Another Side of a Low-Salt Diet: Reductions in the Salinity of Drinking Water May Lower Blood Pressure

PDF Version (365 KB) About This Article Published: 23 June 2017 Note to readers with disabilities: EHP strives to ensure that all journal content is accessible to all readers. However, some figures and Supplemental Material published in EHP articles may not conform to 508 standards due to the complexity of the information being presented. If you need assistance accessing journal content, please contact ehponline@niehs.nih.gov. Our staff will work with you to assess and meet your accessibility needs within 3 working days. Related EHP Article Drinking Water Salinity and Raised Blood Pressure: Evidence from a Cohort Study in Coastal Bangladesh Pauline F.D. Scheelbeek, Muhammad A.H. Chowdhury, Andy Haines, Dewan S. Alam, Mohammad A. Hoque, Adrian P. Butler, Aneire E. Khan, Sontosh K. Mojumder, Marta A.G. Blangiardo, Paul Elliott, and Paolo Vineis High sodium intake has been strongly associated with increased risk of hypertension.1 In some coastal areas, highly saline drinking water adds to people’s sodium intake. In this issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, scientists report that lower blood pressure and risk of hypertension among coastal Bangladeshi communities were associated with declines in salinity of drinking water sources.2 There are several causes of the salinity in Bangladesh and other low-lying deltas. For instance, in some coastal areas, groundwater is being overpumped to sustain shrimp farms, pulling dee...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Science Selections Source Type: research

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Publication date: January 2020Source: Pregnancy Hypertension, Volume 19Author(s): Sarah Novotny, Nicole Lee-Plenty, Kedra Wallace, Wondwosen Kassahun-Yimer, Aswathi Jayaram, James A. Bofill, James N. MartinAbstractObjectiveTo determine the prevalence of acute kidney injury (AKI), placental abruption and postpartum hemorrhage in patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome.Study designA retrospective study of patients with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome treated at the University of Mississippi Medical Center from January 2000 through December 2010.Main outcome measuresRelationships among the obstetric complications of place...
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: Pregnancy Hypertension, Volume 19Author(s): Laura A Magee, Joel Singer, Terry Lee, Richard J McManus, Sarah Lay-Flurrie, Evelyne Rey, Lucy C Chappell, Jenny Myers, Alexander G Logan, Peter von DadelszenAbstractObjectiveTo examine the relationship between pregnancy outcomes and BP level and variability.DesignSecondary analysis of CHIPS trial data (Control of Hypertension In Pregnancy Study, NCT01192412).SettingInternational.Population or sampleWomen with chronic or gestational hypertension.MethodsBP measurement was standardised in outpatient clinics. Adjusted (including for allocated gr...
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: Pregnancy Hypertension, Volume 19Author(s): Cecilia Villalain, Ignacio Herraiz, Borja Cantero, Soledad Quezada, Ana Lopez, Elisa Simón, Alberto GalindoAbstractObjectivesThe optimal timing for delivery in non-severe late-preterm (34 + 0–36 + 6 weeks) preeclampsia (PE) is uncertain. It is attempted to reach term pregnancy safely but current clinical and analytical parameters fail to determine which cases will develop severe features that require preterm delivery. We aim to establish if angiogenic biomarkers may identify cases that would benefit from ...
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: Pregnancy Hypertension, Volume 19Author(s): Mohamed Rezk
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: Pregnancy Hypertension, Volume 19Author(s): Ellie Proussaloglou, Ariel Mueller, Ruby Minhas, Sarosh RanaAbstractObjectivesHypertensive disorders of pregnancy are a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Although acute severe hypertension carries with it a poor prognosis, treatment is often delayed and not universal.Study designA total of 654 patients were assessed for the impact of hypertensive disorders of pregnancies on maternal and fetal morbidity and divided into three groups: normotensive (Group I, N = 306), non-severe hypertension (Group II, N = 24...
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
In conclusion, our data suggests that progression to kidney disease might not be a major concern in women after preeclampsia within 18 years postpartum.
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: Pregnancy Hypertension, Volume 19Author(s): Zain Awamleh, Victor K.M. HanAbstractPreeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are pregnancy complications resulting from abnormal placental development. As epigenetic regulators, microRNAs can regulate placental development and contribute to the disease pathophysiology by influencing the expression of genes involved in placental development or disease. Our previous study revealed an increase in miR-210-5p expression in placentae from patients with early-onset pregnancy complications and identified candidate gene targets fo...
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionWe feel these data are suggestive of increased on-aspirin platelet (re-)activity, as measured by the PFA-200 and the VerifyNow, in non-pregnant carriers of a FII-mutation, but not in carriers of FVL-mutation. Interestingly, this increased on-aspirin platelet (re-)activity is present in spite of low sTxB2 levels.
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionMigraines have a high incidence in gynaecology and obstetrics. Health care providers must include screening questions when history taking to identify women with migraines and effectively manage them. Proper follow-up and treatment is required for all women with migraines in order to minimize the risk of cerebrovascular events, and negative pregnancy outcomes. Women with migraines are advised to avoid combined hormonal contraception and use progesterone only pills.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
​BY GREGORY TAYLOR, DO, &SHERIF G. EL-ALAYLI, DOA 30-year-old G5P3 presented to the ED with bilateral lower-extremity edema and headache for three days. She presented one week after an uncomplicated full-term vaginal delivery with an unremarkable pregnancy course and no prior requirement for antihypertensive therapy. The headache was described as achy to sharp, with associated photophobia. She also noted occasional vaginal spotting, which was common a few weeks after delivery. She denied any chest pain, shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, abdominal pain, or any other symptoms. She admitted to occasional mild cra...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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