Breathtaking: The Future Of Respiratory Care And Pulmonology
Smoke-measuring smart shirts, breath sound analyzing algorithms, and smart inhalers pave the way of pulmonology and respiratory care into the future. As the number of patients suffering from asthma, COPD, or lung cancer due to rising air pollution and steady smoker-levels will unfortunately not decrease any time soon, we looked around what technology can do to help both patients and caregivers. The results are breathtaking. Attacks of breathlessness are too common The diseases which pulmonologists and respiratory care specialists attempt to fight are among the most common conditions in the modern world – and t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers AI asthma cancer cancer treatment care COPD diagnostics inhaler lung lung cancer management medical specialty pulmonology respiratory respiratory care Source Type: blogs

Pancreas on a Chip to Study Causes and Treatments of Diabetes
Dysfunction of the pancreas is related to a number of diseases, most famously diabetes. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD), are particularly difficult to study in a laboratory setting, but researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have now developed a device, and an accompanying methodology, to mimic the functionality of the human pancreas. The technology is already being used to answer important questions about how CFRD comes about and will certainly help in solving other medical mysteries. The team’s microfluidic device has two chambers separated by a porous membr...
Source: Medgadget - July 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Source Type: blogs

Segmental bronchial atresia-Case Report
Discussion –-       Bronchial atresia usually is benign and asymptomatic and is incidental finding& clinical manifestations may range from recurrent pulmonary infections to mild wheezing and dyspnea. Bronchial atresia is a congenital abnormality resulting from focal interruption of a lobar, segmental, or subsegmental bronchus with associated peripheral mucus impaction (bronchocele, mucocele) and associated hyperinflation of the obstructed lung segment. The apicoposterior segmental bronchus of the left upper lobe is most common site to be involved, followed by segmental bron...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - June 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Bioengineered Viruses Used to Kill Antibiotic-Resistant Infection
Scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have achieved a world’s first of beating a bacterial infection using an engineered virus. This was done in a 15-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis who had a severe case of Mycobacterium. The girl received a double lung transplant, but then developed the infection that antibiotics could not kill. The infection spread through the body, even developing into nodules over the skin. As a last resort she was injected with bacteriophages, which are viruses that infect bacteria. These viruses were gathered as part of Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s SEA-PHAGES program, ...
Source: Medgadget - May 10, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Medicine Public Health Surgery Source Type: blogs

Bodily Fluids As The Basis For Digital Health
Blood, saliva, urine, sweat or even ear wax can carry valuable information about an individual’s medical state. Until now, even simpler tests on such bodily fluids had to be carried out at medical facilities, but with the recent uptick in the development of digital diagnostic technologies, more and more solutions appear on the market which enable the patient to do such tests at home. Here we take a look around the bodily fluid business. From bloodletting to digital sweat measurement Blood, yellow bile, black bile, phlegm. Although it doesn’t sound appealing, the ancient Greek already thought that bodily f...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 27, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics blood bodily fluid digital digital health digital solutions digital tattoo saliva smart smart healthcare sweat technology urine Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (February 4-8, 2019): #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #ChicagoMed, #GreysAnatomy
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 13): A risky organ transplant; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 14):Face Transplant; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 13): Suspecting the worst; HIV safety or stigmatization; Suspicion and stealing from patients; Jump to Greys Anatomy (Season 15; Episode 12): Removing Dying Patient’s Autonomy The Resident (Season 2; Episode 13): A risky organ transplant Eloise is a third year medical student in need of a double lung transplant as a result of her cystic fibrosis.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Decision making End of Life Care Featured Posts HIV/AIDS Informed Consent Organ Transplant & Donation Privacy Source Type: blogs

Designer Babies: A Dystopian Sidetrack of Gene Editing
A Chinese scientist shocked the scientific community a couple of days ago with the announcement of having modified the very blueprint of life. If his claims are true, he tried to bestow two baby girls the ability to resist possible future infections with HIV. The outrage shows that humanity is not prepared to utilize the power of gene editing on embryos yet. We have no idea about the biological consequences, and we haven’t tackled the necessary legal and ethical issues. Genes to become toys of the “Gods”? Humanity has come a long way since Aldous Huxley pinned down how methods of genetic engineering, bio...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Future of Medicine Genomics designer babies designer baby Gene gene editing genes Genome genome sequencing Health Healthcare healthcare system Innovation technology Source Type: blogs

