Septin proteins act as cellular police to identify, imprison and kill 'superbug' Shigella
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) A protein family found naturally in our cells could help stop the spread of dangerous drug resistant infections by using 'detective' like powers to collect evidence of bacterial infection and imprison it, according to new research published in the journal Cell Host& Microbe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers at LSTM identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peter Hotez: ‘What happens when the anti-vaccine movement moves into India?’
The American scientist, whose new book explains why vaccines didn ’t cause his daughter’s autism, on why conspiracy theorists need to be challengedPeter Hotez is dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He has worked on developing vaccines for hookworm andschistosomiasis, and is a vocal opponent of the anti-vaccine movement. His daughter Rachel is autistic and he has written a book,Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel ’s Autism, in which he describes her illness and tackles the newly resurgent anti-vaccine movement.Why did you decide to write this book thr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Science Autism Andrew Wakefield Source Type: news

Featured Review: Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) combined with pyrethroids in insecticide ‐treated nets to prevent malaria in Africa
Review confirms that using pyrethroid-PBO treated nets to prevent malaria is more effective at killing mosquitoes in areas where there is a high level of resistance to pyrethroids.The distribution of nets treated with pyrethroid insecticides has been very effective in reducing malaria transmission during the past two decades in Africa. However, there has been a rise in the number of mosquitoes developing resistance to pyrethroids, which is the only class of insecticides currently used to treat nets.In a new Cochrane review, an independent team of review authors led byKatherine Gleave andNatalie Lissenden at the Liverpool S...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 29, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Here ’s Why People Are Obsessed With Popping Pimples
You know it’s a bad idea to pop your pimples. Dermatologists say so. “If the inflamed or infected material”—i.e., the pimple pus—“is not easily extruded with a little pressure, you could force it deep and spread the extent of the inflammation, and even cause permanent scarring and pitting of the skin,” says Dr. Michael Olding, a dermatologist and chief of plastic surgery at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. But despite these warnings, many find it hard to resist evicting the unsightly little squatters that set up shop in their skin. One dermat...
Source: TIME: Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

The anti-vaxxer maps of America: Where the trend is taking hold
Peter Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine, at Baylor College of Medicine, reveals the 18 US states that allow nonmedical vaccine exemptions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Health: Dogs Can Detect Malaria. How Useful Is That?
Canine can sniff out the socks worn by children carrying the mosquito-borne parasites, a study finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Dogs Malaria Smells and Odors American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Durham University Africa Gambia Source Type: news

Humanitarian Evidence Week
Evidence Aid uses knowledge from systematic reviews to provide reliable, up-to-date evidence on interventions that might be considered in the context of natural disasters and other major healthcare emergencies. It was established after the Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004, with input from several members of Cochrane, Cochrane groups, and other individuals and became an independent charity in 2015.  For the second year Evidence Aid has organised Humanitarian Evidence Week in collaboration with The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford, to promote a more evidence-based approach. Webinars, blog...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 1, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

Prenatal exposure to malaria may determine disease susceptibility early in life
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Prenatal exposure to malaria considerably alters the newborn's innate immune response (i.e. its first line of defence), particularly when the placenta has been infected, according to a study led by ISGlobal, the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp (ITM). The results, published in BMC Medicine, could help explain why some babies are more susceptible to malaria than others during their first year of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 1, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Global Health: In Congo ’ s Ebola Outbreak, Experimental Treatments Are Proving Effective
More than half of the patients who received treatment survived, scientists reported. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Ebola Virus ZMapp (Drug) Epidemics Vaccination and Immunization Deaths (Fatalities) American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene University of North Carolina Congo, Democratic Republic of (Congo-Kinshasa) William A. Fischer II Source Type: news

New report finds tropical disease causing heart problems in dogs assisting with homeland security duties
(Burness) More than 100 working dogs employed by the federal government across the United States have been infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease, which may lead to heart problems, according to a new study presented today at the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. Chagas disease is a tropical infection spread by a blood-sucking triatomine or 'kissing bug' that may pose a growing threat in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

