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‘I Had a Right to Be at Central’: Remembering Little Rock’s Integration Battle
It was late September 1957, and students at Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas had been in class for three weeks. Everyone, that is, but 14-year-old Carlotta Walls and eight other teenagers who were to be Central High’s first black students. They had been prevented from entering the school by an angry mob of citizens, backed up by a group of Arkansas National Guardsmen. But on Sept. 25, under escort by federal troops, Carlotta and her classmates walked up the front steps of Central High and into history. They became the highest-profile black students in the United States to integrate a formerly all-white sch...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lina Mai Tags: Uncategorized Civil Rights Education segregation Source Type: news

‘Righting Historical Wrongs.’ Justin Trudeau Addresses Canada’s Failings of Indigenous Peoples
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addressed the United Nations Thursday, focusing on Canada’s ongoing efforts toward “righting historical wrongs” committed against the country’s indigenous communities. “Canada remains a work in progress,” Trudeau said, before reflecting on the experience of indigenous people in Canada as “mostly one of humiliation, neglect and abuse.” Trudeau’s election campaign in 2015 focused heavily on relations with indigenous peoples, and as Prime Minister, he pledged “full reconciliation” following the release of a report that fou...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Suyin Haynes Tags: Uncategorized Canada Justin Trudeau onetime United Nations Source Type: news

The decline in adult activities among U.S. adolescents, 1976-2016 - Twenge JM, Park H.
The social and historical contexts may influence the speed of development. In seven large, nationally representative surveys of U.S. adolescents 1976-2016 (N  = 8.44 million, ages 13-19), fewer adolescents in recent years engaged in adult activities such... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

A review of the historical, criminological, and theoretical understandings of the Cambodian American population: a call for more comprehensive research - Chheang D, Connolly EJ.
The collective view of Asian Americans as model minorities is evident with the extensive amount of statistical data showing support for the academic and socioeconomic success of Asian Americans in the United States. This perception, however, often presents... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

ManaMed Inc. Introduces PlasmaFlow, The World's First FDA-Approved Digital and Tubeless Deep Vein Thrombosis Prevention Device
PlasmaFlow Is Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prevention Made Simple SANTA ANA, Calif., Sept. 21, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- The company's historical first FDA-approved portable and tubeless DVT prevention device is now available to m... Devices, Product Launch ManaMed, PlasmaFlow, Deep Vein Thrombosis (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How the views of liberals evolved from the 19th century to the present day
(RUDN University) Scientists from the RUDN University have analyzed historical sources and revealed the foreign policy views of Russian liberals from the 1850s to the early 1890s. The researchers came to the conclusion that the views of modern liberals have nothing to do with the views of their predecessors. The study is published in The International History Review. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Remembering Jake LaMotta, Combustable Champ and ‘Raging Bull’ Inspiration
Jake LaMotta, the former middleweight boxing champion who died Wednesday at age 95 from complications from pneumonia, handed Sugar Ray Robinson, the man that many sweaty scholars of the sweet science consider the best pound-for-pound fighter of all-time, his first-ever loss. His bouts with Robinson defined boxing in the 1940s and 1950s, an era when the sport soared in popularity. LaMotta’s combustable life, both inside and outside the ring, were brilliantly captured in Raging Bull, the 1980 Martin Scorsese film that won Robert De Niro, who portrayed LaMotta, an Oscar, and is recognized as one of the best and most inf...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Boxing Jake LaMotta martin scorsese Oscar Raging Bull Robert De Niro Sugar Ray Robinson Source Type: news

President Trump, North Korea and a Brief History of Nuclear Threats
During his first presidential speech at the United Nations on Tuesday, President Trump cited the “strength and patience” of his nation before telling the audience that “if [the U.S.] is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.” This is not, as it happens, the first time a nuclear power has openly threatened another state with destruction — but the previous episode does not bode well for President Trump, or for the world. In 1956 only the United States, the USSR and Great Britain had nuclear weapons. It turns out that Russia was quite a w...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Kaiser Tags: Uncategorized Nuclear Opinion United Nations USSR Source Type: news

