Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Fever, Arthralgia and Rash
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Peer Reviewer: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia You are an ED doc working in Perth over schoolies week. An 18 yo man comes into ED complaining of fever, rash a “cracking headache” and body aches. He has just hopped off the plane from Bali where he spent the last 2 weeks partying, boozing and running amok. He got bitten by “loads” of mosquitoes because he forgot to take insect repellent. On e...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine arthralgia dengue fever rash Source Type: blogs

TWiV 498: Salivating at ASM Microbe
Vincent, Kathy and Rich travel to ASM Microbe 2018 in Atlanta where they speak with Stacy Horner and Ken Stapleford about their careers and their research. <span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 17, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology aedes aegypti Aedes albopictus alphavirus ASM Microbe 2018 Chikungunya virus epitranscriptome evolution m6 adenosine m6A quasispecies RNA RNA modification viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Ticked off: America ’s quiet epidemic of tickborne diseases
For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Mayaro Virus Disease and Travel
As of April, 2018 eleven cases of travel-associated Mayaro virus infection have been reported (see chart below). [1,2]  The current report on ProMED is the third to have originated in Peru.  A user-generated Gideon chart comparing the clinical features of several mosquito-borne viral diseases of Peru (Dengue, Chikungunya, Oropouche, Mayaro, Group C viruses and Zika) is also displayed.                                                                  ...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 19, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Travel Source Type: blogs

Malaria Rates in Central America
Although CDC declared that there is no risk for malaria to American travelers in Costa Rica as of 2014, six of eleven cases reported by the latter in 2017 were classified as “autochthonous”. [1]  For much of the past fifty years, Costa Rica has reported the lowest rates of malaria in Central America; and rates for the entire region have decreased dramatically since 2000 [2,3] References: https://www.ministeriodesalud.go.cr/index.php/vigilancia-de-la-salud/boletines/enfermedades-de-transmision-vectorial-2017/3443-boletin-epidemiologico-no-31-2017-zika-chikungunya-y-dengue/file Berger SA. Malaria: Global S...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Source Type: blogs

A Clinical Trial By Any Other Name …
By ARTHUR CAPLAN and KELLY McBRIDE FOLKERS Mosquito borne illnesses pose a significant threat to human health. In the past several years, drug makers have begun developing vaccines for viruses like dengue, Zika, and chikungunya, all of which pose unique risks to billions across the globe. One of them just went terribly, terribly wrong. Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccine division of the multinational pharmaceutical company Sanofi, has the problem. In a press release distributed last Wednesday, Sanofi reported that new analysis of long-term safety data for its dengue vaccine, Dengvaxia®, revealed that the vaccine may not be sa...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Dengue Source Type: blogs

Dengue hemorrhagic encephalitis: MRI
Discussion by Dr MGK Murthy, Dr GA PrasadDengue virus is a single-stranded RNA virus of the Flavivirus genus classified into four serotypes. Neurological manifestations, commonly seen with serotypes 2 and 3.Neurological manifestation in dengue hemorrhagic fever usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to liver failure, cerebral hypoperfusion, electrolyte imbalance, shock, cerebral edema, and hemorrhage related to vascular leak. Presentation as viral encephalitis is rare as the virus is non-neurotrophic.Patients can present with - stroke, mononeuropathies, polyneuropathies, Guillain-Ba...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - November 13, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Rapid Phone-Based Test for Multiple Infectious Pathogens
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington at Tacoma have partnered to develop a compact, portable, and easy to use system for simultaneously detecting a variety of bacteria and viruses that cause disease. The system provides results in about a half an hour, which are nearly as accurate as laboratory equipment, and the technology can be used in the field and at the point-of-care. The technology revolves around a microfluidic chip that contains loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) reagents. Each of the chip’s parallel channels is loaded with reagents de...
Source: Medgadget - October 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Pathology Public Health Source Type: blogs

Mosquito controls with AGO bucket traps, Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGO), tested by CDC
Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGO) bucket trap is a standard 5-gallon bucket adapted in a specific way to capture mosquitoes.AGO traps are available for purchase online from Springstar. Two traps cost $75, free shipping:https://www.springstar.net/collections/mosquitoes/products/agoThe Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGO trap), was developed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and has been proven to reduce populations of Aedes mosquitoes by over 80%. It is effective for the mosquitoes that transmit Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever. No pesticides or pheromones required. Just add water and a little hay.From Springstar we...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - September 24, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: noreply at blogger.com (Ves Dimov) Tags: Florida Infectious Diseases Tropical Source Type: blogs

