Medical News Today: Chikungunya: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment
Chikungunya virus is a debilitating infection spread by mosquitos. Once viewed as a tropical disease, it now occurs in multiple countries and outbreaks can be widespread. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

A Conspiracy Theory Links The Gates Foundation To The Spread Of Zika Virus. Don't Believe It.
This article was updated to accurately reflect the Annenberg Science Knowledge survey question on whether GM mosquitoes have caused the spread of the Zika virus or minimized the spread of the virus.  Also on HuffPost:  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

4 ways to protect your family from mosquitoes
.Follow me at @drClaire The news about the Zika virus possibly causing microcephaly in infants has everyone talking about — and worried about — mosquitoes. It’s not just the Zika virus that can be spread by mosquitoes; these insects also spread other illnesses, such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, West Nile virus, eastern equine encephalitis, and Japanese encephalitis. It should be said that most people who are bitten by mosquitoes don’t get sick with anything. But if you are living in or traveling to an area where these illnesses are prevalent, it’s important to know the four b...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Health Parenting Prevention Travel health Source Type: news

Coming Next Month: Using Gene Drives to Counter Zika, an AIBS Webinar
The rapid spread of the Zika virus in the Americas has prompted international concern because of its apparent link to birth defects, including microcephaly, in infants born to infected women. The virus may also be linked to cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a disabling immune disorder. The World Health Organization has declared the Zika outbreak an international health emergency. The virus is spread by the bite of Aedes mosquitoes, which also transmit dengue and chikungunya virus, among other pathogens. Suppressing these mosquitoes would therefore likely limit the spread of these diseases as well as Zika. One way t...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2016 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Wolbachia parasite superinfection: A new tool to fight mosquito arbovirus transmission
(PLOS) Aedes aegypti mosquitoes transmit a number of pathogens, including the Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika viruses. The Wolbachia bacterium can be introduced into the Aedes aegypti population and then block virus replication in the infected mosquito host. As with any antiviral strategy, the potential development of resistance by the virus is a concern. A study published on Feb. 18, 2016 in PLOS Pathogens reports on a strategy to make it harder for Dengue (and possibly other viruses) to develop Wolbachia resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 18, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic sex change for mosquitoes could stop the spread of Zika
Female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are disease carriers. Inserting male genes into mosquitoes using Crispr-Cas9 could be a new way to prevent epidemicsTwo US scientists have proposed a new answer to the Zika epidemic: a sex-change operation for the mosquito that spreads the virus and other diseases. This genetic modification would turn deadly, blood-drinking females into harmless, nectar-sipping males.The solution could potentially be used to limit not just Zika but malaria, dengue, yellow fever and other mosquito-borne infections such as chikungunya. However, the researchers accept there is a long way to go before the techni...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Tim Radford Tags: Science Zika virus Genetics Biology World news Source Type: news

Mosquito Control: Can It Stop Zika at Source?
World Health Organization. 02/16/2016This resource looks at conventional and new techniques for control of Aedes aegypti, the principal mosquito species that transmits the Zika, dengue, and chikungunya viruses. This mosquito has a number of breeding and behavioral quirks that make it extremely difficult to control. The resource summarizes World Health Organization guidance, discusses the rise and fall of mosquito control, and provides advice for conventional and newer tools for mosquito control. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

