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Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of two Zika virus DNA vaccine candidates in healthy adults: randomised, open-label, phase 1 clinical trials

Publication date: Available online 5 December 2017 Source:The Lancet Author(s): Martin R Gaudinski, Katherine V Houser, Kaitlyn M Morabito, Zonghui Hu, Galina Yamshchikov, Ro Shauna Rothwell, Nina Berkowitz, Floreliz Mendoza, Jamie G Saunders, Laura Novik, Cynthia S Hendel, LaSonji A Holman, Ingelise J Gordon, Josephine H Cox, Srilatha Edupuganti, Monica A McArthur, Nadine G Rouphael, Kirsten E Lyke, Ginny E Cummings, Sandra Sitar, Robert T Bailer, Bryant M Foreman, Katherine Burgomaster, Rebecca S Pelc, David N Gordon, Christina R DeMaso, Kimberly A Dowd, Carolyn Laurencot, Richard M Schwartz, John R Mascola, Barney S Graham, Theodore C Pierson, Julie E Ledgerwood, Grace L Chen Background The Zika virus epidemic and associated congenital infections have prompted rapid vaccine development. We assessed two new DNA vaccines expressing premembrane and envelope Zika virus structural proteins. Methods We did two phase 1, randomised, open-label trials involving healthy adult volunteers. The VRC 319 trial, done in three centres, assessed plasmid VRC5288 (Zika virus and Japanese encephalitis virus chimera), and the VRC 320, done in one centre, assessed plasmid VRC5283 (wild-type Zika virus). Eligible participants were aged 18–35 years in VRC19 and 18–50 years in VRC 320. Participants were randomly assigned 1:1 by a computer-generated randomisation schedule prepared by the study statistician. All participants received intramuscular injection of 4 mg vaccine. In VRC 319 pa...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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