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Drop in Deaths From S. Aureus Bacteremia Linked to Evidence-based Care Drop in Deaths From S. Aureus Bacteremia Linked to Evidence-based Care
Use of three evidence-based practices appears to substantially increase survival of veterans with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), new research suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - September 18, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Critical Care News Source Type: news

T2 Biosystems files 510(k) for T2Bacteria Panel
T2 Biosystems Inc. (NSDQ:TTOO) said today it filed a 510(k) appliation with the FDA for its T2Bateria Panel rapid diagnostic solution designed to identify pathogens assocaited with Sepsis. The T2Bacteria panel is designed to run on the FDA-cleared T2Dx instrument to provide diagnosis of sepsis pathogens within hours, reducing the time for patients with bloodstream infections to receive treatment, the Lexington, Mass.-based company said. The submission includes data from a pivotal clinical trial of the T2Bacteria Panel which compared it to blood culture, as well as the performance of the panel in known bacteria positiv...
Source: Mass Device - September 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance T2 Biosystems Inc. Source Type: news

Bacterial D-amino acids suppress sinonasal innate immunity through sweet taste receptors in solitary chemosensory cells
In the upper respiratory epithelium, bitter and sweet taste receptors present in solitary chemosensory cells influence antimicrobial innate immune defense responses. Whereas activation of bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) stimulates surrounding epithelial cells to release antimicrobial peptides, activation of the sweet taste receptor (T1R) in the same cells inhibits this response. This mechanism is thought to control the magnitude of antimicrobial peptide release based on the sugar content of airway surface liquid. We hypothesized that d-amino acids, which are produced by various bacteria and activate T1R in taste receptor cel...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lee, R. J., Hariri, B. M., McMahon, D. B., Chen, B., Doghramji, L., Adappa, N. D., Palmer, J. N., Kennedy, D. W., Jiang, P., Margolskee, R. F., Cohen, N. A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Nasal decontamination for the prevention of surgical site infection in Staphylococcus aureus carriers
This review located only two RCTs evaluating nasal decontamination as a single intervention in this population; one of these was very small and poorly reported. Based on the availability of limited rigorous evidence, the benefits and harms remain uncertain. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Roche expands cobas Liat PCR System menu with launch of cobas MRSA/SA test to target healthcare-associated infections
Roche announced today the CE-IVD launch of the cobas ® MRSA/SA nucleic acid test for use on the cobas® Liat® System for the qualitative detection and differentiation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) at the point of care. MRSA and SA are both major sources of healthcare and community associated inf ections. (Source: Roche Media News)
Source: Roche Media News - July 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche expands cobas Liat PCR System menu with launch of cobas MRSA/SA test to target healthcare-associated infections
Roche announced today the CE-IVD launch of the cobas ® MRSA/SA nucleic acid test for use on the cobas® Liat® System for the qualitative detection and differentiation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) at the point of care. MRSA and SA are both major sources of healthcare and community associated inf ections. (Source: Roche Investor Update)
Source: Roche Investor Update - July 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Common antimicrobials help patients recover from MRSA abscesses
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and commonly cause skin infections that can lead to serious or life-threatening infection in other parts of the body. NIAID-funded research published in The New England Journal of Medicine found that two common, inexpensive antimicrobials can help heal MRSA skin abscesses. The findings suggest that current treatment options for MRSA still have a role, even as scientists continue to search for new antimicrobial products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 29, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study shows antibiotics effective for treatment of small skin infections
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) New multicenter research, which included Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators, could change treatment approaches to simple skin abscesses, infections often caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decolonization Cheaper Than Screening, Isolation for Preventing MRSA Spread Decolonization Cheaper Than Screening, Isolation for Preventing MRSA Spread
More effective measures for preventing the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in intensive care units (ICUs) are more cost-effective too, new findings show.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - June 20, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