A Viral Story Links The Zika Crisis To Monsanto. Don't Believe It.
A group of doctors in Argentina calling themselves the "Physicians in Crop-Sprayed Towns" have issued an explosive report that denies global scientific consensus on the Zika virus outbreak and its apparent link to an uptick in cases of the birth defect microcephaly in Brazil. The doctors allege that instead of the mild mosquito-borne Zika virus, the increase in microcephaly cases is caused by a larvicide that contains the chemical pyriproxyfen. This larvicide is employed in mosquito control efforts against the Aedes Aegypti mosquito, the type that can carry Zika, including using it to kil...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What makes me so tasty? 5 myths about mosquito bites
Just about everyone can agree that mosquitoes are more than a little annoying. They bite, the bites itch and the repellent stinks. Even more disturbing are the incurable viruses these tiny predators can carry, including West Nile, malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever and chikungunya. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya Viruses: American Association of Blood Banks Bulletin
American Association of Blood Banks. 02/01/2016This eight-page bulletin provides the rationale for blood community action to address the potential threat of Zika virus to blood recipients. Its focus is Zika virus, but the measures described should also be effective for chikungunya and dengue viruses. It includes information about the potential for transfusion-transmitted Zika infection, and a recommendation to facilitate self-deferral of donors who have traveled to countries that are already experiencing Zika epidemics or those that are likely to experience such epidemics in the near future. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Re...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika Communication Materials
World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization. 01/05/2016This Web page provides communication materials about symptoms, prevention, and treatment of Zika virus disease, and about Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which are the main carriers for dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Materials include videos, posters, and infographics. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya Viruses: American Association of Blood Banks Bulletin
American Association of Blood Banks. 02/01/2016This eight-page bulletin provides the rationale for blood community action to address the potential threat of Zika virus to blood recipients. Its focus is Zika virus, but the measures described should also be effective for chikungunya and dengue viruses. It includes information about the potential for transfusion-transmitted Zika infection, and a recommendation to facilitate self-deferral of donors who have traveled to countries that are already experiencing Zika epidemics or those that are likely to experience such epidemics in the near future. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Re...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika Communication Materials
World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization. 01/05/2016This Web page provides communication materials about symptoms, prevention, and treatment of Zika virus disease, and about Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which are the main carriers for dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Materials include videos, posters, and infographics. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Pesticide-induced mosquito death outweighs fitness advantage of survivors
A common toxin used to kill yellow fever mosquito larvae – the most prevalent transmitter of dengue, chikungunya and zika viruses – is highly effective. While there are some fitness advantages to surviving adults, this is still an effective way to control the damaging health impacts of these mosquito-borne diseases, a new study shows. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fighting the 'Cockroach of Mosquitoes'
Experts working to halt the spread of the Zika, dengue and chikungunya viruses face a wily foe in Aedes aegypti, the main mosquito that transmits them, and some methods for fighting them are stirring controversy. (Source: WSJ.com: Health)
Source: WSJ.com: Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: PAID Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Asia's Research Arms Race Has One Major Holdup
Brazilian abortion activists face an uphill battle as they lobby for fewer restrictions in a heavily Catholic country where many of the women most affected by Zika virus hold anti-abortion views.  The virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be causing a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems.    And across the world, scientists in China, India and Singapore -- each of which have large populations and histories of mosqu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Outbreak of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue IllnessesOutbreak of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Illnesses
The spread of Zika virus brings with it additional challenges, particularly the risk for concurrent transmission of chikungunya and dengue viruses by the same vectors. Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - February 9, 2016 Category: Pathology Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Microcephaly Revives Battle for Legal Abortion in Brazil
“Abortion shouldn’t be a crime” reads a sign held in one of the numerous demonstrations held in Brazil to demand the legalisation of abortion. Credit: Courtesy of Distintas LatitudesBy Mario OsavaRIO DE JANEIRO, Feb 8 2016 (IPS)The Zika virus epidemic and a rise in the number of cases of microcephaly in newborns have revived the debate on legalising abortion in Brazil. However, the timing is difficult as conservative and religious groups are growing in strength, especially in parliament.“We are issuing a call to society to hold a rational, generous debate towards a review of the law that criminalise...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Mario Osava Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Gender Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Abortion Bra Source Type: news

