BU awarded NIH grant to support student research
(Boston University School of Medicine) Boston University School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $482,400 T35 grant from the National Institutes of Health to bolster the development of physician-scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Possible pathway to new therapy for Alzheimer's disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have uncovered an enzyme and a biochemical pathway they believe may lead to the identification of drugs that could inhibit the production of beta-amyloid protein, the toxic initiator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New open-source bioinformatics tool identifies factors responsible for diseases
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have developed and tested a new computational tool, Candidate Driver Analysis (CaDrA), which will search for combinations of factors that are likely to cause a specific disease. CaDrA recognizes that diseases are complex and likely induced by multiple causes. It is now available free to members of the research community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can prenatal exposures to BPA impact ovarian function?
(Boston University School of Medicine) While previous studies have shown the adverse health effects of prenatal exposure to the industrial chemical bisphenol A (BPA), there is little evidence surrounding effects specifically on ovarian function. A new study now finds there is sufficient data to raise concerns regarding exposure and ovarian performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Balloon-guided catheters provide better blood flow following stroke interventions
(Boston University School of Medicine) Patients who have experienced a stroke as a result of blockages of the arteries in the brain have better outcomes with the use of balloon-guided catheter surgery as compared to having a conventional guided catheter procedure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens who use ecigarettes are FOUR TIMES more likely to take up tobacco smoking than teens who don't
The Boston University School of Public Health study looked at data on 6,123 teens from 2013 to 2016. They found a clear link between smoking e-cigarettes and tobacco products. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Survivors of a firearm injury at risk for subsequent hospitalizations
(Boston University School of Medicine) Ten percent of firearm injury survivors will be readmitted to the hospital for further treatment within 90 days of their original injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover method to 'turn off' mutated melanoma
(Boston University School of Medicine) Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and notorious for its resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Approximately 25 percent of melanoma is driven by oncogenic mutations in the NRAS gene, making it a very attractive therapeutic target. However, despite decades of research, no effective therapies targeting NRAS have been forthcoming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 31, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Searching for human remains: Study suggests methodology to improve results
(Boston University School of Medicine) In an effort to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of law enforcement searches for human remains in the wild, searchers should cover the same area twice from two different angles and work no more than 1 to 2 meters apart while exploring the area (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Program allows ordinary digital camera to see round corners
Scientists say computational periscopy program works out hidden scene in under a minuteScience may never tell us what lies round the next corner, but researchers have come up with the nearest thing: a computer program that turns a normal digital camera into a periscope.In a demonstration of “computational periscopy” a US team at Boston University showed they could see details of objects hidden from view by analysing shadows they cast on a nearby wall.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Technology World news Photography Source Type: news

Focusing on usability can limit medical device recalls: Here ’ s how
By Stephanie Van Ness and Rex Palmer of Boston UX Building great software has always been challenging. Building software that safeguards patients while flawlessly controlling sensitive embedded and connected medical devices — from room-sized proton radiation systems to portable automatic external defibrillators (AED) — magnifies the challenge. It should be no surprise that design issues cause many device recalls. So how do you mitigate potential problems when designing a medical device user interface (UI)? Begin with a strong focus on usability. The importance of usability According to ...
Source: Mass Device - January 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog Boston UX Source Type: news