Chikungunya Outbreak Halts Blood Collection in Parts of Rome
As a former blood banker, I often take notice of the relationship between blood donation and infectious disease, a sensitivity that harks back to the AIDS era. A recent article noted that blood donations were being halted in parts of Rome because of an outbreak of Chikungunya (see:Outbreak of disease carried by mosquitoes halts blood donation in Rome), Below is an excerpt from it:Italian health officials have banned residents across half of Rome from donating blood because of an outbreak of the painful, mosquito-borne illness Chikungunya. At least 17 people in southeastern Rome have been diagnosed with the virus since...
Source: Lab Soft News - September 18, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Blood banking Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Medical Consumerism Medical Research Source Type: blogs

What Three Decades Of Pandemic Threats Can Teach Us About The Future
Editor’s Note: This post reflects on a speech on pandemic preparedness Dr. Fauci gave on January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC, hosted by  The Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and Health Affairs. One of the most important challenges facing the new Administration is preparedness for the pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease. Infectious diseases will continue to pose a significant threat to public health and the economies of countries worldwide. The U.S. government will need to continue its investment to combat these ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 9, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Anthony S. Fauci Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Ebola HIV/AIDS NIH pandemic preparedness Zika Source Type: blogs

TWiV 421: Like flies on shot
The TWiVnauts present another example of an infectious but replication incompetent vaccine, an insect specific arborvirus bearing chikungunya virus structural proteins. You can find TWiV #421 at microbe.tv/twiv, or listen below. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 421 (67 MB .mp3, 112 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - December 25, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology arborvirus Eilat virus host range vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Paradoxical vaccines
A new breed of vaccines is on the horizon: they replicate in one type of cell, allowing for their production, but will not replicate in humans. Two different examples have recently been described for influenza and chikungunya viruses. The influenza virus vaccine is produced by introducing multiple amber (UAG) translation stop codons in multiple viral genes. Cloned DNA copies of the mutated viral RNAs are not infectious in normal cells. However, when introduced into specially engineered ‘suppressor’ cells that can insert an amino acid at each amber stop codon, infectious viruses can be produced. These virus...
Source: virology blog - December 23, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information Chikungunya Eilat virus flavivirus inactivated vaccine infectious vaccine influenza nonsense suppression stop codon togavirus viral viruses Zika Source Type: blogs

Making a Lasting Impact in Nicaragua
​By CASEY GRAVES​, MD​The Northeast Presbyterian Church (NEPC) has been organizing mission trips to Nicaragua for many years. These trips generally comprise operating roving clinics and performing ministry work in different parts of the country each year. Recently, they added a new option: The church began sending volunteers to a newly established clinic in an extremely poor community to provide affordable care, and I was one of them.   Cristo Rey was a community formed from the good intentions of the Spanish government, which carries out a significant amount of humanitarian work in Nicaragua. Many peo...
Source: Going Global - December 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Making a Lasting Impact in Nicaragua
​By CASEY GRAVES​, MD​The Northeast Presbyterian Church (NEPC) has been organizing mission trips to Nicaragua for many years. These trips generally comprise operating roving clinics and performing ministry work in different parts of the country each year. Recently, they added a new option: The church began sending volunteers to a newly established clinic in an extremely poor community to provide affordable care, and I was one of them.   Cristo Rey was a community formed from the good intentions of the Spanish government, which carries out a significant amount of humanitarian work in Nicaragua. Many peo...
Source: Going Global - December 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

TWiV 414: Zika in the guys with Diamond
On episode #414 of the science show This Week in Virology, Michael Diamond visits the TWiV studio to talk about chikungunya virus and his laboratory’s work on a mouse model of Zika virus, including the recent finding of testicular damage caused by viral replication. You can find TWiV #414 at microbe.tv/twiv, or listen below. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 414 (50 MB .mp3, 83 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 6, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology conjunctivitis fertility microcephaly mouse model sexual transmission sperm sterility testes uveitis viral virus virus in semen virus in tears viruses zika virus Source Type: blogs

