Parent cleansing paramount prior to skin-to-skin care
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) Neonatal intensive care units increasingly encourage meaningful touch and skin-to-skin care -- aka 'kangaroo care' -- between parents and premature babies to aid the babies' development. But a Michigan children's hospital practicing skin-to-skin care noticed an unwanted side effect in 2016 -- a spike in Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections among newborns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC: Invasive MRSA More Likely Among Injection Drug Users
MONDAY, June 11, 2018 -- Injection drug users are more than 16-fold more likely to develop invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Bone apetit: How bacteria eat bone to sustain invasive infection
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center have determined the metabolic pathway that Staphylococcus aureus use to survive in bones. Invasive S. aureus infections frequently occur in the bone and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial therapy. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Superbug Infections Rising Among Injection Drug Users
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Superbug Infections Rising Among Injection Drug Users
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections Among Persons Who Inject Drugs — Six Sites, 2005–2016
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - June 7, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Differential time to positivity of central and peripheral blood cultures is inaccurate for the diagnosis of Staphylococcus aureus long-term catheter-related sepsis
The results of this research research article strongly suggest that despite its high specificity, the differential time to positivity may not be reliable to rule out catheter-related bloodstream infection due to S. aureus. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Treatment for MRSA no longer more costly than for susceptible Staph aureus infections
(Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics& Policy) A new study found that infections caused by one of the most common drug resistant bacteria in the US -- methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA -- are no more expensive to treat than MSSA, the methicillin-susceptible version of the same bacteria. These findings are contrary to earlier studies that have found that MRSA was much more expensive to treat than MSSA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infection
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) University of Washington researchers show that an immune-system generated molecule called nitric oxide inhibits Staphylococcus aureus' transformation from a relatively benign, quiescent colonizing state to its virulent form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Adding the extra antibiotic rifampicin did not improve cure rates after sepsis
This NIHR Signal provides expert commentary on the ARREST study, which showed that adding rifampicin did not improve cure rates or reduce deaths for people with sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and increased the risk of adverse reactions requiring a change in treatment. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bathroom Hand Dryers Spray Feces Particles On Your Hands, Study Says
CBS Local — A new study has found a dirty little secret about hand dryers found in many public restrooms. Researchers say the machines which are designed to blow hot air on you are actually sucking up feces particles and spraying them onto your hands. The report, published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, found that air blasted out from the hand drying nozzles contains far more bacteria than normal bathroom air. As many as 60 different bacterial colonies can be blown out of the machines in just one 30-second drying. “The more air ya move? The more bacteria stick,” the study’s aut...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Bacteria bathrooms Chris Melore hand dryers Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Hand dryers in public bathrooms 'suck in' bacteria from flushing toilets
Researchers from the University of Connecticut found that hot-air dryers can spread Staphylococcus aureus, which can cause life-threatening sepsis or toxic shock syndrome. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Staphylococcus aureus: A new mechanism involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance
(Institut Pasteur) An Institut Pasteur-CNRS research team has characterized a Staphylococcus aureus gene involved in virulence, biofilm formation and resistance to certain antibiotics. These results open up new avenues for understanding the control of S. aureus virulence mechanisms. This work was recently published in the journal PLoS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Gross Reason You Should Never Shave Your Legs Before a Pedicure
This article originally appeared on InStyle.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme / InStyle Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Probiotics help reduce risk of asthma in children
(Natural News) To say that all kinds of bacteria do more harm than good is to do these microorganisms an injustice. Yes, horror stories of how bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus can enter bones, joints, lungs and heart valves and have fatal results. Meningitis, which can deteriorate to brain damage, even death, comes from bacteria, viruses and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New imaging approach offers unprecedented views of staph infection
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Eric Skaar, Ph.D., M.P.H., and colleagues at Vanderbilt have combined multiple types of molecular imaging to probe an invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse. Their integrated imaging approach, reported this week in Science Translational Medicine, revealed new insights about staph infections and can be broadly applied to any health or disease state. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research project on dangerous hospital germ extended
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Cases of multi-resistant bacteria in hospitals have increased dramatically in recent years and the health system faces tremendous problems as a result. Alongside 'old acquaintances', such as Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Klebsiella pneumonia, another pathogen has now arrived on the scene: Acinetobacter baumannii. In order to find new weapons for the fight against this aggressive germ, in 2014 the German Research Foundation established a Research Unit led by Goethe University Frankfurt which has now been extended for a further three years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nerve cells found to suppress immune response during deadly lung infections
(Harvard Medical School) Neurons that carry nerve signals to and from the lungs suppress immune response during fatal lung infections with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.Animal experiments show that disabling these neurons can boost immune response and promote bacterial clearance to aid recovery.Targeting neuro-immune signaling in the lungs can pave the way to nonantibiotic therapies for bacterial pneumonia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Adjunctive rifampicin for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (ARREST): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
This research article has led to a Practice Changing Update on DynaMed Plus. It concludes that adjunctive rifampicin may not reduce composite outcome of risk of treatment failure or disease recurrence and mortality in patients on active antibiotic treatment for S. aureus bacteremia. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Potentially Powerful New Antibiotic Is Discovered in Dirt
The world is facing an epidemic of infections that no longer respond well to the drugs used to treat them—also known as super bugs. In the United States, an estimated 2 million Americans are diagnosed each year with an infection that doesn’t respond to antibiotics, and 23,000 will die from those infections. But New York and New Jersey researchers published a new paper in the journal Nature Microbiology about their hopeful discovery: a potentially new class of antibiotic that they found in dirt. In the lab, the researchers used a method to extract, clone and sequence DNA from soil samples to see if there are gen...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

