Liberia: Ex NPHIL Boss Gets Strategic Global Health Appointments
[FrontPageAfrica] Since his exit as Director General of the National Public Health Institute of Liberia (NPHIL), Dr. Mosoka Papa Fallah continues to make headways on international front with the latest being an appointment with the Boston University. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 6, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Researchers question role of insulin-boosting drugs in Type 2 diabetes
Drugs prescribed for Type 2 diabetes may actually increase insulin resistance in the body by boosting production of the hormone to unhealthy levels, causing the disease to worsen, researchers from Boston University said. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COVID-19 Booster Shots Are Still Controversial —Even for the Immunocompromised People Who Likely Need Them the Most
Chris Neblett, 44, was among the first people in the U.S. to get vaccinated against COVID-19. His job with the U.S. State Department allowed him to get his initial dose of Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine in late December 2020. By January 2021, he was fully vaccinated. But that didn’t mean he was fully protected. Neblett, who received a kidney transplant in 2018 and still takes immune-system-suppressing drugs to prevent his body from rejecting the organ, found out through his participation in a Johns Hopkins study of vaccination among transplant patients that he didn’t produce any disease-fighting antibodies, ev...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Are hair relaxers causing breast cancer in black women? – podcast
Research from the Black Women ’s Health Study has found that long-term and frequent users of hair relaxers had roughly a 30% increased risk of breast cancer compared with more infrequent users. Shivani Dave speaks to Dr Kimberly Bertrand, co-investigator of the study and assistant professor of medicine at Boston University, ab out the research and to journalist Tayo Bero about the effects these findings could have on the black communityContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Shivani Dave, additional reporting from Tayo Bero, produced by Iain Chambers Tags: Women's hair Cancer research Medical research Life and style Beauty Science Source Type: news

Research suggests ending eviction moratoriums led to spikes in COVID cases and deaths
Research by a UCLA-led team has determined that the number of COVID-19 cases and the   number of deaths from the disease both increased dramatically after states lifted eviction moratoriums that had been in place to protect people who were struggling to make rent payments during the pandemic.The study found that the number of COVID-19 cases doubled and the number of deaths attributable to the disease increased fivefold, in the four-month period after eviction moratoriums expired.Those figures suggest that during the summer of 2020, there were 433,700 more COVID-19 cases and 10,700 more deaths in the U.S. than there wo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Patients billed up to $219 million in total for preventive services that should be free
(Boston University School of Medicine) Despite a sharp reduction in out-of-pocket (OOP) costs for preventive care since the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010, patients are still receiving unexpected bills for preventive services that should be free, according to a new study co-authored by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researchers develop novel, woman controlled contraceptive product
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and ZabBio (San Diego, CA) have developed an anti-sperm monoclonal antibody, the Human Contraception Antibody (HCA), which they found to be safe and possess potent sperm agglutination (clumping) and immobilization activity in laboratory tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Metabolic enzyme promotes neuroblastoma aggressiveness
(Boston University School of Medicine) High-risk neuroblastoma is an aggressive childhood cancer with poor treatment outcomes. Despite intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, less than 50 percent of these children survive for five years. While the genetics of human neuroblastoma have been extensively studied, actionable therapeutics are limited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New computational technique, software identifies cell types within a tumor and its microenvironment
(Boston University School of Medicine) The discovery of novel groups or categories within diseases, organisms and biological processes and their organization into hierarchical relationships are important and recurrent pursuits in biology and medicine, which may help elucidate group-specific vulnerabilities and ultimately novel therapeutic interventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Digital pens provide new insight into cognitive testing results
(Boston University School of Medicine) During neuropsychological assessments, participants complete tasks designed to study memory and thinking. Based on their performance, the participants receive a score that researchers use to evaluate how well specific domains of their cognition are functioning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lottery-based incentives do not increase COVID-19 vaccination rates
(Boston University School of Medicine) Would you be more willing to get vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus if you could participate in a lottery for cash and prizes? The answer was surprisingly no, according to Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers who found that Ohio's " Vax-a-Million " lottery-based incentive system, intended to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates, was not associated with an increase in COVD-19 vaccinations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 2, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU receives $2.7M from the AHA to address disparities that intersect heart disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) With a growing need to better understand the many links between heart disease and cancer, the two leading causes of death worldwide, the American Heart Association (AHA), the world's leading voluntary organization dedicated to a world of longer, healthier lives, announced grants focused on this area of scientific research. More than $11 million in research grants has been awarded to create the AHA's newest Strategically Focused Research Network on disparities in cardio-oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 29, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Racism and segregation associated with advanced stage lung cancers among blacks
