Win Before You Begin
If you tend to procrastinate on certain projects, one reason could be that you haven’t created a victory in your mind first. When you think about a project that isn’t advancing very well, consider these questions: Do you have a clear vision of what success for this project looks like?Can you see your desired end result clearly in your mind’s eye, like you’re recalling a vivid memory?Is the path forward relatively clear, from start to finish?Can you visualize the key action steps to bring the project to completion?Have you firmly decided to do the project now (as in this week, this month, or th...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Productivity Source Type: blogs

How to Overcome Your Feelings of Neediness
Why do you feel needy sometimes? You feel needy because your own brain doesn’t believe you. Your brain sees what you want. It also sees what you don’t want. And it genuinely expects that you’re going to keep getting what you don’t want. It doesn’t believe that you’re going to get what you want. Your brain believes that your efforts to get what you want will ultimately provide inadequate. It believes that you’re going to fail. So you feel needy when this happens. That’s actually a good signal, but you have to interpret – and act on it – correctly. You can so...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Emotions Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Lying
Why do some people lie? One reason is that they don’t trust the receiver. They may be worried about a negative reaction to the truth. That’s an obvious answer but not really the deepest one. Perhaps a better answer is that a person lies to control the receiver. By withholding the truth and sharing something else instead, you can semi-control people’s responses – or so you might assume. So in that sense, lying is a form of manipulation. The deeper trust issue could be framed as a lack of trust in reality. When you speak the truth, reality gets to respond to that truth. When you speak a lie, real...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Values Source Type: blogs

For the Experience
One framing that I find empowering is to do something for the experience. If you choose not to do something, you don’t get the experience, which means you miss out on a lot of potential benefits. When you lean into new experiences, you’re likely to gain some or all the following: New lessonsMore character growthPerspective shifts and reframesInsightsNew friendsMaybe a whole new social circleNew income-generating ideasNew invitationsNew opportunitiesNew memoriesMore knowledgeNew skillsMore emotional depthMore emotional resilienceA more optimistic attitudeMore excitement and passionLess boredomA sharper,...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

I Voted for the First Time Ever
I mailed in my ballot on Friday. This is the first political election I’ve ever participated in. Here’s the first question filled out (not a difficult one): Voting for Biden / Harris for President was the only sane option given how hideous the other candidates are. You may not even recognize two of the candidates on the list since they’re running with much smaller parties, and they’re far from popular – for good reason I’d say. Don Blankenship is a former coal company CEO who spent a year in prison for violating mine safety standards (which got 29 miners killed). I’d vote f...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Values Source Type: blogs

The Point of No Return
In Act 1 of a story with a 3-act structure, the protagonist often reaches the point of no return. Their old world crumbles, and they stumble forward into a new world, often reactively at first. There is no going back to the old world. In a novel or movie, there may be multiple progressive points of no return, each creating a deeper level of commitment and increasing the protagonist’s risk as well. Once Neo takes the red pill in The Matrix, he can’t go back to his old life. The old reality has ended, and now his world is permanently changed. Once Harry Potter learns that he’s a wizard, his world i...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Why You Should Make a Video in Your Bathrobe
I love mental and emotional resistance training because it has done so much for me over the years. It’s a fabulous way to think about skill-building when you’re diving into new territory, especially when you feel anxious, uncomfortable, or off balance. Consider learning how to record and publish videos online, for instance. So much of this is about how you model the experience in your mind. A video can be a performance. It can be a conversation. It can be a form of play. It can be a gift. You can frame the experience however you like, but you won’t really feel free to choose your framing until yo...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Creating Reality Emotions Productivity Source Type: blogs

Capturing Story Ideas
On my novel writing journey, I’m starting out by capturing ideas, which are plentiful. I find that committing to a project summons a flood of ideas, and this one is no different in that sense. When I say a firm yes, reality says: Great… let’s unlock that idea space for you. The ideas have been flooding my mind frequently – when I wake up in the morning, while eating, while running, and even while blogging. At any time I might be struck by an idea for a character, scene, location, plot twist, theme, or anything else related to the novel. When I’m at my computer, I like to capture these ideas on ...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

