Prepping for NaNoWriMo
I spent some time today learning more about NaNoWriMo, including sifting through their member forums looking for beginner tips and suggestions. Fortunately there’s a ton of advice from other writers who’ve done NaNoWriMo many times before. I was curious how many people who sign up for NanoWriMo each year actually succeed at writing at least 50,000 words during the month of November. The completion percentage is different each year, but it seems to average around 15%. That lands within my expectations. When it comes to 30-day challenges, I find that the early game is key. I usually win or lose the challeng...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Productivity Source Type: blogs

NaNoWriMo 2020
As I’ve shared previously, one of my goals for this year is to write a novel. I’ve never done that before. It’s been a stretch goal of mine for a long time, and I’ve decided the time has come to finally do it. To move this goal forward in a more concrete way, I signed up for NaNoWriMo on Friday. NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month, and it happens every year in the month of November. I’ve been aware of it for years, but this is the first time I’ve ever signed up for it. If you have a NaNoWriMo account, feel free to add me to your buddy list. Here’s my NaNoWriMo p...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Universal Timing Alignment
I’ve noticed that when I get an idea for a big new project, the timing often doesn’t feel good right away. It’s as if the idea wants to get my attention, so I can start thinking about it, but it also needs time to incubate. If I try to force the idea forward faster, it’s like pushing through molasses. It takes lots of discipline, and I have to forcefully re-engage with the task again and again. The inspiration to move it forward isn’t present. These projects don’t succeed. If they ever get completed, the results are disappointing. On the other hand, if I conclude that the idea isn&...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Productivity Source Type: blogs

Problems You Only Need to Solve Once
If you have a recurring problem and you can reasonably expect it to recur, solve the problem once. Really solve it. Document your solution. Then run your solution each time the problem occurs. This form of process documentation is common in business. I recommend you use it in your personal life as well. Here are some examples of problems you can solve just once: Do you get up right away when your alarm goes off in the morning without ever using the snooze button?If you’re feeling anxious, stressed, worried, frustrated, depressed, or overwhelmed, do you know how to get back to feeling good relatively quickly?...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Curiosity Goals
Maybe you have some goals for accomplishments you’d like to experience and enjoy. That’s great. Just be aware that you can also set goals for outcomes and experiences that you don’t even know if you’ll like. One of my current goals is to be able to walk 80 steps at a normal walking pace while comfortably holding my breath. That’s after exhaling and with only relaxed and shallow nose-breathing beforehand, not while holding in a deep breath. I started working on this goal last week, and currently I’m up to 25 steps. What will I gain by achieving this goal? I don’t know. I&rsquo...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Resolving the Unresolved
Sometimes people don’t look at certain dark corners of their lives because they either want to keep their options open or they don’t want to “collapse the wave function” to a negative outcome. For instance, suppose you’re in a relationship and you suspect that your partner is secretly cheating on you. Or suppose you have a job and want a promotion, and you’re worried that your boss has already excluded you from consideration. Maybe you figure that looking for the truth is worse than not knowing. Knowing is generally better though. If you avoid collapsing the wave function to resolv...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Relationships Source Type: blogs

