BU researchers define possible molecular pathway for neurodegeneration in prion diseases
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study has shed light on the mechanisms underlying the progression of prion diseases and identified a potential target for treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Media invited to NSF for distinguished lecture with Boston University’s Michael Dietze
Is nature predictable? If so, how can we better manage and conserve ecosystems? Near-term ecological forecasting is an emerging interdisciplinary research area that aims to improve researchers' ability to predict ecological processes on timescales that can be validated and updated. The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Biological Sciences invites media and members of the public to a distinguished lecture series with Michael Dietze of Boston University. An ecologist ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=296646&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Significant disparities in college student mental health treatment across race/ethnicity
(Boston University School of Medicine) The first nationally representative study since the 1990s to examine mental health among college students of color, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, shows significant disparities in treatment across race/ethnicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More Baby Boomers Turning To Marijuana, Study Says
(CNN) — Older Americans are increasingly passing the pipe. About 9% of US adults between the ages of 50 and 64 have used marijuana at least once during the survey year, while 3% of those over 65 have done so, new research finds. For middle-age adults, the percentage of cannabis users has doubled over nearly a decade, according to the study, published Thursday in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Older adults have seen a seven-fold increase in that period. Though marijuana use is increasing among older Americans, “most of these people are not first-time users,” said Joseph Palamar, senior stu...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Marijuana talkers Source Type: news

Mouse models may not accurately mimic severity of gonorrhea infection
(Boston University School of Medicine) The mouse model may not fully reflect the severity of the infection and the types of immune responses seen in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV RNA expression inhibitors may restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals
(Boston University School of Medicine) Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. A new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is Guacamole Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Guacamole has a solid reputation as a crowdpleaser, for sports fans and health nuts alike. Even the Aztecs indulged in ahuaca-mulli, or avocado sauce. But is guacamole good for you? Here’s what the experts say. What’s in guacamole? Guacamole’s main ingredient is avocado, a creamy green fruit full of heart-healthy, easy-to-digest monounsaturated fats. It’s typically mixed with salt and lime juice. Some recipes also call for onion, cilantro, tomato, garlic and spices like cayenne pepper or cumin. “It’s easy to spice up your guacamole by adding in jalapeños, chili peppers and hot sau...
Source: TIME: Health - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Untreated genital warts may increase risk of HIV transmission
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study has shown that genital warts may promote HIV sexual transmission and, in turn, their treatment and prevention could help decrease the spread of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU researcher receives DoD grant to study TBI, military service in AD
(Boston University School of Medicine) BU researcher receives three-year, $1.2 million DoD grant to study impact of TBI and military service on Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU professor receives Presidential Award from the American Psychological Association
(Boston University School of Medicine) Terence M. Keane, PhD, professor of psychiatry and clinical psychology and assistant dean for research at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has received the Presidential Award from the Division of Trauma Psychology at the American Psychological Association (APA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This Habit Will Make You Better At Your Job
Imagine you’re faced with a tricky task at work. What’s your first reaction? If you’re socially minded, perhaps you’d fire off an email or Slack message to a co-worker, hoping to pick their brain. Or if you prefer solitude, maybe you’d shut yourself in a conference room to puzzle through the problem on your own. Either of these strategies could yield good results — but a new study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, says the best strategy may be a blend of the two. “With our smartphones and all of these technologies now, we’re constantly able...
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

National team of researchers identify new genes that may contribute to Alzheimer's disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have discovered new genes that will further current understanding of the genetic risk factors that predispose people to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

