Reducing Mental Effort – Part 6
Our series on reducing mental effort continues. Do less One often overlooked way to reduce mental effort is simply to do less. Pull back from obligations. Decline invitations. Withdraw from projects till your plate is less full. Working with a very full plate can be stimulating, but it’s best as a short-term condition. In the long run, it’s great to have excess capacity, especially for developing fresh creative ideas, investing in some long-term projects that will never be urgent, and rejuvenating yourself. When everything on your plate becomes a have-to, especially when there’s constant urgen...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Reducing Mental Effort – Part 5
Our series on reducing mental effort continues. Minimize context switching During a normal workday, it’s easy to begin new tasks without fully finishing previous tasks. Sometimes we do this for the sake of variety, but this can be a very inefficient approach. Each time you switch contexts, your mind has to release the previous context and load in a new context. Think of a context as all of the key ideas that link with the task at hand. It often takes 15-30 minutes to load in a new context well enough to feel like you’re in the flow of good productivity. Before you’ve loaded the relevant contex...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Reducing Mental Effort – Part 4
Our series on reducing mental effort continues. Solve problems fully Incompletes and stress go hand-in-hand. When we’re stressed, we often want to race to the end of a project or task and call it done when it’s really 90% or 95% of the way to done. But even 99% done isn’t actually done. Some projects – like Disneyland – are never fully done because they’re ongoing and always evolving. But other projects like writing and publishing an ebook can be fully completed. And of course there’s a gray area in the middle with some projects having a reasonably well-defined completion ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Reducing Mental Effort – Part 3
Our series on reducing mental effort continues. Pre-process distractions What do you do when you’re distracted by emotions or other circular thoughts, and you can’t be very productive? Some people say to just push through and do your work anyway. I’ve tried this and found that it hasn’t worked well for me. I can work a bit, but if my mind keeps dwelling on something else, I’m certainly not working at full engagement. But nor do I like taking a full day just to deal with emotional processing. So here’s a good solution: Devote a modest amount of time to pre-process whatever is ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Reducing Mental Effort – Part 2
We continue the series on reducing mental effort. Distracting thoughts are a major source of wasted mental energy, so in this part we’ll cover a few ways to reduce internal distractions. Empty your head One reason we dwell on certain thoughts is that we’re trying to remember certain to-dos, ideas, and items that require deeper consideration. Refreshing these items in our minds sucks up extra neural energy and doesn’t necessarily move much towards completion. If your brain is using its working memory to continually bring up distracting thoughts, you can often free up extra processing power by a...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Reducing Mental Effort – Part 1
Cognitive load is the mental effort required to complete a task or project. If you can reduce the average cognitive load of your days, your days will feel easier and less stressful, you can get more done, and you can end your days feeling less fatigued. You’ll also have extra mental resources to apply to your most difficult tasks. Moreover, with a lower cognitive burden from your routine tasks, you’ll gain some excess mental capacity, which you can use to set and pursue more ambitious goals or tackle major transitions. When your cognitive load is high, it’s difficult to add more to your plate wit...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Productivity Source Type: blogs

Side Quests
In yesterday’s article about different types of quests, I defined side quests like this: A side quest is an optional side project that doesn’t directly support your main quest, but completing a side quest could make it a little easier to tackle your main quest or a subquest, such as by building up your skills or gaining additional resources.In a game a side quest may involve doing a favor for a townsperson to earn some extra gold, weapons, or items, none of which you actually need to complete the main quest. I want to delve into the value of side quests a bit more here. A side quest fits somewhere betw...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Main Quest, Subquest, Side Quest, or Minigame
This was an idea that came up in a discussion thread in Conscious Growth Club this week, and I thought it might make an interesting article. You may like this way of thinking if you’re into video games, especially games that involve different types of quests. Main Quest Your main quest is whatever you consider most important in life right now. This could be your life purpose or mission. It could be your alignment with certain values that you consider sacred. It could be a major transition that you’re considering or facing. In a game you main quest is whatever goal you must eventually accomplish in orde...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Energy Wants to Flow
One mindset challenge that plagues many of my readers is an almost obsessive focus on their own needs, problems, and challenges – when they aren’t successfully distracting themselves from it. I also spent a lot of time stuck there. It’s a great mindset for generating lots of stress. But other results? Not so much. One mental shift that helped me a lot was thinking of goals, plans, projects, and desires in terms of energy flows that are in motion. My previous tendency was to think in terms of end points and static states. So instead of fussing over where I am and where I want to be (the end points...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Health Productivity Source Type: blogs

