Face masks may protect hog farm workers and their household members from staph bacteria
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Face masks appear to provide important protection against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria for hog farm workers and for household members to whom they might otherwise transmit the bacteria, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Reprocessed Duodenoscopes Are Still Too Dirty
Preliminary findings from sampling studies of duodenoscopes currently in clinical use indicate higher-than-expected contamination rates after reprocessing, FDA reported in a safety notice this week. The news coincided with Olympus agreeing to pay $85 million to settle a federal investigation that began in 2015 related to its duodenoscope. Back in 2015, FDA ordered all three U.S. duodenoscope manufacturers—Olympus, Fujifilm, and Pentax—to conduct two postmarket surveillance studies to determine whether healthcare facilities were able to properly clean and disinfect...
Source: MDDI - December 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Olympus fined $85 million in duodenoscope case; former exec faces prison
(Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash) Olympus (TYO:7733) and a former senior executive in Japan have pleaded guilty in Newark, N.J., to failing to file required adverse event reports involving infections connected to duodenoscopes, and to continuing to sell the devices in the United States despite those failures, the Justice Department announced.   Tokyo-based Olympus and Hisao Yabe, 62, both entered guilty pleas before U.S. District Court Judge Stanley Chesler in Newark Federal Court: Olympus to three counts, and Yabe to one count, of distributing misbranded medical devices in interstate commerce in violatio...
Source: Mass Device - December 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Legal News Olympus Source Type: news

Improve hand hygiene and patient decolonization to help stem high-risk S. aureus transmission in the operating room
(Elsevier) Adherence to proven protocols for disinfecting surgeons' hands, patients' skin, and operating room surfaces could help to halt the spread of dangerous Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) pathogens in the operating room and beyond, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control, the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 27, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Diagnostics Are Helping Counter Antimicrobial Resistance, But More Work Is Needed
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) threats to patient health are becoming more widely recognized and diagnostics manufacturers are making significant progress in combatting the overuse of antibiotics. There is still a lot of work to be done, however. A recent health scare for Rick Bright, Ph.D., director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), HHS, the very agency working to combat emerging infectious diseases (EID) and other threats, highlights the lingering risks.  During the 10th Public Meeting of the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB...
Source: MDDI - November 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Drug resistant infections associated with higher in-hospital mortality rates in India
(Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics& Policy) In one of the largest studies to measure the burden of antibiotic resistance in a low- or middle-income country, researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics& Policy report that in-hospital mortality is significantly higher among patients infected with multi-drug resistant (MDR) or extensively drug resistant (XDR) pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Toxins override key immune system check
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Staphylococcus aureus bacteria can cause numerous diseases, such as skin infections, pneumonia and blood poisoning (sepsis). The strong immune response triggered by the bacteria is an aggravating factor here. One reason for this lies in specific bacterial toxins -- as established by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and University of T ü bingen. These toxins reduce the amount of cells capable of suppressing the immune response. So multi-resistant strains, which produce very high levels of enterotoxin, become even more dangerous. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectiou...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

External Quality Assessment of Laboratory Performance: European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net), 2017
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 11/2018. This 25-page report provides an analysis of the external quality assessment (EQA) performance of laboratories participating in the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net) in 2017. A total of 893 laboratories participated in the EQA exercise. Six bacterial strains were used: Acinetobacter baumannii complex, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Probiotic bacteria block harmful microbe
Researchers identified how Bacillus bacteria, which are used in many probiotic formulations, can prevent the growth of harmful Staphylococcus aureus, or “staph,” bacteria. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research indicates that turmeric may help mitigate the growth of MRSA superbugs
(Natural News) One of the scariest health problems that the world is facing today is the explosion of antibiotic-resistant superbugs like methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. These bacteria can cause infections, pneumonia, and other problems. When left unchecked – which is often the case because it’s notoriously difficult to treat – it can lead to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: The probiotic that kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus are highly resistant to antibiotics and can be deadly. New research shows that a probiotic can destroy them. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: MRSA / Drug Resistance Source Type: news

