Physicians who visit patients post-hospitalization give more comprehensive discharge plans
(Boston University School of Medicine) (Boston)-- When resident physicians visit the homes of their former hospital patients they are better able to assess patient needs and understand the important role that community services and agencies play in keeping them at home and out of the hospital, according to a new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify characteristics of over the counter skin lightening users
(Boston University School of Medicine) (Boston) -- The desire for unblemished, clear skin permeates all cultures and societies, making the practice of skin lightening to minimize spots and even a skin tone quite common worldwide. Internationally, the use of creams to lighten skin is widespread and widely studied. In the U.S. however, information about use of these creams is sparse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MassDevice co-founder Johnson to lead MassMEDIC
MassDevice co-founder Brian Johnson is set to depart from the publication he founded nearly 10 years ago and take over as president of the Massachusetts Medical Device Industry Council. Johnson will succeed Tom Sommer as president of the regional medical technology association. Sommer has served as MassMEDIC’s president since the group was founded in 1996. The association is the largest regional medtech organization, representing more than 300 members. Since Johnson launched MassDevice.com in 2009 with executive editor Brad Perriello, the site has evolved into the leading online journal of the medtech ...
Source: Mass Device - July 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Business/Financial News MassMEDIC Source Type: news

BU: Almost half of US adults who drink, drink too much, and continue to do so
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers has found that about 40 percent of adults in the United States who drink alcohol do so in amounts that risk health consequences, and identifies a range of factors associated with starting or stopping drinking too much. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New target protein for colon cancer identified
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a new potential target protein (c-Cbl) they believe can help further the understanding of colon cancer and ultimately survival of patients with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Residential segregation associated with black-white disparity in firearm homicide rates
(Boston University School of Medicine) Residential segregation is linked to many racial disparities in health, including cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Now, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers suggests the likelihood of dying from gun violence can be added to the list of adverse health outcomes associated with structural racism in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More studies needed to determine impact of air pollution on gynecologic health
(Boston University School of Medicine) While initial studies suggest a potential relationship between air pollution and both infertility and menstrual irregularity, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine believe more studies are needed to validate these findings in other populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is Hummus Actually Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Hummus, the chickpea-based dip that’s a staple in many Middle Eastern cuisines, is on the rise in the U.S. Multiple factors are fueling its growing popularity, according to the USDA: Hummus is naturally gluten-free, and Americans now have bigger appetites for healthier snacks. But how healthy is hummus? Here’s what the experts say. What is hummus made of? Traditional hummus is made from a blend of chickpeas, olive oil, tahini (sesame paste), lemon juice and spices, and this mix makes for a nutrient-dense food, says Elizabeth G. Matteo, a registered dietitian at Boston University’s Sargent Choice Nutritio...
Source: TIME: Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sophia Gottfried Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

What is the role of the physician when a patient discloses intimate partner violence perpetration?
(Boston University School of Medicine) Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent and has lasting impacts on the health and well-being of the entire family involved. Unfortunately, very little research and guidance about how to address perpetration of IPV in the health care setting, especially among primary care physicians who are in a role to potentially intervene has been available until now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU and Ohio University researchers awarded NIH grant
(Boston University School of Medicine) Noyan Gokce, M.D., professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, has received a four-year, $2.2 million R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health. Gokce, along with his co-principal investigator Vishwajeet Puri, Ph.D., professor at The Diabetes Institute at Ohio University, will investigate the relationship between obesity-induced changes in fat tissue metabolism in human adipose stores (tissue that stores energy in the form of fat) in relations to vascular and cardiometabolic dysfunction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why Some People Have a Crippling Fear of Flying — and How They Can Overcome It
At one point or another, as many as 12.5% of Americans will struggle with a phobia — “an intense, irrational fear of something that poses little or no actual danger” — according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Of these, a fear of flying, or aviophobia, is one of the most common, with estimated prevalence ranging from 2.5% to 6.5% of the population. Far more people have a fear of flying that doesn’t reach phobia levels, despite the fact that people are flying more than ever before and plenty of data shows it’s a reliably safe way to travel. So what is it about flying that stir...
Source: TIME: Health - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Cultural practices may cause dermatologic side effects and complications
(Boston University School of Medicine) Population diversity and widespread immigration predispose physicians to encounter patients with a variety of backgrounds and cultural practices. While many of these practices are commonly performed, there has been limited medical literature describing their potential for complications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers determine the rate of return to sport after shoulder surgery
(Boston University School of Medicine) Athletes with shoulder instability injuries often undergo shoulder stabilization surgery to return to sport (RTS) and perform at their preinjury activity level. Returning to sports in a timely fashion and being able to perform at a high level are priorities for these athletes undergoing surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Police Killings of Unarmed Blacks Impact Community Mental Health
FRIDAY, June 22, 2018 -- For black U.S. adults, police killings of unarmed black Americans have adverse effects on mental health, according to a study published online June 21 in The Lancet. Jacob Bor, Sc.D., from the Boston University School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

