2020, You’ve worked hard to earn the privilege of becoming a physician. I hope you took some time before starting medical school to enjoy yourself and embrace your passions, be they travel, music or art, or simply spending time with family and friends. Becoming a doctor is a long, bumpy and often lonely road. Resiliency is essential. My first and most important piece of advice is to be sure you retain these other parts of your life that you enjoy so much. If you don’t make the effort, it won’t happen. Second, take time now to reflect on and celebrate your achievements. You’ve studied h...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/robert-pearl" rel="tag" > Robert Pearl, MD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

To my fellow school of medicine graduates: Give it to them straight
I would have graduated from medical school this year.  That’s right.  Just like you, I’d be getting ready to move to another city and take up residence at an academic medical center to begin my clinical training. Things don’t always work out the way we planned: like Lenny and George in Steinbeck’s, Of Mice and Men.  Sometimes, the best-laid plans have a way of going awry no matter how carefully we prepare them. Cancer.  I wasn’t worried. It was just a little mole.  Melanoma. Only a few microscopic cells hiding in my lymph no...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Patient Cancer Source Type: blogs

Why We Stopped Participating In US News’ Medical School Rankings
Every spring, the snows recede, birds migrate north, and U.S. News & World Report releases its annual “Best Graduate Schools” rankings. The issue is a predictable hit with prospective graduate students and anxious parents who want to make sure their child gets into the “right” school. Universities that do well amplify the buzz by boasting of their ranking in ads, articles, and campus banners. The hoopla ensures that the issue is an annual moneymaker for the magazine. Much of the data U.S. News uses to generate its rankings is provided by the schools themselves. A few months ago, when we received...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 6, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Arthur Kellermann and Charles Rice Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Health Professionals Quality Graduate medical education Liaison Committee on Medical Education medical school rankings Physicians Uniformed Services University of the Health Services US News & World report Source Type: blogs

These are the 4 words every child needs to hear
As a child and adolescent psychiatrist, I have the privilege of working with many children who are victims of severe abuse, neglect, and trauma.  Some, in turn, become perpetrators of violence. One adolescent, let’s call him Steven, told me that he wants to be an electrician, but he is struggling to earn his high school diploma, which he needs in order to enroll in technical school. When I inquired about his struggles, he looked down at his feet and whispered, “I’m not sure I have what it takes. What if I try and can’t do it?” He went on to say, “When I was little my dad used to say...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 6, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

A star medical student feels like he made a terrible decision
It is February of our last few months of clinical rotations. I am a rising fourth-year medical student at a well-known East Coast institution with a not-so-bad track record, I guess you could say. I scored in the top percentile for the USMLE Step 1, honored my third-year rotations, and have comments from attendings about how I am destined to succeed in this career. One might think that at this point in my life, I should feel confident, well-accomplished, and hopeful for the future. In the last month, there’s been a lot of talk about residency and deciding on a specialty. To me, this meant finally looking back on...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 3, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Should he go to medical school?
I received this email last night: I am 21 and recently graduated with my BS in Computer Science this past May. I took a shining to computing at a young age, never really considering any other field to pursue. I have been working in the field for only 6 months but I don’t know if I feel fulfilled in it. Yes, it may just be this position I am currently in but I am learning about medicine, just in case.   I have been taking some Coursera.org medical courses from Stanford and other great universities online. I find that I am truly enjoying these courses and I may want to pursue this field of study. I don’...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 29, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Mitochondrial Catalase Suppresses Cancer Incidence in Mice
Gene therapy to raise levels of the natural antioxidant catalase in mitochondria is one of many methods shown to modestly extend life in mice. Cancer is so very prevalent in mice that it is frequently worth asking whether or not life extension is a matter of slowing aging or a matter of suppressing cancer - though there is certainly a lot of room for argument as to whether or not these are just two ways of stating the same thing, based on the details of the mechanisms involved. See the debate over whether rapamycin slows aging or suppresses cancer, for example. Given all this, the paper linked here is interesting: The ant...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 2, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Want to become a doctor? Don’t be so sure.
Recently, my friend “Tim” told me that he no longer wished to become a doctor. He had already taken the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) and all his premedical course requirements. But a summer shadowing physicians whom he described as  “always unhappy” convinced him to cut his losses. “I worked hard the last three years,” he explained to me. “But I don’t want to be miserable forever.” Medicine is a demanding and often thankless profession. Long and stressful hours, years of training, little sleep, and heavy debt can all take their to...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

The danger of politically correct medical schools
Ask any premed student what they fear most and the answer will always be the MCAT, or Medical College Admission Test. After 25 years, the MCAT is being revised, becoming longer (by three hours) and covering a broader range of topics than simply chemistry, physics, and biology. One-quarter of the new test covers “psychology, sociology and the biological foundations of behavior.” More specifically, students will be tested on “social inequality, class consciousness, racial and ethnic identity, institutionalized racism and discrimination, and power, privilege and prestige.” Continue reading ... Your pa...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 24, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Rooting for humanities majors in medical school
Medical schools traditionally admit pre-med students who are science nerds, and later wonder why their graduates aren’t well-attuned to their patients’ emotions. The Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City hopes to correct that. It now operates a program, called “Hu-Med,” that admits humanities majors. They’re selected after their sophomore college year, and don’t even need to take the infamous MCAT admissions test. In my mind, this project is more than welcome. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online repu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs