Zika Virus Disease Update for Clinicians
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 04/06/2016 This 51-minute webinar provides a Zika virus update for health care clinicians, including background information about Zika virus, Aedes mosquitoes and their range in the United States, and modes of transmission. It discusses the complications of Zika virus, distinguishing Zika from dengue and chikungunya, diagnostic testing for Zika virus, and reporting Zika virus disease cases. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Genetically modified mosquito use considered in Houston
Mosquitoes that can carry Zika virus, dengue fever and chikungunya ​ are common in the Houston region (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Testing for Zika Virus: There's an App for That
Add rapid, mobile testing for Zika and other viruses to the list of things that smartphone technology is making possible. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a smartphone-controlled, battery-operated diagnostic device that weighs under a pound, costs as little as $100 and can detect Zika, dengue and chikungunya within 30 minutes. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - March 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Testing for Zika virus: There's an app for that
Add rapid, mobile testing for Zika and other viruses to the list of things that smartphone technology is making possible. Researchers have developed a smartphone-controlled, battery-operated diagnostic device that weighs under a pound, costs as little as $100 and can detect Zika, dengue and chikungunya within 30 minutes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Testing for Zika virus: There's an app for that
(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) Add rapid, mobile testing for Zika and other viruses to the list of things that smartphone technology is making possible. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a smartphone-controlled, battery-operated diagnostic device that weighs under a pound, costs as little as $100 and can detect Zika, dengue and chikungunya within 30 minutes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

There's A Reason Zika Virus Became A Pandemic In 2015
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers aim to disrupt egg production in dengue- and Zika-spreading mosquito
(University of California - Riverside) The mosquito Aedes aegypti, which can spread dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever, and yellow fever virus, requires a blood meal to develop eggs. One way to control the spread of these diseases is to tamper with the reproductive events that follow this mosquito's blood meal. A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside has explored this at the molecular level. They focused on microRNAs, which play a critical role in mosquito egg maturation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Washington D.C. Lab Messed Up Hundreds Of Zika Tests
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Officials in Washington, D.C.’s public health laboratory had to repeat Zika tests for nearly 300 pregnant women, including two women who were mistakenly told they tested negative for the mosquito-borne virus that has been shown to cause birth defects. A routine check of lab practices in December revealed that all of the lab’s Zika tests were coming back negative, raising concerns about their accuracy, a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday. CDC experts, who have been working with the lab since mid-January, discovered that technicians doing Zika...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mouse study reveals potential drug target for arthritis caused by chikungunya virus
(PLOS) An immune system proteinase called granzyme A appears to promote arthritic inflammation in mice infected with chikungunya virus, scientists report in a new PLOS Pathogens study. The study also suggested that granzyme A could serve as a potential target for new drugs to treat chikungunya and related viral arthritides in people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Abbott wins FDA nod for whole-blood molecular test for Zika
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today that the FDA approved its RealTime ZIKA test to detect Zika virus in whole blood for emergency use. This is the 1st molecular test made by a commercial manufacturer that the federal watchdog has authorized to detect Zika in whole blood samples, the company touted. Research suggests that Zika virus can be detected in whole blood for a longer period of time and at higher levels compared to serum and urine sample types, according to Abbott. The company’s RealTime ZIKA test was developed to be used with its m2000 RealTime molecular diagnostics instrument. The automated test yields results in ...
Source: Mass Device - February 2, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Clearance Abbott Source Type: news

Repurposed Drugs May Treat Chikungunya Symptoms Repurposed Drugs May Treat Chikungunya Symptoms
Established autoimmune drugs that target T cells appeared to reduce virus-induced joint pathology, including inflammation in mouse models.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Drug combination effective against chikungunya arthritis in mice
Chikungunya virus causes a painful, debilitating arthritis for which there is currently no treatment. A new study has found that combining a drug for rheumatoid arthritis with one that targets the chikungunya virus can eliminate the signs of chikungunya arthritis in mice in the earliest stage of the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 1, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Drug combination effective against chikungunya arthritis in mice
(Washington University School of Medicine) Chikungunya virus causes a painful, debilitating arthritis for which there is currently no treatment. A new study has found that combining a drug for rheumatoid arthritis with one that targets the chikungunya virus can eliminate the signs of chikungunya arthritis in mice in the earliest stage of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers identify mechanism in chikungunya virus that controls infection and severity
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Researchers led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified a mechanism by which the chikungunya virus infects healthy cells and controls how severe the disease it causes will be, a mechanism they believe can be found in a number of other related viruses for which there are no treatments or licensed vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 30, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Global Vector Control Response
World Health Organization. 12/05/2016 This five-page report describes the vector-borne diseases that pose a major threat to the health of societies around the world, including malaria, dengue, Zika virus, chikungunya, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis. It details the draft Global Vector Control Response 2017-2030, which aims to support countries in mounting coherent and coordinated efforts to counter the increasing burden and threat of vector-borne diseases. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Yellow Fever Outbreak In Brazil Could Become An Epidemic, Officials Fear
Public health officials in Brazil suspect that a small yellow fever outbreak in Minas Gerais, a populous landlocked state adjacent to São Paulo state, has infected 110 people and killed 30, according to a Friday report. There is a vaccine for yellow fever, but because the outbreak is taking hold in areas with low vaccination rates, officials are concerned that the disease could continue to spread beyond the state’s borders and cause a larger epidemic, according to the World Health Organization. Yellow fever is spread by the same mosquito that spreads Zika virus, dengue fever and chikungunya.&nbs...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Yellow Fever Outbreak In Brazil Could Become An Epidemic, Officials Fear
Public health officials in Brazil suspect that a small yellow fever outbreak in Minas Gerais, a populous landlocked state adjacent to São Paulo state, has infected 110 people and killed 30, according to a Friday report. There is a vaccine for yellow fever, but because the outbreak is taking hold in areas with low vaccination rates, officials are concerned that the disease could continue to spread beyond the state’s borders and cause a larger epidemic, according to the World Health Organization. Yellow fever is spread by the same mosquito that spreads Zika virus, dengue fever and chikungunya.&nbs...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

5 Ways The Zika Virus Is Here To Stay
Zika virus’ status as a global health threat may officially be over, but the disease’s impact is far from contained.  The World Health Organization decided in November to end its designation of Zika virus as a public health emergency, but that doesn’t mean that Zika virus has disappeared, explained Dr. Carlos Pardo-Villamizar, a clinical neurologist with an expertise in infectious disorders at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Alongside pressing concerns about how to prevent a resurgence of the disease, health care systems in Brazil and other countries that saw births of babies infected with the disease in ute...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Ways The Zika Virus Is Here To Stay
Zika virus’ status as a global health threat may officially be over, but the disease’s impact is far from contained.  The World Health Organization decided in November to end its designation of Zika virus as a public health emergency, but that doesn’t mean that Zika virus has disappeared, explained Dr. Carlos Pardo-Villamizar, a clinical neurologist with an expertise in infectious disorders at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Alongside pressing concerns about how to prevent a resurgence of the disease, health care systems in Brazil and other countries that saw births of babies infected with the disease in ute...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vectors: Aedes Albopictus
European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 12/20/2016 This resource provides information about the Aedes albopictus mosquito, a known vector of chikungunya virus, dengue virus, and dirofilariasis, and a potential vector of Zika virus. It discusses the hazard associated with the mosquito species, geographical distribution, entomology, epidemiology and transmission of pathogens, public health (control/intervention), and key areas of uncertainty. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika Virus (ZIKV) Outbreak: Overview of Relevant Research, Projects and Expertise
Global Research Collaboration for Infectious Disease Preparedness. 02/03/2016 This 20-page report discusses a number of issues arising with regard to diagnostics, clinical characterization, and potential treatment interventions for the Zika virus. The key research questions that are emerging are the relationship between Zika virus, microcephaly, and other neurological abnormalities; clinical characterization for the differential diagnosis of Dengue and Chikungunya; rapid diagnostics that are specific to Zika; and potential intervention-convalescent plasma or other potential treatments. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Can tiny bacteria help stop the spread of disease?
Mosquitoes kill an estimated 700 000 people a year by transmitting viruses that cause diseases like chikungunya, dengue and Zika. With the help of WHO, researchers have discovered that mosquitoes artificially infected with a bacterium called Wolbachia do not transmit these diseases as easily. Wolbachia bacteria exist naturally, and it may be possible to create populations of mosquitoes that cannot transmit deadly viruses by breeding mosquitoes infected with the bacteria. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: zika [subject] Source Type: news

