Pitts study links cystic fibrosis lung inflammation to opportunistic bacteria
An investigation led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has found a link between a new class of bacterial enzymes and the chronic lung inflammation that plagues patients with cystic fibrosis, a terminal lung disease characterized by excess mucus buildup in the body. The study, published Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, details that the bacteria, P. aeruginosa, thrives in inflamed lungs, secreting an enzyme called Cif that sabotages the body’s ability… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 12, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Lydia Nuzum Source Type: news

Bacterial 'sabotage' handicaps ability to resolve devastating lung inflammation
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) The chronic lung inflammation that is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis, has, for the first time, been linked to a new class of bacterial enzymes that hijack the patient's immune response and prevent the body from calling off runaway inflammation, according to a laboratory investigation led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 12, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

MRSA Eradication Feasible in Cystic Fibrosis Patients MRSA Eradication Feasible in Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) eradication can be completed with few treatment-related side effects in children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF), according to results from a randomized controlled trial.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news

Protein disrupts infectious biofilms
Researchers have discovered a protein that inhibits biofilms of a bacterium responsible for many cystic fibrosis infections. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Protein disrupts infectious biofilms
(California Institute of Technology) Researchers discover a protein that inhibits biofilms of a bacterium responsible for many cystic fibrosis infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

This Specific Type Of Exercise Improves Men's Fertility
If you’re a man who spends a little more time on the couch than you want to admit, and you’re planning to start trying for a baby soon, here’s some advice: Exercise could significantly improve the quality of your sperm.  Specifically, moderate steady state cardio like jogging could improve your sperm’s speed, shape and volume, according to a new study published in the journal Reproduction.  How different exercises affected the quality of men’s sperm  A six-month study among 261 previously sedentary men in Iran found that those who were randomly assigned to start exercising on a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

This Specific Type Of Exercise Improves Men's Fertility
If you’re a man who spends a little more time on the couch than you want to admit, and you’re planning to start trying for a baby soon, here’s some advice: Exercise could significantly improve the quality of your sperm.  Specifically, moderate steady state cardio like jogging could improve your sperm’s speed, shape and volume, according to a new study published in the journal Reproduction.  How different exercises affected the quality of men’s sperm  A six-month study among 261 previously sedentary men in Iran found that those who were randomly assigned to start exercising on a ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Person of the Year 2016 Runner-Up: The CRISPR Pioneers
[time-ad size=”large”] Table of ContentsPerson of the Year THE CHOICE DONALD TRUMP The Short List HILLARY CLINTON THE HACKERS RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN THE CRISPR PIONEERS BEYONCÉ Plus EUROPE’S POPULIST REVOLT ARE PRESIDENTS ALWAYS POY? 90 YEARS OF POY BY ALICE PARK Dr. Carl June’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania looks like any other biology research hub. There are tidy rows of black-topped workbenches flanked by shelves bearing boxes of pipettes and test tubes. There’s ad hoc signage marking the different workstations. And there are postdocs buzzing around, calibra...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: person of the year POY Source Type: news

First structural map of cystic fibrosis protein sheds light on how mutations cause disease
Scientists have created the first three-dimensional map of the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease for which there is no cure. This achievement offers the kinds of insights essential to better understanding and treating this often-fatal disease, which clogs the lungs with sticky mucus, leading to breathing problems or respiratory infections. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

First structural map of the cystic fibrosis protein sheds light on how mutations cause disease
A map that shows the arrangement of atoms within the cystic fibrosis protein will help researchers better understand how specific mutations cause disease. Ultimately, this knowledge may reveal potential targets for new drugs. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 1, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News CFTR cryo-electron microscopy cystic fibrosis Jue Chen structural and chemical biology Zhe Zhan Source Type: news

First structural map of cystic fibrosis protein sheds light on how mutations cause disease
(Rockefeller University) A map that shows the arrangement of atoms within the cystic fibrosis protein will help researchers better understand how specific mutations cause disease. Ultimately, this knowledge may reveal potential targets for new drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacteria Found in CF Patients Worldwide Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacteria Found in CF Patients Worldwide
A new, extra-virulent strain of a nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) that infects cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has rapidly found its way around the world, new findings show.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape PublicHealth Headlines)
Source: Medscape PublicHealth Headlines - November 29, 2016 Category: Primary Care Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

