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Aaron Hernandez Had CTE. How Much More Damage Can The NFL Take?
Is the chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) diagnosis for Aaron Hernandez, the convicted murderer and former New England Patriots tight end who committed suicide in April while serving a life sentence, all that surprising? Not really, given what we know about this degenerative brain disease. Several ex-NFL players (Junior Seau, Dave Duerson, Andre Waters, Ray Easterling) who took their own lives were diagnosed with CTE postmortem. CTE victims have struggled with impulse control, turned violent against their spouses, abused drugs, raged and acted irrationally. In 2012 Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher, who had C...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Aaron Hernandez CTE Football New England Patriots NFL Source Type: news

BU: Resurgence of whooping cough may owe to vaccine's inability to prevent infections
(Boston University School of Medicine) The startling global resurgence of pertussis, or whooping cough, in recent years can largely be attributed to the immunological failures of acellular vaccines, Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers argue in a new journal article. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Strong alcohol policies help reduce alcohol-involved homicides
(Boston Medical Center) Stronger alcohol policies, including taxes and sales restrictions, have been shown to reduce the likelihood of alcohol involvement among homicide victims, according to a new study from Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study offers novel treatment strategy for patients with colon cancer
(Boston University School of Medicine) Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that a previously uncharacterized protein is increased in colon cancer. The protein is immunoglobulin containing proline rich receptor-1 (IGPR-1) which was recently identified in the same laboratory as a cell adhesion molecule. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Study Links Playing Youth Football to Later Brain Damage
If children play tackle football before they are 12 and continue to play through high school, they may be putting their brains at risk. That’s the key takeaway from a new study published Tuesday in the journal Nature’s Translational Psychiatry. Researchers from Boston University’s Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center studied 214 former football players, including 43 who only played at the high school level, 103 who played in college, and 68 who played professionally. The scientists found that playing tackle football before the age of 12 increased the odds of problems with behavioral regulation, apathy ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Boston University Brain Damage CTE Football head trauma NFL Youth Football youth sports Source Type: news

BU: HPV vaccine associated with improved fertility in some women
(Boston University School of Medicine) More than 40 percent of American teens are now getting vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV). But, despite HPV infection being associated with reduced semen quality and lower pregnancy rates, there is still public concern about whether the HPV vaccine itself could affect future fertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New lung cell type discovered
(Boston University School of Medicine) A recent study has identified a new lung cell type that is implicated in the body's innate immune defense against the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae -- one of the leading causes of pneumonia worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

LED lights safer, more effective in producing Vitamin D3 than sunlight
(Boston University School of Medicine) Research published today shows that light from RayVio's 293nm ultraviolet (UV) LED is more efficient than sunlight at producingvitamin D3 in skin samples. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify possible new target in fight against lung cancer
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have identified a molecule called miR-124 in non-small cell lung cancer cells that plays a regulatory role in the cancer cells' fate -- determining whether or not the specific subtype of cancer cell will undergo programmed cell death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Melanoma can be prevented by eating fast food
Boston University researchers studied mice to see if a palmitic acid, a fat found in fast food, could prevent melanoma. Red heads, fair skinned and those who tan are most at risk for this skin cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE): What we Know
CHICAGO (AP) — Researchers are tackling fresh questions about a degenerative brain disease now that it has been detected in the brains of nearly 200 football players after death. The suspected cause is repeated head blows, an almost unavoidable part of contact sports. As a new NFL season gets underway, here's a look at what's known — and what still needs to be learned — about the condition: WHAT'S NEW? The largest report to date on chronic traumatic encephalopathy included 202 brains from football players at the youth, college and professional level, all donated post-mortem to a Boston brain bank. CTE was...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE): What we Know
CHICAGO (AP) — Researchers are tackling fresh questions about a degenerative brain disease now that it has been detected in the brains of nearly 200 football players after death. The suspected cause is repeated head blows, an almost unavoidable part of contact sports. As a new NFL season gets underway, here's a look at what's known — and what still needs to be learned — about the condition: WHAT'S NEW? The largest report to date on chronic traumatic encephalopathy included 202 brains from football players at the youth, college and professional level, all donated post-mortem to a Boston brain bank. CTE was...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Life expectancy trends tied to 2016 voting choices
(Boston University School of Medicine) Ever since the unexpected results of the 2016 presidential election, political analysts have sought to understand what factors played into voters' decision making. Now, a new study by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher shows how voting patterns correlated with the nation's growing geographic health divides, with Donald Trump winning more votes in counties that have seen lower gains in life expectancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover why redheads are more prone to melanoma
(Boston University School of Medicine) Red-haired people are known for pale skin, freckles, poor tanning ability and unfortunately, an increased risk for developing skin cancer. Research has shown that they have variants in Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R), a protein crucial for pigmentation in humans, but how this translates to increased risk for cancer and whether that risk can be reversed has remained an active area of investigation -- until now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Health of more than half of US adults affected by obesity
(Boston University School of Medicine) Considering weight across the life course, the prevalence of obesity among adults in the US rises considerably, suggesting that the effects on population health may be even more pervasive than previously understood, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston University gets $5.4M federal grant for Alzheimer's research
The funding from the National Institutes of Health will held the center develop diagnostic tests and potential treatments for one of the most deadly and prevalent diseases. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 29, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Boston University gets $5.4M federal grant for Alzheimer's research
The funding from the National Institutes of Health will held the center develop diagnostic tests and potential treatments for one of the most deadly and prevalent diseases. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 29, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

