Preclinical Atherosclerosis is Widespread in 50+ Year Old People

Atherosclerosis is the growth of fatty, inflamed deposits in blood vessel walls, narrowing and weakening them. It results from processes that are universal, present in every older individual. The oxidative stress and inflammation of aging lead to a raised amount of oxidized lipids and lipid carriers such as LDL particles, and these produce a growing dysfunction in the macrophage cells responsible for clearing unwanted lipids from blood vessel tissue. It is not surprising to see the data presented in today's research materials, showing that near half of older adults in their 50s and 60s age have measurable atherosclerotic lesions in their blood vessels despite exhibiting no clinical symptoms. This is consistent with past studies using imaging to determine the burden of atherosclerosis in large patient populations. Those lesions grow over time to kill at least 25% every older person via stroke, heart attack, or other cardiovascular disease. A way to reverse atherosclerotic lesions is desperately needed, but the research and development of new therapies remains near entirely focused on lowering of LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream, an approach that can only slow the condition, and is incapable of producing sizable reversal of atherosclerosis. To make real progress towards reversal of atherosclerosis, macrophage cells must be made resistant to the aged environment, enabling these cells to continue their beneficial maintenance of blood vessels as they did in youth. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

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AbstractIdentification of individuals with increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) is important. However, algorithms specific to the elderly are lacking. Data were analysed from a randomised trial involving 18,548 participants  ≥ 70 years old (mean age 75.4 years), without prior cardiovascular disease events, dementia or physical disability. MACE included coronary heart disease death, fatal or nonfatal ischaemic stroke or myocardial infarction. Potential predictors tested were based on prior evidence and using a m achine-learning approach. Cox regression analyses were used to...
Source: AGE - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
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Source: Cardiophile MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Research wire Source Type: news
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Drugs Health Heart attack Stroke UK news NHS National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Source Type: news
AbstractNew and clinically useful markers of cardiovascular risk are of great importance in patients with type 2 diabetes since cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death in these patients. We analyzed inflammatory markers and other risk factors for heart disease in 761 patients who participated in the CARDIPP-study, Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes —a Prospective study in Primary care. All participants had type 2 diabetes and were 55–66 years old at recruitment during the years 2005–2008. Patients were followed for incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from ...
Source: Heart and Vessels - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, cancer survivors, especially older individuals, demonstrate greater odds of and accelerated functional decline, suggesting that cancer and/or its treatment may alter aging trajectories. Linking Particulate Air Pollution and Dementia in a Small Region of the US https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/08/linking-particulate-air-pollution-and-dementia-in-a-small-region-of-the-us/ It is fairly settled that evident particulate air pollution, such as daily exposure to smoke from wood-fueled cooking fires, has a strongly detrimental effect on long-term health. The mechanisms involved are inflamm...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2021 Aug 6. doi: 10.1007/s11356-021-15732-2. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTPrevious studies have determined the effects of exposure to certain heavy metals on cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the association between cadmium exposure and CVD in adults remains unclear. The relationship between serum levels of cadmium and the risk of CVD was studied by analyzing available data from 38,223 different participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 to 2016. After adjusting for all covariates, we found that higher serum cadmium concentrations were positivel...
Source: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: These analyses suggest reliability and concurrent validity regarding self-reported cardiovascular risk factors and disease assessed in the PATH Study.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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