Teenage suicide rate are highest in states where gun ownership is too
Nothing predicts higher rates of teen and adolescent suicide in the US than the prevalence of guns in that state, a first-of-its-kind Boston University study revealed, as death rates soar. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU: US youth suicides more prevalent in states with higher gun ownership
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that states with higher levels of household gun ownership also have higher overall youth suicide rates, with every 10 percentage-point increase in household gun ownership associated with a 26.9 percent increase in the youth suicide rate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU finds high-risk drinking common in South Africa
(Boston University School of Medicine) Adults in South Africa consume more alcohol than adults in most other countries; previous research has shown this comes with high rates of fetal alcohol syndrome and is a driver of the country's leading causes of death: sexually transmitted infections and interpersonal violence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU's service-learning initiative to teach hands-only CPR to high school students is successful
(Boston University School of Medicine) PumpStart, a community service-learning program created by students at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), that teaches hands-only CPR to the general public, is effective for both teaching high school students a life-saving skill and providing medical students with an opportunity to engage in public health and medical education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘I Just Have to Sit Here and Twiddle My Thumbs.’ Scientists Face Delays and Uncertainty As Government Shutdown Continues
As far as Douglas Holmes knows, he has to submit a research proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF) on Monday. But as the partial government shutdown nears its two-week mark, leaving the NSF and other government agencies dark, Holmes, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Boston University who wants to study soft robots that would help surgeons perform minimally invasive procedures, has more on his mind than research. “Time typically spent refining the science of the proposal is now spent wondering about deadlines, submission protocol and technicalities,” Holmes says. “The proposal...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

‘I Just Have to Sit Here and Twiddle My Thumbs.’ Scientists Face Delays and Uncertainty As Government Shutdown Continues
As far as Douglas Holmes knows, he has to submit a research proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF) on Monday. But as the partial government shutdown nears its two-week mark, leaving the NSF and other government agencies dark, Holmes, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Boston University who wants to study soft robots that would help surgeons perform minimally invasive procedures, has more on his mind than research. “Time typically spent refining the science of the proposal is now spent wondering about deadlines, submission protocol and technicalities,” Holmes says. “The proposal...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

Archeological discovery yields clues to how our ancestors may have adapted to their environment
(Boston University School of Medicine) During the Stone Age ancestral humans lived with a variety of animal species along what was an area of wetlands in the middle of the Jordanian desert. The site, in the town of Azraq Basin, has been excavated and has revealed an abundance of tools and animal bones from up to 250,000 years ago, leading to better understanding of how ancestral humans have adapted to this changing environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Field Test Discerns Between Ebola and Lookalike Fevers
At the close of the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola crisis, the Paul G. Allen Foundation identified diagnostic gaps as one of the major deficiencies that had contributed to the outbreak’s spread. “The standard diagnostic tests that exist are very good, but they’re hard to do out in the field in the middle of an outbreak like we saw in West Africa,” said John Connor, a virologist at the Boston University National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory (NEIDL). Instead, samples need to be sent to a facility capable of running the tests, which means it could...
Source: MDDI - December 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Relationship impairments hinder men seeking mental health treatment
(Boston University School of Medicine) Relationship impairment (difficulty managing expectations and requirements within an intimate relationship) plays a role in explaining the association between symptom severity and those seeking treatment among post-9/11 military veterans. However, the role it plays is different for men and women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover unique immune cell likely drives chronic inflammation
(Boston University School of Medicine) For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who are responding well to drugs (anti-retrovirals). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Alzheimer's is NOT one disease': Scientists group the memory-robbing disorder into six categories
The study involved 18 researchers from several institutions, including Boston University School of Medicine and the Virginia Puget Sound Health Care System. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Black Americans Lose Twice As Many Years of Life to Guns As White Americans Do, Study Says
Firearms are responsible for a more than four-year loss of life expectancy among black Americans — roughly double the firearm-related loss seen among white Americans, according to a new study published in BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine. According to recent federal data, the average American in 2017 could expect to live until age 78.6, a slight decline from recent years’ estimates. But death rates vary widely depending on demographic, that report showed. The death rate among black men, for example, was calculated at around 1,083 deaths per 100,000 people, compared to about 885 for white men, 728 for black women and...
Source: TIME: Health - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