Redefining Your Roles
You have many roles to play in life, such as various job to perform, being someone’s relationship partner, and being a a personal growth explorer. That there may be gaps, however, in the roles you identify, and you may want to devise a new role to cover a gap. Look especially for areas where you’ve been procrastinating or getting weaker results than you’d like. Do you have an appropriate role for that area? Have you chosen a suitable label for the role that you like? Identity Encourages Behavior Note that identity supports and reinforces behavior, as noted in the recent Be a Voter post. You&rs...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Redefining Your Problems
By looking at a problem from multiple angles, you may spot a creative solution you hadn’t considered before. But another approach is to reframe the way you define the problem to begin with. For example, suppose you define your problem as how to get a new job during COVID times. Within that problem definition, you can consider many ways to solve the problem. You could work on your resume, look through job postings, fill out applications, ask around to discover unadvertised jobs, and take plenty of other actions. But all the while you’re sticking with the original problem definition that you need to get a job....
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Nose Breathing During Exercise
I’ve continued practicing the exercises from The Oxygen Advantage for the past several days, and this morning I hit a nice exercise-related milestone. I decided to take the past two days off from running. Instead I went for walks and practiced reducing my breathing while also doing some breath holds. I figured that some extra practice on the breathing side could be helpful. This morning I went back to running, figuring I’d continue the interval approach. I decided that if I was going to do intervals anyway, I might as well see what it’s like to skip the 15-minute walking warmup. I wanted to know if ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Be a Voter
Which is better? To encourage someone to vote or to encourage them to be a voter? If you want the person to actually vote, encourage them to be a voter. It’s been found that this framing is more likely to lead to action. If you’d like to strengthen a behavior, weave it into your identity. And if you’d like to change someone else’s behavior, encourage them towards an identity change that includes that behavior. Use this framing with yourself too. Don’t just get up early. Be an early riser. Don’t just make a difference. Be a contributor. Don’t just do personal growt...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Values Source Type: blogs

Raising Your Baseline
In practicing the slow, shallow breathing approach from The Oxygen Advantage that I shared about during the past two days, I’m grasping that the key to this approach is to define a new baseline for my breathing and then keep synching back to that new baseline whenever I catch myself drifting from it. The initial temptation is to sync back to my old way of breathing, which can happen automatically when I lose awareness of my breath. Then I might catch myself and practice consciously reducing my breath so I’m not over-breathing. An aspect of this change that’s easier to catch is when I moderately exer...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Health Productivity Source Type: blogs

Relearning to Breathe
As I noted in yesterday’s post about learning to breathe differently, I’m leaning into a different way of thinking about breathing and working on changing old habits to see how The Oxygen Advantage approach affects me. This morning I went for my second nose-breathing run with a similar format like I tried yesterday. I started with a 15-minute walk (all nose breathing), and then I was able to run for 3 minutes with nose breathing before dropping back to walking for a few minutes. That’s longer than the 1:44 I did yesterday for the first round. For the second round, I ran for 5 minutes before dropping...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Apparently I ’ ve Been Breathing All Wrong
This week I’ve been enthusiastically digesting the book The Oxygen Advantage: The Simple, Scientifically Proven Breathing Techniques for a Healthier, Slimmer, Faster, and Fitter You. It’s eye-opening and counter-intuitive in many ways. I thought I knew how to breathe, but it turns out I didn’t. Someone recommended this book to me earlier this year, so I added it to my audiobook queue. I wondered what I’d learn about breathing from nine hours of audio that I didn’t already know. I figured it would just be reinforcement of some relaxation techniques and meditative practices that I was already...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Defining Your Own Spiritual Path
Have you ever connected with someone who had strong preconceived notions about what your spiritual path should look like? Apparently there’s a rulebook for being spiritual, and you have to satisfy certain criteria for how you’re supposed to think, feel, and behave in order to consider yourself a spiritual person. You got the memo summarizing those rules, right? Being spiritual is a label and lens. But it’s not the same lens for everyone. We all assign different meanings to what it means to be spiritual or to walk a spiritual path. My meaning is undoubtedly different from yours. These days I&rsquo...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Lifestyle Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

End the Vegan Tax
Vegans are typically well aware of the vegan tax – the extra money we pay to order a latte, a pizza, or some other item made vegan instead of with animal products. Substitute plant-based milk for dairy or vegan cheese for dairy cheese at a restaurant, and you can often expect to pay more. Starbucks is one of the main outlets that’s been charging a vegan tax for years, whereby it costs extra to order a drink with soy milk, almond milk, or coconut milk instead of the same drink make with dairy. Lots of other places that offer drinks with plant-based milks also charge extra for it. Depending on what you orde...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