High BMIs linked to a greater risk of death from every major cause
The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine analysed 3.6 million people and nearly 370,000 deaths to get a greater insight into BMI. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Body mass index associated with deaths from most causes
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Body mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat, is linked to risk of death from every major cause except transport accidents, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New evidence of durable immune response to 3 experimental Ebola vaccines helps drive new wave of vaccine development targeting a number of diseases with epidemic potential
(American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene) In the midst of an increasingly volatile Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a new study presented today finds that the immune response generated by three experimental Ebola vaccines -- including one already deployed in the DRC -- persists for at least two and a half years. The study, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, could have implications far beyond the Ebola fight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 29, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Millennials are more sceptical of vaccines
A report by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that people who are aged between 18 and 24 are 24 per cent less likely than over-65s to believe vaccines are safe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 67th Annual Meeting
(Burness) Fighting the Latest Ebola Scare, Tackling Disease Outbreaks, Pandemic Flu Concerns, Probing Tick Spit for Cures, Diseases in the Aftermath of Hurricanes, Emerging Infectious Diseases and More at World's Leading Meeting of Global Health and Tropical Disease Experts (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa:Global Handwashing Day - Innovative 'Surprise Soap' Gets Children Washing Hands in Emergencies, With Lifesaving Implications
[savethechildren_uk] Children who had fled their homes because of conflict were four times more likely to wash their hands with soap if it was made fun in an innovative new approach, a pilot study by Save the Children, the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine and humanitarian manufacturing experts Field Ready, has shown[i]. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 15, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Putting your fingers up your nose could spread bacteria which cause pneumonia
Researchers led by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine say it would be unrealistic to tell children to stop touching their noses but hygiene could be improved around vulnerable relatives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds standard treatment for common STD doesn't eliminate parasite in some women
(Tulane University) A new study led by an infectious disease epidemiologist at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine could change the way doctors treat a common sexually transmitted disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents only talk about sex with their first borns
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine found that middle and last-born children are up to 49 per cent less likely to be told about sex by their parents than their older siblings. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

LSTM and TB Alliance collaborate to develop new TB therapies
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) This new partnership is supported by the Medical Research Council (MRC) to research drug regimens to fight drug-resistant tuberculosisLSTM and TB Alliance are collaborating to investigate novel combination drug therapies that could help the fight against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), following an award of £ 1 million from the Medical Research Council (MRC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Malaria-infected children give off a distinctive smell that makes them even MORE attractive to mosquitoes
(Natural News) According to a study, malaria-infected children emit a unique smell through their skin and it makes them “even more attractive to mosquitoes.” The study was published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and it involved researchers from Cardiff University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Wageningen University.  The study is the first of its... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

LSTM led partnership awarded £ 1.5 million for NTD drug development
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) An LSTM led partnership has been awarded nearly £ 1.5 million from the Medical Research Council (MRC) for the pre-clinical development of a candidate drug to treat onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, by targeting the bacterial symbiont Wolbachia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Global Warming Threatens Europe ’ s Public Health
Parched olive groves in northern Croatia, where West Nile Virus has already claimed one victim this year. West Nile Virus infections have sharply increased in Europe this year, the World Health Organisation says, largely due to a longer transmission season in the region which this year saw high temperatures and extended rainy spells followed by dry weather, helping mosquito breeding and propagation. Credit: Ed Holt/IPSBy Ed HoltVIENNA, Sep 13 2018 (IPS)Climate change and health experts are warning of the growing threat to public health in Europe from global warming as rising temperatures help potentially lethal diseases sp...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ed Holt Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Editors' Choice Environment Europe Featured Headlines Health Population Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) Health and Environment Source Type: news

Cochrane Infectious Diseases seeks part-time Clinical Research Associate in Evidence Synthesis - Liverpool, UK
Contract type:Part-time, Fixed-term appointment at 0.6 FTE for up to 2 yearsClosing date:24 September 2018Founded in 1898 and the oldest of its kind in the world, the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for teaching and research in tropical diseases.  LSTM’s Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 5, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Patterns of benign gynaecology care in English NHS hospital trusts
The report, carried out in collaboration with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, identifies a number of national indicators to provide an overview of benign gynaecological care in England. This includes inpatient care, emergency readmission and longer-term surgical outcomes. Initial indicators suggest some variations in both care and longer-term outcomes between trusts. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cochrane review looks at accuracy of Xpert for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) In one-fifth of people with active tuberculosis (TB), the site of disease is outside the lungs (extrapulmonary TB). Some forms of extrapulmonary TB, such as TB meningitis, are extremely dangerous, where a rapid diagnosis can make all the difference to a patient. In a new Cochrane Review, a team of authors reviewed the evidence and assessed the accuracy of the widely-used rapid diagnostic test, mainly used to diagnose pulmonary TB for such cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group seeks Clinical Research Associate in Evidence Synthesis - Liverpool, UK
Salary: Starting salary of £32,478 per annumContract type:Full-time, fixed-term for up to 2 yearsClosing date:11 September 2018Founded in 1898 and the oldest of its kind in the world, the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for teaching and research in tropical diseases.  LSTM’s Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now re...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group seeks Research Assistant in Evidence Synthesis - Liverpool, UK
Salary: Starting salary of £28,098 per annumContract type: Full-time, fixed-term for up to 2 yearsClosing date:11 September 2018 Founded in 1898 and the oldest of its kind in the world, the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for teaching and research in tropical diseases.  LSTM'S Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane and established the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now re...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Nigeria:Health Partnership Trains Stakeholders On Emergency Obstetrics, Newborn Care in Kwara
[Guardian] A groundbreaking Emergency Obstetrics and Newborn Care (EmONC) training has been scheduled for healthcare facilities in Kwara State.The project is a partnership by Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBFA), Johnson& Johnson, as well as Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.The programme, which has been active in seven of the 16 local council areas of the state, is expected to improve health outcomes for mothers and their newborns. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - August 8, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Nigeria:Ground-breaking Health Partnership to Expand Across Kwara State
[Wellbeing Foundation] Ilorin -The ground-breaking partnership between the Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBFA), Johnson& Johnson and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine is set to expand across the whole of Kwara State, in an announcement due to take place today. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - August 6, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