New research suggests your immune system can protect against MRSA infections
After years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph). The findings, publishing online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, open new doors to someday developing vaccines to prevent staph skin infections, which account for 14 million outpatient visits, nearly 500,000 hospital admissions and $3 billion to $4 billion in inpatient health care costs in the U.S. per year. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New research suggests your immune system can protect against MRSA infections
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) After years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FDA OKs First Vancomycin Oral Solution for C diff Diarrhea FDA OKs First Vancomycin Oral Solution for C diff Diarrhea
Vancomycin hydrochloride for oral solution (Firvanq) is for treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and enterocolitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Alert Source Type: news

High levels of antibiotic resistance found worldwide, new data show
BANGKOK 29 January 2018 – The World Health Organization’s first release of surveillance data on antibiotic resistance reveals high levels of resistance to a number of serious bacterial infections in both high- and low-income countries. WHO’s new Global Antimicrobial Surveillance System (known as GLASS) reveals widespread occurrence of antibiotic resistance among 500 000 people with suspected bacterial infections across 22 countries.  The most commonly reported resistant bacteria were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Salmo...
Source: WHO EMRO News - January 29, 2018 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

CutisPharma Announces FDA Approval of Firvanq (vancomycin) for Treatment of Clostridium Difficile Associated Diarrhea and Staphylococcus Aureus Colitis
WILMINGTON, Mass. (Jan. 29, 2018) – CutisPharma announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Firvanq (vancomycin hydrochloride) for oral solution, for the treatment of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea and... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - January 29, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Adjunctive Rifampin Not Beneficial for Staph aureus Bacteremia Adjunctive Rifampin Not Beneficial for Staph aureus Bacteremia
Adjunctive rifampin, also called rifampicin, provides no significant benefit over standard antibiotic therapy in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, according to results from the ARREST trial.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 29, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Aiding and abetting Staphylococcus aureus
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Medimetriks Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Receives FDA Approval for Xepi(TM) (ozenoxacin) Cream, 1%, a Novel Topical Antibiotic for Impetigo
Bactericidal antibiotic cream indicated for the treatment of impetigo due to Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes in adult and pediatric patients 2 months of age and older Demonstrated activity against most isolates both in vitro and in clini... Biopharmaceuticals, Dermatology, FDA Medimetriks Pharmaceuticals, Xepi, ozenoxacin, Impetigo (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - December 14, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Kent State researcher exposes MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beaches
(Kent State University) Tara C. Smith, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology in Kent State's College of Public Health, published the findings of a study her lab conducted in 2015 that shows a higher-than-expected prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at beaches around Lake Erie. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Boosting the antibiotic arsenal
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have discovered a way to make bacteria more vulnerable to a class of antibiotics known as quinolones, which include ciprofloxacin and are often used to treat infections such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists find potential weapons for the battle against antibiotic resistance