A Positive Development
When I heard that Trump had contracted the coronavirus, my first thought was the word good. This feels like a much-needed positive development for humanity and the world. It likely means fewer deaths, less suffering, and less time in pandemic mode – and perhaps less stupidity from him and his minions. So I see it as good news. While some people wish Trump and his wife a speedy recovery, I honestly don’t. I’m sending healing vibes and positive intentions to the virus inside him, not to him. Each day he’s out of work, the better for us all. I’m thankful and appreciative for that one ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Values Source Type: blogs

Hidden Goals and Illness
After I shared earlier this week about hidden goals, a lot of news came out about more people getting infected with the coronavirus. This includes people who deliberately went against sensible health guidelines, especially regarding mask wearing From a cause-and-effect perspective, we could say that the virus eventually caught up with them, and of course their risky behaviors significantly increased their chances of getting infected. But from a hidden goals perspective, we can also say that when people express such behaviors, they’re also expressing the hidden goal of getting infected. In other words, not weari...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Time Logging Insights
For the month of September, I maintained a daily time log, as described in the post called Long-Term Time Logging. Now I can share some insights from what I learned. In this case it actually wasn’t that helpful to see where my time went. I was pretty aware of that already, so reviewing the logs didn’t give me many insights there. My logs matched up pretty closely with my assumptions and expectations. What was surprising was what gave me the most joy. At the end of each day, I asked a simple question and briefly answered it at the bottom of the day’s time log. That question was: Do I love this day...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

The Relationship Frame
One interesting frame shared in the book The Courage to Be Disliked is: All problems are interpersonal relationship problems. That isn’t necessarily a true statement, but you can think of it as a lens for viewing problems. Personally I think it’s a bit exaggerated as far as lenses go. I prefer a similar but more flexible one: All problems, challenges, and situations can be framed as relationships. Not everything translates well to an interpersonal relationship, but you can translate any situation to some type of relationship. This can include your relationships with: yourselfother peoplerealitylifeyour...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

Sliding Bad Habits Into Good Ones
As a follow-up to yesterday’s post on Honoring Your Hidden Goals, consider that hidden goals are similar to hidden habits. In each case the hidden aspect means that some part of you is finding a way to meet a need or desire that you’re not necessarily acknowledging. When you identify hidden habits, you can also trace them back to their needs and desires, and then you can devise more deliberate ways to satisfy those desires. It’s likely you have some habits you may identify as bad or problematic, but they’re actually serving you well. Think of a bad habit as a good habit in disguise – ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Values Source Type: blogs

Honoring Your Hidden Goals
When you look back on the past calendar quarter, consider what you actually got done, even if your actions and behaviors didn’t align well with your stated goals. Your time went somewhere, so where did it actually go? Use the lens of seeing everything you did as an accomplishment, even if your main achievement was watching Game of Thrones. Instead of beating yourself up for what you didn’t do, take a deeper look at what you did do. So then your achievements might actually look like: Watch Game of Thrones.Spend two hours per day on Facebook.Exercise sporadically, averaging about 30 minutes per week, mos...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Values Source Type: blogs

Checking in With Death
The title may sound morbid, but it can be a powerful personal growth practice to pause and ask yourself now and then: Am I ready to die yet? If I’m not ready to die today, what’s missing? What feels incomplete? Then give some real thought to these questions, such as by journaling about them. What will it take to feel that you’ve finished this life? What more do you need to do, say, achieve, or experience? These questions can point you in the direction of meaningful goals. They can help you align the flow of your life with what really matters to you. They can prevent deep regrets too. Whe...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

Declining Vibrational Mismatches
Do you ever get invitations that are vibrationally (or emotionally) out of sync with what you’d like to experience? Do you get invited to boring events when you’re in the mood for some excitement? Do you get invited to tediously slow experiences when you’d prefer faster pacing? Do you get invitations that feel obligatory when you find freedom and flexibility more appealing? Do you get sucked into disempowering invitations (like a pity party or whinefest) when you’re shifting into empowerment mode? Why does this happen? Why do you get invitations like this? The answer is pretty simp...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Lifestyle Relationships Source Type: blogs