A Betraying Breath : Living In The Uncertainty Of A Chronic Illness
All it takes is but a single breath for life to become so very real. In a single breath the heaviness of life and its fragility can pour into the depths of the soul. In a single breath lives a reality that is unchangeable, unfair, and heartbreaking. Within a single breath lives my very truth from which I so often times am on a quest to outrun. A truth that every breath I am given does not come without cost or heartache. A truth that is blended amidst quiet embers of fear waiting to ignite into a consuming blaze - waiting silently to steal that very breath and this life I love. Betrayal in a Single Breath Without conscious...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Unusual case of Burkholderia dolosa Infection in a Cystic Fibrosis Patient but Not His Sister
Irreversible decline in lung function is one of the key contributors to mortality and morbidity in the cystic fibrosis (CF) population [1]. One key determinant of lung health is recurrent respiratory infections with opportunistic pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Haemophilus influenzae, non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) are common opportunistic agents of infections or chronic pulmonary colonizers in the CF population [1]. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 19, 2016 Category: Microbiology Authors: Grace Y. Lam, Josette Salgado, Jamil Kanji, James E.A. Zlosnik, Neil E. Brown, Winnie M. Leung Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

[In Depth] Study suggests hidden epidemic in CF patients
Between 5% and 10% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients become infected with Mycobacterium abscessus, a pathogen that thrives in the excess of thick mucus amassing in the airways of CF patients. Some of them die as a result. Until recently, scientists believed that patients picked up the microbe at random, from the soil or water. But an analysis of hundreds of bacterial genomes from patients around the world, published in this week's issue of Science, suggests that the bacterium has adapted to humans and that several dangerous strains are spreading from one CF treatment center to the next, from country to country, and even bet...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 11, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Kai Kupferschmidt Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: news

[Report] Emergence and spread of a human-transmissible multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterium
Lung infections with Mycobacterium abscessus, a species of multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria, are emerging as an important global threat to individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), in whom M. abscessus accelerates inflammatory lung damage, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Previously, M. abscessus was thought to be independently acquired by susceptible individuals from the environment. However, using whole-genome analysis of a global collection of clinical isolates, we show that the majority of M. abscessus infections are acquired through transmission, potentially via fomites and aerosols, of recent...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 11, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Josephine M. Bryant Source Type: news

A Superbug That Threatens People With Cystic Fibrosis Is Spreading Globally
In this study, researchers from Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sequenced the genomes of more than 1,000 samples of mycobacteria from 517 CF patients at specialist clinics in Europe, the United States and Australia. They found that the majority of patients had picked up transmissible forms of M. abscessus that had spread globally. Further analysis suggested the infection may be transmitted within hospitals via contaminated surfaces and through the air, the researchers said - presenting a serious challenge to infection control practices in hospitals. Because the superbug has already become resistant to man...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Superbug That Threatens People With Cystic Fibrosis Is Spreading Globally
In this study, researchers from Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sequenced the genomes of more than 1,000 samples of mycobacteria from 517 CF patients at specialist clinics in Europe, the United States and Australia. They found that the majority of patients had picked up transmissible forms of M. abscessus that had spread globally. Further analysis suggested the infection may be transmitted within hospitals via contaminated surfaces and through the air, the researchers said - presenting a serious challenge to infection control practices in hospitals. Because the superbug has already become resistant to man...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Multi-drug resistant infection spreading globally among cystic fibrosis patients
A multi-drug resistant infection that can cause life-threatening illness in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and can spread from patient to patient has spread globally and is becoming increasingly virulent, according to new research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Multi-drug resistant infection spreading globally among cystic fibrosis patients
(University of Cambridge) A multi-drug resistant infection that can cause life-threatening illness in people with cystic fibrosis and can spread from patient to patient has spread globally and is becoming increasingly virulent, according to new research published today in the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 10, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pole dancer has just 'months to live' after her body has rejected her second transplant
Kirstie Tancock, 27, from Honiton, Devon, has suffered from cystic fibrosis since she was born. But in a blog, she says she has suffered her second organ rejection and is now too ill to receive a third. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

To Your Health: NLM update: Cystic fibrosis research institute's potential
Listen to the To Your Health: NLM update on Cystic fibrosis research institute's potential. The transcript is also available. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation just opened its own research institute to speed the development of medications in a move that will be watched by other disease advocacy organizations, finds a recent article published in Science... (Source: What's New on MedlinePlus)
Source: What's New on MedlinePlus - November 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Assessing the Airway Microbiota in Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic airway bacterial infections and airway inflammation. Microbiologic cultures of CF airway samples identify a narrow spectrum of pathogenic bacteria. More recently, culture-independent techniques have identified much more diverse microbial communities within the CF airways. The role of these bacterial communities in CF disease progression and pulmonary exacerbations is under investigation. This review discusses advances in molecular approaches for microbiota analysis; challenges in airway sampling; recent findings in airway microbiota in CF, including longitudinal...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 4, 2016 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jordana E. Hoppe, J. Kirk Harris, Edith T. Zemanick Source Type: news