NIH awards BU more than $5 million to continue Alzheimer's research
(Boston University School of Medicine) The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging has awarded the Boston University Alzheimer's Disease Center (BU ADC) a three-year, $5.4 million grant to continue research on ways to reduce the human and economic costs of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through the advancement of knowledge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds link between malnutrition, alcoholism and tuberculosis in India
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study reveals a striking link between malnutrition, heavy alcohol use and tuberculosis in southern India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Behavior theory may offer key to ensuring infants are put to sleep safely
(Yale University) It is still common for infants to be placed in unsafe sleeping positions by their caregivers, report researchers from Yale and Boston University (BU). Fewer than half of infants are always placed on their backs for sleep, the recommended safe sleep position. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher receives AHA grant to improve cardiovascular treatments
(Boston University Medical Center) Vijaya B. Kolachalama, Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, has received a Scientist Development grant from the American Heart Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unstable housing to cost health care system estimated $111 billion over 10 years, study finds
(Boston University Medical Center) Unstable housing among families with children will cost the United States an estimated $111 billion in health and education expenditures over the next ten years, according to new research published by Children's HealthWatch based at Boston Medical Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Will This Be The End Of College Football? It Should Be.
A new study from Boston University shows that over 90% of former college football players suffered serious brain damage later in life. The sample was likely biased and may exaggerate the risks, but how can universities justify exposing students to even a much smaller risk? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Steven Salzberg, Contributor Source Type: news

Will This Be The End Of College Football? It Should Be
A new study from Boston University shows that over 90% of former college football players suffered serious brain damage later in life. The sample was likely biased and may exaggerate the risks, but how can universities justify exposing students to even a much smaller risk? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Steven Salzberg, Contributor Source Type: news

Could This Spell The End For College Football? It Should.
A new study from Boston University shows that over 90% of former college football players suffered serious brain damage later in life. The sample was likely biased and may exaggerate the risks, but how can universities justify exposing students to even a much smaller risk? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Steven Salzberg, Contributor Source Type: news

1 in 12 doctors accepts payment from pharmaceutical companies related to opioids
(Boston University Medical Center) One in twelve physicians -- and nearly one in five family medicine physicians -- accepted payments from pharmaceutical companies related to opioids, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One fall too many
(Boston University Medical Center) Adults age 65 and older who go to the emergency department (ED) for a fall-related injury are not likely to participate in a fall prevention program after being discharged, despite being given a flyer for a local program before leaving the hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Texting while parenting: Mobile program improves safety of sleeping infants
(Yale University) Mother's latest little helper is already in her pocket: A new educational intervention delivered in the form of texts and emails has been found to increase adherence to safe sleep practices for infants, concluded researchers at the Yale, University of Virginia, and Boston University schools of medicine in a joint study published July 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Book Review: On Edge
“Fear ambushes me… I feel fine… And then, a second later, I’m not,” writes Andrea Peterson. Her new book, On Edge: A Journey Through Anxiety, is an exploration of her life with anxiety, from her first panic attack, to realizing that she had an anxiety disorder, to sorting out the dizzying array of treatments and ultimately discovering for herself what anxiety is and how to live with it. While it is estimated that one in three Americans will have at least one anxiety disorder in their lifetime, it took Peterson multiple trips to the emergency room, EKG tests...
Source: Psych Central - August 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anti-anxiety Book Reviews Healthy Living Mindfulness Personal Stories Women's Issues Source Type: news

ReWalk Robotics touts Harvard-led Restore soft exosuit study
ReWalk Robotics (NSDQ:RWLK) today released results from a study of a soft suit exoskeleton system designed to aid ambulatory stroke patients, touting that the system was able to facilitate normal walking ability in patients. The study was authored by researchers at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Boston University, and utilized a prototype that Marlborough, Mass.-based ReWalk Robotics plans to commercialize as the Restore system. Results from the study were published in the Journal of Science Translational Medicine. The Restore system is designed to transmit pow...
Source: Mass Device - August 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Prosthetics Robotics ReWalk Robotics Source Type: news

New Study Examines Brain Injury in Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