That coke could be ruining your chance of getting pregnant: Study concludes that drinking sugary fizzy drinks affect fertility
(Natural News) Drinking soft drinks regularly could affect fertility, an observational study published in the journal Epidemiology suggested. The study revealed that drinking even one sugary drink each day could be enough to lower the chances of having a baby, for both men and women. For the study, researchers from Boston University School of Public... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Peripheral nerve block provides some with long-lasting pain relief for severe facial pain
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study has shown that use of peripheral nerve blocks in the treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) may produce long-term pain relief. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Screening women veterans with fibromyalgia for childhood abuse may improve treatment
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study has shown that women Veterans being treated for fibromyalgia exhibit high rates of childhood abuse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘ Snapchat Dysmorphia ’ : Selfies, Photo Filters Driving People To Plastic Surgery, Doctors Say
BOSTON (CBS News) — Plastic surgeons are sounding the alarm on a disturbing trend that’s emerged with the growing popularity of social media: patients seeking cosmetic surgery to resemble how they see themselves in Snapchat filters. The phenomenon, dubbed “Snapchat dysmorphia,” has people requesting fuller lips, bigger eyes, or a thinner nose in order to look like the filtered or photo-edited versions of themselves. “This is an alarming trend because those filtered selfies often present an unattainable look and are blurring the line of reality and fantasy for these patients,” researchers...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Local TV Plastic Surgery SnapChat Source Type: news

Brigham and Women's Faulkner appoints new president
A top official at Brigham and Women ’s Hospital is set to become the next president of Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital in Jamaica Plain. David McCready will start in the new role on Thursday. He comes from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he served as senior vice president of surgical, procedural and imaging services, facilities and operations. Prior to starting at Brigham and Women’s in 2005, McCready held leadership roles at Boston University Medical Center, PricewaterhouseCoopers… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 6, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

People Are Getting Plastic Surgery to Look Like Snapchat Filters, Doctors Warn
Doctors are raising concerns about a new way social media may be messing with your self-esteem: something called “Snapchat dysmorphia.” An increasing number of patients are seeking out plastic surgery based on what they see in apps like Snapchat and Facetune, according to three dermatologists from the Boston University School of Medicine writing in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery. “A new phenomenon, dubbed ‘Snapchat dysmorphia,’ has patients seeking out cosmetic surgery to look like filtered versions of themselves instead, with fuller lips, bigger eyes, or a thinner nose,” they write. &ldquo...
Source: TIME: Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Boston University lab gets shipment of Ebola, Marburg viruses
Researchers at Boston University ’s infectious disease lab received the first pathogens it's gotten under its new heightened designation: the Ebola and Marburg viruses. The National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories received clearance from the Boston Public Health Commission in December to be upgraded to a Biosafety Leve l 4 facility – the 10th in the country. The designation was years in the making, and came after intense scrutiny by state, city and federal officials, including approval… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 2, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Boston University lab gets shipment of Ebola, Marburg viruses
Researchers at Boston University ’s infectious disease lab received the first pathogens it's gotten under its new heightened designation: the Ebola and Marburg viruses. The National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories received clearance from the Boston Public Health Commission in December to be upgraded to a Biosafety Leve l 4 facility – the 10th in the country. The designation was years in the making, and came after intense scrutiny by state, city and federal officials, including approval… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 2, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Aortic atherosclerotic plaque inflammation may contribute to the progression of fatty liver disease to liver fibrosis
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study sheds light on the long-term effects of highly inflamed plaques on the progression of liver fibrosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Use of VA services impacted by external economic, policy changes
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study has found that use of VA services is affected by economic and policy changes outside the VA, such as Medicaid eligibility, private employer insurance coverage, unemployment and (non-VA) physician availability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New England Organic Egg Farmer Takes On FDA Over What Is ‘ Healthy ’
BOSTON (CBS) — When it comes to healthy eating, many nutritionists will tell you that eggs have gotten a bad rap due to high levels of fat and cholesterol. But “eggs are a fabulous, nutrient-dense food,” says Boston University Nutritionist Joan Salge-Blake. The FDA is not 100% on board, in fact, the agency’s guidelines prohibit eggs from being labeled as healthy because of those fat and cholesterol levels. Eggs (WBZ-TV) Now, a New England Egg farmer is taking on the FDA in an effort to give the egg an image makeover. Jesse LaFlamme of Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs based in New Hampshire, says ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Chris McKinnon Eggs FDA Health News Healthy Local TV Organic Foods Source Type: news

