Heart failure, stroke greater among occupants in motor vehicle accidents
(Boston University School of Medicine) New research has shown that in older adults (65 and older), being an occupant in an automobile during a motor vehicle accident may lead to heart failure or stroke, as compared to pedestrians who are involved in motor vehicle accidents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Proof it's possible to enhance or suppress memories
(Boston University) Boston University neuroscientist Steve Ramirez and collaborators have published a new paper showing memories are pliable if you know which regions of the brain's hippocampus to stimulate, which could someday enable personalized treatment for people with PTSD, depression and anxiety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NAS and NAM Presidents Give Commencement Addresses
NAS President Marcia McNutt delivered the commencement address to Boston University graduates on May 19, where she discussed trust in science and evidence, and the importance of making informed decisions. On May 17, NAM President Victor Dzau spoke to graduates of the Western University Schulich School of Medicine& Dentistry, urging them to keep their commitment to patients at the forefront as they embark on a career in medicine. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Access to Care Worse for Sexual-Minority Cancer Survivors
MONDAY, May 20, 2019 -- Sexual-minority cancer survivors have worse access to care and higher odds of poor quality of life (QOL), according to a study published online May 20 in Cancer. Ulrike Boehmer, Ph.D., from the Boston University School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Protein that hinders advancement of prostate cancer identified
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People with benign skin condition willing to trade time, money to cure disorder
(Boston University School of Medicine) People with benign hyperpigmentation (the darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin), are willing to pay (WTP) nearly 14 percent of their monthly income and approximately 90 minutes a day to cure their condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protein that promotes advancement of prostate cancer identified
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

DR MICHAEL MOSLEY: Can electric shocks to your brain give you the memory of a 20-year-old?
DR MICHAEL MOSLEY: Rob Reinhart, an assistant professor at Boston University, wanted to see if he could improve the working memory of older volunteers by giving their brains a bit of a tickle. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Some Generic Drugs Could Do More Harm Than Good
For the 16 years that Dr. Brian Westerberg, a Canadian surgeon, worked volunteer missions at the Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, scarcity was the norm. The patients usually exceeded the 1,500 allotted beds. Running water was once cut off when the debt-ridden hospital was unable to pay its bills. On some of his early trips, Westerberg even brought over drugs from Canada in order to treat patients. But as low-cost generics made in India and China became widely available through Uganda’s government and international aid agencies in the early 2000s, it seemed at first like the supply issue had been ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Eban Tags: Uncategorized generic drugs medication medicine Source Type: news

Long-term decline in stroke greater in older adults
(Boston University School of Medicine) Although the occurrence of first-ever ischemic stroke (strokes due to a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel in the brain) at middle age has been decreasing over time, researchers have found that the decline is not as steep as seen in older adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU finds rare gene mutations may prevent heart disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) A kind of rare gene mutation may prevent heart disease, according to a new study co-led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher. Published in the journal Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, the study finds that protein-truncating variants in the apolipoprotein B (APOB) gene are linked to lower triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels, and lower the risk of coronary heart disease by 72 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU finds screenings for social determinants of health need to be tailored to clinics
(Boston University School of Medicine) An estimated 70 percent of the variation in healthcare outcomes is attributable to social determinants----but it is only in recent years that healthcare settings have begun formally looking at these factors to better understand and treat patients. A new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers and published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine finds that these social determinant screening systems need to be tailored to individual clinics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women who shave their pubic hair or wear tight trousers are 'more likely to suffer vulva pain'
Scientists at Boston University surveyed more than 400 women about their grooming habits and clothing to establish a link to the little-known vulva pain condition, vulvodynia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU finds tight pants and pubic-hair removal increase risk of vulvodynia
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that the risk of vulvodynia is nearly doubled by wearing tight-fitting jeans or pants four or more times a week, or removing hair from the mons pubis. Published in the Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, it is the first study to show a link between clothing and grooming and the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could Better Materials Lead to Better Outcomes with DCBs?
Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers are examining drug-coated balloon catheters at a microscopic level in hopes of producing more efficient alternatives for treating arterial disease. The researchers are specifically looking at the coatings of the devices. Obstructive arterial disease is a clinical challenge affecting millions of people in the world. Devices such as stents and balloon catheters are the primary choice for treating these narrowed vessels. While the use of stents is beneficial in many cases, once implanted, they remain in the body permanently. Presence of such foreign bodies inside an arte...
Source: MDDI - May 3, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Cardiovascular Materials Source Type: news

