Adequate levels of vitamin D reduces complications, death among COVID-19 patients
(Boston University School of Medicine) Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were vitamin D sufficient, with a blood level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D of at least 30 ng/mL (a measure of vitamin D status), had a significant decreased risk for adverse clinical outcomes including becoming unconscious, hypoxia (body starved for oxygen) and death. In addition, they had lower blood levels of an inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein) and higher blood levels of lymphocytes (a type of immune cell to help fight infection). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 25, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

‘How Am I Going To Make It?’ Months of Eviction Uncertainty Are Taking a Toll on Millions of Families
Nine months into the COVID-19 pandemic, Marlenis Zambrano is out of money. A 48-year-old single mother in Virginia, she tried her best to get by after being furloughed from her Defense Department daycare job in March by selling homemade face masks and empanadas to help support her two dependent children, both in college. She twice applied for housing relief from Arlington County, but was denied because, at the time, she had $5,000 in savings intended for her daughter’s tuition. With that money long gone, Zambrano is living off her credit card, racking up $5,000 in charges to pay for her Arlington, Virginia apartment....
Source: TIME: Health - September 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

BU researchers discover how COVID-19 may trigger fatal levels of lung inflammation
(Boston University School of Medicine) Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, requires models that can duplicate disease development in humans, identify potential targets and enable drug testing. Specifically, access to primary human lung in vitro model systems is a priority since a variety of respiratory epithelial cells are the proposed targets of viral entry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A scientific advance in studying early-stage lung cancer
(Boston Children's Hospital) Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer in the US. It is often missed in its earlier stages, and while recent imaging advances have enabled earlier detection, there are still no targeted treatments for early-stage lung cancers. New research from Boston Children's Hospital, in collaboration with Boston University and UCLA, provides an accelerated platform for identifying and testing potential treatments: 'organoids' created from lung cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 15, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Boston University researchers to develop new breast tumor models
(Boston University School of Medicine) Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers Gerald Denis, PhD, Andrew Emili, PhD, and Stefano Monti, PhD, together with Beth Israel Deaconess/Harvard Medical School researcher Senthil Muthuswamy, PhD, have been awarded a five-year, $2.5 million National Cancer Institute UO1 grant to develop and analyze breast tumor organoids (models). Specifically, the award will support their project: Multiscale analysis of metabolic inflammation as a driver of breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BU researchers awarded NIH grant to create new framingham heart study brain aging program
(Boston University School of Medicine) Since 1976, the Framingham Heart Study (FHS)--the longest running multi-generational epidemiological study in the world--has followed participants for incident dementia. The findings have helped to analyze the differences between normal, age-related changes in thinking and disease-related pathological alterations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In Brazil, homicides are decreasing in big cities, increasing in smaller towns: BU study
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study maps changes in homicide rates across Brazil from 2000 through 2014. Published in the journal Injury Epidemiology, the research shows the success of anti-violence efforts in major urban areas such as S ã o Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Espirito Santo, but the explosion of homicides in fast-developing northeastern areas is a warning for other countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Why people with knee osteoarthritis experience different kinds of pain
This study has identified for the first time a potential underlying mechanism in the nervous system responsible for why people experience varying pain patterns with knee osteoarthritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of Americans with depression symptoms TRIPLED amid the pandemic, study finds 
A new study from Boston University found before the COVID-19 pandemic, 8.5% of participants reported depression symptoms compared to 27.8% during the pandemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dementia May Contribute to More Deaths Than Previously Thought
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2020 -- The U.S. mortality burden associated with dementia may be underestimated by vital statistics, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in JAMA Neurology. Andrew C. Stokes, Ph.D., from the Boston University School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 2, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