VHA initiative significantly reduces MRSA in veterans living centers
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) An initiative led by the Veterans Health Administration reduced methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections by 89 percent over four years in a Veterans community living center in North Carolina, according to research presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Staph infections at hospitals less resistant to antibiotics in recent years: Study
Staphylococcus aureus infections among U.S. hospital patients have been less resistant to key antibiotics in recent years, a new study finds. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Staph Aureus Rates Of Resistance To Certain Antibiotics Show A Decrease Over Time
TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 -- Staphylococcus aureus infections among U.S. hospital patients have been less resistant to key antibiotics in recent years, a new study finds. Between 2009 and 2015, researchers tested antibiotic resistance in more than... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Increasing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in the United States
(American Society for Microbiology) Findings from a study that looked at susceptibility trends of Staphylococcus aureus in US hospital patients showed that key antibiotics used to treat the bacteria became more active over the course of the study, a rare occurrence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Methicillin resistance among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Egypt
(Bentham Science Publishers) In this article that appeared in Infectious Disorders - Drug Targets, Dr. AlaaAbouelfetouh, Associate Professor of Microbiology at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, is gathering the published data describing methicillin resistance in S. aureus (MRSA) in Egypt. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Optimal use of Rapid Diagnostics in Infection Control and Prevention
Clinical laboratories have implemented rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for the identification of bacterial pathogens, with subsequent improvements in antimicrobial stewardship, but these tests may also have a role in infection prevention. Early identification of pathogens by RDTs should allow faster implementation of infection prevention strategies with the goal of reducing transmission. In this review, we assess the use of RDTs as an infection control tool by exploring their role in screening, as well as diagnosis, of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), carbapenem-resistant gram-negative organisms, Clostridi...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Mary Elizabeth Sexton, Jesse T. Jacob Source Type: news

Study: MRSA blood infections less fatal in children
A new study found children with bloodstream infections from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, are less likely to die from the disease. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MRSA blood infections are less fatal in kids, but cause significant complications
Children with bloodstream infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common antibiotic-resistant bacteria, are less likely to die than adults with this condition and have different risk factors for treatment failure, a new study indicates. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

MRSA blood infections are less fatal in kids, but cause significant complications
(Children's National Health System) Children with bloodstream infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common antibiotic-resistant bacteria, are less likely to die than adults with this condition and have different risk factors for treatment failure, a new study led by a Children's National Health System clinician indicates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

10 babies were infected with a superbug... and the hospital CONCEALED it from the parents and the public
(Natural News) On March 26 of this year, a newborn at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) Medical Center tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a superbug that cannot be treated with conventional antibiotics. According to hospital officials, the baby has since tested negative. However, it was revealed that the infant was one of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mysterious compound called "F19" discovered by Israeli researchers to kill antibiotic-resistant superbugs without encouraging resistance
(Natural News) Researchers at Israel-based biopharmaceutical firm Q2 Pharma Ltd. and the Case Western Reserve University have identified and patented a group of non-antibiotic, small-molecule antivirulence compounds that show potential in treating bacterial infections such as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. According to researchers, the compounds were designed to inhibit disease-causing toxins from forming in gram-positive bacteria such as MRSA. The compounds may... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel antibiotic resistance gene in milk
A new antibiotic resistance gene has been found in bacteria from dairy cows. This gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A transfer to S. aureus which is likely according to the researchers would jeopardize the use of reserve antibiotics to treat human infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in hospitals. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 26, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Tick protein helps antibiotics combat MRSA super bug
A protein derived from ticks enhances the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, according to a Yale-led study. The strategy of using the protein in combination with existing treatments can help address the growing challenge of antibiotic-resistant MRSA and other staph infections, the researchers said. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 26, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

Exploring surface cleaning strategies in hospital to prevent contact transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
This research article concludes that daily whole room cleaning, even with 100% cleaning efficiency, provides limited reduction in the number of MRSA transmitted to susceptible patients via the contact route; and should be supplemented with frequent targeted cleaning of high-touch surfaces, such as by a wipe or cloth containing disinfectant. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Case Western Reserve embarks on innovative path to treat infections of drug-resistant superbugs
(Case Western Reserve University) Case Western Reserve University and Q2 Pharma Ltd., an Israeli biopharmaceutical company, have signed a two-year option to license small molecule, antivirulence technology to potentially treat bacterial infections such as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the first known scientific effort of its kind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 31, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

