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Japan's "Blade Library" offers joy of blade running to amputees
TOKYO (Reuters) - Haruta Saito, a young Japanese amputee who dreams of becoming a Paralympian, remembers strapping on a prosthetic "running blade" for the first time. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Bayer submits its extended half-life hemophilia A compound for marketing authorization in Japan (for specialized target groups only)
Pivotal studies with BAY94-9027 showed that bleed protection was achieved with extended dosing intervals (Source: Bayer Company News)
Source: Bayer Company News - October 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Keratin, proteins from 54-million-year-old sea turtle show survival trait evolution
(North Carolina State University) Researchers Japan have retrieved original pigment, beta-keratin and muscle proteins from a 54-million-year-old sea turtle hatchling. The work adds to the growing body of evidence supporting persistence of original molecules over millions of years and also provides direct evidence that a pigment-based survival trait common to modern sea turtles evolved at least 54 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ageing Asia: What Does the Future Hold?
Conclusion To effectively meet the meets of the growing elderly population over the next few decades, it is crucial that we understand what socio-economic, cultural and political factors will drive their healthcare decision making, especially where out-of-pocket payment will be required.  Market research, grounded in local knowledge and expertise, is a key means of achieving this understanding. Whether via patients directly (recognizing the technological or capability limitations that may exist in the elderly population), or their caregivers (noting that the family has traditionally played an important role in provid...
Source: EyeForPharma - October 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marc Yates Source Type: news

Synergistic effects of unintended pregnancy and young motherhood on shaking and smothering of infants among caregivers in Nagoya City, Japan - Isumi A, Fujiwara T.
BACKGROUND: Shaking and smothering in response to infant crying are forms of child abuse that often result in death. Unintended pregnancy and young motherhood are risk factors of such child maltreatment that are often comorbid, few studies have examined th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Effect of Pok émon GO on incidence of fatal traffic injuries: a population-based quasi-experimental study using the national traffic collisions database in Japan - Ono S, Ono Y, Michihata N, Sasabuchi Y, Yasunaga H.
Pok émon GO (Niantic Labs, released on 22 July 2016 in Japan) is an augmented reality game that gained huge popularity worldwide. Despite concern about Pokémon GO-related traffic collisions, the effect of playing Pokémon GO on the incidence of traffic in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Cerebrovascular/cardiovascular diseases and mental disorders due to overwork and work-related stress among local public employees in Japan - Yamauchi T, Yoshikawa T, Sasaki T, Matsumoto S, Takahashi M, Suka M, Yanagisawa H.
In Japan, overwork-related disorders occur among local public employees as well as those in private businesses. However, to date, there are no studies reporting the state of compensation for cerebrovascular/cardiovascular diseases (CCVD) and mental disorde... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

From avatar assistants, to robots as therapy aides
(Bielefeld University) The " Human Agent Interaction " (HAI) conference - held at the Cluster of Excellence CITEC at Bielefeld University from 17-19 October - brings together researchers from cognitive robotics and artificial intelligence, as well as cognitive science and neuroscience to discuss research on agents. After having been held in Japan (2013 and 2014), South Korea (2015) and Singapore (2016), the conference is now being held in Europe for the first time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Early palliative care provides no quality of life benefits for recently diagnosed MPM patients
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Early specialist palliative care for patients that were recently diagnosed with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) does not impact quality of life (QOL) measures, according to research presented by Prof. Fraser Brims of Curtin University in Australia, at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Integration of smoking cessation within CT lung cancer screenings shows life-saving results
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) A study that integrated robust smoking cessation programs into an organized low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening program found that the inclusion of both interventions has the potential to decrease mortality rates while being relatively cost-effective. Dr. William Evans of McMaster University in Canada presented these findings today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study cites race and socioeconomic factors as influential in NSCLC patient survival rates
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) New research found race and specific socioeconomic factors to have a significant influence on disparities in the survival rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Dr. Yanyan Lou of the Mayo Clinic in the United States presented these findings today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A survey on the attitude towards renaming bipolar disorder in Japanese - Kato T, Kanba S.
For the revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD)-10 into the ICD-11, the Liaison Committee of Psychiatric Disease Names of Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology concluded that "disorder" ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Detection of butane gas inhalation at 16 days after hypoxic encephalopathy: a case report - Sato T, Nishioka H, Tsuboi K, Katagi M, Miki A, Saito T, Abe S, Nomura M, Kitagawa M, Tsuchihashi H, Suzuki K.
In Japan, there are increasing reports of death by poisoning following butane abuse. To determine the specific cause of death in such cases, it is important to confirm the presence of fuel gas components in the body, although careful analysis is required b... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Poisoning Source Type: news