COVID has likely tripled depression rate: BU study
(Boston University School of Medicine) A first-of-its-kind study from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) finds 27.8% of U.S. adults had depression symptoms as of mid-April, compared to 8.5% before the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mobile e-shredding may pose risks for workers: bu study
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new Boston University School of Public Health study published in Annals of Work Exposure and Health is the first to evaluate the exposures faced by workers in mobile e-shredding, a new service to securely destroy hard drives, laptops, and other electronics containing confidential information on site. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 Epidemiologists and Infectious Disease Experts On Whether They Are Sending Their Kids Back to School
There are no easy answers to the questions about bringing kids back into classrooms this fall. Parents, school administrators and educators must instead weigh two bad options: isolate children at home or risk them getting and spreading COVID-19 through in-person contact. That decision is daunting even for infectious disease experts and epidemiologists. Over the last few months, they have been forced to think about the pandemic not only as scientists and scholars, but as parents, and despite their wealth of knowledge, like any parents, these experts are grappling with uncertainty. There are ways to limit the spread of the C...
Source: TIME: Health - August 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

MHC class II transactivator CIITA induces cell resistance to Ebola Virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
(Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason) Discoveries from the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason (BRI) have identified a new cellular protection pathway that targets a common vulnerability in several different pandemic viruses, and collaborators at Case Western Reserve University, Boston University School of Medicine and MRIGlobal have shown that this pathway can protect cells from infection by Ebola virus and coronaviruses, like SARS-CoV-2. Published today in Science, these new findings provide a better understanding of cellular mechanisms involved in viral resistance that can inform future treatments an...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Somerville, Medford Residents Protest Reopening Plan Outside Tufts President ’ s Home
MEDFORD (CBS) – A small group of community members from Somerville and Medford held a protest outside the Tufts University president’s house Wednesday over the school’s plan to bring students back to campus and hold classes in person. Protesters are concerned an influx of students will put surrounding communities at risk for coronavirus. “This is another example where Tufts administration does not care about the community around them and that they continue to make plans that could adversly affect our community and cause our residents to die,” said Marianne Walles, co-chair of Our Revolution Wo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health schools Syndicated Local Coronavirus Medford News Somerville News Tufts University Source Type: news

Somerville, Medford Residents To Protest Reopening Plan Outside Tufts President ’ s Home
BOSTON (CBS) – Community members from both Somerville and Medford are planning to protest outside the Tufts University president’s house Wednesday morning over the school’s plan to bring students back to campus and hold classes in person. Protesters are concerned an influx of students will put surrounding communities at risk for coronavirus. Earlier this month, the mayors of Somerville and Medford sent a letter to the university asking them to reconsider their reopening plan. But the school moved ahead with their plan to stagger arrival times and test students when they get to campus.. Students will also ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health schools Syndicated Local Coronavirus Medford News Somerville News Tufts University Source Type: news

Students Arrive At BU Looking To Balance College Experience With Coronavirus Safety
BOSTON (CBS) – Amid the backdrop of vastly improved overall coronavirus metrics – but with the stubborn threat of a resurgence still real – some students at Boston University are moving into their dorms this weekend. The influx of college students from around the country is adding to the anxiety of Massachusetts health officials – not to mention the parents of those students. Saturday began college move-in day at BU as students and their families get ready for a year where the unusual is now the new normal. Move-in day at Boston University. (WBZ-TV) Classmates are hoping to soak in at least some of ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Events Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Boston University Coronavirus Jim Smith Source Type: news