Guillain-Barré syndrome – Brazil
On 22 January 2016, the National IHR Focal Point of Brazil notified PAHO/WHO of an increase of Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) recorded at the national level. Data from the hospital-based surveillance system reveal that, between January and November 2015, 1,708 cases of GBS were registered nationwide. While a number of states reported significant increases in reported cases – especially, Alagoas (516.7%), Bahia (196.1%), Rio Grande do Norte (108.7%), Piauí (108.3%), Espirito Santo (78.6%), and Rio de Janeiro (60.9%) – other states reported stable or even diminishing number of GBS cases as compared to 2014...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - February 8, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: pesticide [subject], insecticides, fungicides, risk assessment [subject], zika, Brazil [country], Disease outbreak news [doctype], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Virus In Bodily Fluids Prompts New Sex Recommendations
On Friday, Brazilian researchers detected Zika virus in saliva and urine for the first time. While it's still too early to say whether the disease can be spread by the fluids, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its health guidelines for pregnant women to include sexual health recommendations.  The Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be linked to a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems. &nb...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Already Struggling With Dengue, Hawaii Braces Itself For Zika
The mosquito-borne Zika virus could hit Hawaii especially hard if it arrives in the Aloha State, according to an expert from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While a widespread outbreak of Zika in the Hawaiian islands remains unlikely at the moment, the state is at higher risk because of its tropical climate and large number of foreign travelers. And many experts are voicing serious concerns about the state's ability to handle such an event, should it occur. Hawaii is already battling its largest outbreak of dengue fever since the 1940s, a disease that is carried by the sam...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What the rise of Zika (and other viruses) might tell us about our planet
Follow me at @JohnRossMD Zika virus, a pathogen that was almost unknown a few months ago, is now rampant in Central and South America and the Caribbean. In Brazil, it has already infected about 1.5 million people and caused nearly 4,000 cases of microcephaly, a severe birth defect. It is almost certain to spread to every country in the Americas, except Canada and Chile, which lack the Aedes mosquitoes that spread Zika. Zika is not the only virus that has come from the tropics to menace the United States. Dengue, an unpleasant and potentially fatal viral infection, has broken out in Texas, Florida and Hawaii in the past 10 ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: news

Zika Virus: Fact Sheets and Posters
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 01/21/2016This resource provides fact sheets and posters about mosquito bite prevention, and dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses that are useful tools for healthcare providers. Fact sheets cover Mosquito Bite Prevention for Travelers, Mosquito Bite Prevention for the United States, and Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses. Posters address Going to the American Tropics? and Recently in the American Tropics? (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Clip-on device offers protection against mosquitoes that transmit Zika
A new repellent device could be an effective tool for preventing bites from the Aedes aegypti mosquito -- the primary vector of Zika, chikungunya, dengue, and yellow fever -- according to a new article. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Brazil Wages War against Zika Virus on Several Fronts
In the country’s capital, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff oversees one of the military operations against the Aedes Aegypti mosquito carried out at a national level in the last few days to curb the spread of the Zika virus. Credit: Roberto Stuckert Filho/PRBy Mario OsavaRIO DE JANEIRO, Feb 2 2016 (IPS)Brazil is deploying 220,000 troops to wage war against the Zika virus, in response to the alarm caused by the birth of thousands of children with abnormally small heads. But eradicating the Aedes aegypti mosquito requires battles on many fronts, including science and the pharmaceutical industry.The Zika virus, transm...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Mario Osava Tags: Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Brazil cities Science and Technology Zika Virus Source Type: news

Clip-on device offers protection against mosquitoes that transmit Zika
(Entomological Society of America) A product called the OFF!® Clip-On™ repellent device could be an effective tool for preventing bites from the Aedes aegypti mosquito -- the primary vector of Zika, chikungunya, dengue, and yellow fever -- according to an article in the Journal of Medical Entomology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 2, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What you need to know about Zika virus
Follow me at @JohnRossMD Last week, the government of El Salvador gave what might be the strangest public health advice of all time: don’t get pregnant for the next two years. Officials in Colombia, Ecuador, and Jamaica have also warned women to avoid pregnancy, although only for the next several months. The reason for these unusual recommendations? An outbreak of Zika virus, currently raging in 21 countries in the Americas and the Caribbean, as well as the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Samoa, and Cape Verde. Until recently, Zika was an obscure virus, confined to equatorial Africa and Asia, an...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Children's Health Family Planning and Pregnancy Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: news