Initial Evidence for the Antibiotics Azithromycin and Roxithromycin to be Senolytic
Researchers here report on two new senolytic compounds identified in the existing library of approved drugs, based on screening work in cell cultures. It is worth bearing in mind that drug candidates that demonstrate good results in cell culture quite often fail to show promise when tested in animals, so it is wise to be patient as new senolytics work their way through the research and development pipeline. There will be a lot more of this sort of thing in the years ahead, as ever greater amounts of funding pour into finding new ways to selectively destroy senescent cells. Any senolytic approach that removes a significant ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Deton is Developing “Aerosol Biopsy” to Detect Lung Diseases
Biopsies and bronchoscopies are the gold standard for diagnosing lung diseases, including pneumonia and cancer. However, these procedures are difficult to provide, requiring general anesthesia and an operating room. Deton hopes to simplify the process. The Pasadena-based company takes advantage of the lung’s natural reaction to bacteria or particles — coughing it out. Rather than invasively sampling lung tissue within the lungs, Deton’s patented technology samples the particles ejected from the lungs. The expelled cough sample is then read by a point-of-care analyzer or sent to a lab. “When a person...
Source: Medgadget - September 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Medicine Oncology Pathology Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Drowning in Drugs: An Interview with Carnegie Mellon ’s Diane Nelson
One of the most engaging areas of research these days is improving drug delivery. Here at Medgadget, we often share news about technological advances in nanomedicine that promise improved delivery to tumor sites, or newly designed gadgets that increase drug delivering efficacy. Rarely do we hear about attempts to improve drug delivery in the lungs. Recent reports suggest that almost 7% of all US deaths are due to chronic respiratory diseases, making them the fifth leading cause of death. Thankfully, a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon has recently taken on the challenging task of improving drug delivery in the ...
Source: Medgadget - August 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Critical Care Exclusive Materials Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Drowning in Drugs: Interview with Carnegie Mellon ’s Diane Nelson
One of the most engaging areas of research these days is improving drug delivery. Here at Medgadget, we often share news about technological advances in nanomedicine that promise improved delivery to tumor sites, or newly designed gadgets that increase drug delivering efficacy. Rarely do we hear about attempts to improve drug delivery in the lungs. Recent reports suggest that almost 7% of all US deaths are due to chronic respiratory diseases, making them the fifth leading cause of death. Thankfully, a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon has recently taken on the challenging task of improving drug delivery in the ...
Source: Medgadget - August 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Critical Care Exclusive Materials Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

A Libertarian ’ s Case Against Free Markets in Healthcare
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first thi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Economics Source Type: blogs

A Libertarian ’ s Case Against Free Markets in Health Care
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III, the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle, Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Economics Free Market health economics Libertarian Source Type: blogs

Forskolin: another natural compound goes on my list of myeloma killers
Yesterday I came across a 2015 study that really caught my attention. A group of Norwegian researchers has discovered that the combination of dexamethasone with a natural compound called forskolin kills multiple myeloma cells. They tested forskolin with other conventional myeloma drugs, too: bortezomib (Velcade), cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and melphalan. And by itself. Results in a nutshell: dead myeloma cells.    Excerpt from the abstract: “Our findings support a potential role of forskolin in combination with current conventional agents in the treatment of MM.” The researchers believe that ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll forskolin myeloma Source Type: blogs

Microparticles Carrying Bacteria-Killing Viruses Halt Deadly Pneumonia
Antibiotics suffer from eventual resistance by the bacteria and the fact that they can be quite indiscriminate in who they attack, including the gut’s healthy microbiome. But, there are also bacteriophages, which are viruses that can kill specific bacteria without harming any other bacteria. The problems with bacteriophages, though, is that they’re hard to produce in large quantities and difficult to deliver, particularly into the lungs. Researchers at Georgia Tech are now reporting that they developed special microparticles packed with bacteriophages that can be inhaled to fight bacterial lung infections. The...
Source: Medgadget - July 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Students Develop Cheap and Portable Cough Assist Device
People with cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, and other chronic conditions can have serious difficulty coughing. This creates not only discomfort, but potentially dangerous complications for the lungs and heart. There are cough assist devices on the market that help, but they tent to be pricey, heavy, and require electric power. Now students at Michigan’s Grand Valley State University, working with clinicians at Beaumont Health, a hospital system, have developed their own cough assist device that overcomes these limitations. The device, already licensed out for manufacturing, is made mostly of plastic and vin...
Source: Medgadget - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Pediatrics Rehab Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Notice of Funding Opportunity: Bioethics and Disability
This report would examine developments at the state and federal-level, court cases, and current views from stakeholders. Policy Questions Which states have PAS laws and what do those laws provide? What protections against abuse of PAS?What have the Supreme Court and lower courts held regarding individuals’ rights under PAS laws? The laws themselves?Is there evidence that persons with disabilities are being denied treatment by insurance companies but offered PAS instead, as NCD predicted?How is PAS viewed by disability organizations? Has this evolved in the past 13 years? If so why? If not, why?Are persons with disabi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Would You Want To Know Whether You ’re At Risk For Alzheimer’s?
Do genetic tests help in preparing for potential future health issues or open Pandora’s box full of concerns, worries and hypochondriac thoughts? Would you want to know your genetic fate? Whether you are at risk for Alzheimer’s or a chronic disease 30 years in advance? Would you want to live with this kind of information? Would you take the BRCA test to find out that you are at risk for breast cancer? What would you do if you were? The Medical Futurist team contemplated situations requiring hard, life-altering decisions. What would you do? Our genetic heritage carries secrets that are difficult to process In Se...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 28, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Genomics alzheimer disease DNA dna testing doctor-patient doctor-patient relationship DTC future genetics Huntington's patient empowerment personal genomics Source Type: blogs