BU researcher recognized for outstanding contributions in the field of spondyloarthritis
(Boston University School of Medicine) Maureen Dubreuil, M.D., MSc, assistant professor of Clinical Epidemiology Research& Training at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is one of two recipients of the 2018 Spondylitis Association of America (SAA) Bruckel Early Career Investigator in Axial Spondyloarthritis Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

E-cigarettes may damage blood vessels in same way as heart disease
Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine have discovered the chemicals used to produce flavours in e-cigarettes cause damage to heart cells in the same way heart disease does. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flavored E-Cigarettes Can Damage Blood Vessels, BU Report Says
BOSTON (CBS) – There is a public perception that flavored e-cigarettes are harmless or at least less harmful than traditional cigarettes, but researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine say e-cigs may pose significant health risks. They looked specifically at the short-term effects of flavoring chemicals used in e-cigs and found that flavor additives are directly toxic to blood vessels. Scientists say, over time, they could lead to heart and blood vessel disease similar to that caused by traditional cigarettes. E-Cigarette. (Credit: iStockphoto) This research released Thursday provides more reason fo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall e-cigarettes Local TV vaping Source Type: news

E-cigarettes may damage blood vessels in the same way as HEART DISEASE, study finds
Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine have discovered the chemicals used to produce flavours in e-cigarettes cause damage to heart cells in the same way heart disease does. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU receives grant to assist scientists in training for career transitions
(Boston University School of Medicine) In an effort to broaden opportunities for participation in professional development activities for graduate and postdoctoral trainees, Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) will develop a software application (app) that will enable identification and sharing of these opportunities with local institutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flavored electronic cigarettes linked to possible cardiovascular disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Could flavored electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) cause bodily harm?There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, partially due to flavoring additives in tobacco products and perception of less harm than traditional combustible cigarettes. Numerous studies have been done on the risks of e-cigarettes to lungs, but the risk to blood vessels and how flavorings can affect the body are largely unknown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Possible marker found to predict long-term learning
(Boston University School of Medicine) For the first time, researchers have discovered a possible biomarker for long term learning. Could this new discovery help reshape how students learn and how they are taught? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Turning the tables on the cholera pathogen
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology (MIT) and Boston University, led by James J. Collins are reporting a two-pronged probiotic strategy in Science Translational Medicine that is able to suppress V. cholerae's colonization of the intestinal tract in mice and to indicate their presence by simple stool sampling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU: Medicaid expansion increases volume and quality of care in rural areas
(Boston University School of Medicine) New study from Boston University School of Public Health finds that the first two years of Medicaid expansion were associated with increased coverage, better quality care, and more service use at rural community health centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weight changes associated with reduced bone strength
(Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research) Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, Boston University, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and University of Calgary have found evidence that weight loss can result in worsening bone density, bone architecture and bone strength. The results were published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tighter Alcohol Policies Cut Alcohol-Related Crash Deaths
WEDNESDAY, May 30, 2018 -- Strengthening state alcohol policies can reduce alcohol-related crash fatalities, according to a study published online May 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Timothy S. Naimi, M.D., M.P.H., from Boston University, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Member Highlights: Poughkeepsie Public Library District, Poughkeepsie, NY
Library Speaker Series with the MidHudson Regional Hospital The Poughkeepsie Public Library District has offered a Health & Wellness speaker series, beginning in January 2018, presented by staff from the MidHudson Regional Hospital. All of the programs within this series discussed easy ways to implement suggested life-style changes into participants’ daily lives. Nancy Case, MS, RDN, CDN Paul Hanna, MD Syed Naqvi, MD, FAAC Corey Scurlock, MD, MBA Zubair M. Khan, MD, and Lisa McKevitt, RRT, RPSGT, RST Nutrition for a New Year (January 2018) – Presented by Outpatient Dietitian Nancy Case, MS, RDN, CDN, thi...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - May 29, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Member Highlights Source Type: news