Advancing Your Goals and Your Processes
As we’re coming to the end of the third quarter of 2020, how are you feeling about the progress you’ve made during the last three months? Are you satisfied or dissatisfied? Or do you have mixed feelings? I like to review each closing quarter to reflect on what I actually got done. Usually I’m pleased when I see what I completed and experienced. This is relatively easy for me since I habitually maintain a log of accomplishments and experiences on a quarter-by-quarter basis, so I review this list at the end of each quarter. I find it more useful to compare one quarter’s progress to the previous qua...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Relax Into Being
A few nights ago, I did a 30-minute yoga session before dinner. While lying in Savasana (corpse pose) at the end of it, I reveled in a delightful sense of beingness. This was a good reminder to set aside doingness and to fully relax into just being now and then. When you relax into being, you experience existence without any need for doing. Breathing in stillness feels effortless and automatic. In this state you can enjoy the feeling of connectedness to life without having to think about it. You can set aside all stress and worry. Sometimes it feels marvelous to be like a puddle on the floor without a care in the world....
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Health Source Type: blogs

You ’ re in Charge of Your Time
It’s easy to pretend that you’re not in control of your time with expressions like these: I don’t have time.I have to ____.I’m all booked up.My schedule is packed.I haven’t had a day off since ____.I’m always doing things for other people.My boss/spouse/kids need me to ____.I never have any time to myself.I have a lot of work to do. How you spend your time is your choice. You can choose to obey other people’s expectations. You can choose to obligate yourself. You can pretend that you don’t have a choice, but of course you still do have a choice. You choose to go to w...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Serving Beyond Yourself
You could consider this a follow-up to one of last week’s posts: Are You Most Loyal to Purpose or People? I want to share another way of framing the mindset of being loyal to purpose ahead of people, especially for those who’d prefer to shift into greater loyalty to purpose. Putting purpose first isn’t dehumanizing if you frame it a certain way – if your purpose actually involves serving people. If, however, your purpose is mainly self-centered, like if it’s based on individual achievements that will be of little or no benefit to others, then I think you’re more likely to run in...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Values Source Type: blogs

Studying Your Actual Behaviors
Observing your behaviors and responses like a scientist observing apes in the jungle can be useful for spotting opportunities for growth and improvement. While it’s tempting to see yourself as a conscious human being making fresh decisions each day, you can also benefit by seeing yourself like an animal or robot responding to stimuli in a pre-programmed or instinctual manner. Observe your own stimulus-response patterns, as if you never really had a choice in between. Then consider that you can get different behaviors from yourself if you change the stimuli. Give yourself different inputs, and watch your behavio...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

The Alien Mindset of a Fixed Income
One really weird mindset I notice among certain readers looks something like this: My wife and I are both teachers. Our combined salary is $___. And in about five years, we’ll be earning $___. So based on this, we’re able to afford ___, but we won’t be able to afford ___. So the basic idea is that the couple’s income is fixed and predictable. It’s not really up to them. Their family income is largely determined by the system that they’re in. Okay, this is an alien mindset for me. I’m impressed that people can hold this mindset and not have it fall apart on them. Here&rs...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Refining Your Personal Growth Palate
When you’re on a path of personal growth, it’s to be expected that you’ll eventually outgrow some lenses or tools that you used in the past, even if they were useful and effective. Your goals and interests may change, and other tools may become more useful to you. You may also integrate some practices well enough that you no longer have to think about using them as separate tools. Be careful about treating lenses as laws or beliefs, and be especially cautious to avoid wrapping them into your identity. That gets people stuck a lot. Treat lenses as tools that you can pick up and experiment with and then ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

The Lens of Attraction
The “Law of Attraction” isn’t really a law of course. It’s just a lens – a way of looking at reality and interpreting events. When you use this lens, you consider a potential relationship between your thoughts, feelings, attitudes, or vibes and the events and circumstances that occur in your life. You look at events as having a lot to do with with your inner state and not just your worldly behaviors. I’ve found this to be a useful lens myself, which is why it’s part of my toolbox, but I don’t treat it as a law of reality. It’s just one perspective to consider when ma...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Source Type: blogs