Genome hypermobility by lateral transduction
Genetic transduction is a major evolutionary force that underlies bacterial adaptation. Here we report that the temperate bacteriophages of Staphylococcus aureus engage in a distinct form of transduction we term lateral transduction. Staphylococcal prophages do not follow the previously described excision-replication-packaging pathway but instead excise late in their lytic program. Here, DNA packaging initiates in situ from integrated prophages, and large metameric spans including several hundred kilobases of the S. aureus genome are packaged in phage heads at very high frequency. In situ replication before DNA packaging c...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Chen, J., Quiles-Puchalt, N., Chiang, Y. N., Bacigalupe, R., Fillol-Salom, A., Chee, M. S. J., Fitzgerald, J. R., Penades, J. R. Tags: Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

Has the cure for MRSA been found? A traditional Côte d’Ivoire medicine shows great potential in treating the disease
(Natural News) An African medicinal plant might be a potential means of treating infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Researchers from Côte d’Ivoire studied the therapeutic potential of extracts from cherry mahogany (Tieghemella heckelii), a tree that grows in certain African countries like Cameroon and Côte d’Ivoire. S. aureus is one of the bacteria commonly... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH study finds probiotic Bacillus eliminates Staphylococcus bacteria
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A new study from NIH scientists and their Thai colleagues shows that a 'good' bacterium commonly found in probiotic digestive supplements helps eliminate Staphylococcus aureus, a type of bacteria that can cause serious antibiotic-resistant infections. The researchers, led by NIAID, unexpectedly found that Bacillus bacteria prevented S. aureus bacteria from growing in the gut and nose of healthy individuals. Researchers from Mahidol University and Rajamangala University of Technology in Thailand collaborated on the project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Therapy Dogs Can Spread Superbugs to Kids, Hospital Finds
(NEW YORK) — Therapy dogs can bring more than joy and comfort to hospitalized kids. They can also bring stubborn germs. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore were suspicious that the dogs might pose an infection risk to patients with weakened immune systems. So they conducted some tests when Pippi, Poppy, Badger and Winnie visited 45 children getting cancer treatment. They discovered that kids who spent more time with the dogs had a 6 times greater chance of coming away with superbug bacteria than kids who spent less time with the animals. But the study also found that washing the dogs before visits and usin...
Source: TIME: Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MIKE STOBBE / AP Tags: Uncategorized health onetime Research Source Type: news

Cleaning procedure prevents therapy dogs from spreading MRSA to children with cancer
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Therapy dogs help ease stress in young patients with cancer, but can spread methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), putting vulnerable kids at risk for a serious infection. Cleaning the dogs with special antibacterial shampoo and wipes reduces MRSA carriage and helps keep the kids safe, suggests a first-of-its-kind study presented at IDWeek 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MRSA Contamination of Hospital Privacy Curtains Common MRSA Contamination of Hospital Privacy Curtains Common
Two weeks after being hung, 87.5% of hospital privacy curtains were contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a small study found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hospital Medicine News Source Type: news

Interventions for the eradication of meticillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in people with cystic fibrosis
This review concluded that whilst early eradication of respiratory MRSA in cystic fibrosis with oral trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole combined with rifampicin is possible, the evidence is of low quality to justify use. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The therapeutic potential of cherry mahogany in treating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
(Natural News) Côte d’Ivoire researchers tested cherry mahogany (Tieghemella heckelii) for its antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). They reported that extracts from the stem bark of the African medicinal plant were able to inhibit the growth of different strains of the drug-resistant pathogenic microbe. The study was supported by the Institut Pasteur Côte d’Ivoire. Its findings were... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DNA islands effective as 'anti-bacterial drones'
Genomic "islands" that evolved from viruses can be converted into "drones" that disable Staphylococcus aureus, bacteria that are often resistant to antibiotics and pose a threat to safe hospital care, a new study finds. Conducted by researchers from NYU School of Medicine and published online in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the study found that a certain type of bacterial DNA can be engineered to replace disease-causing genes with ones that kill or cripple bacteria. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