Digestive enzyme supplements for heartburn?
My love affair with spicy food came to a sad end a few years ago. Age — and I’m guessing too many jalapenos — have left me prone to heartburn if I eat meals with a fiery flare. My doctor says there’s no underlying condition causing the problem, and advises me to avoid the foods that seem to trigger symptoms. But that’s tricky sometimes. So I was particularly interested when a friend suggested that an over-the-counter (OTC) digestive enzyme supplement might help. I learned pretty quickly that there are lots of ads for the pills and powders. It’s a booming business, with sales for OTC dige...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Watery Diarrhoea
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Our medical student who caught shigella on a Nepalese elective has a thirst for adventure. They plan to help at a Bangladesh refugee camp but the latest CDC report states there have been some cases of cholera. They’ve done a little bit of reading and want your help to teach them all about cholera and how they may prepare and best serve their new community. Questions: Q1. What is cholera and how is it transmitted? Answer and inte...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine cholera diarrhoea john snow ORS rice water diarrhoea watery diarrhoea Source Type: blogs

Which Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Test to Choose?
Due to the collapse of the price of genetic testing and the FDA’s gradual ease of the regulatory environment, direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies are booming. You can inquire your deoxyribonucleic acid about your ancestry, health risks, metabolism, and some start-ups even promise you to find true love or your kids’ talents. As the jungle of DTC companies is getting denser, more and more people ask me which genetic tests are worth the try. They love the possibility of getting access to their DNA but don’t know where to start. Here’s the DTC genetic testing kick-starter package! Naviga...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 20, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Genomics 23andme ancestry DNA DTC future genetic test Genetic testing genetics Genome genome sequencing Health 2.0 Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 322
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 322nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The Intensive Care Network have more podcasts from the CICM ASM. A new batch focusi...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Treat the Pathway, not the Gene (from Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease)
Treat the key pathway, not the genetic mutation (fromPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease)Some of the earliest and most successful Precision Medication drugs have targeted specific mutations occurring in specific subsets of diseases. One such example is ivacaftor, which targets the G551D mutation present in about 4% of individuals with cystic fibrosis [135]. It is seldom wise to argue with success, but it must be mentioned that the cost of developing a new drug is about $5 billion [136]. To provide some perspective, $5 billion exceeds the total gross national product of many countries, including Sierra L...
Source: Specified Life - February 5, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: clinical trials convergent pathways cost of precision medicine precision treatment Source Type: blogs

Shutdown of Claritas Genomics Comes as a Surprise to Lab Community
The recent shutdown ofClaritas Genomics came as a surprise to many lab professionals with some reports making reference to the possibility that inadequate reimbursement for genetic testing may have been the root cause (see:Sudden Shutdown of Claritas Genomics After Five Years as A Leading Source of Pediatric Genetic Testing..) Below is an excerpt from the article:[The shutdown of Claritas may be] the latest market sign of how health insurers are making it difficult for labs to get paid for proprietary molecular diagnostic assays and genetic tests....Claritas was like other genetic testing laboratories... tha...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 31, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Food and Drug Administration Genomic Testing Lab Industry Trends Lab Regulation Medical Consumerism Medical Research Public Health Source Type: blogs