Are You Most Loyal to Purpose or People?
Where is your greatest loyalty – to your purpose or to specific people in your life? This is an interesting character sculpting choice, isn’t it? If you remain loyal to the people in your life, your alignment with your purpose will be weaker. When you have a conflict between people and purpose, you’ll stick with the people and allow some misalignments with your purpose. For example, if your purpose is focused on personal growth, but you’re loyal to the people in your life above and beyond your purpose, you’ll stick with friends who hold you back from growing. You may get sucked into p...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Declining Emotional Invitations
This is a follow-up to the last two posts on emotional consent and how to invite emotional consent. What if someone makes an emotional offer, either directly or indirectly, and you’d actually like to decline? Suppose someone starts venting at you emotionally, and you know that if you continue to listen, it’s likely to be draining. Or suppose someone is pretty aware of the importance of emotional consent, and they ask you if you’re up for a heart-to-heart about something important to them. And suppose you don’t feel up to having that kind of conversation. What’s a good way to decline t...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Relationships Source Type: blogs

How to Invite Emotional Consent
In my previous post, I addressed the importance of emotional consent. In this post I’ll share how to ask for emotional consent when you want to have a heart-to-heart with someone. It’s pretty straightforward in terms of the words. The intention behind it is what matters most. You could start with a line like this: I want to share my thoughts and feelings about ___.Something’s really bothering me, and I’d like to discuss it with you.I’m feeling stressed/worried/anxious/____.I’m stuck on ____.I’d love some help with ___.I had a really difficult experience a while back.There&...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Emotions Relationships Source Type: blogs

Emotional Consent
Have you ever had the experience of someone venting their emotions onto you or roping you into an emotional conversation, and you never actually consented to sharing that kind of experience with them? How did that feel? Did you ever feel used, abused, or drained by someone emotionally, especially someone who expected to be granted automatic access to your emotional resources? Did this encourage you to open your heart more to such people, or did you learn to keep your heart closed in such situations? Just as you need physical consent for sharing physical intimacy with someone, consider that it’s also important t...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Relationships Source Type: blogs

Do Nice Zombies Make Worthwhile Friends?
Some people have asked me why I don’t engage with Trump supporters, try to understand them better, invite deep conversations with them, or something along those lines. I think it’s a valid question, and the answer is simple: I don’t see any real potential in such relationships. For me they all land somewhere on a scale that spans from dumb to dumber to dumbest. It’s not the people that are the issue per se, but the behavior pattern of supporting Trump during this time is so rotten to the core that I don’t see anything redeeming there. There’s no hint of depth, value, or worthwhile dis...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Lifestyle Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Reader Experiences
On July 22 I shared a checking in with you post, inviting people to share what they’ve been experiencing during this time and how they’re doing. A lot of people decided to take me up on that – more than I was expecting. After personally replying to the first several dozen people that wrote to me, I let the remaining responses pile up for a while, and then I gradually read through them. I did read all of the responses, although I regrettably didn’t reply to everyone else after the first day or so. I actually just finished reading the last of those messages last night. More responses to that post w...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Emotions Source Type: blogs

How to Stop Worrying About Criticism
Overcome fear of criticism and judgment, especially when building an online audience. Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:Blog CommentsHow to Bypass ResistanceSilence (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Lifestyle Video Source Type: blogs

Becoming More Resilient
Develop long-term resilience to quickly bounce back from setbacks. (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Lifestyle Productivity Values Video Source Type: blogs

Your Most Valuable Minutes
Your results may depend on extraordinary minutes more than productive hours. Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:Build Fitness With Mild Interval TrainingBoost Your Happiness in 2 MinutesOverclock Your Audio Learning (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Video Source Type: blogs