A molecular look at nascent HDL formation
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at Boston University pin down a molecular interaction between an apolipoprotein and a lipid transporter that's key to reverse cholesterol transport. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Superfund Wetterhahn Award goes to Stephanie Kim
Stephanie Kim of Boston University received the 2018 Karen Wetterhahn Memorial Award during the Superfund Research Program annual meeting. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - December 5, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Black Americans' life expectancy decreasing due to firearms
(Boston University School of Medicine) While it is well known that gun deaths are a major public health problem, a new study quantifies the significance of substantially higher gun homicide rates in driving down life expectancy among black Americans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU study: Modified malaria drug proven effective at inhibiting Ebola
(Boston University) Robert Davey, professor of microbiology at Boston University School of Medicine and researcher at Boston University's National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL), discovered that certain derivatives of amodiaquine, a medication typically used to treat malaria, could provide a new therapeutic approach to treating patients infected with Ebola virus disease by blocking the viruses from entering cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Teens With Autism Educate Future Doctors At Boston University
BOSTON (CBS) – It’s a unique medical school class designed to increase awareness of patients with autism and other intellectual disabilities. And today’s teachers were two teenagers, both on the autism spectrum. “I’m 13 years old. I’m in eighth grade. I really, really like otters, and I have ADHD and a tiny bit of autism,” says Hana. She and her 15-year-old sister Helen have come to a Boston University Medical School classroom to talk with third year students. Both girls are on the autism spectrum, and are ready for any and all questions. “Anything! I’m not going to ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Autism Boston University School Of Medicine Paula Ebben Source Type: news

