Can You Trust a Life of Fun?
During my late teens, each time I got caught shoplifting and had to deal with the consequences, my mind would dwell on what I could have done differently. I went over and over different actions I could have taken to avoid the arrest. This helped me get better at shoplifting. Each arrest or near-arrest made me refine my techniques. I learned to shoplift more valuable items and at lower risk. I started out stealing candy bars and cassette tapes. Several months later I was stealing video games and small electronics like telephone-answering machines – remember those? Then I progressed to larger items like TVs, cutlery ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

Can You Trust a Life of Fun?
During my late teens, each time I got caught shoplifting and had to deal with the consequences, my mind would dwell on what I could have done differently. I went over and over different actions I could have taken to avoid the arrest. This helped me get better at shoplifting. Each arrest or near-arrest made me refine my techniques. I learned to shoplift more valuable items and at lower risk. I started out stealing candy bars and cassette tapes. Several months later I was stealing video games and small electronics like telephone-answering machines – remember those? Then I progressed to larger items like TVs, cutlery ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Lifestyle Values Source Type: blogs

Proactive Boundary Management
A recent gift from a friend included a question card deck, and one of the questions was: What is one of the most valuable lessons you have learned in the past year? I’d say my biggest lesson of this year was to more deeply understand the relationship between intelligent boundary management and investing in deep and meaningful connections with people. I had understood the importance of saying a firm “no” to partial matches as they arise. It’s necessary to reserve space to say “yes” to those really aligned opportunities, and I can’t do that if I’m caught up fussing wit...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Proactive Boundary Management
A recent gift from a friend included a question card deck, and one of the questions was: What is one of the most valuable lessons you have learned in the past year? I’d say my biggest lesson of this year was to more deeply understand the relationship between intelligent boundary management and investing in deep and meaningful connections with people. I had understood the importance of saying a firm “no” to partial matches as they arise. It’s necessary to reserve space to say “yes” to those really aligned opportunities, and I can’t do that if I’m caught up fussing wit...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Thriving Without a God
In your favorite models of reality, do you include a god or gods? Have you tested models and frames that are god-free to see how well they work for you? I grew up learning models of reality that include a god, in that case a Christian version of one. Later I went atheist, and I enjoyed the godless style of living – perhaps a little too much. It was way more fun, but it took me a few years to find my footing with it. After that I explored some New Age models that included angels, spirit guides, Source, and so on. There are many flexible ways to include divinity in our models of reality, but one key aspect is whether...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Relationships Source Type: blogs

Thriving Without a God
In your favorite models of reality, do you include a god or gods? Have you tested models and frames that are god-free to see how well they work for you? I grew up learning models of reality that include a god, in that case a Christian version of one. Later I went atheist, and I enjoyed the godless style of living – perhaps a little too much. It was way more fun, but it took me a few years to find my footing with it. After that I explored some New Age models that included angels, spirit guides, Source, and so on. There are many flexible ways to include divinity in our models of reality, but one key aspect is whether...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Relationships Source Type: blogs

Thriving Without a God
In your favorite models of reality, do you include a god or gods? Have you tested models and frames that are god-free to see how well they work for you? I grew up learning models of reality that include a god, in that case a Christian version of one. Later I went atheist, and I enjoyed the godless style of living – perhaps a little too much. It was way more fun, but it took me a few years to find my footing with it. After that I explored some New Age models that included angels, spirit guides, Source, and so on. There are many flexible ways to include divinity in our models of reality, but one key aspect is whether...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Relationships Source Type: blogs

Heartstorming
is brainstorming with the heart (or the emotional part of your brain). The mental kind of brainstorming is good for generating problem-solving ideas. It’s useful for mapping out the logical space of solutions. Generate lots of ideas, and sift through them to pick the best ones. That kind of brainstorming, however, is terrible for setting goals and priorities, especially big picture goals for your life. That’s because you can’t set priorities dispassionately. Goals are emotional in nature. The logical brain doesn’t distinguish between the value of brushing your teeth versus transforming som...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Emotions Productivity Source Type: blogs

Heartstorming
is brainstorming with the heart (or the emotional part of your brain). The mental kind of brainstorming is good for generating problem-solving ideas. It’s useful for mapping out the logical space of solutions. Generate lots of ideas, and sift through them to pick the best ones. That kind of brainstorming, however, is terrible for setting goals and priorities, especially big picture goals for your life. That’s because you can’t set priorities dispassionately. Goals are emotional in nature. The logical brain doesn’t distinguish between the value of brushing your teeth versus transforming som...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Emotions Productivity Source Type: blogs

Listening to Your Energy
I often begin my days by asking: What wants to come through? What energy wants to be expressed? Then I listen. Sometimes I listen with my mind or body. Sometimes I listen with my heart. And sometimes it feels like I’m listening with my spirit. I feel like there’s a collective idea space where thoughts and feelings are always flowing, like radio waves being constantly transmitted. When I tune into that space, I often get ideas for articles. Or I could pull out bigger ideas like for a new course or workshop. But I don’t have to aim my internal beam-forming antenna in that direction, scanning the...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Listening to Your Energy
I often begin my days by asking: What wants to come through? What energy wants to be expressed? Then I listen. Sometimes I listen with my mind or body. Sometimes I listen with my heart. And sometimes it feels like I’m listening with my spirit. I feel like there’s a collective idea space where thoughts and feelings are always flowing, like radio waves being constantly transmitted. When I tune into that space, I often get ideas for articles. Or I could pull out bigger ideas like for a new course or workshop. But I don’t have to aim my internal beam-forming antenna in that direction, scanning the...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Relationships Values Source Type: blogs

Your Relationship With Unreasonable Standards
Here’s a simple rule of thumb that I learned at the start of the pandemic: If you think you’re being reasonably cautious, you’re probably taking on too much risk. If you think you’re being unreasonably cautious, you’re probably doing it right. This made sense to me, so I aimed to keep my COVID-prevention standards higher than I thought was reasonable. I sought to keep them at a level that made me wonder if I was overdoing it. Since the start of the pandemic, Rachelle and I haven’t had friends or family over, we stopped doing in-person meetups, and we stopped all travel. We have ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - December 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Lifestyle Relationships Source Type: blogs