WHO calls on countries of the Region to take steps to prevent Zika virus
Cairo, 31 January 2016 As the Zika virus outbreak continues to spread reaching 24 countries in the Americas (as of 27 January),  WHO’s Regional Director for the Eastern Mediterranean Dr Ala Alwan is calling on governments to work together to keep the Region protected.   “Zika virus is spread by the Aedes mosquito, the same type of mosquito that transmits dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya,” says Dr Ala Alwan.  “No cases of the virus have been reported so far in this Region, but this type of mosquito exists in several countries here, so it is essential that government leaders take s...
Source: WHO EMRO News - February 1, 2016 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

Surveillance and Control of Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Albopictus in the United States
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 01/25/2016This resource provides guidance for Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquito surveillance and control in response to the risk of introduction of dengue, chikungunya, Zika, and yellow fever viruses in the United States and its territories. It is intended for state and local public health officials and vector control specialists. Topics include Prevention and Control, Vector Surveillance and Control Recommendations, Specimen Collection and Types of Traps, Mosquito-Based Surveillance Indicators, and Vector Control. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disast...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Updated Diagnostic Testing for Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses in U.S. Public Health Laboratories
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 01/13/2016This four-page memorandum provides information about diagnostic testing for Zika, chikungunya, and dengue viruses in U.S. public health laboratories. Laboratory evidence of recent chikungunya, dengue, or Zika virus infection is generally accomplished by testing serum to detect viral nucleic acid or virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M and neutralizing antibodies. The document discusses laboratory assays for acute and convalescent specimens, laboratory safety, and options for obtaining/conducting Zika, chikungunya, and dengue virus diagnostic testing. It includes a tiere...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: One Mother's Story
As Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, continues to dominate the headlines, personal stories are coming to the forefront. One mother whose son was born with microcephaly, the birth defect believed to be linked to the Zika virus, describes the difficulty of facing her son's future without certainty that he'll ever be able to walk or talk. With the high volume of news about the Zika virus, it's tough to stay up-to-date. Check out our full coverage here -- or read our daily recaps here. Here's the latest information you should know: 1. Brazilian mother of baby born with microcep...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Revised Diagnostic Testing for Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses in U.S. Public Health Laboratories
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 02/07/2016This six-page memorandum provides revised information about diagnostic testing for Zika, chikungunya, and dengue viruses in U.S. public health laboratories. This test algorithm now includes a recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women with a history of travel to areas with local transmission of Zika virus or are living in an area with ongoing transmission. Laboratory evidence of recent chikungunya, dengue, or Zika virus infection is generally accomplished by testing serum to detect viral nucleic acid or virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika virus infection – United States of America - United States Virgin Islands
On 25 January 2016, the National IHR Focal Point for the United States of America notified PAHO/WHO of the first laboratory-confirmed cases of Zika virus infection in St. Croix, one of the three main islands in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI). The USVI Department of Health received laboratory confirmation of the case on 22 January. The patient is a non-pregnant woman from USVI who reported the onset of fever, rash, conjunctivitis and arthralgia on 1 January. She had not travelled in the three weeks that preceded the onset of symptoms. A serum sample obtained from the patient on 8 January tested IgM positive at the...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - January 29, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: pesticide [subject], insecticides, fungicides, risk factor [subject], risk, health risks, water [subject], safe water, wastewater, greywater, clean water, Disease outbreak news [doctype], Region of the Americas [region], United States of America [country] Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: World Leaders Weigh In
As Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, continues to dominate the headlines, world leaders and health organizations warned the public about the virus' spread and offered up resources to fight the disease, which is likely linked to a wave of birth defects in Brazil over the past few months.  With the high volume of news about the Zika virus -- check out our full coverage here -- it's tough to stay up-to-date on the most recent developments. Here's the latest information you should know: 1. World Health Organization says Zika is "spreading explosively" in the Americas Four ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