Fluorescent sensor provides low-cost diagnosis of cystic fibrosis
Scientists have developed a new diagnostic test for cystic fibrosis. The new device provides a cheaper, easier way to detect levels of chloride in sweat, which are elevated in cystic fibrosis patients. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A lead to overcome resistance to antibiotics
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common bacterium in the environment. It can however become a formidable pathogen causing fatal infections, especially in intubated patients, people suffering from cystic fibrosis or severe burns. The presence of certain metals in the natural or human environment of the bacterium makes it more dangerous and, in particular, resistant to antibiotics of last resort. A team of researchers has shown that a specific protein of P. aeruginosa, called Host factor q (Hfq), is essential for reacting to these metals and acquire these new properties. The results single out the Hfq protein as the Achilles heel...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nurse Assist Initiates Nationwide Voluntary Recall of All Unexpired Lots of I.V. Flush Syringes
Nurse Assist, Inc. announced today that it is voluntarily recalling all unexpired lots of I.V. Flush Syringes due to a potential link to Burkholderia cepacia bloodstream infections with the product.  According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the effects of Burkholderia cepacia on people'vary widely, ranging from no symptoms at all to serious respiratory infections, especially in patients with cystic fibrosis.' If a patient is having symptoms, contact your health care provider. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - October 5, 2016 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Curing inherited disease by running a stop sign
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) A study published today by scientists at University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Alabama at Birmingham provides insight into the mechanism of action of the drug ataluren, which is showing promise in treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

FDA OKs Cystic Fibrosis Drug Orkambi for Younger Patients FDA OKs Cystic Fibrosis Drug Orkambi for Younger Patients
The lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination drug is now approved for children aged 6 to 11 years with two copies of the F508del mutation in the CTFR gene.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines - September 29, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Alert Source Type: news

Cystic Fibrosis: Ensuring adequate nutrition
People with cystic fibrosis (CF) need help to ensure they are getting correct nutrition and the right amount of enzymes. They also need constant reminders. Researchers are now developing a digital support device to promote autonomy, but are finding that this is no easy task. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

FDA Approves Orkambi (lumacaftor/ivacaftor) for Use in Children with Cystic Fibrosis Ages 6 through 11 who have Two Copies of the F508del Mutation
BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE) September 28, 2016 -- Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (Nasdaq: VRTX) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Orkambi (lumacaftor/ivacaftor) for use in children with cystic fibrosis (CF)... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - September 28, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Katie Prager dies days after her husband
Katie Prager, the wife in the real "Fault in Our Stars" couple, died Thursday after complications from cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant. She was 26 years old. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Katie Prager, wife in real 'Fault in Our Stars' couple, dies
Katie Prager, the wife in the real "Fault in Our Stars" couple, died Thursday after complications from cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant. She was 26 years old. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Real-life Fault in Our Stars wife with cystic fibrosis dies
Katie Prager and her husband Dalton Prager met on Facebook in 2009. Dalton Prager died Saturday at a St. Louis hospital from cystic fibrosis, which clogs the lungs with mucus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Real 'Fault in Our Stars' couple: Katie Prager dies
Katie Prager, the wife in the real "Fault in Our Stars" couple, died Thursday after complications from cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant. She was 26 years old. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Fault in our Stars' wife dies 5 days after husband
Katie Prager died after complications from cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant. She was 26 years old. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A real 'Fault in Our Stars' couple
Katie and Dalton Prager both had cystic fibrosis. Despite doctors' warnings, they married and became known as the real "Fault in Our Stars" couple. They passed away days apart from each other in September 2016. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dalton and Katie Prager: A love story
Katie and Dalton Prager both had cystic fibrosis. Despite doctors' warnings, they married and became known as the real "Fault in Our Stars" couple. They passed away days apart from each other in September 2016. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A low-cost sensor for cystic fibrosis diagnosis
A new, inexpensive method for detecting salt concentrations in sweat or other bodily fluids has been developed by biomaterials scientists. The fluorescent sensor, derived from citric acid molecules, is highly sensitive and highly selective for chloride, the key diagnostic marker in cystic fibrosis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease
Gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis (CF), suggests new research. Working with CF pigs, the researchers have shown that two different virus-based vectors can restore a working version of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein that is faulty in CF to the pigs'airway cells. Moreover, this gene replacement normalized important aspects of the lung biology and improved the ability of airway secretions to kill bacteria. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Husband in real-life "Fault in Our Stars" couple dies
25-year-old Dalton Prager died from cystic fibrosis, while his wife is in hospice care with the same disease (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New clues to cystic fibrosis'gender gap '
There is evidence that women with Cystic Fibrosis die on average two to three years earlier than do men with the devastating lung airway disease. A research team has come up with the first detailed molecular explanation for a factor that may contribute to the so-called cystic fibrosis (CF) " gender gap. " (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