Channel Islands' buried porpoise is not the first such mysterious find
A porpoise jawbone, discovered in the Shetlands by a 1950s schoolboy as part of an ancient treasure hoard, raises similar questions about the significance these animals held for earlier peopleThestrange discovery of a porpoise skeleton interred in a medieval religious grave in the Channel Islands is evocative of a deep cultural connection between humans and cetaceans which we are only just beginning to understand.It speaks to a different, historical relationship to the natural world – one which now appears to be coming full circle.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Philip Hoare Tags: Porpoises Cetaceans Marine life Environment Scotland Archaeology Science UK news Heritage Channel Islands Source Type: news

The shadows of the past: effects of historical group trauma on current intergroup conflicts - Schori-Eyal N, Klar Y, Roccas S, McNeill A.
We examined associations between two orientations based on historical group trauma, a form of enduring group victimhood (Perpetual Ingroup Victimhood Orientation [PIVO]) and the belief that one's group might itself become a victimizer (Fear of Victimizing ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

‘This Is All We Can Do’: How the Japanese Are Preparing for a North Korean Nuclear Attack
The wail of the emergency siren reverberates across the school’s playing field, conjuring a primal fear even before the words “Missile launched! Missile launched!” crackle over the loudspeaker. Two dozen men, women and children—many wearing bonnets and wet neck towels against the blazing sunshine—scamper across the shingle expanse before squatting down low with arms covering heads. “We haven’t got a nuclear shelter or even strong buildings, so this is all we can do,” says Nakamura Takashi, an official of Sakura City in Japan’s central Tochigi Prefecture, who helped to o...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Tokyo Tags: Uncategorized Japan onetime Source Type: news

The Story Behind the Truman Quote in President Trump ’s U.N. Speech
In his first speech as President at the U.N. General Assembly, Donald Trump on Tuesday expressed support for the organization by quoting one of his predecessors who was among the institution’s earliest supporters: President Harry S. Truman, who was a signer of the charter that established the U.N. In discussing how the U.S. helped restore post-World War II Europe by providing support through the Marshall Plan, President Trump called on member states to “embrace their sovereignty” in the interest of the group. “Our support of European recovery is in full accord with our support of the United Nations,...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Foreign Relations Source Type: news

Technology in the classroom: Robots could replace teachers in 10 years
(Natural News) Classroom teaching will primarily be handled by adaptable robots rather than humans within 10 years and will alter human life as we know it in the process. That is the prediction of historian Sir Anthony Seldon, vice chancellor of the University of Buckingham in the U.K., which he made at the recent British... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Where 2017 ’s Hurricanes Fit in the Long History of American Climate Confusion
This post is in partnership with the History News Network, the website that puts the news into historical perspective. The article below was originally published at HNN. Last month, Hurricane Harvey dumped more rain on the Texas coast in a week than most states see all year. As I write, Florida is engulfed in a hurricane expected to cause tens of billions more in damage. We know rising sea levels mean higher storm surges. We know hotter air means potentially larger hurricanes with more rain and winds. What’s harder to say is whether we should blame these particular storms—or any other weather event—on glo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sam White / History News Network Tags: Uncategorized Environment natural disaster Source Type: news

Blaming ‘Bad Dudes’ Masks the Role of Women in the History of White Nationalism
The “Unite the Right” Rally last month in Charlottesville, Va., continues to dominate headlines, with President Trump reigniting controversy last week by reiterating his belief that both sides are to blame for the violent fallout between protesters and counter-protesters. “You have some pretty bad dudes on the other side also,” the President said. The president’s choice of words — the idea that there are “bad dudes” out there — is significant, as it sheds light on an aspect of the controversy that has largely been ignored, which is the role of women in the white nationa...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Arica L. Coleman Tags: Uncategorized Charlottesville KKK Opinion Race Source Type: news