Kinky MacGyver
Last night’s kinky meetup class was titled “Kinky Crafts,” and it was about how to make do-it-yourself items for BDSM play. Ever thought about making your own flogger using leftover supplies from some plumbing work? Me neither… but apparently this is a thing. Imagine if MacGyver was into BDSM and taught a two-hour class on it, showing off a couple dozen items he made from PVC pipe, plastic tubing, rope, duct tape, and various industrial scraps. And then imagine him describing the sensations these contraptions generate when used on humans… and passing around most of the items for everyo...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Your Least Favorite Screwdriver
One thing that people have observed that’s a bit unusual about me is that I use such a wide variety of models and tools in my work, and I don’t seem to have a problem when the rules of reality that those models are based upon seem to be in conflict. For instance, I can write from a neuroscience perspective in one article, and in another piece I might be talking about spiritual energy. This gives me a lot of flexibility. I might use one set of models when talking to an engineer and a different set when talking to a yoga instructor. There are several reasons I like to leverage a wide variety of models. O...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Source Type: blogs

Making Exercise More Fun and Social
On Sunday night Rachelle and I signed up for a new local fitness studio membership. The place is 5 minutes from our home and is called TruFusion. They only do group classes, so this helps me move forward my intention to make exercise and fitness more social this year. We attended our first class that same night, starting out easy with a 75-minute candlelight yoga class. This was yin yoga, so it was slow and deep stretching, relaxation, and some meditation and mantras. It was very non-strenuous – my Apple Watch reported that my average heart rate was only 86 bpm – a nice way to glide into getting that first c...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Conscious Conversation – Steve Pavlina and Martin Rutte
Here’s the video of my Conscious Conversation call with author, speaker, fellow Transformational Leadership Council member, and long-time friend Martin Rutte. We had a lively chat about Martin’s Project Heaven on Earth (which is about how to create a better world for all of humanity), pursuing impossible goals, and many other personal growth topics. Here are some related links: Project Heaven on Earth websiteProject Heaven on Earth bookMartin Rutte’s website I hope you enjoy the conversation. 🙂 Receive Steve's new articles by email.Read related articles:Conscious ConversationsConscio...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Lifestyle Relationships Values Video conscious conversations heaven on earth martin rutte project heaven on earth Source Type: blogs

Replacing Mission Statements with Invitation Statements
Google’s corporate mission is: to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. Facebook’s mission is: to give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together. Microsoft’s mission statement is: to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. The mission statement of Amazon is: We strive to offer our customers the lowest possible prices, the best available selection, and the utmost convenience. What I find interesting about these (and many other mission statements) is that they’re about empowerme...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Values Source Type: blogs

Honoring Your Future Self
This is my 61st day in a row of blogging, so I’m flowing along nicely with the daily blogging challenge for this year. My biggest concern with this challenge isn’t that I’ll intentionally skip a day or give up. I’m more concerned with accidentally missing a day, especially since I like to blog with the flow of inspiration, which often means writing at different times each day. It feels good to honor this challenge. Most days it’s no problem, but I will say that it isn’t easy to do this every day. Some days I get pretty busy, but I’m never tempted to skip it. When I was younge...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Values Source Type: blogs

Conscious Conversations
I’m leaning into an inspired idea that I’ve been wanting to explore for a while now, which is to have deep and interesting conversations with various friends, record them, and share them – especially friends who are very into personal growth or who are doing empowering transformational work in the world. There are two parts to my intention. The first part is to give people more insight into real conversations that growth-oriented people are having about life, the universe, and everything. Instead of doing formal interviews, I want these to be more like one-on-one conversations over coffee – relax...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Relationships Source Type: blogs