All the Way Humans Try to Kill Mosquitos—and Why We’re Still Losing
For such a tiny creature, mosquitoes have caused humans untold misery for millennia. The insect, which measures no more than a few millimeters in length, has killed tens of millions of human beings by spreading deadly diseases like malaria and dengue fever with its bite. The Zika virus, which scientists believe may be causing severe birth defects in newborn children whose mothers had been infected, is the latest mosquito-borne illness to strike fear in the public as it explodes through Latin America and threatens the U.S. Read More: U.S. Launches ‘Full-Court Press’ on Zika Vaccine But if mosquitoes have been ki...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized crispr gene editing genetic modification Infectious Disease mosquitos Zika Zika mosquitos Zika transmission Source Type: news

All the Ways Humans Try to Kill Mosquitos—and Why We’re Still Losing
MoreCDC Says 31 Americans Diagnosed with ZikaWhy the Zika Outbreak Marks a New Normal for Infectious DiseaseCDC Confirms Zika Virus Infection in Minnesota Woman For such a tiny creature, mosquitoes have caused humans untold misery for millennia. The insect, which measures no more than a few millimeters in length, has killed tens of millions of human beings by spreading deadly diseases like malaria and dengue fever with its bite. The Zika virus, which scientists believe may be causing severe birth defects in newborn children whose mothers had been infected, is the latest mosquito-borne illness to strike fear in the public a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized crispr gene editing genetic modification Infectious Disease mosquitos Zika Zika mosquitos Zika transmission Source Type: news

Zika Virus Health Information Resources from NLM’s Outreach and Specific Populations Branch
We have all been hearing more about the mosquito-borne flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, Zika Virus. The National Library of Medicine has gathered together these resources to assist public health departments, health care providers, librarians, and others seeking authoritative information on the virus. General Information Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Zika Virus – http://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html World Health Organization (WHO) Zika virus disease – http://www.who.int/csr/disease/zika/en/ Zika Virus Fact sheet...
Source: Dragonfly - January 27, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Emily Glenn Tags: News from NLM Public Health Source Type: news

International entomologists to collaborate on controlling Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue in Brazil
(Entomological Society of America) On March 13, 2016, in Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil, the Entomological Society of America (ESA) and the Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil (SEB) will host a gathering of the world's entomological societies to discuss collaborative control options to combat one of the world's most deadly animal species -- Aedes aegypti, a mosquito that transmits Zika virus, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Zika Virus (ZIKV) Surveillance in the Americas: Interim Guidance for Laboratory Detection and Diagnosis
World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization. 06/29/2015This four-page document provides an algorithm that is addressed to reference laboratories with established capacity (molecular/antigenic and serological) to detect dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV), and Zika (ZIKV) viruses. There are different protocols (primers and probes) for detecting ZIKV by RT-PCR (both conventional and real time). Because of their sensitivity, the tools used by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are recommended. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

U.S. Launches ‘Full-court Press’ for a Zika Vaccine
The United States is pushing to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus, a top health official said Thursday, as doctors warn that the mosquito-borne disease, which causes birth defects in infants and is typically found abroad, has become a growing threat in the U.S. “I’ve made it clear that we want to put a full-court press.” Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview. “I’m saying, ‘Folks, this is it, all hands on deck for Zika, this is really important.’ We are rapidly pushing.” In addition to vaccine developmen...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized birth defects Infectious Disease NIH public health vaccine Zika Zika virus Source Type: news

How Can We Slow The Epidemic Of Zika Infections?
Zika infections are exploding in the Americas and require new tools to slow the epidemic. Given that Zika seems the likely cause of a serious birth defect, microcephaly, the CDC has just cautioned pregnant women to avoid travel to affected areas. The travel warnings are likely to decimate tourism, particularly to hardest hit Brazil, already burdened with dengue and Chikungunya outbreaks. How can we best respond to these threats? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 19, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Judy Stone Source Type: news