AI and Character Design
One thing I have to do ASAP for my novel writing project is to figure out some character and plot ideas. I don’t already have a story in mind, and I haven’t figured out any characters. I haven’t even picked a genre, so I’m really starting from scratch here. I’d love to have at least a basic sketch of what kind of story I’m going to write by November 1st when NaNoWriMo officially starts. I can lean on past role-playing experience to help with some details of character design, but I also prefer to trust in the flow of inspiration and see where that leads. One idea that randomly poppe...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Productivity Source Type: blogs

NaNoWriMo Tips
A couple of days ago, I searched for NaNoWriMo tips from people who’ve done it before. I especially looked for lessons that people discovered by contrasting their own failures versus successes with NaNoWriMo. I compiled a short list of the most interesting tips as reminders for myself, so I thought I’d share this list with you in today’s post. I’m sure you can generalize some of these ideas to improve your ability to succeed with other short-term challenges as well. Just write. Don’t do editing, and don’t even fix typos as you go. This was among the most common tips. Many people...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Prepping for NaNoWriMo
I spent some time today learning more about NaNoWriMo, including sifting through their member forums looking for beginner tips and suggestions. Fortunately there’s a ton of advice from other writers who’ve done NaNoWriMo many times before. I was curious how many people who sign up for NanoWriMo each year actually succeed at writing at least 50,000 words during the month of November. The completion percentage is different each year, but it seems to average around 15%. That lands within my expectations. When it comes to 30-day challenges, I find that the early game is key. I usually win or lose the challeng...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Productivity Source Type: blogs

NaNoWriMo 2020
As I’ve shared previously, one of my goals for this year is to write a novel. I’ve never done that before. It’s been a stretch goal of mine for a long time, and I’ve decided the time has come to finally do it. To move this goal forward in a more concrete way, I signed up for NaNoWriMo on Friday. NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month, and it happens every year in the month of November. I’ve been aware of it for years, but this is the first time I’ve ever signed up for it. If you have a NaNoWriMo account, feel free to add me to your buddy list. Here’s my NaNoWriMo p...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Creating Reality Lifestyle Productivity Source Type: blogs

Universal Timing Alignment
I’ve noticed that when I get an idea for a big new project, the timing often doesn’t feel good right away. It’s as if the idea wants to get my attention, so I can start thinking about it, but it also needs time to incubate. If I try to force the idea forward faster, it’s like pushing through molasses. It takes lots of discipline, and I have to forcefully re-engage with the task again and again. The inspiration to move it forward isn’t present. These projects don’t succeed. If they ever get completed, the results are disappointing. On the other hand, if I conclude that the idea isn&...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Productivity Source Type: blogs

Problems You Only Need to Solve Once
If you have a recurring problem and you can reasonably expect it to recur, solve the problem once. Really solve it. Document your solution. Then run your solution each time the problem occurs. This form of process documentation is common in business. I recommend you use it in your personal life as well. Here are some examples of problems you can solve just once: Do you get up right away when your alarm goes off in the morning without ever using the snooze button?If you’re feeling anxious, stressed, worried, frustrated, depressed, or overwhelmed, do you know how to get back to feeling good relatively quickly?...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Productivity Source Type: blogs

Curiosity Goals
Maybe you have some goals for accomplishments you’d like to experience and enjoy. That’s great. Just be aware that you can also set goals for outcomes and experiences that you don’t even know if you’ll like. One of my current goals is to be able to walk 80 steps at a normal walking pace while comfortably holding my breath. That’s after exhaling and with only relaxed and shallow nose-breathing beforehand, not while holding in a deep breath. I started working on this goal last week, and currently I’m up to 25 steps. What will I gain by achieving this goal? I don’t know. I’...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Abundance Lifestyle Source Type: blogs