Zeke Emanuel May Not Be Right This Time: Increasing Costs Will Probably Not Slow Antibiotic Resistance
Ezekiel J. (Zeke) Emanuel, MD, PhD, is chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania. On May 30, 2016, the Washington Post published an opinion piece by Dr. Emanuel titled “Want to Win $2 Billion? Create the Next Antibiotic.” In the article, Dr. Emanuel makes two key points: (1) the low cost of antibiotics may be one of the principal factors that have led to doctors over-prescribing these drugs; (2) the low cost of antibiotics with the resulting low rate of return on investment for pharmaceutical companies dis-incentivizes drug manufacturers from allocating more...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 24, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care antibiotic cost drug safety evidence based medicine prescribing resistance syndicated Source Type: blogs

Zika virus and mosquito eradication
The Aedes aegypti eradication campaign coordinated by the Pan American Health Organization led by 1962 to elimination of this mosquito from 18 countries, including Brazil. Ae. aegypti transmits not only Zika virus, but dengue virus, chikungunya virus, and yellow fever virus. Could control measures be implemented today to achieve similar control of this mosquito? Two articles in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases revisit the successful PAHO mosquito control campaign and suggest that its approaches should be revived. The elimination of Ae. aegypti in 18 countries, which was accompanied by a marked reduction in dengue hemo...
Source: virology blog - June 9, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information Chikungunya virus DDT dengue virus mosquito PAHO perifocal control vaccine viral viruses zika virus Source Type: blogs

Zika virus, like all other viruses, is mutating
Not long after the appearance of an outbreak of viral disease, first scientists, and then newswriters, blame it all on mutation of the virus. It happened during the Ebolavirus outbreak in West Africa, and now it’s happening with Zika virus. The latest example is by parasitologist Peter Hotez, who writes in the New York Times: There are many theories for Zika’s rapid rise, but the most plausible is that the virus mutated from an African to a pandemic strain a decade or more ago and then spread east across the Pacific from Micronesia and French Polynesia, until it struck Brazil. After its discovery in 1947 i...
Source: virology blog - April 15, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Commentary Information genome microcephaly mutation pandemic transmission viral virulence virus viruses zika virus Source Type: blogs

MedlinePlus Health Topic: Chikungunya
MedlinePlus has published a new health topic page on chikungunya virus. From MedlinePlus: “Chikungunya is a virus that spread by the same kinds of mosquitoes that spread dengue and Zika virus. Rarely, it can spread from mother to newborn around the time of birth. It may also possibly spread through infected blood. There have been outbreaks of chikungunya virus in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Indian and Pacific Oceans, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.” Chikungunya (English): http://1.usa.gov/1PQFtUD Chikungunya (Spanish): http://1.usa.gov/1TwHj45 (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - April 4, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kate Flewelling Tags: National Library of Medicine News Public Health Regional Information Source Type: blogs

To Improve Pandemic Preparedness, Update The Priority Review Voucher Program
Legislation recently introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would add the Zika virus to the list of diseases in the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) priority review voucher (PRV) program. The Senate HELP Committee has also recently advanced similar legislation. This is a positive step that would help incentivize needed research and development (R&D) to fight the disease. However, it also illustrates the fact that the PRV platform could be used far more proactively to help address future pandemics before they strike. Incentive For Innovation In 2007 the US government created the PRV as an incentive to...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 22, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Kenneth Gustavsen Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Global Health Congress Ebola FDA outbreaks pandemic priority review Research Zika Source Type: blogs

A promising Ebolavirus antiviral compound
A small molecule antiviral compound has been shown to protect rhesus monkeys against lethal Ebolavirus disease, even when given up to three days after virus inoculation. The compound, called GS-5734, is a nucleoside analog. After uptake into cells, GS-5734 is converted to a nucleoside triphosphate (illustrated, bottom panel) which is incorporated by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase as it copies the viral genome. However, the nucleoside is chemically different from ATP (illustrated, top) and no further nucleotides can be incorporated into the growing RNA strand. RNA synthesis ceases, blocking ...
Source: virology blog - March 3, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information antiviral compound chain terminator ebolavirus nucleoside analog RNA polymerase rna synthesis viruses Source Type: blogs