The importance of nutrition in cystic fibrosis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - January 20, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Domino heart transplantation – Cardiology MCQ – Answer
 >>>Available Here with Free Look Inside Option Correct answer: 3. Both 1 and 2 In domino heart transplantation, the donor receives heart lung transplantation. The excised heart is transplanted to another recipient so that the donor for recipient of domino heart transplantation is alive, unlike the conventional donor who is brain dead. In one report of 10 cases of domino heart transplantation, one year survival of donor was 60% while that of recipient was 90% [1]. It worthwhile noting that donors had terminal cardio pneumopathy (mostly primary pulmonary hypertension, one case of Eisenmenger syndrome and ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 7, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Update on cystic fibrosis related liver disease
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - January 6, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: gastroenterology pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Good source of information about cystic fibrosis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - December 28, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: infectious disease pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Infections in cystic fibrosis and eligibility for lung transplantation
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - December 28, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: infectious disease pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Natural Disaster Planning for At-Risk Hospice Patients
This article is the first in a series about our hospice’s response to the storm emergency.We triaged patients to maintain their safety, based on their risk of flooding at home and the risk of electricity loss (especially for patients who relied on high oxygen flows). We moved high risk patients to care centers with low flood risks and back-up electrical generators. This included moving at-risk patients out of hospice care centers, assisted living, nursing homes, or their homes.At my care center, we took 16 single-occupancy rooms, and set it up for 30 patients and their families (double-occupancy for all but 2 rooms)....
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - December 18, 2017 Category: Palliative Care Tags: disaster emergency preparedness hospice hurricane inpatient rich room weather Source Type: blogs

A New Gimish Model of Complex Disease?
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD The appeal of precision medicine is the promise that we can understand disease with greater specificity and fashion treatments that are more individualized and more effective. A core tenet (or “central dogma,” as I wrote in 2015) of precision medicine is the idea that large disease categories – like type 2 diabetes – actually consist of multiple discernable subtypes, each with its own distinct characteristics and genetic drivers. As genetic and phenotypic research advances, the argument goes, diseases like “type 2 diabetes” will go the way of quaint descriptive...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Broad Institute CAD Circulation Disease Categories Gimish Model of Disease Kathiresan Khera Massachussetts General Hospital Source Type: blogs

A More Precise Definition of Precision Medicine?
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD The appeal of precision medicine is the promise that we can understand disease with greater specificity and fashion treatments that are more individualized and more effective. A core tenet (or “central dogma,” as I wrote in 2015) of precision medicine is the idea that large disease categories – like type 2 diabetes – actually consist of multiple discernable subtypes, each with its own distinct characteristics and genetic drivers. As genetic and phenotypic research advances, the argument goes, diseases like “type 2 diabetes” will go the way of quaint descriptive...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Broad Institute CAD Circulation Disease Categories Gimish Model of Disease Kathiresan Khera Massachussetts General Hospital Source Type: blogs

Why “ Precision Health ” May Not Be the Precise Word
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD The appeal of precision medicine is the promise that we can understand disease with greater specificity and fashion treatments that are more individualized and more effective. A core tenet (or “central dogma,” as I wrote in 2015) of precision medicine is the idea that large disease categories – like type 2 diabetes – actually consist of multiple discernable subtypes, each with its own distinct characteristics and genetic drivers. As genetic and phenotypic research advances, the argument goes, diseases like “type 2 diabetes” will go the way of quaint descriptive...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized Broad Institute CAD Circulation Disease Categories Gimish Model of Disease Kathiresan Khera Massachussetts General Hospital Source Type: blogs

Latest Legal Settlements Suggest Hazards of Making Pharmaceutical Regulation More Lenient, as is Apparently Favored by New FDA Leader
DiscussionAll the cases discussed above were of behavior that could have harmed patients.  Many of the companies involved had records of previous ethical misadventures.  While a few cases resulted in corporate guilty pleas (to misdemeanors), none resulted in monetary penalties that would have much impact on the companies'finances, and none resulted in any negative consequences for people who enabled, authorized, directed or implemented the bad behavior.These, just the latest in the march oflegal settlements by large health care organizations, again demonstrate how often and how seriously pharmaceutical companies ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - October 1, 2017 Category: Health Management Tags: adulterated drugs Celgene crime deception FDA impunity legal settlements market fundamentalism Novo Nordisk revolving doors thalidomide Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205. Question 1 Meigs’ Syndrome resolves after removal of the tumour. What is the classic triad of Meigs’ Syndrome? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet771338363'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetli...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis Argyll Robertson aspergilloma aspergillus Calabar extrinsic allergic alveolitis invasive aspergillosis kartagener's syndrome liver Loa loa worms Meigs syndrome ocular oa Source Type: blogs