BU researchers investigate differences in coatings of drug-coated balloon catheters
(Boston University School of Medicine) Drug-coated balloon catheters to open narrowed blood vessels and to deliver drugs to the impacted sites are used frequently for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Scientists believe improvement of the coatings could lead to better designs and improved outcomes. Now for the first time, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have examined these coatings at microscopic levels in hopes of producing more efficient alternatives for treating arterial disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Device That Heats Tobacco, But Doesn ’t Burn It, Can Now Be Sold in the U.S. Here’s What to Know About IQOS
After a two-year wait, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Tuesday green-lit the sale of a new gadget that heats tobacco instead of burning it. The device, which is called IQOS (pronounced EYE-kose) and made by Philip Morris International, works by heating tobacco-filled sticks, called Heatsticks, to produce a nicotine-rich aerosol. The FDA’s decision means the device may now be marketed in the U.S. — but even though IQOS has been shown to produce fewer of the cancer-causing chemicals found in traditional cigarettes, the FDA has not yet approved a separate application to call IQOS a lower-risk alternative...
Source: TIME: Health - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Gender impacts brain activity in alcoholics
(Boston University School of Medicine) Compared to alcoholic women, alcoholic men have more diminished brain activity in areas responsible for emotional processing (limbic regions including the amygdala and hippocampus), as well as memory and social processing (cortical regions including the superior frontal and supramarginal regions) among other functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU receives Massachusetts life sciences capital grant award
(Boston University School of Medicine) Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) today announced that it had received a $4.9 million grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center (MLSC) to create a state-of the-art facility to accelerate development of novel brain imaging techniques to track subtle changes in the brain after neurotrauma. The Center for Translation Neurotrauma Imaging (CTNI), hopes to pioneer biomarkers, diagnostics and therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vascular surgery after firearm injury associated with increased morbidity and mortality
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) found that among all hospitalizations that were due to firearm injury, patients who underwent surgical repair of their major blood vessels had the highest injury severity score (predictor of in-hospital death). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU, Johnson & Johnson Innovation alliance: Immune system boost could prevent lung cancer
(Boston University) BU, Johnson& Johnson Innovation alliance: why an immune system boost could prevent lung cancer (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Two-and-a-half hours of exercise a week 'improves mental fitness'
Researchers from Boston University said every extra hour of exercise on top of the recommended 250-minute weekly average could wipe an extra year off someone's brain age. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Light, physical activity reduces brain aging
(Boston University School of Medicine) Incremental physical activity, even at light intensity, is associated with larger brain volume and healthy brain aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bioengineers add cooperative molecules to their toolkit for programming signal processing
(Boston University College of Engineering) Synthetic biologists have added a new toolset powered by self-assembling molecules and predictive modeling will allow researchers to construct the complex computation and signal processing found in eukaryotic organisms, including human cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

BU scientists find electrostimulation can improve working memory in people
(Boston University) In a groundbreaking study published in Nature Neuroscience, Boston University researchers demonstrate that electrostimulation can improve the working memory of people in their 70s so that their performance on memory tasks is indistinguishable from that of 20-year-olds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU Study Of NFL Players ’ Brains Might Help Diagnose CTE In The Living
CNN) — After examining the brains of former professional football players, researchers might be a step closer to diagnosing the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the living, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers utilized PET imaging to find tau, an abnormal protein that’s a signature indicator of CTE, using a radioactive drug or tracer called flortaucipir. The researchers imaged the brains of 26 living former football players and compared them with the brains of 31 people with no history of traumatic brain injury. (WBZ-TV) Th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN CTE Source Type: news

Experimental PET scan detects abnormal tau protein in brains of living former NFL players
(Boston University School of Medicine) Using an experimental positron emission tomography (PET) scan, researchers have found elevated amounts of abnormal tau protein in brain regions affected by chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in a small group of living former National Football League (NFL) players with cognitive, mood and behavior symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New method for evaluating cancer risk of chemicals is quick, precise, inexpensive
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University Schools of Medicine (BUSM) and Public Health have developed and evaluated a fast, accurate and cost-effective approach to assessing the carcinogenicity of chemicals -- that is, whether exposure to a chemical increases a person's long-term cancer risk. As a result, they have generated one of the largest toxicogenomics datasets to date, and have made the data and results publicly accessible through a web portal at carcinogenome.org. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mind: To Improve Memory, Tune It Like an Orchestra
A noninvasive technique shows promise in improving the working memory of older adults. But, the scientists note, “ Do not try this at home! ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Brain Age, Chronological Dementia Memory Boston University Nature Neuroscience (Journal) University of California, San Diego University of Pennsylvania Kahana, Michael J Source Type: news