(University of North Carolina Health Care) UNC School of Medicine scientists found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce specific molecular factors that dramatically increase or decrease an antibiotic's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus, another bacterium that often co-infects with P. aeruginosa. The findings, published in PLoS Biology, point to the possibility of new antibiotics employing these factors to enhance antibiotic susceptibility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Livestock-associated MRSA found in human MRSA samples
A recent survey has identified livestock-associated meticillin Staphylococcus aureus, or LA-MRSA, has been found in human MRSA samples. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Superbug-related deaths hit at least 15-year Wales low
The number of deaths related to MRSA, C. diff and Staphylococcus aureus continue to fall. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statins May Help Guard Against S Aureus Bacteremia Statins May Help Guard Against S Aureus Bacteremia
A large Danish study finds a lower risk of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in statin users, suggesting another pleiotropic effect of the cholesterol-lowering drugs.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

The Never-Ending Battle Against Sport ’ s Hidden Foe
The virulent bacteria MRSA flourishes in locker rooms, on gear and on players ’ skin, and the fight to prevent infections includes high-tech solutions like a chemical fog. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BILL PENNINGTON Tags: Football (College) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Athletics and Sports Colgate University National Football League Antibiotics Bacteria Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Statins may prevent potentially fatal blood infection
New research has found that statins may reduce the risk of community-acquired blood infection with Staphylococcus aureus by almost a third. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Statin use can reduce risk of serious bacterial bloodstream infection
Researchers have found that people who use statins to prevent cardiac disease have a lower risk of contracting a Staphylococcus aureus, a bloodstream infection. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statin use appears to reduce risk of serious bacterial bloodstream infection
(Elsevier) Users of statins, widely prescribed for prevention of cardiac disease, have a 27% lower risk of contracting a Staphylococcus aureus (S aureus) bloodstream infection outside of a hospital, according to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers report that statin use, especially among elderly patients with preexisting chronic conditions such as diabetes, kidney, or liver disease, may be protective against this serious bloodstream infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotics warranted for kids with minor staph infections
(Washington University in St. Louis) The overuse of antibiotics has left some doctors questioning whether to give such drugs to children diagnosed with uncomplicated Staphylococcus aureus (staph) infections. Now, research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that prescribing antibiotics -- in addition to lancing and draining staph-infected areas -- reduces the risk of recurrent infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Too much manganese may lead to fatal heart infection
New research finds that excessive intake of manganese, an essential nutrient in leafy vegetables, may lead to a Staphylococcus aureus heart infection. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Your Towels Are Way Dirtier Than You Think
Dirty towels can carry a huge variety of microbes, and they’ve even been linked to spreading infectious disease. You can’t keep your towels 100% germ-free, experts say, but you can limit the grossest ones by washing your towels—only way more often than you probably do now. Towels are such great bacteria traps because every time you use a towel, you transfer your natural skin bacteria, and any other germs you’re carrying, onto their surface. Most of these germs won’t have any negative health effects because they’re coming from you. “Our bodies are adapted to being able to live in th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Bacteria bath towels coliform bacteria dirty towels E. coli fungus how often should i do laundry how often should i wash my bath towels how often should i wash my towels how to wash towels Hygiene kitchen towels mic Source Type: news