Zika Warning Spotlights Latin America’s Fight Against Mosquito-Borne Diseases
The C.D.C. advisory for pregnant women to avoid more than a dozen Latin American countries comes only a few months before the start of the Olympic Games in Brazil. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SIMON ROMERO Tags: Dengue Fever Travel Warnings Zika Mosquitoes Brazil Latin America Chikungunya Virus Guillain-Barre Syndrome Olympic Games (2016) Source Type: news

We Need To Take Action Against Zika Virus Now, U.S. Experts Say
By: Mindy Weisberger Published: 01/15/2016 02:34 AM EST on LiveScience The rapid spread of a disease called Zika virus urgently requires attention, two leading researchers say. Zika virus is the most recent in a list of viruses that were formerly confined to remote niches of the world but are now expanding their reach into the Northern Hemisphere. Much about these viruses is still poorly understood, wrote Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and Dr. David Morens, senior scientific advisor for the NIAID, in an article published in the New England Journal of M...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Aedes to Zika: Mosquito-borne Viruses a Growing ConcernFrom Aedes to Zika: Mosquito-borne Viruses a Growing Concern
Chikungunya, dengue, and now Zika viruses pose significant risks to travelers' health, with little defense except mosquito-control measures. Medscape Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines - January 12, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases Commentary Source Type: news

4 Things To Know About Zika's Potential Spread To The U.S.
A mosquito-borne virus that may have caused serious birth defects for thousands of babies in Brazil made its way to Puerto Rico by the end of last year, and experts are grappling with what this means -- if anything -- for North America. Zika has been characterized in the past as an annoying but generally harmless sickness, with symptoms like rash, fever, joint-pain and red eyes. In fact, about one in four who get infected with disease probably don't even notice they have it. But when the virus became widespread in Brazil in 2015, with an estimated 500,000 to 1.5 million residents contracting Zika, health officials noticed ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

4 Things To Know About Zika's Potential Spread To The U.S.
A mosquito-borne virus that may have caused serious birth defects for thousands of babies in Brazil made its way to Puerto Rico by the end of last year, and experts are grappling with what this means -- if anything -- for North America. Zika has been characterized in the past as an annoying but generally harmless sickness, with symptoms like rash, fever, joint-pain and red eyes. In fact, about one in four who get infected with disease probably don't even notice they have it. But when the virus became widespread in Brazil in 2015, with an estimated 500,000 to 1.5 million residents contracting Zika, health officials noticed ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Q&A: Zika virus in mothers linked with microcephaly in babies in Brazil
You may have heard the news: Brazil is facing a startling outbreak of microcephaly, a rare condition in which an infant is born with a head much smaller than it should be. Microcephaly almost always causes significant brain damage and can be life threatening. The epidemic has been linked to a simultaneous influx of the mosquito-borne virus Zika. Thriving spoke with Dr. Ganeshwaran Mochida, a pediatric neurologist at Boston Children’s Hospital who specializes in microcephaly, and Dr. Asim Ahmed, an infectious disease researcher at Boston Children’s who specializes in mosquito-borne illnesses, to find out mo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 11, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Ask the Expert Diseases & Conditions Health Headlines In the News dr. asim ahmed dr. ganesh mochida http://www.childrenshospital.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions/cytomegalovirus/overview infectious diseases microcephaly mosquitoe Source Type: news

Evolution and Epidemiology of Chikungunya Virus
Chikungunya is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus that is spreading worldwide in the tropical areas and that has a 11.8 kb RNA genome. The most relevant vectors belong to the genus Aedes and contribute to the diffusion of the three different genotypes of the virus from the original site of first identification in East Africa. Recently, an additional site of origin has been identified in Asia. The epidemiology of Chikungunya has been extensively evaluated from 2004 when the virus initiated its travel eastbound from the coast of Africa to the Indian Ocean. It is noteworthy that this diffusion has been mainly sustained by Ae. albopi...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - January 1, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news