These 3 Superbugs Pose The Greatest Risk To Human Health
The World Health Organization is issuing a warning about a group of deadly bacteria: Recently, the WHO released its first-ever list of “priority pathogens,” a list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that the organization says pose the greatest threat to human health. The list is divided into three categories: critical-, high- and medium-priority. Three pathogens made it into the critical-priority group. These bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and pose a high risk to people in hospitals and nursing homes, the WHO says. Multidrug-resistant bacteria, sometimes called “superbugs,” are a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mutants in microgravity
(NASA/Johnson Space Center) A proof-of-concept investigation, Nanobiosym Genes, is sending two strains of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria to the International Space Station. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Lotion Treated With Bacteria Could Help Prevent Skin Infections
Human skin is home to a multitude of microbes, including some that are helpful and some that could potentially be harmful. Now, a small pilot study shows that it might be possible to harness the good bacteria, put them into a lotion and then spread that lotion onto the skin to fight off the bad bacteria. In the study, researchers took bacterial samples from patients’ skin, picked out certain species and cultured them in a lab, and then put these bacteria into a lotion. They found that, for five patients with a skin condition, the bacteria-rich lotion protected them against infections by destroying harmful germs on th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fighting MRSA with new membrane-busting compounds
(American Chemical Society) Public health officials are increasingly concerned over methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The bacteria have developed resistance to a number of treatments, even antibiotics of last resort in some cases. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Bioconjugate Chemistry that a new class of compounds can treat MRSA skin infections in mice with no signs of acute toxicity, and no signs that the bacteria would develop resistance to them after many applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Post - PCV13 Drop in Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia
As pneumococcal rates dropped, rates of E. coli, Salmonella spp, Staphylococcus aureus increased (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - March 13, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Infections, Nursing, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

This Scientist Sent A Superbug To Space To Help Life On Earth
At 9:39 a.m. on the morning of February 19th, 2017, NASA Kennedy Space Center’s historic Launch Complex 39A rumbles to life, waking from a six-year slumber. On the platform where men were once launched to the moon, sit a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon capsule loaded with cargo, ready to be catapulted through Earth’s atmosphere to the International Space Station on a resupply mission. Among the payload, tucked inside a protective box under subzero temperatures, something else sleeps: a deadly, antibiotic-resistant superbug. This sounds like the premise for a sci-fi television drama, but truth is often strang...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 7, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

WHO Says New Drugs Urgently Needed To Fight 12 'Priority Pathogens'
New antibiotics need to be developed urgently to combat 12 families of bacteria, the World Health Organization said on Monday, describing these “priority pathogens” as the greatest threats to human health. The United National health agency said many of these bacteria have already evolved into deadly superbugs that are resistant to many antibiotics. The bugs “have built-in abilities to find new ways to resist treatment” the WHO said, and can also pass on genetic material that allows other bacteria to become drug-resistant. Governments need to invest in research and development (R&D)if new drugs a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Next Generation: Personalized Probiotic Skin Care
Scientists treat Staphylococcus aureus skin infections using lotions made with bacteria from atopic dermatitis patients’ own microbiomes. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 27, 2017 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist, News & Opinion Source Type: news

Novel amyloid structure could lead to new types of antibiotics
Researchers have discovered unique amyloid fibers used by the highly drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterium (which causes MRSA). The findings could lead to new types of antibiotics with a novel mechanism of action for attacking bacterial toxins, they say. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

[Report] The cytotoxic Staphylococcus aureus PSM α3 reveals a cross-α amyloid-like fibril
Amyloids are ordered protein aggregates, found in all kingdoms of life, and are involved in aggregation diseases as well as in physiological activities. In microbes, functional amyloids are often key virulence determinants, yet the structural basis for their activity remains elusive. We determined the fibril structure and function of the highly toxic, 22-residue phenol-soluble modulin α3 (PSMα3) peptide secreted by Staphylococcus aureus. PSMα3 formed elongated fibrils that shared the morphological and tinctorial characteristics of canonical cross-β eukaryotic amyloids. However, the crystal structure ...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Einav Tayeb-Fligelman Source Type: news