This Device Has Been Around for 20 Years
It comes in different sizes and configurations now, but the Gore Excluder AAA Endoprosthesis, which seals off abdominal aneurysms from inside the aorta, hasn’t changed radically since it was introduced to the European market in 1997. The endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) device has been implanted in more than 300,000 patients diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), according to its manufacturer, W.L. Gore & Associates. Before EVAR, patients with AAA had two options: major surgery to repair the aneurysm or crossed fingers. “The number of patients who were not candidates for surgery really drove ...
Source: MDDI - October 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Implants Design Source Type: news

Legacy of Chernobyl: Boar shot in Sweden found to have 10 TIMES the accepted amount of radiation, 30 years after disaster
(Natural News) On April 26, 1986, a disastrous accident at the power station in Chernobyl, Ukraine led to the release of more radiation into the atmosphere than the nuclear bomb released over Hiroshima, Japan in the Second World War. A routine test gone wrong resulted in what has been called the worst power plant accident... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

2017 UNC-IntraHealth Fellows Explore HIV Stigma, Sexual Harassment in the Health Workforce, and More
From left: Rebecca Kohler (senior vice president of corporate strategy and development at IntraHealth), Kati Jackson, Pape Gaye (president and CEO at IntraHealth), Yutaka Endo, Alex Dest, Peggy Bentley (associate dean for global health at UNC), and Saja Al-Falahi. Photo by Carol Bales for IntraHealth International.October 13, 2017Graduates of the eighth annual UNC-IntraHealth Summer Fellows Program spent ten weeks working side-by-side with global health professionals atIntraHealth International this summer, taking on projects that ranged from HIV-related stigma to sexual harassment and discrimination in the health workforc...
Source: IntraHealth International - October 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Anime hero joins Japan's antibiotics resistance campaign
Japan's health ministry enlists Mobile Suit Gundam to combat overuse of antibiotics. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New ‘healthier’ way to smoke set to overtake vaping
A US study suggests heat-not-burn devices will overtake the sales of e-cigarettes after their surge in popularity in Japan, the first country to sell them. Independent research is crucial, say experts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New type of diabetes caused by a genetic mutation
(Universit é libre de Bruxelles) Scientists from the ULB Center for Diabetes Research and the Erasmus Hospital of the ULB, together with colleagues at the University of Exeter (UK), University of Helsinki (Finland) and Kyoto University (Japan), have identified a new type of diabetes caused by a mutation in the gene RFX6. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Daiichi Sankyo, Astellas and Mitsubishi Tanabe partner to develop new therapeutics
Japan-based companies Daiichi Sankyo, Astellas Pharma and Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma have collaborated to jointly carry out a programme to discover new therapeutic drugs using drug-repositioning compound libraries. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - October 11, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UTokyo NY Conference to headline studies on deadly viruses, Alzheimer's
(University of Tokyo) Leading scientists from Japan in the fields of medical science and industrial science will speak at the UTokyo NY Conference on Friday, November 3, 2017, to report on their international collaboration projects on deadly viruses and Alzheimer's prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Otsuka taps Medibio's quantitative mental health assessment for Abilify
Otsuka, the Japanese pharma company that makes the antipsychotic drug Abilify, has partnered with Australian digital health company Medibio to use Medibio ’s system to assess the efficacy of its flagship product. Medibio uses wearable-derived data about heart rate, motion, and sleep to create objective biomarkers for mental illness. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 10, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Court Rules TEPCO, Japanese Government Liable For 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Disaster
It's the largest class-action lawsuit filed over the 2011 nuclear disaster in the region. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