You Can Change Today
Let’s consider four different variations on the title of this post, each emphasizing a different word. YOU Can Change Today You are the driving force of change in your life. You don’t have to wait for something external to happen first. You don’t need anyone else’s permission. If some part of your life is going to change, it’s up to you and you alone. This is a reminder to take responsibility for your situation. It’s your life. You’ll need to initiate and propel any changes you wish to make. Be proactive about that, not passive. Even if your current circumstances weren&...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Money and Social Flows
Money is a social construct, but we so often treat it like it’s a form of individual accomplishment. This mindset gets a lot of people stuck. I think it’s a lot easier for many people to generate abundant income when they think about the social flows. I know it’s challenging to do that though, especially when we get caught up in focusing on our own needs and desires. In the past I used to think about how to align doing what I enjoyed with income generation. It was often tricky to connect the dots, but that framing got me into the ballpark. The key there was to keep making two types of mistakes and l...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Source Type: blogs

Exploring Beyond the Cage
I just read an interesting BBC article about why there are significantly more vegan women than men, which is mostly summarized by this statement at the top: When women hold two incompatible beliefs, they’re more likely to change their behaviour to reconcile them. Men, by comparison, tend to dig themselves in. The article cites a variety of studies that delve into gender differences and how these connect with dietary decisions. Reading it had an odd effect on me, making my vegan side feel good and my male side feel primitive and stupid. While I do consider myself an ethical vegan today, this article reminded ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

Using Sync States to Be More Consistent
A big step forward in reason is when we gain the logical recognition that the brain needs to synchronize and coordinate its operations effectively in order to function well as an integrated being instead of a collection of parts that don’t mesh well. Then the question becomes: What’s a reasonable way to synchronize our mental operations? The heart provides that function since its own tiny, primitive brain sends signals up through the nervous system (spinal column and vagus nerve) and into the brain. These signals then branch throughout the brain, inviting different regions to get on board with whatever is...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Emotions Source Type: blogs

Numbers vs Alignment
If the numbers in your work (like sales and profits) matter more than the alignment of your work (like fulfillment, purpose, and appreciation), then even if you succeed on those terms, you may end up with bigger numbers but with lower alignment, which can strangle your motivation. Good luck pursuing bigger numbers when you’ve lost your mojo because you feel overwhelmed and under-appreciated. Better numbers aren’t much compensation for the daily punishment of feeling emotionally out of sync with life. This approach will just disconnect you from your heart, and then you’ll likely feel inclined to spend m...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Values Source Type: blogs

Simple Acts of Courage
One way to train your courage muscles is simply to decide that you’re going to lean in a courageous direction when the opportunity arises. Don’t worry about big, bold acts that require an 8+ level of courage on a 1-10 scale. Instead look for some 3s and 4s that you can do more easily. When you lean towards these easier opportunities to exercise courage, it can help those 8s, 9s, and 10s seem more accessible, like they’re 1-2 notches lower than before. Moreover, the 5s, 6s, and 7s will start to feel more accessible too. At some of our previous workshops, we gave attendees a list of about 50 different...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Values Source Type: blogs

Early Impressions of Star Trek: Picard
After seeing the first 4 episodes of the new series Star Trek: Picard, I think it’s just okay so far. It seems to be setting up a potentially interesting story arc, but in other ways I find it disappointing. The acting feels a bit off, as if Picard has consumed a few too many cups of Earl Grey and is overly caffeinated. It feels more like the dorky movie version of Picard while I was hoping for more of the chill version of his character from The Next Generation. It doesn’t feel like a believable future version of Picard, at least not yet. I also remind myself that Star Trek: The Next Generation took a whi...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Reality ’s Unusual Invitations
Last night Rachelle and I attended our first class from the kink-related meetup group that we joined after going through the orientation on Monday. The topic of littles and age play wasn’t something that either of us are into, but we thought we’d go anyway to see what the meetup was like. We also got some synchronicities related to attending, which I often take as a hint from reality that it’s wise to accept the invitation. I also like leaning into learning and social experiences that are very different from what I’ve previously explored. Even if I’m not particularly interested in something...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Lifestyle Relationships Source Type: blogs

Launch Principles
In case you might find this interesting, these are the principles I use for designing course launches. I tweak this list for each new course, but overall it’s been pretty stable. When I have a tricky design decision to make while developing the project design document (or during the launch itself), I consult this list. It’s a way of refreshing my alignment with the principles I want to follow. Careful thought went into coming up with this list, and they’ve already proven themselves to me, so I know that I can trust them. Trust Assume trust, and launch to people who trust me. Don’t chase low...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Values Source Type: blogs