Interior Secretary Recommends Shrinking 6 National Monuments
WASHINGTON (AP) — Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is recommending that six of 27 national monuments under review by the Trump administration be reduced in size, with changes to several others proposed. A leaked memo from Zinke to President Donald Trump recommends that two Utah monuments – Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante — be reduced, along with Nevada’s Gold Butte and Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou. Two marine monuments in the Pacific Ocean also would be reduced under Zinke’s memo, which has not been officially released. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the memo, which was first...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized National Parks onetime Source Type: news

Review: Colbert Aside, Inclusive Winners Made for a Refreshing, Sharp Emmys
Last year’s Emmys were memorable — insofar as casual TV viewers remember any single Emmys ceremony beyond the night it airs — for two things. One was host Jimmy Kimmel’s vocal anger over then-presidential nominee Donald Trump, at one point yelling at audience member Mark Burnett, the former producer of The Apprentice. The other was the dominance of Game of Thrones. It’s hard to say which absence was more striking during this year’s Emmy Awards, which aired Sunday night. Game of Thrones‘s ineligibility for awards (having aired outside the eligibility window this year) opened the doo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Daniel D’Addario Tags: Uncategorized awards Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton Is the Only Person Who Should Tell Her Story
A lot of people have told Hillary Clinton to shut up in her life. We meet a few of them in her new book, What Happened, part memoir and part election post-mortem. And we are seeing more of them pipe up now with the book’s publication, angry that this woman dares defy their personal preferences with her stubborn insistence that yes, she mattered, and yes, she will keep talking. Clinton’s detractors would like her to say two simple words: “I’m sorry.” She does, of course, and has many times, and does it again and again in this memoir. But instead of leaving it at that – doing the very fema...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jill Filipovic Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

Funding public health emergency preparedness in the United States - Katz R, Attal-Juncqua A, Fischer JE.
The historical precedents that support state and local leadership in preparedness for and response to disasters are in many ways at odds with the technical demands of preparedness and response for incidents affecting public health. New and revised laws and... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

My Father ’s Vietnam
Courtesy Jon MeachamJere Meacham on patrol in Vietnam with other members of the U.S. Army’s Fourth Infantry Division. He sent the images to his son in 1999 Thirty years after everything happened–and 31 years since he had first set foot in Southeast Asia–my father, a soldier of the Fourth Infantry Division, wrote me a letter. It was 1999, and the note came with a set of recently rediscovered photographs he and his friends had taken with an old 35-mm Minolta in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. There were images of impossibly young men, their helmets heavy on their heads, carrying M-16s, smoking cigarettes ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Meacham Tags: Uncategorized History Vietnam Source Type: news

How Edith Windsor Became a ‘Matriarch of the Gay-Rights Movement’
For most of her life, Edith Windsor was a private citizen who, like most Americans, had a name that — while meaningful to those in her circle of friends and family — was largely unknown to the wider world. But a late-in-life decision ensured that the LGBTQ activist, who died on Tuesday at 88, as her wife Judith Kasen-Windsor confirmed, would find her name a solid part of American history. After all, it’s her name in the 2013 Supreme Court case United States v. Windsor, which overturned key parts of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). “America’s long journey towards equality has been guided by...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Civil Rights remembrance Source Type: news

Outreach On A Stick
The Minnesota State Fair, often referred to as the “Great Minnesota Get-Together,” is one of the most popular late summer destinations in the region. The fair attracts nearly 2 million guests annually over the twelve days leading up to and through Labor Day.   One fun aspect about the fair is how many foods can be devised to be eaten “on a stick” (mac ‘n cheese or spaghetti & meatballs on a stick anyone?).   The Health Sciences Libraries at the University of Minnesota has had a presence at the Minnesota State Fair in one form or another since the mid-2000.  &n...
Source: The Cornflower - September 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Blog Outreach Source Type: news