Excess dietary manganese promotes staph heart infection
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Too much dietary manganese -- an essential trace mineral found in leafy green vegetables, fruits and nuts -- promotes infection of the heart by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. The findings, reported this week in Cell Host& Microbe, add to evidence that diet modifies risk for infection and suggest that people who have excess levels of tissue manganese, potentially from dietary supplements, may be at increased risk for staph infection of the heart. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Drop in Deaths From S. Aureus Bacteremia Linked to Evidence-based Care Drop in Deaths From S. Aureus Bacteremia Linked to Evidence-based Care
Use of three evidence-based practices appears to substantially increase survival of veterans with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), new research suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - September 18, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Critical Care News Source Type: news

T2 Biosystems files 510(k) for T2Bacteria Panel
T2 Biosystems Inc. (NSDQ:TTOO) said today it filed a 510(k) appliation with the FDA for its T2Bateria Panel rapid diagnostic solution designed to identify pathogens assocaited with Sepsis. The T2Bacteria panel is designed to run on the FDA-cleared T2Dx instrument to provide diagnosis of sepsis pathogens within hours, reducing the time for patients with bloodstream infections to receive treatment, the Lexington, Mass.-based company said. The submission includes data from a pivotal clinical trial of the T2Bacteria Panel which compared it to blood culture, as well as the performance of the panel in known bacteria positiv...
Source: Mass Device - September 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance T2 Biosystems Inc. Source Type: news

Bacterial D-amino acids suppress sinonasal innate immunity through sweet taste receptors in solitary chemosensory cells
In the upper respiratory epithelium, bitter and sweet taste receptors present in solitary chemosensory cells influence antimicrobial innate immune defense responses. Whereas activation of bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) stimulates surrounding epithelial cells to release antimicrobial peptides, activation of the sweet taste receptor (T1R) in the same cells inhibits this response. This mechanism is thought to control the magnitude of antimicrobial peptide release based on the sugar content of airway surface liquid. We hypothesized that d-amino acids, which are produced by various bacteria and activate T1R in taste receptor cel...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lee, R. J., Hariri, B. M., McMahon, D. B., Chen, B., Doghramji, L., Adappa, N. D., Palmer, J. N., Kennedy, D. W., Jiang, P., Margolskee, R. F., Cohen, N. A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Nasal decontamination for the prevention of surgical site infection in Staphylococcus aureus carriers
This review located only two RCTs evaluating nasal decontamination as a single intervention in this population; one of these was very small and poorly reported. Based on the availability of limited rigorous evidence, the benefits and harms remain uncertain. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Roche expands cobas Liat PCR System menu with launch of cobas MRSA/SA test to target healthcare-associated infections
Roche announced today the CE-IVD launch of the cobas ® MRSA/SA nucleic acid test for use on the cobas® Liat® System for the qualitative detection and differentiation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) at the point of care. MRSA and SA are both major sources of healthcare and community associated inf ections. (Source: Roche Media News)
Source: Roche Media News - July 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche expands cobas Liat PCR System menu with launch of cobas MRSA/SA test to target healthcare-associated infections
Roche announced today the CE-IVD launch of the cobas ® MRSA/SA nucleic acid test for use on the cobas® Liat® System for the qualitative detection and differentiation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) at the point of care. MRSA and SA are both major sources of healthcare and community associated inf ections. (Source: Roche Investor Update)
Source: Roche Investor Update - July 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Common antimicrobials help patients recover from MRSA abscesses
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and commonly cause skin infections that can lead to serious or life-threatening infection in other parts of the body. NIAID-funded research published in The New England Journal of Medicine found that two common, inexpensive antimicrobials can help heal MRSA skin abscesses. The findings suggest that current treatment options for MRSA still have a role, even as scientists continue to search for new antimicrobial products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 29, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study shows antibiotics effective for treatment of small skin infections
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) New multicenter research, which included Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators, could change treatment approaches to simple skin abscesses, infections often caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news