Doctors Slam NRA ’s Directive to ‘Stay in Their Lane’ After Chicago Hospital Shooting
After a shooting at Mercy Hospital in Chicago killed three people, including two hospital workers, doctors across the country are continuing to speak out against gun violence — and they’re pushing back on the National Rifle Association’s (NRA) admonition that they should “stay in their lane.” Earlier this month, the NRA responded to an Annals of Internal Medicine position paper on the urgency of reducing firearm fatalities with a tweet directing “self-important anti-gun doctors” to “stay in their lane.” The backlash from the medical community was swift and strong, with ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Here's More Evidence Obesity Can Shorten Your Life
Being statistically obese, but not simply overweight, was tied to a 27 percent increase in the odds of dying within the study period, according to new research from Boston University. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU faculty honored with achievement awards from the American Academy of Ophthalmology
(Boston University School of Medicine) The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) honored two members of the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) faculty with awards during its annual meeting last week. Stephen Christiansen, M.D., chairman of ophthalmology, received a Senior Achievement Award, while Babak Eliassi-Rad, M.D., assistant professor of ophthalmology, received an Achievement Award. Both awards recognize significant scholarly work, teaching and committee contributions to the Academy. The Senior Achievement Award honors those members with at least ten years of noteworthy contributions. (Source: EurekAlert! ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Twitter users spreading sexual violence prevention strategies
(Boston University School of Medicine) In the wake of #MeToo, the hashtag #HowIWillChange asked men to come forward on Twitter to discuss ways in which they would change their own behavior to prevent sexual violence and mitigate harm for victims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why some people get CTE may be in their genes
Scientists have zeroed in our genetic code to better determine why some people develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the Alzheimer's-like disease associated with repeated hits to the head. In a new study, researchers at Boston University's CTE Center say that a variant of the gene TMEM106B may influence why some people experience more severe forms of the disease than others. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - November 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic risk factor for CTE detected
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have identified a genetic variation that may influence chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) disease severity.TMEM106B is one of the first genes to be implicated in CTE. It may partially explain why some athletes present with severe CTE symptoms while others are less affected despite similar levels of head trauma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are E-Cigarettes Safe? Here ’s What the Science Says
In 1965, when Herbert Gilbert was granted the first patent on a smoke- and tobacco-­free cigarette, he wrote that the product would “provide a safe and harmless means for and method of smoking.” More than 60 years later, however, modern iterations of Gilbert’s invention have sparked debate in the public-health community. E-cigarettes, which have grown increasingly popular in the past five years, were designed as a tool to help people quit ­smoking—and by doing so they should drastically reduce rates of lung cancer and other diseases. But the question is, does that potential outweigh their po...
Source: TIME: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Pain sensitization increases risk of persistent knee pain
(Boston University School of Medicine) Becoming more sensitive to pain, or pain sensitization, is an important risk factor for developing persistent knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA), according to a new study by researchers from the Universit é de Montr é al (UdeM) School of Rehabilitation and H ô pital Maisonneuve Rosemont Research Centre (CRHMR) in collaboration with researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spanish-speakers experience barriers when receiving dense breast notifications
(Boston University School of Medicine) Spanish-speaking women encounter unique challenges when receiving notifications regarding their mammogram results and breast density. The findings, which appear in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, are an example of the unintended consequences some new health policies can have on specific populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Big data, digital tools are great, but building their ecosystem is'where the rubber meets the road ’
Speaking at the Big Data& Healthcare Analytics Forum in Boston, University of Texas System's Dr. Lynda Chin stressed the importance of connecting new technologies in addressing healthcare's failings.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Why some with the 'Alzheimer's gene' do NOT develop the disease
The ApoE4 gene increases the risk of Alzheimer's, but has also been detected in people who never develop neurodegenerative disease. Boston University has a theory as to why. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaping increases risk of surgery complications
E-cigarettes strip out the combustible chemicals of tobacco, but a new study by Boston University shows vapes have the same effect, hampering the process where injured flaps of skin join together. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Self-lubricating condoms will reduce STIs by being 'more appealing'
Researchers from Boston University have created a condom (pictured) that secretes a lubricant when it comes into contact with bodily fluids. This avoids couples having to apply messy lube. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Self-lubricating condoms will reduce STIs by making contraception 'more appealing'
Researchers from Boston University have created a condom (pictured) that secretes a lubricant when it comes into contact with bodily fluids. This avoids couples having to apply messy lube. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simple, cost effective treatment following failed back surgery shows promise
(Boston University School of Medicine) Failed back surgery (continued low back and leg pain after surgery) is relatively common. With each reoperation, success, as defined by pain reduction, becomes less likely and most patients do not improve. However, preliminary studies using a simple procedure to remove scar tissue or adhesions suggests a new treatment could help those with post-surgical, chronic low back pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Work-life stress slashes a woman’s chance of becoming pregnant by 25%
A study by Boston University of almost 5,000 women trying for a baby found those who reported feeling the most pressure from commitments were 25 percent less likely to conceive. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU researchers define possible molecular pathway for neurodegeneration in prion diseases
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study has shed light on the mechanisms underlying the progression of prion diseases and identified a potential target for treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Media invited to NSF for distinguished lecture with Boston University’s Michael Dietze
Is nature predictable? If so, how can we better manage and conserve ecosystems? Near-term ecological forecasting is an emerging interdisciplinary research area that aims to improve researchers' ability to predict ecological processes on timescales that can be validated and updated. The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Biological Sciences invites media and members of the public to a distinguished lecture series with Michael Dietze of Boston University. An ecologist ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=296646&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Significant disparities in college student mental health treatment across race/ethnicity
(Boston University School of Medicine) The first nationally representative study since the 1990s to examine mental health among college students of color, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, shows significant disparities in treatment across race/ethnicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More Baby Boomers Turning To Marijuana, Study Says
(CNN) — Older Americans are increasingly passing the pipe. About 9% of US adults between the ages of 50 and 64 have used marijuana at least once during the survey year, while 3% of those over 65 have done so, new research finds. For middle-age adults, the percentage of cannabis users has doubled over nearly a decade, according to the study, published Thursday in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Older adults have seen a seven-fold increase in that period. Though marijuana use is increasing among older Americans, “most of these people are not first-time users,” said Joseph Palamar, senior stu...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Marijuana talkers Source Type: news

Mouse models may not accurately mimic severity of gonorrhea infection
(Boston University School of Medicine) The mouse model may not fully reflect the severity of the infection and the types of immune responses seen in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news