10 simple facts about Zika virus
1. Zika is an infectious disease caused by a virus and transmitted by mosquitoes. It is one of four worrisome viral infections that have spread rapidly across the world recently including dengue, chikungunya, and West Nile virus, all of which are transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks. The most dangerous mosquito type is the one that spreads yellow fever (Aedes). 2. Though Zika is mostly spread by mosquito bites, there is emerging evidence that it may be sexually transmitted from men to women (not vice versa) as well as blood transfusions and during labor. The Zika virus can live in urine and saliva but so far there in no evid...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Current Wisdom: Swatting Away the Zika/Climate Change Connection
The Current Wisdom is a series of occasional articles in which Patrick J. Michaels and Paul C. “Chip” Knappenberger, from Cato’s Center for the Study of Science, review interesting items on global warming in the scientific literature or of a more technical nature. These items may not have received the media attention that they deserved or have been misinterpreted in the popular press. — We hardly need a high tech fly-swatter (although they are fun and effective) to kill this nuisance—it’s so languorous that one can just put their thumb over it and squish. Jeb Bush’s candidacy? No, ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 19, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Paul C. "Chip" Knappenberger, Patrick J. Michaels Source Type: blogs

Rubella virus and birth defects
Amidst the fear surrounding Zika virus, remember that there are over 100,000 children born each year with birth defects caused by infection with rubella virus. The virus Rubella virus is a member of the Togaviridae family, which also includes chikungunya virus. The genome is a 9.7 kilobase, positive strand RNA enclosed in a capsid and surrounded by a membrane (illustrated; image from ViralZone). Transmission Humans are the only natural host and reservoir of rubella virus. The virus is transmitted from human to human by respiratory aerosols.  Upon entry into the upper respiratory...
Source: virology blog - February 17, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information birth defects congenital rubella syndrome microcephaly mmr vaccine placenta viral virus viruses Zika zika virus Source Type: blogs

Zika
When “Ebola” became a household word for most Americans in 2015, few realized that a more sinister outbreak was unfolding in their own back-yard. Chikungunya, a dengue-like illness which had previously been limited to the jungle areas of Africa and Asia, suddenly appeared in Latin America, resulting in over 2 million cases as of January 2016. And then Zika virus followed in the same region, threatening to attack a similar number of people. Unlike Chikungunya and Dengue, Zika virus infection has now been identified as a major cause of microcephaly (abnormally-small head) and other severe neurological disord...
Source: GIDEON blog - February 5, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Uri Blackman Tags: Cases Epidemiology Examples Maps Source Type: blogs

Where did Zika virus come from and why is it a problem in Brazil?
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. (Source: The A and P Professor)
Source: The A and P Professor - January 27, 2016 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

El Niño Season Temperatures Linked to Dengue Epidemics
Incidence of dengue fever across Southeast Asia, 1993-2010. Note increasing incidence (red) starting about June 1997, which corresponds to a period of higher temperatures driven by a strong El Niño season. At the end of the El Niño event, in January 1999, dengue incidence is much lower (green). Credit: Wilbert van Panhuis, University of Pittsburgh. Weather forecasters are already warning about an intense El Niño season that’s expected to alter precipitation levels and temperatures worldwide. El Niño seasons, characterized by warmer Pacific Ocean water along the equator, may impact the spr...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - November 9, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Emily Carlson Tags: Computers in Biology Big Data Bioinformatics Infectious Disease Spread Source Type: blogs

Arthropod-borne Viruses of Senegal
A recent outbreak of suspected viral infection in Kedougou Region (http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php?id=3626668) highlights the complexity of establishing a specific etiological agent in West Africa.  At least twenty arthropod-borne viruses are associated with known or suspected human infection in Senegal.  The following alphabetical list is abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series [1]   (Primary references are available from Dr. Berger on request) Bagaza – Bagaza virus has been recovered from mosquitoes in Senegal (Aedes fowleri, Culex neavei, Cx. Poicilipes and...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 6, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks ProMED Senegal Source Type: blogs