Combatting Zika in Texas
“Photo” by SilasCamargo is licensed under CC0. Texas recently saw its first case of locally transmitted Zika, meaning it was spread through infected mosquitos. Texas was generally always considered a location to watch for the spread of locally transmitted Zika because in the past, the state has seen mosquitos carrying dengue fever and chikungunya virus. The Texas Department of State Health Services first started recommended testing for Zika in the Rio Grande Valley back in October, and the area saw its first local case at the end of November. Since this first confirmation, the state has seen several more local...
Source: Network News - December 22, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NN/LM South Central Region Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

WHO (World Health Organization) Emergency Use Assessment and Listing for Zika IVDs (In Vitro Diagnostics): AccuPower ® ZIKV (DENV, CHIKV) Multiplex Real-Time RT-PCR Kit; EUAL Number: EAZ 0006-004-00
World Health Organization. 10/28/2016 This 64-page document provides information about the World Health Organization's Emergency Use Assessment and Listing (EUAL) procedure to expedite the availability of in vitro diagnostics (IVDs) for AccuPower ® ZIKV (DENV, CHIKV) Multiplex Real-Time RT-PCR Kit, with product code ZIK-1111. The kit is an in vitro diagnostic kit designed for the qualitative detection of Zika, dengue, and chikungunya virus RNA in human samples such as serum, plasma, and urine (only for Zika) samples through real-time rever se transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Researchers develop first chikungunya vaccine from virus that does not affect people
Researchers have developed the first vaccine for chikungunya fever made from an insect-specific virus that doesn't have any effect on people, making the vaccine safe and effective. The newly developed vaccine quickly produces a strong immune defense and completely protects mice and nonhuman primates from disease when exposed to the chikungunya virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

UTMB researchers develop first chikungunya vaccine from virus that does not affect people
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed the first vaccine for chikungunya fever made from an insect-specific virus that doesn't have any effect on people, making the vaccine safe and effective. The newly developed vaccine quickly produces a strong immune defense and completely protects mice and nonhuman primates from disease when exposed to the chikungunya virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 19, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika-linked birth defects more extensive than previously thought, UCLA-led research finds
UCLADr. Karin NielsenNew UCLA-led research finds that Zika-linked abnormalities that occur in human fetuses are more extensive — and severe — than previously thought, with 46 percent of 125 pregnancies among Zika-infected women resulting in birth defects in newborns or ending in fetal death.Thestudy, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that damage during fetal development from the mosquito-borne virus can occur throughout pregnancy and that other birth defects are more common than microcephaly, when babies are born with very small heads. Further, these defects may only be detected weeks o...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 15, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Assessing Fever in Returning Travelers: Part II
  Zika continues to be the virus of the day for returning travelers, but there are several other diseases that we need to consider in these patients when they present to us in the emergency department. Chikungunya is epidemic in many of the same countries as Zika and can be even more devastating. And Avian and MERS-CoV is still present in many countries. Unlike patients infected with Zika virus, these patients do require isolation to protect our health care staff from infection. Chikungunya Chikungunya, which means “to walk bent over,” was likely endemic but unrecognized in the United States before the mos...
Source: EPMonthly.com - November 25, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matt McGahen Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