Contact sports associated with Lewy body disease, Parkinson's disease symptoms, dementia
(Boston University School of Medicine) There is mounting evidence that repetitive head impacts from contact sports and other exposures are associated with the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and dementia. A new study suggests that contact sports athletes may also be at increased risk for Lewy Body Disease, which can cause Parkinson's disease, a brain disorder that leads to problems with movement and thinking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher receives NIH award to examine repetitive head injuries in former NFL players
(Boston University School of Medicine) Michael Alosco, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has received a five-year, $793,000 K23 Award from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physicians who visit patients post-hospitalization give more comprehensive discharge plans
(Boston University School of Medicine) (Boston)-- When resident physicians visit the homes of their former hospital patients they are better able to assess patient needs and understand the important role that community services and agencies play in keeping them at home and out of the hospital, according to a new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify characteristics of over the counter skin lightening users
(Boston University School of Medicine) (Boston) -- The desire for unblemished, clear skin permeates all cultures and societies, making the practice of skin lightening to minimize spots and even a skin tone quite common worldwide. Internationally, the use of creams to lighten skin is widespread and widely studied. In the U.S. however, information about use of these creams is sparse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MassDevice co-founder Johnson to lead MassMEDIC
MassDevice co-founder Brian Johnson is set to depart from the publication he founded nearly 10 years ago and take over as president of the Massachusetts Medical Device Industry Council. Johnson will succeed Tom Sommer as president of the regional medical technology association. Sommer has served as MassMEDIC’s president since the group was founded in 1996. The association is the largest regional medtech organization, representing more than 300 members. Since Johnson launched MassDevice.com in 2009 with executive editor Brad Perriello, the site has evolved into the leading online journal of the medtech ...
Source: Mass Device - July 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Business/Financial News MassMEDIC Source Type: news

BU: Almost half of US adults who drink, drink too much, and continue to do so
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers has found that about 40 percent of adults in the United States who drink alcohol do so in amounts that risk health consequences, and identifies a range of factors associated with starting or stopping drinking too much. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New target protein for colon cancer identified
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a new potential target protein (c-Cbl) they believe can help further the understanding of colon cancer and ultimately survival of patients with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Residential segregation associated with black-white disparity in firearm homicide rates
(Boston University School of Medicine) Residential segregation is linked to many racial disparities in health, including cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Now, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers suggests the likelihood of dying from gun violence can be added to the list of adverse health outcomes associated with structural racism in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More studies needed to determine impact of air pollution on gynecologic health
(Boston University School of Medicine) While initial studies suggest a potential relationship between air pollution and both infertility and menstrual irregularity, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine believe more studies are needed to validate these findings in other populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is Hummus Actually Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Hummus, the chickpea-based dip that’s a staple in many Middle Eastern cuisines, is on the rise in the U.S. Multiple factors are fueling its growing popularity, according to the USDA: Hummus is naturally gluten-free, and Americans now have bigger appetites for healthier snacks. But how healthy is hummus? Here’s what the experts say. What is hummus made of? Traditional hummus is made from a blend of chickpeas, olive oil, tahini (sesame paste), lemon juice and spices, and this mix makes for a nutrient-dense food, says Elizabeth G. Matteo, a registered dietitian at Boston University’s Sargent Choice Nutritio...
Source: TIME: Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sophia Gottfried Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

