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Researchers win grant to test new approach to overcoming roadblocks to health care delivery
(Boston University School of Medicine) Investigators at Boston University Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), Tufts CTSI, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Catalyst (the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center), and University of Massachusetts Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) won a five-year, $8.6 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) for a project called Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BU researcher studying ways to reduce health disparities for black women dealing with insomnia
(Boston University School of Medicine) Black women are among those most likely to have insomnia, according to Lynn Rosenberg, ScD, associate director of Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center and a principal investigator of the Black Women's Health Study (BWHS). Rosenberg has been awarded a three year $2,225,495 grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to study this. The study will be using a self-administered internet program called SHUTi (Sleep Healthy Using the Internet), a web-tool based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fighting HIV through a better delivery method of anti-retrovirals
(Boston University School of Medicine) Rahm Gummuluru, PhD, associate professor of microbiology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), and Bjoern Reinhard, PhD, professor of chemistry at Boston University, have been awarded a Research Project Grant (R01) from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institute of Health. The R01 is the original and historically oldest grant mechanism used to provide support for health-related research and development based on the mission of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston University geologist fights for his job
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wadman, M. Tags: In Depth Source Type: news

A 3-Mile-Wide ‘Potentially Hazardous’ Asteroid Will Fly by Earth, Scientists Say
A gigantic asteroid will pass by Earth in December — but scientists say the “close” encounter isn’t cause for concern. A three-mile-wide asteroid called 3200 Phaethon will come within 6.4 million miles of Earth on Dec. 16, according to NASA. While that’s relatively close in space terms — for context, the rock hasn’t gotten this close to our planet since 1974, by NASA estimates — and 3200 Phaethon’s size and proximity to Earth have earned it a “potentially hazardous” asteroid moniker from the International Astronomical Union, scientists say there’s no n...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - November 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

US arthritis rates underestimated and driven by obesity
Arthritis is likely 68 percent more common than previous estimates have suggested, according to a new Boston University study. The researchers link the surging rates to the obesity epidemic in the US. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How meditation works: It synchronizes key regions in the brain, improving cognitive functions
(Natural News) Meditation can do more than help you relax after a long day. According to an article by Christina Sarich at the Waking Times, several Boston University researchers have discovered how to activate the two areas of the brain that can “turbo charge” cognitive functioning, or certain cerebral processes that pertain to knowledge and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU: Immediate ART treatment improves retention rates
(Boston University School of Medicine) Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) immediately following an HIV diagnosis dramatically improves retention in clinical HIV care, according to a study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding a therapeutic paradox for treating thrombo-vascular complications in kidney disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered a potential treatment target to prevent chronic kidney disease patients from developing blood clots without causing bleeding complications - an unwanted and perplexing side effect. They say the strategy offers a much-needed therapeutic alternative to standard-of-care heparin, which throws off the finely-tuned balance between pro-clotting and anticoagulant factors in blood vessels that work to keep fluid flowing while protecting against excessive bleeding after injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arthritis rates underestimated and driven by obesity
Arthritis is likely 68 percent more common than previous estimates have suggested, according to a new Boston University study. The researchers link the surging rates to the obesity epidemic in the US. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mucosal healing: An objective measure of disease activity?
(Boston University School of Medicine) The absence of inflammatory and ulcerative lesions in all segments of the colon, also known as mucosal healing, should be the end goal in treating patients with ulcerative colitis according to an editorial in the journal Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Developing a New Score: How Machine Learning Improves Risk Prediction
Composite risk scores have been used for decades to identify disease risk and health status in the general population. However, current approaches often fail to identify people who would benefit from intervention or recommend unnecessary intervention. Machine learning promises to improve accuracy, ensuring targeted treatment for patients that need it and reducing unnecessary intervention. Framingham Risk Score, the gold standard for predicting the likelihood of heart disease, predicts hospitalizations with about 56% accuracy. It uses factors such as age, gender, smoking, cholesterol levels, and systolic blood pre...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Heather R. Johnson Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Naturally occurring molecule may help prevent and treat atherosclerosis and gum disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Resolvin E1, a molecule produced naturally in the body from an omega -3 fish oil, topically applied on gum tissues not only prevents and treats gum disease as previously shown (Hasturk et al 2006 and 2007), but also decreases the likelihood for advanced arterial atherosclerotic plaques to rupture and form a dangerous thrombus or blood clot. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diabetes May Be Driving High Rates of Breast Cancer in Black Women
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 -- Type 2 diabetes may increase the risk for an aggressive type of breast cancer among black women in the United States, a new study finds. Researchers from Boston University analyzed data from more than 54,000 black women... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Type 2 diabetes associated with risk of aggressive breast cancer in black women
(Boston University School of Medicine) African American women with type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult-onset diabetes) are at a greater risk for developing breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Development of new protein may lead to novel treatment options for cancer, birth defects
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have engineered an artificial protein that may block malignant properties of cancer cells as well as correct certain birth defects.The findings, which appear in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may lead to identifying new molecular targets suitable for therapeutic intervention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New images show Aaron Hernandez suffered from extreme case of CTE
Dr Ann McKee said Hernandez suffered severe damage to key brain areasImages show damage to areas important to impulse control and behaviorHernandez, the former NFL star, killed himself in prison in April aged 27Former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez suffered severe damage to parts of the brain that play an important role in memory, impulse control and behavior, a researcher who studied his brain said Thursday.Dr Ann McKee, director of the CTE Center at Boston University, said she could not “connect the dots” between Hernandez’s severe case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is linked t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: NFL New England Patriots Sport US sports Concussion in sport Science Medical research US news Massachusetts World news Source Type: news