TWiV 344: Glasgwegians go viral
Episode #344 of the science show This Week in Virology was recorded at the Glasgow Science Festival microTALKS, where Vincent spoke with Ruth, Glen, and Esther about their research on viruses and Hodgkin lymphoma, adenovirus structure and entry into cells, and interactions between arthropod borne viruses and their hosts. You can find TWiV #344 at www.twiv.tv. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 5, 2015 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology adenovirus arbovirus Chikungunya EBV endosome rupture Epstein-Barr virus flavivirus Hodgkin lymphoma insect insect defense integrin midge nuclear entry rnai tick viral Source Type: blogs

Long-term effects of Ebolavirus infection
This study only included adults; children who have recovered should also be examined as their health care needs may be different. These results confirm that there are long-term sequelae of Ebolavirus infection. The basis for the complications is not known, but is likely a consequence of tissue damage due to viral replication and the immune response. Whether or not virus was present in the patients was not determined. However it is known that Ebolavirus can persist in the testicles and eye long after it is absent from serum. Other serious viral infections are also accompanied by long term health effects. For example, 29% of...
Source: virology blog - June 19, 2015 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information acute arthralgia Ebola ebolavirus long term myalgia persistent symptoms uveitis viral Source Type: blogs

TWiV 339: Herpes and the sashimi plot
On episode #339 of the science show This Week in Virology, tre TWiV amici present three snippets and a side of sashimi: how herpesvirus inhibits host cell gene expression by disrupting transcription termination. You can find TWiV #339 at www.twiv.tv. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 31, 2015 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Uncategorized cancer Chikungunya virus exon herpesvirus host shutoff intron IRF7 Lassa fever mosquitoes splicing transcription termination translation viral virology West Nile virus Source Type: blogs

Thoughts from #SGIM15 & #ProudtobeGIM
Today I leave the SGIM meeting and fly to Boston for the ACP meeting. Despite having 8 days of meetings and finishing my stint as Chair of the ACP Board of Regents, I could never miss the SGIM meeting. SGIM (the Society for General Internal Medicine) became my academic home in the early 1980s. At SGIM I found my peers and became convinced that academic GIM would become my career path. Each year at this meeting I become energized; I get new ideas and I see many, many friends. SGIM is rolling out a new campaign Proud to be GIM. This wonderful campaign echoes my personal feelings. I believe I was born a general internist, and...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 25, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Alphaviruses
Suresh Mahalingam, Lara Herrero and Belinda Herring present a new book on Alphaviruses: Current Biology This timely book provides a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in alphavirus research. Written by a team of prominent scientists the main focus is on the pathogenesis and host interactions. Topics covered include: genome structure and replication; viral evolution; laboratory diagnosis and detection; interaction with the interferon system; antiviral responses in mosquitoes; animal models of alphavirus-induced inflammatory disease; clinical manifestations of arthritogenic alphaviruses; encephalitic alphaviru...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - March 6, 2015 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Lessons from Ebola: The Infectious Disease Era, And The Need To Prepare, Will Never Be Over
With the wall-to-wall news coverage of Ebola recently, it’s hard for many to distinguish fact from fiction and to really understand the risk the disease poses and how prepared we are to fight it. Fighting infectious diseases requires constant vigilance. Along with Ebola, health officials around the globe are closely watching other emerging threats: MERS-CoV, pandemic flu strains, Marburg, Chikungunya and Enterovirus D68. The best defense to all of these threats is a good offense — detecting, treating and containing as quickly and effectively as possible. And yet, we have consistently degraded our ability to res...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 28, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeffrey Levi Tags: All Categories Global Health Hospitals Pharma Policy Prevention Public Health Research Workforce Source Type: blogs

Ebola Deaths in Perspective
Recent events in West Africa have largely eclipsed several other ongoing outbreaks on the global stage. For example, over 780,000 cases of Chikungunya have been reported in the western hemisphere in recent months, including 1,371 cases in the United States (vs. only 4 of Ebola). Obviously, the severity of Ebola far outweighs that of Chikungunya; thus, the ratio of reported Chikungunya cases to Ebola cases (772,069 / 10,141) is 76-to-1, the ratio of Ebola deaths to Chikungunya deaths (4,922 / 118) is 73-to-1. Sadly, one ongoing epidemic which is more severe than Ebola in both disease numbers and mortality, receives little n...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 28, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Epidemiology Events General Outbreaks ProMED Ebola Influenza SARS Source Type: blogs