As the Aedes aegypti mosquito spreads globally, so does the risk of epidemics
Of all the mosquito species that populate the planet, few have proved themselves more resilient or more deadly to humans than the Aedes aegypti. The epidemics fueled by this tiny mosquito stretch across hundreds of years and include millions of victims. Yellow fever, dengue fever, chikungunya. And now Zika, which has spread to more than 50 […]Related:Many Medicare cancer patients hit by high out-of-pocket costsMany LASIK patients may wind up with glare, halos or other visual symptoms, study suggestsNormal head size at birth doesn’t rule out microcephaly, Zika syndrome after birth (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - November 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aethlon ’ s blood filtration device as broad countermeasure for infectious diseases
In the midst of a devastating global crisis 2 years ago, a Ugandan physician was infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone as he was treating patients. He was hospitalized at the Frankfurt University Hospital and 12 days later he was unconscious, suffering from multiple organ failure. By the time Aethlon Medical (NSDQ:AEMD) got permission to use its Hemopurifier device, the doctor required mechanical ventilation, continuous dialysis and vasopressor medications. After almost 7 hours of treatment with the single cartridge blood filtration device, the patient’s viral load dropped from 400,000 virus copies per milliliter ...
Source: Mass Device - November 18, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Blood Management Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Research & Development Aethlon Medical Inc. MassDevice Q&A Source Type: news

Mosquitoes May Infect You With More Than One Disease In A Single Bite
As if disease-carrying mosquitoes weren’t bad enough in the first place, scientists have found the pesky insects may be able to infect us with two viruses at the same time.  A small lab study that exposed mosquitoes to blood infected with varying combinations of dengue, Zika and chikungunya proved that the mosquitoes were able to pick up two viruses — Zika and chikungunya — at the same time. The results suggest that human beings could be infected with both the Zika virus and the chikungunya virus in one bite, but researchers need to conduct more studies to find out how this affects a person&rsqu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya Prevention Toolkit
International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. 10/17/2016 This 55-page document is a toolkit for two modules that promote community and school outreach activities for Zika, dengue, and chikungunya prevention. It features full-color imagery, interactive formats, and games material to teach all audiences according to the methodology suggested in the two module guides. All materials can be printed in color or black/white and are of high resolution for those national societies wishing to enlarge and print posters and banners for other uses in their Zika, dengue, and/or chikungunya prevention activities. (PDF...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Mosquitoes can spread Zika, Chikungunya at the same time
HealthDay News Mosquitoes can infect people with Zika and chikungunya viruses at the same time, new research suggests. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mosquitoes Can Deliver Virus Double Whammy
And like Zika, dengue and chikungunya can also cause neurological problems, study found (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mosquitoes Can Deliver Zika/Chikungunya Double Whammy
And like Zika, dengue and chikungunya can also cause neurological problems, study found Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Chikungunya, Insect Bites and Stings, Zika Virus (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mosquitoes Can Deliver Zika/Chikungunya Double Whammy
MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 -- Mosquitoes can infect people with Zika and chikungunya viruses at the same time, new research suggests. And another study found that in addition to Zika virus, two other mosquito-borne viruses -- chikungunya and dengue --... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 14, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

