A Comparatively Simple Approach to Improve Engraftment of Transplanted Cells

The issue with first generation cell therapies for regenerative medicine is that transplanted cells near entirely fail to engraft into tissue. There are exceptions, but for the most part, the cells used in therapy die rather than take up productive work to enhance tissue function. Where benefits occur, they are mediated by the signals secreted by the transplanted cells in the brief period they remain alive. Mesenchymal stem cell therapies that reduce chronic inflammation for some period of time are an example of the type. They are good at that outcome of reduced inflammation, but highly unreliable when it comes to any other desired result, such as increased regeneration. Thus an important goal in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering circles is to solve the issue of engraftment, and enable the reliable delivery of cells that survive to participate in improving tissue function. Numerous strategies have been tried, with varying degrees of success. The best to date is to provide cells with a surrounding biodegradable scaffold that incorporates supporting nutrients and signals. This can work quite well when cells are allowed to form a pseudo-normal tissue like structure prior to transplantation, for example in heart patches or retina patches. The research noted here offers quite a different and much simpler strategy to improve engraftment rates, the removal of lower quality cells from the cell population created for transplantation. Biomedical engineers bel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

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Abstract: The US industrial revolution led to a significant increase in the amount of dietary sugar consumed annually. The impact has become a public health crisis over the past several decades. The consequences are seen in the dramatic rise in rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease.
Source: The Nurse Practitioner - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature: SUGAR CONSUMPTION Source Type: research
The drug, Rybelsus (semaglutide) is the first pill in a class of drugs called glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) approved for use in the United States. Before Rybelsus, the drug had to be injected.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 19 September 2019Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): Yinghua Peng, Xiaozheng Zhang, Tianshu Zhang, Peter M. Grace, Hongyuan Li, Yibo Wang, Hang Li, Hongqian Chen, Linda R. Watkins, Mark R. Hutchinson, Hang Yin, Xiaohui WangAbstractThere is growing interest in drug repositioning to find new therapeutic indications for drugs already approved for use in people. Lovastatin is an FDA approved drug that has been used clinically for over a decade as a lipid-lowering medication. While lovastatin is classically considered to act as a hydroxymethylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor,...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Alert Source Type: news
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In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, CAVD is highly prevalent. Long understood as a passive process, it is now known to be complex and one which involves pathophysiological mechanisms similar to those of atherosclerosis. Understanding these mechanisms could help to establish new therapeutic targets that might allow us to halt or at least slow down the progression of the disease. Early Steps in the Tissue Engineering of Intervertebral Discs https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/08/early-steps-in-the-tissue-engineering-of-intervertebral-discs/ In this paper, researchers report on progress towards the manufacture of interver...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
All that the doctors who treated Cincinnati, Ohio resident Otto Warmbier knew is what they had seen or maybe read in the news. They knew he had just been released on June 13 from imprisonment in North Korea where he had been held by for more than 17 months. He had been sentenced in March 2016 to 15 years of hard labor for allegedly removing a propaganda poster from a wall at a Pyongyang hotel where he had been staying. The University of Virginia honors student had been visiting the authoritarian state during a five-day trip with a group called Young Pioneer Tours, which is a group out of China – an important note. Ot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
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