The Median Household Income in the U.S. Is Rising
(WASHINGTON) — In a stark reminder of the damage done by the Great Recession and of the modest recovery that followed, the median American household last year finally earned more than it did in 1999. Incomes for a typical U.S. household, adjusted for inflation, rose 3.2 percent from 2015 to 2016 to $59,039, the Census Bureau said. The median is the point at which half the households fall below and half are above. Last year’s figure is slightly above the previous peak of $58,665, reached in 1999. It is also the first time since the recession ended in 2009 that the typical household earned more than it did in 200...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Rugaber / AP Tags: Uncategorized income Money onetime Source Type: news

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History
Join the National Library of Medicine, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) through a grant to Virginia Tech, for this exciting opportunity! On January 29-30, 2018, NLM will host Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History, bringing together scholars from various fields of medical history whose innovative research shows promise through the use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. Viral Networks will combine a face-to-face workshop with structured virtual-editing activities to produce and advance the innovative scholarship of the participant...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Data Science Education News from NLM/NIH Technology Source Type: news

A Devastating Hurricane Season Exposes America ’s Flood Insurance Problem
As Hurricane Irma continued on a collision course toward South Florida with wind speeds topping 150 mph, millions of people in the region boarded up their homes and packed up their bags. In the face of a storm that is predicted to be devastating, the question looming over many families is whether they will be able to afford to rebuild their homes if they’re destroyed. At the heart of that question is the issue of flood insurance — an increasingly fraught topic not just in South Florida but in the flood-prone regions of the country as a whole. Private insurance companies moved away from offering flood insurance ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Congress FEMA hurricane irma Natural Disasters Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight September is National Preparedness Month! Visit the Ready Campaign web page to learn about this year’s theme, “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can” and check out the 2017 promotional toolkit which includes graphics, social media content, free publications, and more! Read the Summer 2017 issue of The MAReport! In this issue, Academic Coordinator Elaina Vitale writes about her experience at the Evidence Based Library & Information Conference in Philadelphia! Renew your membership today! If you have...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 8, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

The One Number That Shows Why Climate Change Is Making Hurricane Season Worse
Hurricanes Irma and Harvey have reignited discussions about the link between global warming and extreme weather, with climate scientists now saying they can show the connections between the two phenomena better than ever before. Scientists’ explanation of how they do that involves a complex discussion of climate models, historical temperature data and probability. But understanding the link really comes down to one figure: the air can hold 7% more water with every degree Celsius that the temperature rises. That figure comes from the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, a widely accepted physical law established centuri...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Models of mortality and morbidity in severe traumatic brain injury: an analysis of a Singapore neurotrauma database - Han JX, Qi See AA, Gandhi M, Kam King NK.
OBJECTIVE: Current prognostic models for traumatic brain injury (TBI) available for use are developed from diverse historical datasets. We aim to construct a prognostication tool for severe TBI as it is this group who would benefit the most from an accurat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Gardia Medical Demonstrates Enhanced Safety in Lower Extremity Interventions
Gardia met the primary end-point for the WISE-LE FDA study with an unprecedented safety profile In the 100-patient interim analysis, only one event was adjudicated as a Major Adverse Event (MAE) versus the 9 events allowed based on the historical compar... Devices, Interventional Gardia Medical, WIRION, atherectomy, Peripheral Arterial Disease (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A Conversation with Christian Curtis
Discussion includes the work of the HPDP, including school-based clinics and telehealth, and the influence of historical trauma on health, among other things. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - September 5, 2017 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Does the civil war begin on November 4? "Refuse Fascism" to radically escalate left-wing battle tactics in bid to overthrow the country
(Natural News) Radical leftist groups have threatened to greatly escalate their counter-protest tactics after descending on Charlottesville, Virginia, recently to engage in violence against a group of peaceful protesters who were there to speak up about the removal of a historical statue. The so-called anti-fascist group “antifa” says it plans to become even more violent... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A historical comparison of Australian lawyers' strategies for cross-examining child sexual abuse complainants - Zajac R, Westera N, Kaladelfos A.
Many child sexual abuse complainants find the adversarial trial process so distressing that they say they would never report abuse again. Their concerns stem largely from cross-examination, in which the lawyer acting for the accused attempts to discredit t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Book Review: Addiction Treatment
Spanning across all socioeconomic statuses, races, cultures and ages, addiction is one of the largest and most insidious problems our society faces today. And yet, for the medical doctors who are often tasked with treating addiction, identifying and treating it is not always a straight forward process. In his new book, Addiction Treatment, Dr. Michael Weaver, a specialist in substance abuse disorders, provides a comprehensive review of addiction, dual diagnosis, pharmaceutical treatment and clinical advice about how to work with an addict. “People are embarrassed to admit to using drugs partly because they worry...
Source: Psych Central - August 31, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Book Reviews Medications Psychiatry Substance Abuse Treatment Source Type: news