(Boston University School of Medicine) Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80-85% cases of lung cancer and when diagnosed early, has a five-year survival rate of 50-80%. Black patients have lower overall incidence of NSCLC than white patients, but are more likely to be diagnosed at later stages. They also are less likely to receive surgery for early-stage cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 22, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study reveals recipe for even more powerful COVID-19 vaccines
(Boston University) A new study looking at the way human cells activate the immune system in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection could open the door to even more effective and powerful vaccines against the coronavirus and its rapidly emerging variants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Many Older Women Not Eligible to Quit Cervical Cancer Screening
TUESDAY, June 15, 2021 -- About two-thirds of older women fail to qualify for discontinuation of cervical cancer screening, according to a study published online June 3 in Gynecologic Oncology. Jacqueline M. Mills, M.D., from the Boston University... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Microbes in ocean play important role in moderating Earth's temperature
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) A new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences uncovers where much of the carbonate consumption in the deep sea is happening - a process that prevents its escape into Earth's atmosphere. Researchers from Harvard and Boston University collected and examined methane-eating microbes from seven geologically diverse seafloor seeps and found that the carbonate rocks from all sites host methane-oxidizing microbial communities with the highest rates of methane consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds that inflammatory processes are altered in the brains of people with OUD
(Boston University School of Medicine) Prevalence rates of opioid use disorder (OUD) have increased dramatically, accompanied by a surge of overdose deaths--nearly 50,000 in the U.S. in 2019. While opioid dependence has been extensively studied in preclinical models, an understanding of the biological alterations that occur in the brains of people who chronically use opioids and who are diagnosed with OUD remains limited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol companies earned billions from underage drinking in 2016
(Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs) Underage youth consumed $17.5 billion worth, or 8.6 percent, of the alcoholic drinks sold in 2016. Products from three alcohol companies - AB Inbev, MillerCoors and Diageo - accounted for nearly half of youth consumption, according to a new study from researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Johns Hopkins and Boston University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researchers create novel curriculum assessment tool to improve medical education about sexual and gender minority (LGBTQI) populations
(Boston University School of Medicine) Medical education aspires to mitigate bias in future professionals by providing a robust curriculum that includes perspectives and practices for caring for sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTQI) persons. To provide medical schools with a more systematic, uniform approach to teaching these topics in their curriculum, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in 2014 published 30 SGM competencies and topics that curricula should address. However, implementation of these ideals remains challenging. (Sour...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beyond synthetic biology, synthetic ecology boosts health by engineering the environment
(Boston University) In a new Nature Communications study, researchers from BU's Microbiome Initiative discovered that providing microbial communities with a broader variety of food sources didn't increase the variety of microbial species within their experiments, but more food did fuel more microbial growth. The team's ultimate goal is to learn how to direct microbiome behavior through environmental molecules like food sources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why scientists want to solve an underground mystery about where microbes live
(Boston University) A team of BU biologists revealed, for the first time, that it is possible to accurately predict the abundance of different species of soil microbes in different parts of the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Computer simulations of the brain can predict language recovery in stroke survivors
(Boston University) Speech rehabilitation experts can predict how well a patient will recover from aphasia, a disorder caused by damage to the part of the brain responsible for producing language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston Globe Investigation Finds Many Boston Hospital CEOs Also Sit on Healthcare Company Boards
Cozy relationships between hospital chief executives and healthcare companies they do business with may raise ethical questions If hospital employees, including pathologists, wonder why their hospital uses a certain company’s products and services it may be because their Chief Executive Officer (CEO) sits on the Board of Directors of the same companies from which the […] The post Boston Globe Investigation Finds Many Boston Hospital CEOs Also Sit on Healthcare Company Boards appeared first on Dark Daily. (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - May 26, 2021 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Kristen Noonan Tags: Compliance, Legal, and Malpractice Laboratory News Management & Operations anatomic pathology Betsy Nabel MD Boston Children's Hospital Boston Globe Boston University Brigham and Women’s Hospital Brigham Health Carl Elliott MD PhD Source Type: news

Moderate use of hair relaxers does not increase breast cancer risk among black women
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have now found no association of hair relaxer use with breast cancer risk overall in Black women, but they did find some evidence that heavy use of lye-containing hair relaxers may be associated with increased risk of ER+ breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Total deaths due to COVID-19 underestimated by 20% in US counties
(Boston University School of Medicine) More than 15 months into the pandemic, the U.S. death toll from COVID-19 is nearing 600,000. But COVID-19 deaths may be underestimated by 20%, according to a new, first-of-its-kind study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH), the University of Pennsylvania, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Paying people to get vaccinated might work – but is it ethical?