Aaron Hernandez's CTE was unusually severe, doctor says
For the first time since announcing former NFL star Aaron Hernandez's CTE diagnosis in September, Boston University neuropathologist Dr. Ann McKee shared the findings from Hernandez's brain autopsy on Thursday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU: Air pollution exposure inequality persists in Massachusetts
(Boston University School of Medicine) Despite overall reductions in ambient air pollution in Massachusetts, exposure continues to fall unequally along racial/ethnic, income, and education lines, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher leads team in 'cancer interception' project
(Boston University School of Medicine) Developing diagnostic tools to 'intercept' lung cancer at its earliest stage is the goal of a research team led by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), along with colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Using innovative approaches such as nasal swabs, blood tests and radiological imaging, scientists look to confirm whether lung abnormalities found on chest imaging are benign lung disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BU finds marijuana use associated with cognitive dysfunction in people with HIV
(Boston University School of Medicine) Marijuana use is associated with cognitive dysfunction in people with HIV infection who have an alcohol or other drug use disorder, according to a new study from researchers at Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH), Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), and Boston Medical Center (BMC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strong maternal antibodies for HIV ineffective for protecting infants from HIV
(Boston University School of Medicine) HIV+ mothers who possess a strong neutralizing antibody response may be more likely to pass the virus on to her infant through breast feeding. In addition, infants born to mothers with a strong antibody response are significantly more likely to have a serious illness or death, regardless of whether or not they acquire the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU receives prestigious ACS award
(Boston University School of Medicine) Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) is one of 12 sites nationwide selected to receive the American Cancer Society's Institutional Research Grants program award. Beginning in January 2018, the three-year, $270,000 award will provide three pilot grants per year to junior faculty conducting cancer research. They will be chosen by an internal committee of faculty members with diverse cancer research expertise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BU researchers create tool to measure, control protein aggregation
(Boston University College of Engineering) In the cover article in the current issue of Cell, BU Biomedical Engineer Ahmad S. Khalil along with colleagues from MIT and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, among others, describe the synthetic genetic tool they built to quantitatively sense, measure and manipulate protein aggregation in live cells. This may open the door to greater understanding and treatment of a range of maladies from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prostate problem? Take 2 nuts
By age 60, you have a 50/50 chance of having a clinically enlarged prostate. And it only gets worse every year. When your prostate isn’t functioning properly, it’s hard to enjoy life. Traditional doctors give you two choices. Go under the knife or you take Big Pharma’s drugs. Either way, you have a good chance of ending up with your manhood on the line… If you have surgery, there’s a big risk you’ll be saying goodbye to your sex life for good. The rate of impotence is a shocking 50 to 60% after prostate surgery.1 Big Pharma’s meds to shrink your prostate are no better. These sy...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 19, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