Create Your Day
Here’s a new video about creating your day in advance, not just mentally (like with a to-do list) but emotionally as well. Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:Day 16: Creating Financial AbundanceDay 9: Creating Artistic ValueDay 17: Your Relationship with the Universe (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Emotions Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Creating Reference Experiences
This video shares how to boost your confidence, overcome impostor syndrome, and upgrade your self-image by creating powerful reference experiences you’ll cherish and appreciate. Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:StevePavlina.com FAQPersonal Development for Smart PeopleDisruptive Innovation (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Emotions Lifestyle Productivity Video Source Type: blogs

The Trepidatious Concertgoer
In this video a fearful concertgoer is used as an analogy for people who make excuses to avoid starting a new business or taking worthwhile risks in life. Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:Our Journey (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Give the Truth a Voice
Here’s quick video about using the “cards speak” standard to give the truth a voice in your life – and the importance of separating truth from power when making decisions. Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:Human PrivilegeAsk Steve – Intuition vs. EgoPower Challenges (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Video Source Type: blogs

Quick Daily Evaluation
Here’s a quick video lesson to help you improve the quality of your days by asking yourself one simple question at the end of each day. Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:Sparky QuestionsBehavioral ConditioningMy 5-Minute Vegan Breakfast (Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog)
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Being Emotionally Honest With Yourself
The reasons people offer for making a decision often don’t match up with their real reasons. Real reasons are generally emotional, not logical. People hide and guard their real reasons for making decisions. When you quit a job or leave a relationship, how often do you tell your boss or partner your real (emotional) reason for moving on? Even if you try to do that, will the other person accept it as valid? We tend to discount making decisions for emotional reasons, even though that’s really how we make them internally. We act on our feelings and then layer them with logical explanations afterwards. It&rsqu...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Source Type: blogs

Fragile Objections
Suppose you’re sitting in a Toastmasters meeting where members are practicing their speaking skills. Suppose there are about 20 members in the room, which would be pretty typical for a Toastmasters club. Now suppose you hear a fellow member give a speech that you find objectionable, and it bothers you to hear such words spoken within your club. The topic is permitted within the club though. What do you do? Do you stay quiet and keep your thoughts and feelings to yourself? Do you voice your objections to the speaker privately? Do you privately share your concerns with some other members about the speech...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Racism and Self-Interest
Last week I finished the book How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi. It gave me a lot to ponder, especially the frame that racism stems from self-interest. There were some chapters sharing how racism links up with sexism, anti-LGBTQ stances, and other social justice issues. How this links up with animal rights was glaringly obvious since people claim entitlement to animals’ bodies for reasons of self-interest too. The main value I got from the book was increased awareness of two areas: racist ideas and racist policies. It’s easier to notice when politicians are expressing one or both, even when they try ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Values Source Type: blogs

Will You Ring the Bell?
During Navy SEALs training, which is really tough, recruits can quit by ringing a bell three times. Then they get a shower and a hot meal, and they’re done with the struggle. No more physical ordeals. No more being wet and sandy. No more sleep deprivation. And no more opportunity to be part of a SEAL team. Afterwards the recruits who quit can offer up any reasons they want, but it doesn’t matter in terms of results. They’ve demonstrated that they will give up on the team, so the team grows stronger when they leave. SEAL training, especially hell week, is a filter. It separates the quitters fro...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - September 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Behaviors, Consequences, and Alignment
By supporting Trump a person supports: Racist ideas and policiesSexist ideas and policiesXenophobic ideas and policiesAnti-science ideas and policiesAnti-environment ideas and policiesMassive amounts of outright lying (20K+ false and misleading statements in 3.5 years)Massive amounts of incompetenceTreasonous collusionDirect election interferenceTweeting instead of leadingTons of utter bullshit that could easily populate a list 100x longer Even if someone would otherwise be a 10 out of 10 as a human being, supporting Trump is an instant -20 added to that, meaning that the person is deep into negative territory no mat...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - August 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Relationships Values Source Type: blogs