Alzheimer's disease could be treated by zapping patients' brains
The Boston University breakthrough could lead to people wearing skull caps or gaming style headset devices to treat a host of neurological disorders - from dementia to autism. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Postdoctoral researcher launches Community Noise Lab at Boston University
(Boston University School of Medicine) Dr. Erica Walker, a postdoctoral researcher at Boston University School of Public Health's Department of Environmental Health, has launched Community Noise Lab, an interdisciplinary research lab that will explore the relationship between community noise and health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers determine how a major tumor suppressor pathway becomes deactivated
(Boston University School of Medicine) The Hippo pathway is an important biological tumor suppressor program that controls cell growth and organ size in humans. Cancer cells have been found to frequently deactivate Hippo signaling in order to achieve increased cell growth and become more aggressive. However, how the Hippo pathway becomes deregulated in human cancers is still poorly understood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BU finds Medicare Advantage networks are broad and getting broader
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that networks in Medicare Advantage -- a private plan alternative to traditional Medicare -- are relatively broad and may be getting broader. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HIV infection increases the risk of death associated with depressive symptoms
(Boston University School of Medicine) In a new study to investigate the relationship among depressive disorders or symptoms, HIV status and mortality, researchers report that symptoms of depression are moderately associated with death among veterans with HIV but not among those without HIV infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poor oral health may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer among African American women
(Boston University School of Medicine) African American women with poor oral health may be more likely to get pancreatic cancer (PC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researchers discover therapeutic target of melanoma
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have identified a biomarker and a possible new therapy for melanoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify gene variant associated with cellular aging
(Boston University School of Medicine) It is well known that psychiatric stress is associated with accelerated aging. Now, a new study shows that a gene mutation interacts with multiple types of psychiatric stress including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain and sleep disturbances in association with cellular aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inequality In Retirement Is Getting Worse
“A long, healthy, and prosperous old age is the ultimate reward of economic and racial privilege,” Boston University professor Deborah Carr writes in her new book. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Teresa Ghilarducci, Contributor Source Type: news

BU medical students win national award for eliminating transportation barriers for patients
(Boston University School of Medicine) Two medical students from Boston University School of Medicine have received the Lancet Global Health Award for Best Student Poster for their presentation, 'Uber Health: A Novel Method of Eliminating Transportation Barriers To Care Among Urban OBGYN Refugee Women.' The award was presented at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Current training of physicians to care for LGBTQ individuals is falling short
(Boston University School of Medicine) Not enough is being done to prepare physicians to care for the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients. Better physician training on their unique clinical needs may eliminate many of the health disparities among this growing segment of the population according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Consumer products and medical device development challenges differ – so should teams
[Image from ICS]Stephanie Van Ness, Integrated Computer Solutions (ICS) Today’s consumers have steep expectations. They want products that solve their immediate problems. But they also want new and innovative products that make their lives easier or better in some way, setting the bar ever-higher for manufacturers. As a result, product development is trickier than ever. And, if we’re talking product development in the medical device arena, where one poorly designed device can spell disaster for both user and manufacturer, the challenges (and risks) are off the charts. One way manufacturers of consumer products...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog ICS Source Type: news

BU: Central American kidney disease epidemic linked to occupational heat exposure
(Boston University School of Medicine) For two decades, Nicaragua and El Salvador have seen increasing mortality from an unusual form of chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN). The disease has disproportionately affected sugarcane and other agricultural workers, and appears to be unrelated to traditional kidney disease risk factors such as diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Family of Olympic cyclist Kelly Catlin, 23, donate her brain for concussion research 
The family of Kelly Catlin, 23, who committed suicide last week in California, have donated her brain to the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation Brain Bank. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU researchers develop 'acoustic metamaterial' that cancels sound
(Boston University) Boston University researchers, Xin Zhang, a professor at the College of Engineering, and Ghaffarivardavagh, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, released a paper in Physical Review demonstrating it's possible to silence noise using an open, ringlike structure, created to mathematically perfect specifications, for cutting out sounds while maintaining airflow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

BU medical students win award for video on preventing falls from operating room tables
(Boston University School of Medicine) Two fourth-year medical students from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have been honored with the 'Best Instructional Exhibit Award' for their scientific presentation, Falls From An Operating Room Table: A Patient Safety Educational Tool. The award was presented at the 72nd Post-Graduate Assembly in Anesthesiology in New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU conducts first experimental evaluation of pharmaceutical industry-led access program
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers is the first to use a randomized trial design to generate rigorous evidence on the impact of a pharmaceutical industry-led medicines access program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposure to trauma impacts ability to squash bad memories
(Boston University School of Medicine) People exposed to trauma are less able to suppress unwanted emotional memories due to neural and behavioral disruptions in their brain that may contribute to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher receives grant to study how PTSD may accelerate aging
(Boston University School of Medicine) Erika J. Wolf, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine, has been awarded a two-year, $346,000 R21 grant from the National Institute on Aging to study post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related accelerated cellular aging in post-mortem brain tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fast Food Is Worse For You Than It Was 30 Years Ago
BOSTON (CBS) – You may see healthier options on fast food menus these days, but according to researchers at Boston University and Tufts University, fast food, in general, is worse for you than it was 30 years ago. They looked at 10 popular fast food joints like McDonald’s, KFC and Dairy Queen and found that the entrees, the sides and the desserts have many more calories and sodium than back in the 1980s and the portion sizes have grown significantly. While the variety has sky-rocketed, newer items tend to be less nutritious than the classics. They found that an entree plus side is an average of 770 calories &nd...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Fast Food Source Type: news

BU awarded NIH grant to support student research
(Boston University School of Medicine) Boston University School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $482,400 T35 grant from the National Institutes of Health to bolster the development of physician-scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news