New Study Examines Brain Injury in Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Dr. Agus on new football brain study: "This is a major issue"
The largest study of brain trauma in football players reveals the risks to players of all ages. Researchers at Boston University examined the brains of 111 deceased NFL players. They found signs of the disease CTE in 110 players. Families of the former players donated the brains after they suspected injuries. Dr. David Agus joins "CBS This Morning" from Los Angeles to talk about results of the study, athletes' potential to sustain head injuries and how to prevent CTE. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: New report finds brain disease in most football players studied
Researchers at Boston University found that of the 111 former NFL pros included in their study, 110 met the criteria for a CTE diagnosis. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - July 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

ACA reduced disparities in health care access, report shows
(Boston University Medical Center) The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has helped to close the gap in health care access between residents of poor and higher-income households, a new report by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Study Shows Prevalence of Brain Disease in Former Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

New Study Shows Prevalence of Brain Disease in Former Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

CTE was nearly ubiquitous among former NFL players who donated their brains to science
In a group of more than 100 professional football players whose brains were examined after their death, new research has found that virtually all suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a condition likely brought on by repeated blows to the head.At a Boston University program that investigates... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - July 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

NFL brain study diagnoses CTE in 99% of ex-players' brains
Boston University's famed CTE team, which is analyzing Aaron Hernandez's brain, has released major findings from post-mortems on 202 players' brains, which were donated to research. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CTE found in 99% of studied brains from deceased NFL players
Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) was found in 110 brains of 111 deceased former NFL players that were donated to Boston University's CTE Research Center, according to a study released Tuesday by JAMA. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Snoring link to Alzheimer ’s disease unproven
Conclusion This relatively large cross-sectional analysis has found a link between certain measures of breathing problems during sleep and poorer cognitive function in middle-aged to older adults. The strengths of this study include its size and use of a prospective sleep study to assess whether people had sleep apnoea or other problems with breathing during sleep. The use of standard cognitive tests is also a strength. However, the study does have its limitations: The study did have mixed findings – while certain measures of problems with breathing during sleep (e.g. oxygen levels) were associated with cognitive o...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Substance Use Disorders Webinar Series
Register today for this 4-part webinar series, sponsored by NER! Participants may attend any or all sessions in the series. Each webinar has a specific focus within the substance use disorder field, and will provide a professional perspective that combines research and/or evidence-based information, along with personal experience to further understanding of the opioid health crisis. Presenters will share what they have learned by being involved on the front lines of addiction and treatment. Participants may be eligible for MLA CE, pending course approval. Registration is required. Misperceptions and the Misused Language of...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - July 20, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Consumer Health Education Health Professionals Public Health Source Type: news

Engineered liver tissue expands after transplant
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers have developed a way to engineer liver tissue by organizing tiny subunits that contain cells embedded into a biodegradable tissue scaffold. In a study of mice with damaged livers, the researchers from MIT, Rockefeller University, and Boston University found that after implantation in the abdomen, the structures expanded 50-fold and performed normal liver tissue functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Team-based model reduces prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent
(Boston University Medical Center) A new, team-based, primary care model is decreasing prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine, which is published online ahead of print in JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frequent ejaculation may decrease prostate cancer risk
"Ejaculating at least 21 times a month significantly reduces a man's risk of prostate cancer," is the headline on the Mail Online. This is based on research from the US that asked men how often they ejaculated per month and subsequent reporting of prostate cancer. They found that men who ejaculated 21 times or more a month were less likely to report prostate cancer at follow-up than those ejaculating four to seven times per month. However, it does not prove that ejaculating more frequently prevents cancer, only that it is associated with a reduction in risk. It might be that a range of other factors such as ...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Hospital discharge program improves patient experience leaving the hospital
(Boston University Medical Center) A standardized, in-hospital discharge planning program, known as Project ReEngineered Dishcharge (RED), improves patient experience as they leave the hospital, according to researchers at Boston Medical Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: No link seen between traumatic brain injury and cognitive decline
(Boston University Medical Center) Although much research has examined traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a possible risk factor for later life dementia from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), little is known regarding how TBI influences the rate of age-related cognitive change. A new study now shows that history of TBI (with loss of consciousness) does not appear to affect the rate of cognitive change over time for participants with normal cognition or even those with AD dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds protective effect of obesity after a stroke
A new study by Boston University suggests that although obesity raises the risk of stroke, overweight or mildly obese people survive strokes at higher rates. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does carrying extra weight offer better survival following a stroke?
(Boston University Medical Center) Despite the fact that obesity increases both the risk for stroke and death, a new study has found that people who are overweight or even mildly obese survive strokes at a higher rate as compared to those with a normal body weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BUSM receives grant to create software prototype for sharing medical data
(Boston University Medical Center) In an effort to securely share medical data between the US and India, Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has received a BU Digital Health Initiative Research Award.The $40,000 award will fund the two-year project, 'Enabling Data Science for Medicine.' It allows for collaboration between BUSM and the Center for Reliable Information Systems and Cyber Security and Software& Application Innovation Lab. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news