TWiV 308: The Running Mad Professor
On episode #308 of the science show This Week in Virology, Tom Solomon, an infectious disease doctor from Liverpool, talks with Vincent about viral central nervous system infections of global importance, Ebola virus, and running the fastest marathon dressed as a doctor. You can find TWiV #308 at www.twiv.tv. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - October 26, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology central nervous system Chikungunya Dengue ebola virus ebolavirus encephalitis Japanese encephalitis virus poliovirus Running mad professor Tom Solomon viral Source Type: blogs

Could the Ebola virus epidemic have been prevented?
The cover of this week’s issue of Businessweek declares that ‘Ebola is coming’ in letters colored like blood, with the subtitle ‘The US had a chance to stop the virus in its tracks. It missed’. Although the article presents a good analysis of the hurdles in developing antibody therapy for Ebola virus infection, the cover is overstated. Why does Businessweek think that Ebola virus is coming to the US? (there is no mention of this topic in the article). Are we sure that antibody therapy would have stopped the outbreak? (no, as stated in the article). How the U.S. Screwed Up in the Fight Against ...
Source: virology blog - September 30, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Commentary Information antiviral ebola virus ebolavirus epidemic monoclonal antibody therapy outbreak vaccine West Africa ZMapp Source Type: blogs

Chikungunya – Coming to America ?
Chikunguna is hardly a “household” word in the United States; but we may all be talking about the disease very soon! This viral infection, transmitted by mosquitoes, is associated with high fever, rash and severe joint pains. Even after recovery, the pains may persist for many months. Originally described in Africa, the disease spread to Asia, causing an epidemic of over 1.5 million cases in India during 2006 to 2007. At one point, an Indian traveler carried the infection to Italy, resulting in hundreds of cases in the region of Ravenna. During the first half of 2014, new outbreaks were reported in the South Pa...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 17, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Will chikungunya reach your neighborhood?
Could chikungunya be coming to your neighborhood? Right now, chikungunya has been detected in all these states (dark blue = locally-acquired cases; light blue = travel-associated cases):Are you surprised by this map? This map is probably going to change as the summer goes on. So many families travel to Florida with their children to visit theme parks like Disney. Florida is the only state (dark blue) where we have detected locally-acquired cases. The light blue states represent travel-associated cases. There have been 2 cases of chikungunya in Florida so far. (Source: Medicine and Technology by Dr. Joseph Kim)
Source: Medicine and Technology by Dr. Joseph Kim - July 23, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Chikungunya Virus in the United States
Chikungunya virus is transmitted to people by mosquitoes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most common symptoms of chikungunya virus infection are fever and joint pain. Other symptoms may include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, or rash. Those who travel to and from the Caribbean are the most at risk, with no local transmission reported to date. The CDC is asking travelers to use common methods of mosquito bite prevention when traveling, and to be aware of fever with joint pains or rash within two weeks of returning from the Caribbean.  To see a table of chiku...
Source: BHIC - July 11, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Naomi Gonzales Tags: Public Health Source Type: blogs

The next emerging threat
Ian Lipkin, Columbia University, New York, and Lyle Petersen, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, discuss recently emerged pathogens, and how to prepare should their range expand. When asked if MERS-coronavirus would cause the next pandemic, Ian Lipkin responded ‘I don’t have a crystal ball’. Recorded at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, Boston, MA on 19 May 2014. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 22, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information Chikungunya Dengue emerging infection ian lipkin MERS-CoV middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus viral yellow fever Source Type: blogs

Researchers Warn Chikungunya Virus Will Invade Americas
French and Brazilian researchers are warning that the Chikungunya will invade the Americas. Read more on healthnewsblog.com Permalink | Facebook | Twitter | Recent Headlines | News Feeds (Source: HealthNewsBlog.com)
Source: HealthNewsBlog.com - April 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Chikungunya-virus mosquitoes Source Type: blogs

TWiV 226: Taking the viral A train with Terry Dermody
On episode #226 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent and Dickson speak with Terry Dermody about his career in medicine and virology. You can find TWiV #226 at www.twiv.tv. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - March 31, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology Chikungunya virus entry pathogenesis receptor reovirus Terry Dermody viral Source Type: blogs