Neurocognitive impairment and suicide risk among prison inmates - Vadini F, Calella G, Pieri A, Ricci E, Fulcheri M, Verrocchio MC, De Risio A, Sciacca A, Santilli F, Parruti G.
BACKGROUND: Worldwide, prisoners are at high risk of suicide. Reducing the number of suicides in jails and prisons is an international priority. Several risk factors for suicide attempts, such as historical, prison-related, psychosocial and clinical factor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Evaluation of 'Safe Home Safe Kids': a home visiting program for Aboriginal Australian children (Safety-2016 abstract #235) - Clapham K, Bennett-Brook K.
BACKGROUND Research reveals consistently higher injury rates amongst Aboriginal Australian children (AIHW: Pointer 2014). Intervention strategies for this population must be culturally appropriate and take into account a broad range of social, historical a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Bahamian songbirds disappeared during last glacial-interglacial transition
(University of California - Riverside) Two species of songbirds that once made a home in the Bahamas likely became extinct on the islands because of rising sea levels and a warmer, wetter climate, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Florida, Gainesville. The study, which was published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, presents a historical view of how climate change and the resulting habitat loss can affect Earth's biodiversity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaccine tyranny throughout history: Caribbean slave owners infected women and children with smallpox to "make them stronger"
(Natural News) The historical roots of Big Pharma are a chillingly ugly matter, as it’s been shown time and time again that the industry has taken advantage of vulnerable populations to shamelessly advance its agenda. In the case of Caribbean slaves, new evidence suggests that so-called doctors from Great Britain deliberately injected many of them... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meteorologist On Hurricane Historical Texas Damage
Hurricane Harvey is causing much more damage than other hurricanes have in Texas. NPR's Michel Martin interviews Dr. Neil Frank, former director of the National Hurricane Center and longtime meteorologist, about why this storm is so bad. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Hurricane Harvey Related to Climate Change? Scientists Have a Better Answer
As Hurricane Harvey approaches Texas, an old argument has again resurfaced about whether climate change is to blame. In the past, scientists have had a rather unsatisfying answer for both environmentalists and skeptics, essentially saying that while climate change increases the frequency and severity of extreme weather, no individual event could be attributed to it. But that may be changing. Climate scientists now say that they can use models and historical data to evaluate with increased precision how global warming has affected the odds of a given individual weather event. Known collectively as the World Weather Attribut...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change hurricane harvey Hurricanes weather Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Update your membership record today! If you have completed the renewal process before Friday, July 21, you can expect to receive your membership certificate by the end of August. If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, check out our Membership renewal flyer for more information. National Preparedness Month begins September 1! Visit the Ready Campaign web page to learn about this year’s theme, “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can” and check out the 2017 promot...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - August 25, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) (U54)
Funding is to expand the national capacity for research in the health sciences by providing cooperative agreement support to institutions that offer doctorate degrees in the health professions or in a health-related science and have a historical and current commitment to educating underrepresented students, and for institutions that deliver health care services, providing clinical services to medically underserved communities. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - August 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The social construction of disasters in the United States: a historical and cultural phenomenon - Neaves TT, Wachhaus TA, Royer GA.
INTRODUCTION: Societal risks from hazards are continually increasing. Each year, disasters cause thousands of deaths and cost billions of dollars. In the first half of 2011, the United States endured countless disasters-winter snowstorms in the Midwest and... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Vibroacoustic impact on the architectonic heritage when using replicas of 16th century weapons - Lloret AT, Sendra S, Lloret J, Del Rey R, Louis Cereceda M.
The recreation of historical battles next to old buildings, walls, churches, fortifications or historical facades belonging to the historical heritage of a city, has always been a source of controversy and discussion. In the absence of a clear legislation ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