New evidence finds mosquitoes could infect humans with Zika and chikungunya viruses at the same time
(Burness) Mosquitoes are capable of carrying Zika and chikungunya viruses simultaneously and can secrete enough in their saliva to potentially infect humans with both viruses in a single bite, according to new research presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 14, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Effective Vector-Borne Disease Surveillance and Control
ESRI (Environmental Systems Research Institute). 10/26/2016 This 45-minute webinar discusses how geographic information systems (GIS) can provide the tools to help reduce the outbreak, exposure, and spread of vector-borne diseases, including the Zika, dengue, and chikungunya viruses. It discusses tracking the spread of disease, and the impact of vector-borne diseases, which are on the rise in the Asia Pacific region. It also provides maps of the global distribution and habitat of aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit those viruses. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration. (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Gu...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika Appears To Affect Women More Than Men
By Julie SteenhuysenCHICAGO (Reuters) - Adult women in Puerto Rico were significantly more likely to develop Zika than men, researchers said on Thursday, raising new questions about the potential role of sexual transmission of the virus from males to females. The study, published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly report on death and disease, evaluated more than 29,000 laboratory-confirmed cases of Zika since the outbreak began in Puerto Rico in November 2015. The data show that of all Zika cases with laboratory evidence of infection, 62 percent were female. The results pattern similar ob...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika Appears To Affect Women More Than Men
By Julie SteenhuysenCHICAGO (Reuters) - Adult women in Puerto Rico were significantly more likely to develop Zika than men, researchers said on Thursday, raising new questions about the potential role of sexual transmission of the virus from males to females. The study, published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly report on death and disease, evaluated more than 29,000 laboratory-confirmed cases of Zika since the outbreak began in Puerto Rico in November 2015. The data show that of all Zika cases with laboratory evidence of infection, 62 percent were female. The results pattern similar ob...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

‘ Lazy Mosquitoes ’ Mean More Women Than Men Get Chikungunya - Scientists ‘ Lazy Mosquitoes ’ Mean More Women Than Men Get Chikungunya - Scientists
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Chikungunya, Zika Virus Dissemination in the Americas Chikungunya, Zika Virus Dissemination in the Americas
A better understanding of the dissemination of these viruses through the Americas could have important implications for disease control.Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - November 8, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

The Strange Reason Women Get Chikungunya More Than Men
LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - “Lazy mosquitoes” are the reason why women, who tend to spend more time at home than men, are more likely to be infected by chikungunya, a painful mosquito-borne viral disease which spreads the same way as Zika, researchers said on Monday. Chikungunya, which is commonly transmitted by the daytime-biting aedes aegypti mosquito, can cause debilitating symptoms including fever, headache and severe joint pain lasting months. A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, analyzed a 2012 outbreak of chikungunya in the Bangladeshi village of Palpar...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Strange Reason Women Get Chikungunya More Than Men
LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - “Lazy mosquitoes” are the reason why women, who tend to spend more time at home than men, are more likely to be infected by chikungunya, a painful mosquito-borne viral disease which spreads the same way as Zika, researchers said on Monday. Chikungunya, which is commonly transmitted by the daytime-biting aedes aegypti mosquito, can cause debilitating symptoms including fever, headache and severe joint pain lasting months. A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, analyzed a 2012 outbreak of chikungunya in the Bangladeshi village of Palpar...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Lazy mosquitoes' mean more women than men get chikungunya: scientists
LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - "Lazy mosquitoes" are the reason why women, who tend to spend more time at home than men, are more likely to be infected by chikungunya, a painful mosquito-borne viral disease which spreads the same way as Zika, researchers said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Mosquito-borne illness spreads in and around homes, disproportionately hits women
Outbreaks of the mosquito-borne disease chikungunya appear to be driven by infections centered in and around the home, with women significantly more likely to become ill, suggests new research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Southern Research contracted for Zika drug discovery
Southern Research has landed an additional Zika research grant, the company announced Monday. The National Institutes of Health have awarded Southern Research $650,000 to begin high throughput screening for Zika, a drug-discovery process in antiviral research. The award is a supplement to a larger grant Southern received in 2014 for HTS antiviral screenings against dengue, West Nile, SARS, influenza, Venezuela equine encephalitis complex and chikungunya. According to a Southern release, the company… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 7, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Melissa Brown Source Type: news

Mosquito-borne illness spreads in and around homes, disproportionately hits women
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Outbreaks of the mosquito-borne disease chikungunya appear to be driven by infections centered in and around the home, with women significantly more likely to become ill, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Institut Pasteur in Paris and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 7, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news