PharmaMar will present final data on PM1183 during the 18th World Lung Conference in Japan
(Pharmamar) PharmaMar (MSE:PHM) will present the final efficacy and safety data obtained from the Phase I/II trial combining PM1183 (lurbinectedin). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Overwork: Does It Put the Heart at Risk?
(MedPage Today) -- In Japan it's called'Karoshi'- death from overwork. (Source: MedPage Today Nephrology)
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - October 9, 2017 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Did you solve it? The pain and pleasure of Japanese puzzles
The solutions of today ’s puzzles, and the results of the Nikoli Derby.In my column earlier today I set five examples of a new Japanese puzzle calledSnake Place and we also played a re-run of the Nikoli Derby, where I asked you to submit a number, with the winner being the person submitting the lowest number that no one else also submits.Thesolutions to Snake place can be seen here (on a printable page).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Science Source Type: news

What came first, the chicken or the cure for cancer?
Prices of beta interferons are currently sky-high, but could be halved if the new method works, experts at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Japan claim. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can you solve it? The pain and pleasure of Japanese puzzles
A new logic puzzle from Japan, and another chance to be a number ninjaHi guzzlersLast column we played the Nikoli Derby, a Japanese game in which I asked you to submit the lowest number nobody else submits. The winner was 69. Honestly! It was such fun that we ’re going play another round today, below. (Again, there’s a prize). Your strategy, however, may be different, since this time you can make a decision based on how people voted last time.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Science Mathematics Japan Source Type: news

All-in-One Resuscitation Room for Severe Trauma Reduces Mortality All-in-One Resuscitation Room for Severe Trauma Reduces Mortality
Having an all-in-one trauma resuscitation room that includes whole-body CT, surgery, and interventional radiology can significantly reduce mortality in patients with severe trauma, researchers from Japan report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery News Source Type: news

Disaster relief and crisis intervention with deaf communities: lessons learned from the Japanese deaf community - Takayama K.
During natural disasters and crises, the Deaf and hard of hearing community might not have full accessibility to all of the information shared with the larger hearing community. This may be due to the lack of awareness among social work professionals about... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Deer prefer native plants leaving lasting damage on forests
(Cornell University) When rampant white-tailed deer graze in forests, they prefer to eat native plants over certain unpalatable invasive plants, such as garlic mustard and Japanese stiltgrass. These eating habits lower native plant diversity and abundance, while increasing the proportion of plant communities made up of non-native species, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Godly gift for arthritis pain
Big Pharma is at it again… Creating and selling a drug that causes thousands of heart attacks and strokes each year. In 2015, the FDA asked drug makers to strengthen their warning labels. Since then, most have listed their dangerous side effects on the bottle. But one manufacturer thought they didn’t have to warn people about their dangerous drug. They marketed their product as a “unique” breakthrough. They even published studies promising it was “safe for long-term use.” 1 The drug is a 7-year-old arthritis drug called Actemra. It’s made by the Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche....
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Vitamin D may prevent asthma worsening for some
Conclusion This review gathers the available trial evidence to address the specific question of whether giving people with asthma vitamin D supplements could have an effect on how many asthma exacerbations they have. The review has many strengths. It only included double-blind trials, where participants and assessors didn't know if people were taking vitamin D or a placebo. Researchers also made careful attempts to gather all relevant data and information on confounding factors, and all but one trial had a low risk of bias. But there are some limitations to bear in mind: With the relatively small number of trials and par...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Kazuo Ishiguro Wins the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature
British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, known for his spare prose style and books rich in repressed emotion, has won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature. Ishiguro, 62, author of The Remains of the Day, has “uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world,” the Swedish Academy said in the announcement Thursday morning. BREAKING NEWS The 2017 #NobelPrize in Literature is awarded to the English author Kazuo Ishiguro pic.twitter.com/j9kYaeMZH6 — The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize) October 5, 2017 The prize, which comes with a cash award of 9 million Swedish Krona ($1.1 million), is awarded...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized Kazuo Ishiguro nobel prize nobel prize for literature onetime World Source Type: news

