Predictors of 30-day re-admissions in patients with infective endocarditis: a national population based cohort study.

In this study, we analyzed the National Readmissions' Database (NRD) to identify infective endocarditis cases and the causative organisms, clinical determinants, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and 30-day hospital readmission rates. The study cohort was derived from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's National Readmission Database between 2010-15. We queried the National Readmissions' Database using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnostic code for infective endocarditis (421.0) and identified a total of 187,438 index admissions. SAS 9.4 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) was utilized for statistical analyses. A total of 187,438 patients with a primary diagnosis of IE were identified over 6 years (2010-2015). Twenty-four percent (44,151 patients) were readmitted within 30 days. Most common etiologies for readmission included sepsis (14%), acute heart failure (8%), acute kidney injury (6%), intracardiac device infection (5.6%) and recurrence of IE (2.7%). Predictors of increased readmissions included female sex, staphylococcus aureus infection, diabetes, chronic lung disease, chronic liver disease, acute kidney injury, acute heart failure and anemia. In-hospital mortality for the readmission of IE was 13%, and average length of stay during the re-admission was 12 days. IE is associated with high rates of index admission mortality and for 30-day readmissions of which are associated with a substantial risk...
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: The average patient is middle aged (often male) with a history of subacute back pain, sometimes presenting fever and/or neurological damage on diagnosis. Acute phase reactants are frequently raised. Diabetes mellitus, endocarditis and immunosuppressed patients may have the worst chance of a good outcome, therefore these patients should be more carefully managed (always try to obtain an imaging-guided biopsy, correct antibiotic treatment, and a functional and clinical follow-up). PMID: 32446680 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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