Boston University researcher receives grant to fight melanoma
(Boston University School of Medicine) Deborah Lang, MD, associate professor of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has been awarded a two-year, $250,000 grant from the Harry J. Lloyd Charitable Trust to further her basic science research on the molecular and cellular biology of melanoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research suggests combating a pandemic is 500 times more expensive than preventing one
(Boston University) BU biologist and peers find investing in wildlife monitoring and deforestation could prevent costly pandemics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medicaid-covered mothers have less say in birthing experience: BU study
(Boston University School of Medicine) Giving birth in the United States is a radically different experience based on race and income, illustrated most brutally by the Black and Indigenous maternal mortality crisis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU national survey of gun owners: Majority favor gun violence prevention policies
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study sheds new light on the opinions and practices of U.S. gun owners, casting doubt on the way gun owners have been portrayed in policy discussions and media, and even how they perceive themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Higher Legal Age for Handgun Sales Tied to Fewer Teen Suicides
FRIDAY, July 24, 2020 -- Raising the age of handgun sales from 18 to 21 years may reduce deaths from suicide among 18- to 20-year-olds, according to a study published online July 22 in The BMJ. Julia Raifman, Sc.D., from the Boston University School... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 24, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Racial discrimination may adversely impact cognition in African Americans
(Boston University School of Medicine) Experiences of racism are associated with lower subjective cognitive function (SCF) among African-American women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genes and cardiovascular health both affect dementia risk: BU study
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) study finds that genes and cardiovascular health can both raise or lower risk of dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers identify possible drug target for prostate cancer
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that the protein BRD4 could be an important new target to prevent castration-resistant prostate cancer metastases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Coronavirus Outbreaks Linked to Fraternity Houses are a Warning for College Campuses
Recent coronavirus outbreaks have been linked to fraternities at universities in Washington, California and Mississippi, and experts say it’s an example of what’s to come as many colleges reopen for in-person classes beginning in August. At least 136 fraternity house residents and nine other students at the University of Washington in Seattle had tested positive for COVID-19 as of July 10 in what officials called a “Greek Row outbreak.” It “provides lessons for students as they consider their return to campus this fall,” said Dr. Geoffrey Gottlieb, chair of the university’s Advisor...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Education Source Type: news

BU researcher outlines coronavirus media failures, harms, and recommendations
(Boston University School of Medicine) In a new JAMA editorial, a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher and a health research journalist outline common ways that media, governments, and industry and academic public relations press releases have incompletely and misleadingly reported coronavirus research, and how they can do better. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Largest study of prostate cancer genomics in Black Americans ids targets for therapies
(University of California - San Francisco) Black men in the United States are known to suffer disproportionately from prostate cancer, but few studies have investigated whether genetic differences in prostate tumors could have anything to do with these health disparities. Now, in the largest study of its kind to date, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), UC San Francisco (UCSF), and Northwestern University have identified genes that are more frequently altered in prostate tumors from men of African ancestry compared to other racial groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researchers: 'Gun culture 3.0' is missing link to understand US gun culture
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in the Nature journal Humanities& Social Sciences Communications, shows that gun ownership means very different things in different parts of the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research uncovers COVID-19's impact on college student mental health and well-being
(Boston University) In college students, COVID-19 has increased depression rate and raised new barriers to mental healthcare. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study outlines best practices for delivering care via telehealth
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers describe how the SAMHSA-developed principles of trauma-informed care can be used during telehealth encounters in primary care and other specialties to help mitigate the isolating, traumatic effects of COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A memory game could help us understand brain injury
(Boston University) A Boston University team created a memory game for mice in order to examine the function of two different brain areas that process information about the sensation of touch and the memory of previous events. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Remdesivir can save more lives where ICUs are overwhelmed
Amid news that the United States has bought up virtually the entire global supply of remdesivir, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study outlines how the drug could save lives in countries with less hospital capacity, such as South Africa, where COVID-19 is beginning to overwhelm intensive care units (ICUs). (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - July 7, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Remdesivir can save more lives where ICUs are overwhelmed: BU study
(Boston University School of Medicine) Amid news that the United States has bought up virtually the entire global supply of remdesivir, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study outlines how the drug could save lives in countries with less hospital capacity, such as South Africa, where COVID-19 is beginning to overwhelm intensive care units (ICUs). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 7, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU researchers design artificial genes to sense cellular responses to drugs
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have developed and implemented a new way to better understand how human cells communicate with each other, how this communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU study: Nearly half of US youth have been stalked/harassed by partners
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new, first-of-its-kind Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that 48% of 12-18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
(Boston University School of Medicine) The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study points to a previously-unidentified factor widening the racial health gap: high deductible health plans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers attempt new treatment approach for blood cancer
(Boston University School of Medicine) In an effort to improve the survival of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, a type of leukemia, researchers inhibited a specific protein (alpha5beta1 integrin) to decrease the number of large bone marrow cells (megakaryocytes) in an experimental model. An increase in megakaryocyte numbers is thought to be the cause of many problems observed in this disease. This type of treatment approach has never been attempted before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heat may kill more people in US than previously reported: BU and UBC study
(Boston University School of Medicine) As temperatures rise this summer, a new study by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and the University of British Columbia School of Population and Public Health (UBC SPPH) researchers finds that thousands of U.S. deaths may be attributable to heat each year, far more than the 600 deaths previously estimated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research shows tiny, decoy 'sponges' attract coronavirus away from lung cells
(Boston University) New nanotechnology tested at BU's NEIDL stops SARS-CoV-2 from infecting cells and replicating. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanosponges could intercept coronavirus infection
Nanoparticles cloaked in human lung cell membranes and human immune cell membranes can attract and neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, causing the virus to lose its ability to hijack host cells and reproduce. The first data describing this new direction for fighting COVID-19 were published on June 17 in the journal Nano Letters. The "nanosponges" were developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego and tested by researchers at Boston University. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 17, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice in Preschool Years Tied to Healthy Diet Later
TUESDAY, June 16, 2020 -- Drinking 100 percent fruit juice during the preschool years is associated with better diet quality in adolescence, according to a study recently published in BMC Nutrition. Li Wan, from the Boston University School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Events Like Trump Rally Are ‘Perfect Storm’ for Viral Spread, Experts Say
Social gatherings and campaign rallies like those planned by President Trump could spread infections this summer. People should wear masks and continue social distancing, public health researchers say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pam Belluck Tags: States (US) Coronavirus Reopenings Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Masks Fox News Channel National Broadcasting Co University of Minnesota Boston University Osterholm, Michael T your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