Here are the Odds of Donald Trump Winning the Nobel Peace Prize
The odds of Donald Trump winning the Nobel Peace Prize were 100/1 at one British oddsmaker today, just one day before the award is announced. Russian President Vladimir Putin has the same chances of walking home with the prize, according to the same oddsmaker, Ladbrokes. Another British firm, William Hill, offered slightly better odds on Trump of 66/1. Eight years ago, in October 2009, Barack Obama won the Nobel Peace Prize, just eleven months after winning his first election. Trump is now in the same position, although Obama’s odds were only 10/1 the day before the 2009 announcement. Bookmakers in the U.K. make Pop...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized Donald Trump nobel peace prize 2017 Source Type: news

Violence towards family caregivers by their relative with schizophrenia in Japan - Kageyama M, Solomon P, Yokoyama K, Nakamura Y, Kobayashi S, Fujii C.
This study ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

There Are Better Ways to Mourn
On a crisp fall day in Vienna, Austria, I received a private tour of the crypt below Michaelerkirche (St. Michael’s Church). Bernard, the young Austrian man who led me down the steep stone staircase, had perfect English delivered in an inexplicably deep Southern accent. “Aye’ve been told my ax-sent is straynge be-fore,” he drawled, like a Confederate general. Bernard explained that during the Middle Ages, when the members of the Hapsburg court attended St. Michael’s, there was a cemetery located directly outside, in the courtyard. But, as so often happened in larger European cities, the cemete...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Caitlin Doughty Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

Will Apama Help Bos Sci Find Its Rhythm?
Boston Scientific has struggled to gain share in the $4.4 billion electrophysiology (EP) market, but a new deal should give it a much-needed boost. The Marlborough, MA-based company said it will pay up to $300 million for Apama Medical, a privately-held firm that is trying to treat atrial fibrillation (AF) with a radiofrequency (RF) balloon that combines the best of catheter- and balloon-based ablation. The deal calls for an up-front cash payment of $175 million and another $125 million payment based on clinical and regulatory milestones expected over the period of 2018 through 2020. The acquisition is expected to clo...
Source: MDDI - October 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Cardiovascular Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Just Picked Its New Leaders. Most of Them Are Women
The World Health Organization announced its new senior leadership team Tuesday, and more than 60% of the appointees are women. “The team represents 14 countries, including all WHO regions, and is more than 60% women, reflecting my deep-held belief that we need top talent, gender equity and a geographically diverse set of perspectives to fulfill our mission to keep the world safe,” WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement. The five men selected to lead the agency are Dr. Peter Salama, Dr. Bernhard Schwartländer, Dr. Ranieri Guerra, Dr. Ren Minghui, and Stewart Simonson. WHO ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Nations women's empowerment Source Type: news