The Eclipse Crosses America
NASA; Ted S. Warren—AP The Eclipse Crosses America Millions of people looked skyward to witness the Great American Eclipse For photographers, the Great American Eclipse is a visual, movable feast—and a very fast one. The zone of totality will zip across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina at an average of 1,700 mph (2,735 k/h). That means that unlike other celestial events, which look more or less the same from more or less any place on Earth, the scene will be different in every city or town or square of farmland in the path of totality, depending on elevation, clouds, light pollution, tree cover a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: eclipse space space 2017 Source Type: news

We ’re Flying a Plane to Go See the Solar Eclipse
Over the weekend, millions of Americans crowded into the narrow celestial interstate from Oregon to South Carolina known as the “path of totality,” where a total solar eclipse will appear briefly on Monday. From Washington, D.C., it would be about an eight-hour drive one way to get to the closest point along that path. We wanted to cover the total eclipse in person, but we didn’t want to drive. So we decided to fly — ourselves. On Monday morning, White House Correspondent Zeke Miller, a pilot since 2014, will be piloting TIME Force One — a Cessna 172 Skyhawk we rented for the occasion — ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zeke J Miller and Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized eclipse space space 2017 Source Type: news

The spatial diffusion of counterterrorist legislation, 1970-2011 - Shor E.
Ostensibly, nations adopt counterterrorist legislation in response to terrorist attacks and/or in an attempt to prevent future attacks. Yet, recent data on global historical trends suggest a decoupling of counterterrorist legislation and actual terrorist a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Watch Live as the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Crosses the U.S.
As a total solar eclipse makes its way across the United States on Monday, TIME will livestream the rare event in a free broadcast featuring popular space personality Amy Shira Teitel and former NASA astronaut Marsha Ivins. Teitel, a YouTube host and spaceflight historian, will anchor TIME’s broadcast from New York City, while Jeffrey Kluger, editor-at-large for TIME and the author of Apollo 8, reports from Casper, Wyo., which is in the path of totality — where the moon completely blocks out the sun. Ivins is a veteran of five space flights who has spent more than 1,300 hours in space. The free broadcast begins...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized eclipse onetime solar eclipse space 2017 Source Type: news

The Beauty and Science of a Total Solar Eclipse
This story originally appeared in the TIME special edition Beautiful Phenomena available now at retail outlets and through the TIME shop and through Amazon The moon was not placed in space for our entertainment. In fact, it was placed there by accident, most astronomers believe, as the product of a nearly mortal blow the Earth sustained more than 4 billion years ago, when our planet was sideswiped by a Mars-size planetesimal speeding through local space. That collision produced a massive debris cloud that eventually coalesced into our moon. The sun didn’t pop into being for our enjoyment either; it spun down out of a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized eclipse space space 2017 Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Update your membership record today! If you have completed the renewal process before Friday, July 21, you can expect to receive your membership certificate by the end of August. If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, check out our Membership renewal flyer for more information. A solar eclipse will be visible across North America for 2 to 3 hours on Monday, August 21. This is a rare and exciting opportunity, but should be attempted with caution. Check out the National Eye Institute...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - August 18, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Dentist Roots Out Clues to Doomed Arctic Expedition
FRIDAY, Aug. 18, 2017 -- For more than 150 years, the deaths of the famed Franklin naval expedition crew -- on a mission to reach the Northwest Passage -- have been a captivating historical mystery. Now, a dentist says some of the truth may lie in... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news