BU study: Alcohol taxes have never been lower
(Boston University School of Medicine) Inflation has reduced American alcohol tax rates by 70% since 1933, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trump Rally Is the ‘Perfect Storm Setup,’ for Viral Spread, Disease Expert Says
Campaign rallies like those planned by Trump and other social gatherings could spread infections this summer. People should adhere to wearing masks and continue social distancing, public health researchers say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pam Belluck Tags: States (US) Coronavirus Reopenings Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Masks Fox News Channel National Broadcasting Co University of Minnesota Boston University Osterholm, Michael T your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Coronavirus May Have Been Spreading In China Last August, Harvard Research Suggests
Researchers from Harvard and Boston University looked at online search data and hospital parking lot satellite imagery to detect potential signs that the virus was present in China months before it was detected. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 9, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Isabel Togoh, Forbes Staff Tags: Business /business Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Editors' Pick editors-pick Breaking breaking-news Coronavirus Source Type: news

Coronavirus may have been in Wuhan in August, study suggests
Research finds rise in hospital car park usage and web searches for ‘diarrhoea’ and ‘cough’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCoronavirus may have been present and spreading in Wuhan as early as August last year, according to a study that analysed satellite imagery of car parks outside major hospitals and search engine data.Thestudy, by researchers from Harvard Medical School, Boston University of Public Health and Boston children ’s hospital, looked at images captured between January 2018 and April 2020 and found a “steep increase” in vehicle counts ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lily Kuo in Beijing Tags: Coronavirus outbreak China Medical research Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

New study finds drinking fruit juice in early years can have long term dietary benefits
(Kellen Communications - NY) A new study from Boston University found that drinking 100% fruit juice early in life was associated with healthier dietary patterns in later childhood without adversely impacting weight gain. The study found that consumption of 100% fruit juice during the preschool years was associated with higher intakes of whole fruit and total fruit as well as better diet quality through childhood and into middle adolescence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher: Screening for drug use can be reasonable, but not evidence-based
(Boston University School of Medicine) In the June 9 issue of JAMA, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians screen for unhealthy drug use (that is, any use of drugs that are illegal or medications not used for medical purposes) for all adult patients, but admits that there is still little evidence weighing the benefits and risks of this practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bat Ecologist Thomas Kunz Dies
The Boston University professor, who died of complications related to COVID-19, spent more than 40 years researching the lives of bats. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 5, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news