How I Use Scrivener to Design Course Launches
Scrivener is an outlining and word processing app for writers. It’s especially suitable for large creative projects like a book or screenplay. It helps me organize and structure my thoughts, research, notes, and more as I gradually piece together a larger work. I’ve been using the Mac version for many years, and I’ve been very pleased with it. It has way more features than I need, but the features that I do use work solidly. I like the flexibility of it, and the interface does a reasonable job of balancing accessibility and complexity. There’s a little bit of a learning curve at the beginning, bu...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Psychological Safety
This evening Rachelle and I attended an orientation meeting for a local kink-related meetup group. It’s a very active group that does frequent educational workshops as well as social meetups. I’ve known about them for years and was curious, but I never went to one of their meetups, mainly because there was a (relatively minor) prerequisite that seemed just annoying enough to dissuade me from going and keep the idea perpetually on the back burner. In order to attend any meetings from this group, they require that everyone has to attend a 90-minute orientation meeting in person before they can attend anything ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Relationships Source Type: blogs

Psychological Safety
This evening Rachelle and I attended an orientation meeting for a local kink-related meetup group. It’s a very active group that does frequent educational workshops as well as social meetups. I’ve known about them for years and was curious, but I never went to one of their meetup, mainly because there was a (relatively minor) prerequisite that seemed just annoying enough to dissuade me from going and keep the idea perpetually on the back burner. In order to attend any meetings from this group, they require that everyone has to attend a 90-minute orientation meeting in person before they can attend anything e...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Relationships Source Type: blogs

Butts Up
When I was around 12 years old, I came upon a game being played by a group of boys from the neighborhood. They invited me to play with them, telling me that the game was called butts up. I didn’t know how to play, so they briefly explained the rules. It’s a fairly simple game played with a single ball (like a tennis ball or racketball) thrown against a wall. It didn’t sound too complicated, and I liked games, so I figured I’d give it a try. What they didn’t explain at the time was the penalty for making a mistake three times. Since I was new to the game, I didn’t have any issues with ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Values Source Type: blogs

Fully Disengaged Rest Breaks
A lot of time and energy are poorly utilized by working with partial engagement and then taking half-engaged breaks, like to web surf or check email. A great way to increase productivity is to focus on a single task when working and fully engage with it. If the task is a little dull, a good way to make it more engaging is to try to do it faster than usual but at the same level of quality. Then when focus starts to fade, take a break that’s fully disengaged for several minutes, doing nothing other than resting your mind. Don’t check email or social media. Don’t count eating or going to the bathroom o...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Fret Credit
Fret credit is the notion that we’re more entitled to achieve a result if we’ve worried or stressed about it a lot. Does reality actually work this way? Do we bank some karmic credits for fretting? That seems pretty doubtful of course. Have you ever succumbed to this mindset though? Have you ever felt more deserving of an outcome because you stressed about it? Do you feel that reality owes you a little something extra for the stress you endured? Do you ever tell yourself, “I’m due,” based on your perceived balance of fret credit? Do you think reality considers fret credit to be a viab...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Source Type: blogs

Aligning Rewards
We had an interesting discussion on a recent Conscious Growth Club coaching call about making sure that the financial rewards of your career path are aligned with the ways you’d like to be rewarded. For instance, you may want or expect to be rewarded for some of the following: devising a creative solution to a problemsuccessfully completing a projecthelping a co-worker solve a problemreporting a problem that could cost the company if not solvedacting with honor and integritytelling the truth in a difficult situationencouraging and/or mentoring a team memberstretching yourself to develop a new skillworking hard ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Creating Harmonious Flow
It’s only February 5, and due to my daily blogging challenge this year, I’ve already published more blog posts in 2020 than I did in all of 2019. I realized fairly early in this challenge that it could feel very burdensome if I don’t frame it the right way. I think the wrong way to frame it would be as a self-discipline challenge. That makes it feel stressful to me. It makes the daily behaviors feel like demanding “have tos.” I wouldn’t want the next 11 months to feel like a forced march. This morning while doing some journaling, I noted that writing is an activity that I often reg...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Productivity Source Type: blogs