Ultimately, a well-designed vaccination incentive can help save lives and need not keep the ethicists up at night. A Boston University behavioral scientist and ethicist weighs in. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 19, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

BU study: Racial disparities in COVID-19 mortality wider than reported
(Boston University School of Medicine) More than a year into the pandemic, the disproportionate burden of COVID-19 among racial and ethnic minorities in the US has been well documented. But a new study by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) reveals that previous research has underestimated the true extent of racial disparities in COVID-19 deaths--as well as the extent to which structural racism contributes to these deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research will allow convenient investigation of human innate immune response to viral infections
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) report the formation of human cells containing a green fluorescent protein or GFP (one of the most important proteins in biology and fluorescence imaging) genetically fused with two interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), namely Viperin and ISG15. This new creation makes these cells highly valuable reagents for reporting innate immune responses to viral infections, including those caused by coronaviruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify genes responsible for loss of lung function
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a panel of genes that are active in smokers and ex-smokers who experience faster loss of lung function over time. They believe these genes could be useful to predict which people are most at risk for smoking-related decline in lung function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 11, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Elizabeth Hutton, MD, receives Stanley L. Robbins Award for Excellence in Teaching
(Boston University School of Medicine) Elizabeth Hutton, MD, assistant professor of medicine and pediatrics, has been recognized with Boston University School of Medicine's (BUSM) highest teaching honor, the Stanley L. Robbins Award for Excellence in Teaching. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People with familial longevity show better cognitive aging
(Boston University School of Medicine) If you come from a family where people routinely live well into old age, you will likely have better cognitive function (the ability to clearly think, learn and remember) than peers from families where people die younger. Researchers affiliated with the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) recently broadened that finding in a paper published in Gerontology, suggesting that people who belong to long-lived families also show slower cognitive decline over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aryl hydrocarbon receptor suppresses immunity to oral cancer through immune checkpoint regulation
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study has identified for the first time how the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an environmental chemical receptor, drives immunosuppression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)--and that its removal from malignant cells can result in tumor rejection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 4, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Without commuter traffic, pandemic-era drivers are speeding up, increasing noise pollution
(Boston University) When millions of Americans began working from home, city traffic halted. Although the air became cleaner, researchers discovered that sound levels increased in nature conservation areas due to cars driving faster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

St. Elizabeth's switches affiliation to BU from Tufts
The Brighton hospital will become a teaching hospital of Boston University, switching its existing medical affiliation away from Tufts University. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 3, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Researchers describe rare case of heart rhythm problem in newborn with Turner syndrome
(Boston University School of Medicine) Doctors treating babies born with Turner syndrome need to look for heart rhythm abnormalities, in addition to the usual heart problems of high blood pressure or left-sided structural heart defects, according to Meena Bolourchi, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Northern forest fires could accelerate climate change
(Boston University) New research shows that the global models used to project how Earth's climate will change in the future underestimate the impact of forest fires and drying climate on forests' ability to capture and store atmospheric carbon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 29, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Majority of US faculty help students with mental health issues--but few are trained for it
(Boston University) Nationwide survey, led by BU researcher Dr. Sarah Lipson, indicates colleges and universities need to invest in more resources for faculty " gatekeepers " of mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study provides insight in identifying, treating lung cancer at early stages
(Boston University School of Medicine) Lung carcinomas are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and worldwide. Lung squamous cell carcinomas (non-small cell lung cancers that arise in the bronchi of the lungs and make up approximately 30 percent of all lung cancers) are poorly understood, particularly with respect to the cell type and signals that contribute to disease onset. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 26, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Majority of US faculty help students with mental health issues -- but few are trained for it