New research explains why a common bacterium can produce severe illness
How can the same infection result in dramatically different levels of illness in two different people? A new study identifies two conditions—a genetic immunodeficiency and delayed acquired immunity—that explain why a patient developed a life-threatening disease in response to a common strain of bacterium. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 23, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News case study immune system Jean-Laurent Casanova St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases Staphylococcus aureus Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Skin health: Friendly bacteria keep harmful Staph in check
The mix of bacteria on our skin influences its health. Now, scientists show how harmful Staphylococcus aureus is kept in check by skin-friendly cousins. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections
(University of California - San Diego) Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterial scourge that is resistant to most common antibiotics and thus difficult to treat, particularly in children where it commonly causes complicated skin and skin structure infections. In a randomized, controlled clinical trial -- the first of its kind -- a multi-institution research team reports that daptomycin, part of a new class of antibiotics currently approved only for use in adults, is effective and well-tolerated in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Staphylococcus aureus: guidance, data and analysis
This Guidance covers the characteristics, diagnosis, management, surveillance and epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Compound from deep-water marine sponge could provide antibacterial solutions for MRSA
A compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also called the'super bug.'Researchers have named the antibiotic compound'dragmacidin G'and have shown that it has a broad spectrum of biological activity including inhibition of MRSA as well as a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 8, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Compound from deep-water marine sponge could provide antibacterial solutions for MRSA
(Florida Atlantic University) A compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also called the 'super bug.' Researchers have named the antibiotic compound 'dragmacidin G' and have shown that it has a broad spectrum of biological activity including inhibition of MRSA as well as a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 8, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Harnessing 'brute force' could be key to creating new antibiotics
Conclusions This laboratory study furthers understanding of the mechanisms by which antibacterial drugs target and destroy bacteria. The answer seems to lie in how effectively the drug can bind to target molecules on the bacterial surface membrane. When the force of this binding exerts sufficient mechanical strain on the cell surface, then the bacteria breaks apart and is destroyed. It shows that the strongest antibacterials that we have, such as vancomycin, are currently not infallible. That we could reach a point where we have bacterial infections that not even the strongest antibiotics are able to fight is a major pu...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Study offers new insights into receptor that regulates Staphylococcal virulence
(Princeton University) Princeton University researchers have revealed new insights into a molecular pathway that leads to Staphylococcus aureus virulence, which can cause a range of human illnesses from skin infections to pneumonia, that could help scientists design molecules to inhibit it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus between health-care workers, the environment, and patients in an intensive care unit: a longitudinal cohort study based on whole-genome sequencing
This research found that in the presence of standard infection control measures, health-care workers were infrequently sources of transmission to patients. S aureus epidemiology in the ICU and HDU is characterised by continuous ingress of distinct subtypes rather than transmission of genetically related strains. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salicylic acid, a widespread ingredient in pain relief medications, promotes nasal mucosa colonization
An international research team has now shown that this multifaceted compound can also have an unpleasant side effect. Salicylic acid forms complexes with iron and lab tests showed that the iron limitation strongly promotes formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus. This allows the bacteria to survive and persist in our respiratory tract for longer periods of time which eventually trigger life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Salicylic acid promotes nasal mucosa colonization
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) An international research team, including scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna, has now shown that this multifaceted compound can also have an unpleasant side effect. Salicylic acid forms complexes with iron and lab tests showed that the iron limitation strongly promotes formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus. This allows the bacteria to survive and persist in our respiratory tract for longer periods of time which eventually trigger life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons. Published in Frontiers in Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 3, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

AmpliPhi Biosciences Appoints Dr. Igor P. Bilinsky as Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
SAN DIEGO--(Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network)--AmpliPhi Biosciences Corporation (NYSE MKT: APHB), a global leader in the development of bacteriophage-based antibacterial therapies to treat drug-resistant infections, today announced the appointment of I... Biopharmaceuticals, Personnel AmpliPhi Biosciences, Staphylococcus aureus (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Arsanis begins dosing patients in Phase II trial of ASN100 to prevent S. aureus pneumonia
Bio-pharmaceutical company Arsanis has begun dosing patients in a Phase II clinical trial of ASN100 to treat Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) pneumonia in high-risk, mechanically ventilated patients. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - January 26, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists decipher a mechanism in serious skin infections
(German Center for Infection Research) Scientists from the University of T ü bingen and the German Center of Infection Research (DZIF) have been able to demonstrate that sugar polymers on the outer cell envelope of Staphylococcus aureus mean that the disease progresses in a particularly aggressive way -- and this suggests a starting point for possible treatment. The results were published in the Nature Microbiology specialist journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Redeploying β-Lactam Antibiotics as a Novel Antivirulence Strategy for the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections
This study suggests that β-lactam antibiotics should be included in the treatment regimen as an adjunct antivirulence therapy for patients with MRSA infections. This would represent an important change to current clinical practice for treatment of MRSA infection, with the potential t o significantly improve patient outcomes in a safe, cost-effective manner (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UV light helps Duke hospitals fight transmission of super bugs
Treatment TermsInfectious diseases SEO Meta Description UV light helps hospitals cut transmission of super bugs like MRSA that linger in patient rooms and cause new infections. Author Debbe Geiger Content Blocks ContentA type of ultraviolet light called ultraviolet light C or UVC is helping hospitals cut transmission of super bugs like MRSA that linger in patient rooms and cause new infections, according to a study by Duke Health researchers. As a result, several UVC machines are now in use at Duke University Hospital, Duke Regional Hospital and Duke Raleigh Hospital Section Features Text Content Header Tough bug...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 at duke.edu Source Type: news