What is the role of the physician when a patient discloses intimate partner violence perpetration?
(Boston University School of Medicine) Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent and has lasting impacts on the health and well-being of the entire family involved. Unfortunately, very little research and guidance about how to address perpetration of IPV in the health care setting, especially among primary care physicians who are in a role to potentially intervene has been available until now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU and Ohio University researchers awarded NIH grant
(Boston University School of Medicine) Noyan Gokce, M.D., professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, has received a four-year, $2.2 million R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health. Gokce, along with his co-principal investigator Vishwajeet Puri, Ph.D., professor at The Diabetes Institute at Ohio University, will investigate the relationship between obesity-induced changes in fat tissue metabolism in human adipose stores (tissue that stores energy in the form of fat) in relations to vascular and cardiometabolic dysfunction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why Some People Have a Crippling Fear of Flying — and How They Can Overcome It
At one point or another, as many as 12.5% of Americans will struggle with a phobia — “an intense, irrational fear of something that poses little or no actual danger” — according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Of these, a fear of flying, or aviophobia, is one of the most common, with estimated prevalence ranging from 2.5% to 6.5% of the population. Far more people have a fear of flying that doesn’t reach phobia levels, despite the fact that people are flying more than ever before and plenty of data shows it’s a reliably safe way to travel. So what is it about flying that stir...
Source: TIME: Health - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Cultural practices may cause dermatologic side effects and complications
(Boston University School of Medicine) Population diversity and widespread immigration predispose physicians to encounter patients with a variety of backgrounds and cultural practices. While many of these practices are commonly performed, there has been limited medical literature describing their potential for complications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers determine the rate of return to sport after shoulder surgery
(Boston University School of Medicine) Athletes with shoulder instability injuries often undergo shoulder stabilization surgery to return to sport (RTS) and perform at their preinjury activity level. Returning to sports in a timely fashion and being able to perform at a high level are priorities for these athletes undergoing surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Police Killings of Unarmed Blacks Impact Community Mental Health
FRIDAY, June 22, 2018 -- For black U.S. adults, police killings of unarmed black Americans have adverse effects on mental health, according to a study published online June 21 in The Lancet. Jacob Bor, Sc.D., from the Boston University School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

BU researcher recognized for outstanding contributions in the field of spondyloarthritis
(Boston University School of Medicine) Maureen Dubreuil, M.D., MSc, assistant professor of Clinical Epidemiology Research& Training at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is one of two recipients of the 2018 Spondylitis Association of America (SAA) Bruckel Early Career Investigator in Axial Spondyloarthritis Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

E-cigarettes may damage blood vessels in same way as heart disease
Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine have discovered the chemicals used to produce flavours in e-cigarettes cause damage to heart cells in the same way heart disease does. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flavored E-Cigarettes Can Damage Blood Vessels, BU Report Says
BOSTON (CBS) – There is a public perception that flavored e-cigarettes are harmless or at least less harmful than traditional cigarettes, but researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine say e-cigs may pose significant health risks. They looked specifically at the short-term effects of flavoring chemicals used in e-cigs and found that flavor additives are directly toxic to blood vessels. Scientists say, over time, they could lead to heart and blood vessel disease similar to that caused by traditional cigarettes. E-Cigarette. (Credit: iStockphoto) This research released Thursday provides more reason fo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall e-cigarettes Local TV vaping Source Type: news

E-cigarettes may damage blood vessels in the same way as HEART DISEASE, study finds
Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine have discovered the chemicals used to produce flavours in e-cigarettes cause damage to heart cells in the same way heart disease does. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU receives grant to assist scientists in training for career transitions
(Boston University School of Medicine) In an effort to broaden opportunities for participation in professional development activities for graduate and postdoctoral trainees, Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) will develop a software application (app) that will enable identification and sharing of these opportunities with local institutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flavored electronic cigarettes linked to possible cardiovascular disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Could flavored electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) cause bodily harm?There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, partially due to flavoring additives in tobacco products and perception of less harm than traditional combustible cigarettes. Numerous studies have been done on the risks of e-cigarettes to lungs, but the risk to blood vessels and how flavorings can affect the body are largely unknown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Possible marker found to predict long-term learning
(Boston University School of Medicine) For the first time, researchers have discovered a possible biomarker for long term learning. Could this new discovery help reshape how students learn and how they are taught? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Turning the tables on the cholera pathogen
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology (MIT) and Boston University, led by James J. Collins are reporting a two-pronged probiotic strategy in Science Translational Medicine that is able to suppress V. cholerae's colonization of the intestinal tract in mice and to indicate their presence by simple stool sampling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU: Medicaid expansion increases volume and quality of care in rural areas
(Boston University School of Medicine) New study from Boston University School of Public Health finds that the first two years of Medicaid expansion were associated with increased coverage, better quality care, and more service use at rural community health centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weight changes associated with reduced bone strength
(Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research) Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, Boston University, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and University of Calgary have found evidence that weight loss can result in worsening bone density, bone architecture and bone strength. The results were published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news