BU: More permissive concealed-carry laws linked to higher homicide rates
(Boston University School of Medicine) Easier access to concealed firearms is associated with significantly higher rates of handgun-related homicide, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston University and Bodkin Design Use HSI for Seized Drug Analysis
Bodkin Design & Engineering works with Boston University's Biomedical Forensic Sciences using HSI for seized drug analysis and collection, the results of which will be presented at the annual...(PRWeb October 17, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14807054.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

BU researcher receives award to study factors associated with non-fatal firearm injury
(Boston University School of Medicine) Bindu Kalesan, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is the recipient of a three-year, $693,695 award from the US Department of Justice to study 'racial and ethnic differences in non-fatal firearm injuries using a spatiotemporal approach.' The goal is to understand the differences in risk factors associated with gun injuries in different regions of the country in order to tailor efforts to specific places to reduce them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher receives NIH award to better understand wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis
(Boston University School of Medicine) Lawreen H. Connors, PhD, associate professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is the recipient of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) High Priority, Short-Term Project Award, for her research 'molecular mechanism of senile cardiac amyloidosis.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People Magazine finds beautiful people are more diverse
‘Beauty’ is getting older and more diverse, according to a new Boston University study comparing People Magazine’s ’50 Most Beautiful People’ of 2017 to its first list, in 1990. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU researchers question: Can an app reduce cardiac risks?
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) are the recipients of a three-year, $446,999 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to explore different approaches to capturing health data using mobile devices such as smartphones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Stepped care beneficial after hurricanes
(Boston University School of Medicine) Stepped care is more effective than usual care in reducing the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder in the aftermath of hurricanes, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher receives grant to better understand lymphoblastic leukemia
(Boston University School of Medicine) Hui Feng, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacology and medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is the recipient of a four-year, $792,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to study why T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is so aggressive and resistant to treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A 'turbo charge' for your brain?
(Boston University) Two brain regions -- the medial frontal and lateral prefrontal cortices -- control most executive function. Robert Reinhart used high-definition transcranial alternating current stimulation (HD-tACS) to synchronize oscillations between them, improving brain processing. De-synchronizing did the opposite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Beer brands popular among youth violate code with youth-appealing ads
(Boston University School of Medicine) Alcohol brands popular among underage drinkers are more likely to air television advertisements that violate the industry's voluntary code by including youth-appealing content, according to a new study by researchers from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient remedy crushes “breakthrough” depression drug
Two breakthrough treatments for depression have been making headlines over the last few weeks. One is ketamine — an illegal party drug called “Special K.” There is a legal use for it — as a heavy-duty anesthetic for horses! Although it seems to work for some severely depressed people, the doctors prescribing it have no idea how or why it works, or what the long-term effects will be for the patients who take it. What we do know is that chronic use of ketamine has been linked to cognitive impairment and bladder inflammation. Taking too high a dose causes hallucinations and temporary paralysis. A keta...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 3, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Brain Health depression drugs relax yoga Source Type: news

Local researcher studying cognitive decline in hopes of discovering biomarker
(Boston University School of Medicine) Hugo J. Aparicio, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine and a Framingham Heart Study investigator, recently received a grant from the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health to study the vascular risk factors, brain imaging, biomarkers and genetics associated with aging and cognitive decline among participants of the FHS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Few South Africans receiving adequate diabetes care
(Boston University School of Medicine) The large number of South Africans with unmet diabetes care highlights the challenges the country faces with rising levels of chronic non-communicable diseases, says a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