Whether or not you are susceptible to traveler’s diarrhea depends on the protein content of your saliva, according to new research
(Natural News) Traveler’s diarrhea can be either inconvenient or fatal, depending on its severity. However, thanks to research, experts are one step closer to discovering how we can protect ourselves from this infectious disease. According to a research team from the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), they have successfully identified histatin-5, a protein in saliva that can protect the body... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU: Religious refusal laws harm sexual minority mental health
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher has found that state laws permitting the denial of services to same-sex couples because of religious or moral beliefs harm the mental health of sexual minority adults in those states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston nonprofit tackling 'superbugs' gets $52M from Gates foundation, U.K.
An accelerator program based at Boston University that funds the development of potential life-saving antibacterial drugs will receive up to $52 million from the U.K. government and the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation. The public-private partnership, called Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator — or CARB-X — announced the new funding on Tuesday. CARB-X said it has now raised more than $500 million since being launched in July 2016 by the U.S. Department of Health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 22, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Crises, Calamities, and Chaos: How Public Health Can Improve Response to Emerging Threats Wherever They Arise
Boston University. 04/30/2018 This 46-minute presentation discusses how, from Ebola to Zika, from hurricanes to opioids, threats to health make headlines and challenge the public health response. Lessons learned from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's engagements around the world, and in everyone's backyard, suggest a role for everyone in mitigating risk and building resilience. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Changing the Climate: How Public Health, Cities, and the Media Can Advance Climate Solutions
Boston University. 04/20/2018 This day-long symposium brings together thought leaders from public health, cities, and journalism to develop strategies that bring greater attention to, and produce visionary actions that address, the global climate challenge. Panelists discuss how many cities are developing far-sighted policies to reduce carbon emissions while also adapting to ongoing changes. Public health researchers are documenting how urban climate solutions can directly benefit the health of local residents, but this research has not yet been communicated in a manner that has motivated effective action. (Video or Multim...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

BU researcher receives competitive $100,000 NIH grant
(Boston University School of Medicine) Duo Zhang, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate at Boston University School of Medicine, has received the highly competitive National Institutes of Health Pathway to Independence (K99) Award. The award helps facilitate the transition of postdoctoral researchers from mentored positions to independent tenure-track or faculty positions and helps launch research careers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dementia risk soars for middle aged people who are under weight
People who are widowed, struggle to sleep, and have low weight in their 50s and 60s have a much higher risk of developing the disease down the line, Boston University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Age, marital status, BMI and sleep associated with risk for dementia
(Boston University School of Medicine) Could your age, marital status, BMI (body mass index) and amount of sleep impact your risk for dementia? Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) analyzed data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) to identify new combinations of risk factors that are linked to increased risk of dementia in later life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nature or nurture: unravelling the roots of childhood behaviour disorders
Studies on young children have identified a genetic link for some such disorders, but environmental factors also have an effectHumans have succeeded as a species in large part because of our ability to cooperate and coordinate witheach other. These skills are driven by a range of “moral emotions” such as guilt and empathy, which help us to navigate the nuance of social interactions appropriately.Those who lack moral emotions are classed as having “callous-unemotional” traits: persistent personality characteristics that make negotiating social situations difficult. The combination of callous-unemotio...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Greg Chapman, research scientist, Boston University Twin Project Tags: Psychology Science Mental health Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Genetics Biology Society Medical research Source Type: news