Memo To White Nationalists From A Geneticist: Why White Purity Is A Terrible Idea
On August 14th, UCLA researchers Aaron Panofsky and Joan Donovan presented findings of their study,  “When Genetics Challenges a Racist’s Identity: Genetic Ancestry Testing among White Nationalists,” at a sociology conference in Montreal. They’d analyzed 3,070 comments organized into 70 threads publicly posted to the (sometimes difficult to access) “social movement online community”  Stormfront.Former KKK Grand Wizard Don Black launched Stormfront on March 27, 1995. Posts exceed 12 million, ramping up since the 2016 election season. Panofsky and Donovan’s report has ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 29, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Genetics Health Care Ethics and Hate syndicated Source Type: blogs

Get Ready for Multicolored MRI
Researchers at Case Western University are making MRI multicolored as a way to conduct more comprehensive and precise disease diagnosis. Introduced by Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield in the 1980s, and considered “one of the greatest medical breakthroughs of the 20th century,” MRI traditionally uses one single contrast agent to illuminate images in the brain. This new technique enables radiologists to use these two contrast agents — gadolinium and manganese — to differentiate between healthy tissue a nd diseased tissue. Currently, MRI is limited to only measuring one agent at a time. However, this...
Source: radRounds - August 25, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Cell Therapy versus Lung Fibrosis
In recent years the research community has made some progress towards the use of cell therapies to treat fibrosis in lung tissue, the basis for a number of ultimately fatal conditions that present cannot be effectively controlled. Fibrosis is a disruption of the structure of tissue, the formation of scar-like structures that degrade tissue function. This line of research may soon be overtaken by the use of senolytic treatments to remove senescent cells, given that senescent cells appear to be a significant cause of the age-related failures in regenerative processes that cause fibrosis. Nonetheless, prior to recent work on ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 4, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Undoctored: Health Should Be (Almost) Free
Follow the current debate on “healthcare reform”–which has NOTHING to do with healthcare reform, but healthcare insurance reform, by the way–and you will hear comments about the escalating and uncontrolled cost of healthcare and how people need access to it. What you will NOT hear is that fact that, because the healthcare system fails to deliver genuine health, real health is actually quite easy, straightforward, and inexpensive–nearly free. We achieve a life of being Undoctored, not becoming a profit source for the healthcare industry, not being subjected to the predatory practices of Big P...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 13, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle acid reflux anti-aging autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol Dr. Davis energy Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains health healthcare Inflammation joint pain low-carb Source Type: blogs

Live Life the Fullest
Don't let anything hold you back in your pursuit to live life to the fullest. You want to experience everything and anything (well except maybe eating insects, flydiving, going over Niagara Falls in a barrel, or other really weird things). Get out there and do as many as many things as you can.I think I want to say that I don't think you need to constantly push yourself to do something every minute. Sometimes you need to sit there and appreciate what you just accomplished. You should also share your experiences with others who might benefit from what you have done.Do not let your health hold you back. Okay, if you break yo...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - July 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fun living with cancer respect terminal ailments Source Type: blogs

Outbreaks of Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Infection in the United States
To date, 114 known outbreaks of human infection by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been associated with medical / other invasive procedures.  37 of these (32%) have reported from the United States.  The following chronology is abstracted from the Gideon e-book series. [1]   Primary references are available from the author.  1987     17 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae otitis media in Louisiana caused by contaminated water used by an ENT practice  1988    8 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection associated with a contaminated jet injector used in a Podiatry of...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Top Companies in Genomics
From portable genome sequencers until genetic tests revealing distant relations with Thomas Jefferson, genomics represents a fascinatingly innovative area of healthcare. As the price of genome sequencing has been in free fall for years, the start-up scene is bursting from transformative power. Let’s look at some of the most amazing ventures in genomics! The amazing journey of genome sequencing Genome sequencing has been on an amazing scientific as well as economic journey for the last three decades. The Human Genome Project began in 1990 with the aim of mapping the whole structure of the human genome and sequencing ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 30, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Genomics Personalized Medicine AI artificial intelligence bioinformatics cancer DNA dna testing DTC gc3 genetic disorders genetics genome sequencing personal genomics precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Patient Advocacy Groups Line Up Against Trumpcare
“There is no substitute for fundamental, unequivocal protections for people with pre-existing conditions.” So reads a statement by eight leading patient groups in response to the U.S. House of Representatives vote on the American Health Care Act (AHCA or “Trumpcare”). The strongly worded letter was posted to legislators by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, March of Dimes, National Organization for Rare Disorders, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, and WomenHeart: The National Coalition for...
Source: Life with MS - May 11, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: Trevis Gleason Tags: multiple sclerosis MS and family ms community MS in the news MS Money Matters trevis gleason Source Type: blogs