They ate raw centipedes -- and then the headaches began
After two people in Guangzhou, China, were admitted to the hospital with headaches and other neurological symptoms, doctors pinpointed an infection with a unusual backstory: They had eaten raw centipedes, according to a report published Monday in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

£ 2 Million for sepsis research in Africa
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) LSTM is to lead a new multinational project on sepsis following a £ 2 million award from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global Health: Maybe You Were Thinking About Eating Raw Centipedes. Don ’ t.
Dried or powdered centipedes are used in Chinese traditional medicine. But uncooked specimens may contain a parasite that infects the brain, scientists report. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Alternative and Complementary Medicine Insects Parasites American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene China Guangzhou (China) Centipedes lungworm Source Type: news

Researchers in China link dangerous foodborne pathogen to centipedes
(Burness) A dangerous foodborne parasite typically found in snails and other mollusks was detected in two patients in a Chinese hospital and traced to their consumption of raw centipedes, according to a new case report published today by the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 30, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Africa:MTV Shuga Launches New Campaigns On HIV Prevention
[Daily Trust] Unitaid, the MTV Staying Alive Foundation (MTV SAF) and the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine on Wednesday announced a three-year partnership to introduce and evaluate storylines on HIV innovation, including HIV self-testing and preventive drugs (PrEP) into the award-winning drama series, MTV Shuga. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Are boys more cliquey than girls?
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Children's friendship groups in secondary school remain consistent over time and are often structured around gender, with boys forming the most tight-knit bands, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. The findings suggests boys might be more 'cliquey' than girls, and that factors such as location and timetable may have an impact on the social networks that children develop. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA marks in adults tracked back to changes in earliest days of life
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Scientists have gained a glimpse of how marks on our genes that could be linked to adverse health outcomes in later life behave differently in the first few days after conception, according to new research published in Science Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LSTM led consortium awarded £ 3 million to study the impact of human behavior on AMR
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) An LSTM led consortium called DRUM (Drivers of Resistance in Uganda and Malawi) has been awarded £ 3 million to investigate the way in which human behaviour drives the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed in current malaria regimen
(PLOS) Current recommended dosing regimens for the most widely used treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria may be sub-optimal for the most vulnerable populations of patients, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine, led by Professor Joel Tarning of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network and the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Network. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Yuck! Why there ’s more to disgust than not getting sick
From rotten food to weeping sores, our sense of squeamishness can help save our lives. But why are some people more susceptible ​to disgust ​than others – and what does it mean?One of the fun parts of being a disgustologist – as researchers who study the emotion of disgust sometimes call themselves – must be coming up with revolting scenarios. Repulsive enough to test a theory, but not quite so stomach-turning as to repel the people who have volunteered to take the test. In a recent study led by Prof Val Curtis, di rector of the environmental health group at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical M...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner Tags: Science Evolution Psychology Source Type: news

Ribavirin for treating Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever -- latest Cochrane review
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) In a viral hemorrhagic disease where up to 40 percent of people developing it die, it is remarkable that doctors still do not agree whether the only recognized treatment, an antiviral drug called ribavirin, makes a difference. In a new Cochrane Review a team of authors at LSTM, along with colleagues in London, the Philippines and in Greece, evaluated the evidence to assess the effectiveness of treating Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why women are more likely to view life with disgust
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine researchers asked 2,500 people to rate how revolted they were by 75 different scenarios - including treading barefoot on a slug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A filthy first -- the 6 common types of disgust that protect us from disease revealed
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Poor hygiene, animals or insects carrying disease and risky sexual behavior are among the distinct kinds of disgust that can help us to avoid disease and infection, according to new research published in a special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Severe Atopic Eczema Tied to Higher CV Disease Risk
FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 -- Adults with severe atopic eczema are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online May 23 in The BMJ. Richard J. Silverwood, Ph.D., from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 25, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Link found between severe eczema and heart problems
Individuals with severe eczema face a higher risk of cardiovascular problems such as heart attacks, heart failure and strokesPeople with severe eczema have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems, new research suggests.About 10% of the population are thought to have atopic eczema, but evidence for a connection to cardiovascular problems had been mixed, said Dr Sin éad Langan, lead author of the research from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The new study, she said, suggests such a link exists.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Eczema Health Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

Advance genetics study identifies virulent strain of TB
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) LSTM's Dr Maxine Caws is co-lead investigator on an advanced genetics study published in Nature Genetics(link is external), which has shown that a virulent strain of tuberculosis (TB) has adapted to transmit among young adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news