The Chinese ground orchid discovered to be a powerful antibiotic
(Natural News) Chinese researchers examined the antibiotic potential of phenanthrene, a fraction derived from the tuber of the Chinese ground orchid (Bletilla striata). They reported that phenanthrenes showed significant bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects on several pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The research was supported by the Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. The outcome was published... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The pseudokinase MLKL activates PAD4-dependent NET formation in necroptotic neutrophils
Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation can generate short-term, functional anucleate cytoplasts and trigger loss of cell viability. We demonstrated that the necroptotic cell death effector mixed lineage kinase domain–like (MLKL) translocated from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane and stimulated downstream NADPH oxidase–independent ROS production, loss of cytoplasmic granules, breakdown of the nuclear membrane, chromatin decondensation, histone hypercitrullination, and extrusion of bacteriostatic NETs. This process was coordinated by receptor-interacting protein kinase-1 (RIPK1), which activated the ca...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: DCruz, A. A., Speir, M., Bliss-Moreau, M., Dietrich, S., Wang, S., Chen, A. A., Gavillet, M., Al-Obeidi, A., Lawlor, K. E., Vince, J. E., Kelliher, M. A., Hakem, R., Pasparakis, M., Williams, D. A., Ericsson, M., Croker, B. A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Scientific study reveals Mexican mint essential oil can treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria
(Natural News) Research has shown that the essential oil of Plectranthus amboinicus (PAEO), also known as Mexican mint, can potentially be used as an alternative treatment for certain antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. The study, published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, evaluated the effects of PAEO and its active ingredient carvacrol in Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. To make PAEO,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene study pinpoints superbug link between people and animals
(University of Edinburgh) Scientists led by the University of Edinburgh have shed light on how a major cause of human and animal disease can jump between species, by studying its genes. The findings reveal fresh insights into how new disease-causing strains of the bacteria -- called Staphylococcus aureus -- emerge. Experts say the research could help improve the use of antibiotics and design better strategies for limiting the spread of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 23, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

You Are Washing Your Hands All Wrong, Study Finds
By Melissa Gray, CNN (CNN) – Hand-washing seems pretty simple, but a recent study shows that 97% of the time, we’re still doing it wrong — which can lead to contamination of food and surfaces and result in foodborne illness. The study from the US Department of Agriculture shows most consumers failed to wash their hands and rub with soap for 20 seconds. That’s the amount of time recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which says that washing for shorter periods means fewer germs are removed. “Numerous” study participants also didn’t dry their hands with a clea...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Offbeat CNN Source Type: news