(Boston University) Nationwide survey, led by BU researcher Dr. Sarah Lipson, indicates colleges and universities need to invest in more resources for faculty " gatekeepers " of mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Comprehensive NICU discharge planning essential for at-home readiness
(Boston University School of Medicine) Being a parent of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) infant does not come with its own playbook of instructions. Preparing to care for a medically needy infant requires the mastery of technical skills, knowledge, emotional comfort and confidence. After confirming that an infant is medically ready for discharge, the quality of NICU discharge training/teaching is the strongest predictor of discharge readiness. A new study reinforces the importance of discharge preparation and transition to home planning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify potential subtype of PTSD
(Boston University School of Medicine) A major obstacle in understanding and treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is its clinical and neurobiological heterogeneity. In order to better treat the condition and address this barrier, the field has become increasingly interested in identifying subtypes of PTSD based on dysfunction in neural networks alongside cognitive impairments that may underlie the development and maintenance of symptoms. VA and BU researchers have now found a marker of PTSD in brain regions associated with emotional regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study provides novel platform to study how SaRS-CoV-2 affects the gut
(Boston University School of Medicine) How could studying gastrointestinal cells help the fight against COVD-19, which is a respiratory disease? According to a team led by Gustavo Mostoslavsky, MD, PhD, at the BU/BMC Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) and Elke M ü hlberger, PhD, from the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) at Boston University, testing how SARS-CoV-2 affects the gut can potentially serve to test novel therapeutics for COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 13, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Boston University to require students to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before fall semester
Boston University is the latest local institution to announce it will require students to be vaccinated against COVID-19. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Mario Kart teach us how to reduce world poverty and improve sustainability?
(Boston University) New study shows how the principles of Mario Kart — especially the parts of it that make the game fun for players — can be applied to reduce world poverty and improve sustainability in farming and agriculture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sandra Looby-Gordon, MD, receives Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award
(Boston University School of Medicine) Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) faculty member, Sandra Looby-Gordon MD, has been chosen as the recipient of the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award presented by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation. This award is presented to faculty who best demonstrate the foundation's ideals of outstanding compassion in the delivery of care, respect for patients, their families and health-care colleagues, as well as clinical excellence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For better or worse, the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the health care delivery landscape
(Boston University School of Medicine) In a Viewpoint in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, researchers warn that health care delivery and access issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic may worsen pregnancy and chronic disease-related inequities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 29, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

National research project bundles interventions to make gains in black women's health
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) The University of Massachusetts Lowell, in collaboration with AIDS United, and the Center for Innovation in Social Work& Health (CISWH) at Boston University's School of Social Work (BUSSW), have been tapped to lead a national, first-of-its-kind project to evaluate and disseminate bundled evidence-informed and trauma-informed interventions for Black women with HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could your smartphone hold clues to early Alzheimer's disease?
(Alzheimer's Research UK) The development of a wearable to detect early Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases years before symptoms show has taken a step closer to reality today, as UK charity Alzheimer's Research UK announces a partnership with Boston University that will see the first digital data flowing into its global Early Detection of Neurodegenerative diseases (EDoN) initiative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researchers identify two drugs that delay bone marrow cancer development
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) led by corresponding author Katya Ravid, DSc, has found that the drugs PXS-LOX_1 and PXS-LOX_2 are capable of slowing PMF's disease progression in experimental models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 22, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

2021-2022 Boston University Sports and Shoulder Research Fellowship
Dr. Xinning Li is seeking an ambitious medical student who is pursing orthopaedic surgery as a career and interested in a year-long clinical research fellowship at the Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center.   (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - March 20, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news