[In Depth] Cystic fibrosis foundation opens drug discovery lab
The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is once again breaking new ground. In 2000, with little beyond symptomatic relief available for the inherited, life-threatening condition, the Bethesda, Maryland–based foundation hired a biotech company to develop more effective treatments. The move, unprecedented for a disease advocacy organization, paid off in two new drugs, the first to target the molecular root of the disease. But there is still no cure, and cystic fibrosis patients continue to die—467 in the United States alone in 2014. So on 19 September, the foundation is setting another precedent by officially opening its ...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 15, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Bijal P. Trivedi Tags: Biomedicine Source Type: news

What Causes Hyperphosphatemia?
Discussion Constipation is a common problem in general pediatrics and its causes are numerous. It can cause acute and recurrent abdominal pain and is a cause of abdominal distention. Patients who are young, whose presentations are other than routine or who had complications should be invested for underlying causes of their constipation. This patient had undergone some evaluations in the past for constipation but because of the presentation of sepsis a more rigorous evaluation was undertaken. The differential diagnoses of the following can be found here: constipation, acute abdominal pain, recurrent abdominal pain, and abdo...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 12, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

New research sheds light'gender gap' in cystic fibrosis
Medical researchers have examined the underpinnings of cystic fibrosis, including its disproportionate effect on women -- due in part to the influence of estrogen on the flow of important chemical ions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New research sheds light 'gender gap' in cystic fibrosis
(Arizona State University) In new research appearing in the current issue of Science Advances, Wade Van Horn and colleagues from Vanderbilt and Northwestern Universities examine the underpinnings of cystic fibrosis, including its disproportionate effect on women -- due in part to the influence of estrogen on the flow of important chemical ions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Sweat Chloride Test (Cystic Fibrosis)
Title: Sweat Chloride Test (Cystic Fibrosis)Category: Procedures and TestsCreated: 2/11/1999 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/7/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - September 7, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Burkholderia cepacia: a Complex Problem for More than Cystic Fibrosis Patients
It is always surprising to find that an organism we know only from the clinical laboratory is a “player” in other venues. Therefore, it was with some fascination that we learned that Burkholderia cepacia, long known as a pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients, is also the number one organism isolated from product recalls. We recount the story of this amazing organism, which has a place in th e clinical, agricultural, and pharmaceutical sectors. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 3, 2016 Category: Microbiology Authors: Nehemiah J. Landes, Hannah N. Livesay, Fran Schaeffer, Pam Terry, Ernest Trevino, Alice Schauer Weissfeld Source Type: news

Genetic Factors Shed Light on Barrett's Esophagus, Adenocarcinoma Genetic Factors Shed Light on Barrett's Esophagus, Adenocarcinoma
Cystic fibrosis is among factors which may influence the complex relationship of genetics to Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma, according to a large-scale meta-analysis.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Palivizumab for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus infection in children with cystic fibrosis
Respiratory syncytial virus infection causes acute lung infection in infants and young children worldwide, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. Children with cystic fibrosis are prone to recurrent lung inflammation, bacterial colonisation and subsequent chronic airway disease, putting them at risk for severe respiratory syncytial virus infections requiring intensive care and respiratory support. No treatment currently exists, hence prevention is important. Palivizumab is effective in reducing respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation rates and is recommended for prophylaxis in high-risk children with other ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Marijuana: Health effects of recreational and medical use
Marijuana is widely used, especially in adolescents and young adults. In the US, there are about 20 million users (about 7.5% of people aged 12 or older). Marijuana is a mind-altering (psychoactive) drug. Similar to hemp, it comes from the cannabis plant. The plant’s primary drug effects come from the chemical delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or “THC.” Marijuana is smoked, “vaped” (inhaling the vapor), or ingested in foods or teas. Over the last few decades, the concentration of THC in the cannabis plant has been increasing. In addition, the plant extracts are more potent. Short-term effects of m...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - August 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Drugs and Supplements Pain Management Source Type: news