How to Spot a Future Vegan
Given the rapid rise of veganism we’ve been seeing lately, which by some accounts has increased by a factor of 10 or more in recent years (at least in the USA), it seems clear that this explosive growth is going to continue for a while. It stands to reason that many people who aren’t vegan today eventually will go vegan, perhaps sometime within the next few years. I’ve had a lot of experience seeing people transition from non-vegan to vegan, including hundreds who’ve emailed or talked to me about this before, during, and/or after their transitions. I’ve also seen people who’ve b...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

How to Spot a Future Vegan
Given the rapid rise of veganism we’ve been seeing lately, which by some accounts has increased by a factor of 10 or more in recent years (at least in the USA), it seems clear that this explosive growth is going to continue for a while. It stands to reason that many people who aren’t vegan today eventually will go vegan, perhaps sometime within the next few years. I’ve had a lot of experience seeing people transition from non-vegan to vegan, including hundreds who’ve emailed or talked to me about this before, during, and/or after their transitions. I’ve also seen people who’ve b...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Spiritual People Don ’ t Charge for Their Work 
Have you heard anyone proclaim that truly spiritual people don’t charge for their work? Apparently if you create something and charge money for it, the nonzero price alters the nature of the work, rendering it non-spiritual. Is that actually true? Of course it’s true. This rule is written into the Laws of Spirituality, not to be confused with the Laws of Acquisition. 😉 Okay, from one perspective it makes some sense, but only if you regard money as non-spiritual. Is money actually non-spiritual though? Which way you lean depends on how you define spirituality and how you perceive the role of money. W...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Values Source Type: blogs

Spiritual People Don ’ t Charge for Their Work 
Have you heard anyone proclaim that truly spiritual people don’t charge for their work? Apparently if you create something and charge money for it, the nonzero price alters the nature of the work, rendering it non-spiritual. Is that actually true? Of course it’s true. This rule is written into the Laws of Spirituality, not to be confused with the Laws of Acquisition. 😉 Okay, from one perspective it makes some sense, but only if you regard money as non-spiritual. Is money actually non-spiritual though? Which way you lean depends on how you define spirituality and how you perceive the role of money. W...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Values Source Type: blogs

Listen to the Screams
By being vegan for as long as I have (and vegetarian a few years before that), about 5000 fewer animals were harmed and killed by my lifestyle. But since I blogged about this aspect of my lifestyle (including writing my longest article ever, called How to Be Vegan), I’ve since influenced hundreds (if not thousands) more people to try vegetarianism or veganism for months or years or to adopt such a lifestyle permanently. So the combined impact of going vegan and publicly sharing what I learned is likely beyond 1,000,000 animals by now. That’s based mainly on feedback people have shared with me over the years....
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

Listen to the Screams
By being vegan for as long as I have (and vegetarian a few years before that), about 5000 fewer animals were harmed and killed by my lifestyle. But since I blogged about this aspect of my lifestyle (including writing my longest article ever, called How to Be Vegan), I’ve since influenced hundreds (if not thousands) more people to try vegetarianism or veganism for months or years or to adopt such a lifestyle permanently. So the combined impact of going vegan and publicly sharing what I learned is likely beyond 1,000,000 animals by now. That’s based mainly on feedback people have shared with me over the years....
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

Loved-based Clarity
It’s common to slant your understanding of clarity heavily towards truth and power while not giving as much attention to the love aspect of clarity. The risk in doing so is that your perception of clarity may end up being too mental and lacking in the depth that emotional alignment brings to it. So you may think you have it all figured out, but your mental models won’t feel quite right to you. You’ll look at your goals and plans, and they’ll look brilliant on paper – until you actually attempt to take action on them. That’s where you’ll often feel like you’re fighting your...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - February 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Productivity Source Type: blogs

Loving the Chaos
Since I began blogging in 2004, my website has been hacked half a dozen times. People I’ve never met have published scathing personal criticisms of me as a human being. Some have sent me hateful messages, including the occasional death threat. My ex-wife actually had to get the FBI involved to deal with a nasty online stalker. This stuff happens – it comes with the territory of sharing one’s life online. I can predict that more bots will probe my website for vulnerabilities today because that’s been happening every hour of every day for many years. I can trust that bots will continue to behave as...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - January 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Emotions Source Type: blogs