Hill-Rom ’s New Monarch Battery Powered Airway Clearance System
A number of conditions can cause fluid and mucus to build up in the lungs, causing difficulty breathing and leading to serious complications. Patients with cystic fibrosis are particularly affected, and caretakers have been helping to perform chest physical therapy (CPT) techniques for decades to help dislodge the mucus plugs and excess of secretions from the lungs. These include drumming with palms around the sternum and vibrating the patient, something that can require a proper technique and that gets tiring after a few minutes. Hill-Rom is releasing its new Monarch airway clearance system, a powered vest that delivers&n...
Source: Medgadget - April 27, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Rehab Source Type: blogs

Value Frameworks For Rare Diseases: Should They Be Different?
The US health care system is increasingly focusing on value as a basis for reimbursement of pharmacotherapies and devices, and as a result the use of “value frameworks” for measuring and comparing treatment value has grown in recent years. However, the therapies assessed by most frameworks frequently apply to modest-to-large disease populations, rather than the smaller populations affected by rare diseases, where the factors driving value may differ. Rare diseases are different from diseases affecting larger populations in several fundamental ways. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as one that aff...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 12, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Anupam Jena and Darius Lakdawalla Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation Quality Orphan Drug Act Precision Medicine rare disease treatment treatment value value frameworks Source Type: blogs

Six Things to Know About DNA and DNA Repair
Deoxyribonucleic acid, better known as DNA, was first identified on a discarded surgical bandage almost 150 years ago. Increasingly sophisticated tools and techniques have allowed scientists to learn more about this chemical compound that includes all the instructions necessary for building a living organism. From among the dozens of fascinating things known about DNA, here are six items touching on the make up of DNA’s double helix, the vast amounts of DNA packed into every human’s cells, common DNA errors and a few ways DNA can repair itself. 1. DNA is in every living thing. DNA consists of two long, twiste...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - April 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Anne Oplinger Tags: Genetics DNA DNA repair Source Type: blogs

The Children of Medicaid
This article was originally published on Complex Child.  Compiled by Susan Agrawal I’ve been continually surprised by how many people think Medicaid is just for poor families on welfare. Those of us who parent children with complex medical needs know that Medicaid is so much more than that. After all, 72% of Medicaid enrollees are children, people with disabilities, and the elderly, and these groups account for 84% of spending. Medicaid provides vital services for children, including home nursing care and therapies, that are not otherwise covered. In this article, we will share just a few of the children with me...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Is U.S. Preeminence in High-Tech Medicine a Myth? The Case of Cystic Fibrosis
U.S. health care has many well-documented shortcomings. However, it is often assumed that—because we invest so heavily in technology and specialists—our health care system performs well for patients who have rare or complex diseases. New research shows that we should be skeptical of that assumption.         (Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Blog)
Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Blog - April 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: blogs

Health should be FREE
Imagine that you receive a notice in the mail stating “In order to maintain your freedom of speech, you will be billed $10,000 per year.” You would be—understandably—outraged. Freedom of speech in America is precious, something Americans have fought wars to defend. We view free speech as a basic right, no big check to write in order to maintain it. It should be free and available to everyone regardless of religion, color, political leanings, or income. I believe that same principle should apply to health. Being healthy means living free of common chronic health conditions such as high cholesterol, h...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 31, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored crowd wisdom health free Healthcare System predatory wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 177
This study has some frustrating findings: they looked at 318 patients who got a CTPA within 2 weeks of a negative CTPA and found a 5% positive rate. Is CTPA like a stress test, where we just can’t predict plaque rupture? Are people who get CTPAs people who other docs are also worried about PE? Or are we just ordering too many CTPAs? How many of these were false postives or negatives? Sadly, as with most clinical research on pulmonary embolism, I am let with more questions than answers (but we probably order too many CTPAs). Recommended by: Seth Trueger Pediatrics Luck RP, et al. Cosmetic outcomes of absorbable...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Clinical Case Education Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Intensive Care Pediatrics R&R in the FASTLANE Radiology Respiratory Resuscitation critical care research and reviews Source Type: blogs