BU study marks key step toward diagnosing CTE in living football players
Researchers at Boston University have previously documented how scores of deceased former football players suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a brain disease linked to repeated head trauma. But CTE can only be diagnosed through autopsies, posing a significant hurdle to developing treatments. Now, however, researchers at the BU School of Medicine and the VA Boston Healthcare System say they have identified a protein that could serve as a so-called “biomarker,” or indicator, of CTE.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 26, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

BU study marks key step toward diagnosing CTE in living football players
Researchers at Boston University have previously documented how scores of deceased former football players suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a brain disease linked to repeated head trauma. But CTE can only be diagnosed through autopsies, posing a significant hurdle to developing treatments. Now, however, researchers at the BU School of Medicine and the VA Boston Healthcare System say they have identified a protein that could serve as a so-called “biomarker,” or indicator, of CTE.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 26, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Researchers find biomarker that could help diagnose CTE in living people
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative neurological disease found in the brains of athletes and others with a history of repetitive hits to the head, is hard for researchers to pin down. The disease’s prevalence is not known and it is only after death that scientists can confirm if someone was suffering from CTE. But now, researchers believe they have identified a new biomarker for CTE, called CCL11, that could allow for a person to be diagnosed with the condition while they are still alive. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Researchers find biomarker that could he...
Source: Mass Device - September 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Neurological Boston University Source Type: news

Boston scientists discover biomarker to detect CTE
Boston University's high profile brain investigation team has identified a biomarker in the brain which is linked to CTE. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU researcher honored for work on reducing cancer health disparities
(Boston University School of Medicine) Julie Palmer, Sc.D., associate director of Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center, professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, and associate director for population sciences at the BU-BMC Cancer Center, is the recipient of the 2017 American Association for Cancer Research Distinguished Lecture on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities funded by Susan G. Komen ® . (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

WATCH: Aaron Hernandez's family suing NFL, Patriots
Doctors at Boston University determined Hernandez, a former New England Patriots star who committed suicide in prison, had an advanced form of the brain disease CTE. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Aaron Hernandez Had CTE. How Much More Damage Can The NFL Take?
Is the chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) diagnosis for Aaron Hernandez, the convicted murderer and former New England Patriots tight end who committed suicide in April while serving a life sentence, all that surprising? Not really, given what we know about this degenerative brain disease. Several ex-NFL players (Junior Seau, Dave Duerson, Andre Waters, Ray Easterling) who took their own lives were diagnosed with CTE postmortem. CTE victims have struggled with impulse control, turned violent against their spouses, abused drugs, raged and acted irrationally. In 2012 Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher, who had C...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Aaron Hernandez CTE Football New England Patriots NFL Source Type: news

BU: Resurgence of whooping cough may owe to vaccine's inability to prevent infections
(Boston University School of Medicine) The startling global resurgence of pertussis, or whooping cough, in recent years can largely be attributed to the immunological failures of acellular vaccines, Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers argue in a new journal article. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Strong alcohol policies help reduce alcohol-involved homicides
(Boston Medical Center) Stronger alcohol policies, including taxes and sales restrictions, have been shown to reduce the likelihood of alcohol involvement among homicide victims, according to a new study from Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study offers novel treatment strategy for patients with colon cancer
(Boston University School of Medicine) Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that a previously uncharacterized protein is increased in colon cancer. The protein is immunoglobulin containing proline rich receptor-1 (IGPR-1) which was recently identified in the same laboratory as a cell adhesion molecule. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Study Links Playing Youth Football to Later Brain Damage
If children play tackle football before they are 12 and continue to play through high school, they may be putting their brains at risk. That’s the key takeaway from a new study published Tuesday in the journal Nature’s Translational Psychiatry. Researchers from Boston University’s Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center studied 214 former football players, including 43 who only played at the high school level, 103 who played in college, and 68 who played professionally. The scientists found that playing tackle football before the age of 12 increased the odds of problems with behavioral regulation, apathy ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Boston University Brain Damage CTE Football head trauma NFL Youth Football youth sports Source Type: news