If You ’re Feeling Anxious, Try This 2,000-Year-Old, Neuroscience-Backed Hack

Some 2,000 years ago, in the throes of a targeted chase to his death, a Roman philosopher named Seneca had a thought: “what’s the worst that can happen?” Today, a growing body of research finds that a Seneca-inspired exercise—inviting the worried brain to literally envision its worst fears realized—is one of the most evidence-based treatments for anxiety. In scientific terms, that exercise is called imaginal exposure, or “facing the thing you’re most afraid of” by summoning it in your mind, says Dr. Regine Galanti, the founder of Long Island Behavioral Psychology, and a licensed clinical psychologist who regularly integrates imaginal exposure into her therapy. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] As a subset of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), imaginal exposure relies on simple logic. Just as anxiety is created in your head, it can also be squashed in your head. And even though the most effective anxiety treatment is administered by a mental health professional over a long period of time, a growing brigade of psychologists are finding ways to help people do imaginal exposure in their own homes, on their own terms. Two thousand years before imaginal exposure would be proven one of science’s strongest anxiety treatments, dozens of Greek and Roman philosophers had the same intuition about the theoretical value of putting worry in perspective. In a letter to his friend Lucilius, around 64 A.D., Seneca wrote: &ldquo...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Mental Health Source Type: news

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Increases in mental health conditions have been documented among the general population and health care workers since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic (1-3). Public health workers might be at similar risk for negative mental health consequences because o...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news
On July 2, 2021, MMWR published "Symptoms of Depression, Anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Suicidal Ideation Among State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Public Health Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic -- United States, March-April 2021" (1). ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Conclusion: Our findings suggested that positive and negative psychological reactions coexist in adolescents faced with the pandemic. The factors associated with psychological problems and PTG provide strategic guidance for maintaining adolescents' mental health in China and worldwide during any pandemic such as COVID-19.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Among 26,174 surveyed state, tribal, local, and territorial public health workers, 53% reported symptoms of at least one mental health condition in the past 2 weeks. Symptoms were more prevalent among those who were unable to take time off from work or who felt bullied, threatened, or harassed because of work.
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Tags: Coronavirus [CoV] Depression Mental Health MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Suicide COVID-19 Source Type: news
Among 26,174 surveyed state, tribal, local, and territorial public health workers, 53% reported symptoms of at least one mental health condition in the past 2 weeks. Symptoms were more prevalent among those who were unable to take time off from work or who felt bullied, threatened, or harassed because of work.
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Tags: Bullying Coronavirus [CoV] Depression Mental Health MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Stress Coping COVID-19 Source Type: news
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Dec 3;70(48):1680-1685. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7048a6.ABSTRACTIncreases in mental health conditions have been documented among the general population and health care workers since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic (1-3). Public health workers might be at similar risk for negative mental health consequences because of the prolonged demand for responding to the pandemic and for implementing an unprecedented vaccination campaign. The extent of mental health conditions among public health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, however, is uncertain. A 2014 survey estimated that there were nearly 2...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Dec 3;70(48):1679. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7048a5.NO ABSTRACTPMID:34855728 | DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm7048a5
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Dec 3;70(48):1680-1685. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7048a6.ABSTRACTIncreases in mental health conditions have been documented among the general population and health care workers since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic (1-3). Public health workers might be at similar risk for negative mental health consequences because of the prolonged demand for responding to the pandemic and for implementing an unprecedented vaccination campaign. The extent of mental health conditions among public health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, however, is uncertain. A 2014 survey estimated that there were nearly 2...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Dec 3;70(48):1679. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7048a5.NO ABSTRACTPMID:34855728 | DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm7048a5
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Dec 3;70(48):1680-1685. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7048a6.ABSTRACTIncreases in mental health conditions have been documented among the general population and health care workers since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic (1-3). Public health workers might be at similar risk for negative mental health consequences because of the prolonged demand for responding to the pandemic and for implementing an unprecedented vaccination campaign. The extent of mental health conditions among public health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, however, is uncertain. A 2014 survey estimated that there were nearly 2...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
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