Risk of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile in patients with a documented penicillin allergy: population based matched cohort study
This research article covers a UK study (n=64,141 penicillin allergy [PA] and 237,258 matched comparators) noted documented penicillin allergy was linked to increased risk of MRSA (HR 1.69; 95% CI 1.51 to 1.90) and C difficile (1.26; 1.12 to 1.40) that was mediated by increased use of alternative (non- β lactam) antibiotics. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penicillin Allergy Linked to MRSA, C. Difficile Risk
THURSDAY, June 28, 2018 -- There is a correlation for documented penicillin allergy with increased risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile, which is mediated by increased use of β-lactam alternative... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 28, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Penicillin Allergy Linked to MRSA, C difficile Infections Penicillin Allergy Linked to MRSA, C difficile Infections
Patients with documented penicillin allergy have a greater risk of developing new methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile infections, a study has found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Parent cleansing paramount prior to skin-to-skin care
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) Neonatal intensive care units increasingly encourage meaningful touch and skin-to-skin care -- aka 'kangaroo care' -- between parents and premature babies to aid the babies' development. But a Michigan children's hospital practicing skin-to-skin care noticed an unwanted side effect in 2016 -- a spike in Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections among newborns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC: Invasive MRSA More Likely Among Injection Drug Users
MONDAY, June 11, 2018 -- Injection drug users are more than 16-fold more likely to develop invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Bone apetit: How bacteria eat bone to sustain invasive infection
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center have determined the metabolic pathway that Staphylococcus aureus use to survive in bones. Invasive S. aureus infections frequently occur in the bone and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial therapy. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Superbug Infections Rising Among Injection Drug Users
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Superbug Infections Rising Among Injection Drug Users
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections Among Persons Who Inject Drugs — Six Sites, 2005–2016
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - June 7, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Differential time to positivity of central and peripheral blood cultures is inaccurate for the diagnosis of Staphylococcus aureus long-term catheter-related sepsis
The results of this research research article strongly suggest that despite its high specificity, the differential time to positivity may not be reliable to rule out catheter-related bloodstream infection due to S. aureus. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Treatment for MRSA no longer more costly than for susceptible Staph aureus infections
(Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics& Policy) A new study found that infections caused by one of the most common drug resistant bacteria in the US -- methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA -- are no more expensive to treat than MSSA, the methicillin-susceptible version of the same bacteria. These findings are contrary to earlier studies that have found that MRSA was much more expensive to treat than MSSA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infection
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) University of Washington researchers show that an immune-system generated molecule called nitric oxide inhibits Staphylococcus aureus' transformation from a relatively benign, quiescent colonizing state to its virulent form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Adding the extra antibiotic rifampicin did not improve cure rates after sepsis
This NIHR Signal provides expert commentary on the ARREST study, which showed that adding rifampicin did not improve cure rates or reduce deaths for people with sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and increased the risk of adverse reactions requiring a change in treatment. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bathroom Hand Dryers Spray Feces Particles On Your Hands, Study Says
CBS Local — A new study has found a dirty little secret about hand dryers found in many public restrooms. Researchers say the machines which are designed to blow hot air on you are actually sucking up feces particles and spraying them onto your hands. The report, published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, found that air blasted out from the hand drying nozzles contains far more bacteria than normal bathroom air. As many as 60 different bacterial colonies can be blown out of the machines in just one 30-second drying. “The more air ya move? The more bacteria stick,” the study’s aut...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Bacteria bathrooms Chris Melore hand dryers Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Hand dryers in public bathrooms 'suck in' bacteria from flushing toilets
Researchers from the University of Connecticut found that hot-air dryers can spread Staphylococcus aureus, which can cause life-threatening sepsis or toxic shock syndrome. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Staphylococcus aureus: A new mechanism involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance
(Institut Pasteur) An Institut Pasteur-CNRS research team has characterized a Staphylococcus aureus gene involved in virulence, biofilm formation and resistance to certain antibiotics. These results open up new avenues for understanding the control of S. aureus virulence mechanisms. This work was recently published in the journal PLoS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Gross Reason You Should Never Shave Your Legs Before a Pedicure
This article originally appeared on InStyle.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme / InStyle Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Probiotics help reduce risk of asthma in children
(Natural News) To say that all kinds of bacteria do more harm than good is to do these microorganisms an injustice. Yes, horror stories of how bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus can enter bones, joints, lungs and heart valves and have fatal results. Meningitis, which can deteriorate to brain damage, even death, comes from bacteria, viruses and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New imaging approach offers unprecedented views of staph infection
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Eric Skaar, Ph.D., M.P.H., and colleagues at Vanderbilt have combined multiple types of molecular imaging to probe an invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse. Their integrated imaging approach, reported this week in Science Translational Medicine, revealed new insights about staph infections and can be broadly applied to any health or disease state. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research project on dangerous hospital germ extended
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Cases of multi-resistant bacteria in hospitals have increased dramatically in recent years and the health system faces tremendous problems as a result. Alongside 'old acquaintances', such as Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Klebsiella pneumonia, another pathogen has now arrived on the scene: Acinetobacter baumannii. In order to find new weapons for the fight against this aggressive germ, in 2014 the German Research Foundation established a Research Unit led by Goethe University Frankfurt which has now been extended for a further three years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nerve cells found to suppress immune response during deadly lung infections
(Harvard Medical School) Neurons that carry nerve signals to and from the lungs suppress immune response during fatal lung infections with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.Animal experiments show that disabling these neurons can boost immune response and promote bacterial clearance to aid recovery.Targeting neuro-immune signaling in the lungs can pave the way to nonantibiotic therapies for bacterial pneumonia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Adjunctive rifampicin for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (ARREST): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
This research article has led to a Practice Changing Update on DynaMed Plus. It concludes that adjunctive rifampicin may not reduce composite outcome of risk of treatment failure or disease recurrence and mortality in patients on active antibiotic treatment for S. aureus bacteremia. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Potentially Powerful New Antibiotic Is Discovered in Dirt
The world is facing an epidemic of infections that no longer respond well to the drugs used to treat them—also known as super bugs. In the United States, an estimated 2 million Americans are diagnosed each year with an infection that doesn’t respond to antibiotics, and 23,000 will die from those infections. But New York and New Jersey researchers published a new paper in the journal Nature Microbiology about their hopeful discovery: a potentially new class of antibiotic that they found in dirt. In the lab, the researchers used a method to extract, clone and sequence DNA from soil samples to see if there are gen...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

New research suggests your immune system can protect against MRSA infections
After years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph). The findings, publishing online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, open new doors to someday developing vaccines to prevent staph skin infections, which account for 14 million outpatient visits, nearly 500,000 hospital admissions and $3 billion to $4 billion in inpatient health care costs in the U.S. per year. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New research suggests your immune system can protect against MRSA infections
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) After years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news