Study Raises New Questions About Safety Of Youth Football
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study from the Boston University School of Medicine raises more questions about the safety of youth tackle football. Researchers focused on 211 football players who were diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after death and found that those who began tackle football before age 12 developed cognitive, behavioral and mood symptoms on average 13 years earlier than other players. CTE, believed to be caused by repetitive blows to the head, leads to profound degeneration of the brain. The researchers found for every one year younger that a player began tackle football, he developed symp...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen CTE Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Youth football may inflict damage on players' mood and behavior
Every one year younger that they took up the sport was associated with earlier onset of cognitive problems by 2.4 years, and of mood problems by 2.5 years, Boston University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Youth football may inflict irreparable damage on players' mood, emotion and behavior
Every one year younger that they took up the sport was associated with earlier onset of cognitive problems by 2.4 years, and of mood problems by 2.5 years, Boston University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Playing Youth Tackle Football Is Linked to Earlier Symptoms of Brain Disease
This study has limitations. The brains used in this study may not represent those of the broader tackle football population, because most ex-football players, and their families, chose to donate their brains to shed light on their cognitive and behavioral struggles. Still, the results are alarming. “The data supports that you should not play tackle football until you’re more physically mature,” says McKee, whose future work will attempt to define a sort of tipping point for tackle football: how long can kids play before the risks rise exponentially? Last week, California lawmakers dropped legislation bann...
Source: TIME: Health - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime onetime Source Type: news

First radiologist to receive clinical research award from osteoarthritis research
(Boston University School of Medicine) Ali Guermazi, M.D., Ph.D., assistant dean of diversity and professor of radiology at Boston University School of Medicine, and vice chairman of academic affairs in the department of radiology at Boston Medical Center, is the recipient of Osteoarthritis Research Society International Clinical Research Award for his outstanding work in the field of imaging. Guermazi is the first radiologist to receive this honor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Smoking, alcohol consumption increase lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers found that among individuals aged 55 years or older, the overall lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) was 37 percent and was influenced by the burden of risk factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protein responsible for Leukemia's aggressiveness identified
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have identified a protein critical for the aggressiveness of T-cell leukemia, a subtype of leukemia that afflicts children and adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Upgrading the immune system to fight cancer
(Boston University College of Engineering) New research has opened the door to reducing serious side effects of CAR-T therapy while enhancing its effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BU study: Egyptian fruit bat genome yields clues to protection
(Boston University) The study examined the genome of Rousettus aegyptiacus, the Egyptian fruit bat, and found larger-than-expected families of genes related to the mammalian immune system. Specifically, researchers found large families of interferon and natural killer genes that differed dramatically from their counterparts in other mammals. The finding, published online and featured in the May 2018 print edition of Cell, may eventually lead to a deeper understanding of virus transmission, and better treatments for humans who become infected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU: Obese patients underrepresented in cancer clinical trials
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new review by Boston University School of Public Health researchers found that less than one-fifth of participants in cancer-related clinical trials are obese. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Doctors prescribe opioids at high rates to those at increased overdose risk, but trends improving, study finds
The number of first-time prescriptions for opioid drugs has not risen since about 2010, according to UCLA researchers. However, patients taking a class of drug known to increase the risk for overdoses were likelier to receive a first-time opioid prescription — a combination that could be linked to the current surge in opioid-related deaths.People with chronic pain are often prescribed a class of medications called “benzodiazepines” to treat anxiety, panic attacks and other mental conditions that can be brought on by the stress of coping with their pain. But these people also are likelier to receive new op...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

BU medical student receives student fellowship from Alpha Omega Alpha
(Boston University School of Medicine) Melissa Chua, a fourth-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has received the Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Carolyn L. Kuckein Student Research Fellowship. The purpose of the award is to foster the development of the next generation of medical researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Guns used in cross-border crimes originate from states with more lax laws
(Boston University School of Medicine) Opponents of gun control have frequently pointed to high rates of gun violence in cities such as Chicago to argue that strong state gun control laws are not effective.But guns used in states with stricter gun laws typically flow from states with weaker laws, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Upswings in older-age cognitive ability may not be universal
(Boston University School of Medicine) A study of a majority-black cohort, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, finds no clear upward trend in cognitive abilities among older adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news