Rivanna touts Accuro research
Ultrasound technology developer Rivanna Medical said new research published...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Rivanna seeks new patents in U.S., Japan Rivanna receives NIBIB grant Rivanna gets Middle East distribution deals Rivanna's ultrasound device IDs epidural space Rivanna lands FDA nod for Accuro navigation (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Aytu BioScience Announces International Distribution Agreement for Fiera(R) in Japan
ENGLEWOOD, Colo., Oct. 3, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Aytu BioScience, Inc. (OTCQX: AYTU), a specialty life sciences company focused on global commercialization of novel products in the field of urology, today announced that the comp... Biopharmaceuticals, Urology, Distribution Aytu BioScience, Fiera, Mitsuboshi Product Planning (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Recent Wave of WWII Memoirs May Also Be the Last
(NEW YORK) — Don Stratton, one of the few remaining surviving veterans from the bombing of Pearl Harbor, had been holding on to his memories for more than 70 years. “It’s a long story and a hard one,” says Stratton, 95, whose memoir, “All the Gallant Men,” about his experiences on the USS Arizona, came out in 2016. “We lost so many men that day, friends of mine. I’m not sure how many people are interested in this anymore, but I’ve had a lot of people call me and say they’ve read my story and recommended it to others.” Stratton’s book is among a recent...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hillel Italie / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW History onetime Source Type: news

Nobel Physics Prize Goes to Trio Who Led Breakthrough in Gravitational Waves
The Nobel Physics Prize 2017 has been awarded to three scientists for their discoveries in gravitational waves. Sweden’s Royal Academy of Sciences announced Tuesday that the winners are Rainer Weiss of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Barry Barish and Kip Thorne of the California Institute of Technology. The three were key to the first observation of gravitational waves in September 2015. When the discovery was announced several months later, it was a sensation not only among scientists but the general public. Gravitational waves are extremely faint ripples in the fabric of space and time, generated by s...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized nobel prizes onetime Physics Source Type: news

Study casts fresh doubt on chest x-ray proficiency
New research has raised serious concerns about the accuracy of chest x-ray...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: NIH releases massive database of chest x-rays Study questions whether x-rays really need to be repeated Johns Hopkins tackles problem of unnecessary scans Japanese group refines digital chest x-ray algorithm Can AI accurately diagnose tuberculosis from chest x-rays? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 3, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

PSU study tracks potentially harmful species from Japanese tsunami to American shores
(Portland State University) Nearly 300 aquatic species have landed on American shores since the 2011 Japanese tsunami by hitching rides on manmade debris, according to a team of researchers from Portland State University and other institutions. Their findings about long-distance life rafting on debris and its impact on the environment were published in the Sept. 29 issue of the journal 'Science.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Japan and NIEHS partner to advance disaster research response
Amid growing international interest in the Disaster Research Response program, NIEHS and Japan sign an agreement to work together. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - October 2, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Japan's Murata will buy Twin Cities health-tech company for $102M
Vios Medical Inc., a health-tech startup that makes patient-monitoring sensors and software, has reached a deal to be sold for about $102 million. The buyer is Japanese electronics giant Murata Manufacturing Co. Ltd., which already owns a 3.6 percent stake in Vios. Founded in 2012, St. Paul-based Vios makes chest sensors that track vital signs like heart and breathing rates. It has also developed software that lets health care providers mon itor patient data in real time. Vios' approach allows… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 2, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

A new method for removing cells infected with the AIDS virus
(Kumamoto University) With the successful suppression of the AIDS virus (HIV) through medication, the focus turns toward its eradication. Japanese researchers have developed a new compound that is key to the destruction of HIV. When the compound is introduced into infected cells, viral budding is suppressed thereby confining it within the host cells. The cell then dies naturally through apoptosis. This treatment is believed to lead to the complete recovery from AIDS in the near future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Depression symptoms linked to problems with daily activities for older Japanese adults
(American Geriatrics Society) Recently, researchers investigated whether depressive symptoms might make it harder for older adults to perform their regular daily activities. The researchers also wanted to find out whether living circumstances or marital status had any impact on whether depressive symptoms affected older adults' abilities to perform daily activities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New drug protects heart from cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction
(Kumamoto University) There are currently many kinds of drugs for heart failure. Among them, the new drug LCZ696 is recommended by US guidelines as a first-line treatment for chronic heart failure. LCZ696 is better than conventional drugs at reducing cardiac death and hospitalization due to heart failure. Now, Japanese researchers have revealed that LCZ696 can prevent cardiac rupture and heart failure following acute myocardial infarction which is one of the causes of chronic heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news