Climate Experts Are Testing New Ways To Reach the People Most Affected by Extreme Heat
As heat waves become longer, hotter, and more widespread across the planet, human responses to them are becoming increasingly local and specialized. Both scientific researchers and government officials are finding that the best strategies to keep cool are ones that are specially tailored to a community. That may seem obvious, given that outdoor laborers need different cooling resources than school teachers, for instance. But existing national and regional policies aren’t always that fine tuned—and they run the risk of wasting resources or missing the most vulnerable people. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”tru...
Source: TIME: Health - July 19, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized climate climate change Climate Is Everything extreme weather healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Without Roe v. Wade, U.S. Maternal Mortality Rates May Get Even Worse
The United States is a surprisingly dangerous place to be pregnant. The U.S. maternal mortality rate—nearly 24 deaths per 100,000 live births, as of 2020—is far higher than in comparable developed nations, and research shows it has gotten worse in recent years, not better. Maternal death rates are particularly high among Black women, at 55 deaths per 100,000 births compared to 19 deaths per 100,000 births among white women. Experts fear these numbers will only get worse now that Roe v. Wade has been overturned, eliminating the constitutional right to abortion and triggering an array of state-level bans that pla...
Source: TIME: Health - June 30, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized abortion healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

South Africa: Children's Rights to Nutrition Must Be Put At the Centre of Food Systems, Conference Is Told
[Daily Maverick] Children's rights to food and adequate nutrition took centre stage on Thursday evening at the Agriculture, Nutrition and Health Academy Week hosted jointly by Stellenbosch University and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 30, 2022 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Polio Eradication Will Take Funds and Awareness
A polio vaccinator administers the oral polio vaccine to a child in Pakistan. Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jun 22 2022 (IPS) For forty days, Kunle Adeyanju – a Nigerian, Rotarian, polio eradication advocate and biker – rode for more than 12,500km from London to Lagos to raise funds for polio eradication. Adeyanju documented his journey on Twitter, where his handle is appropriately named @lionheart1759. Indeed, it takes one with a lion’s heart to embark on such a bold adventure. People like philanthropist Bill Gates, who works on polio eradication, and the CEO of Twitter, Parag Agrawal, tweet...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 22, 2022 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Africa Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Polio Source Type: news

Gay and bisexual men WILL be offered monkeypox vaccine in targeted rollout
Scientists at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine warned it is 'highly likely' that another 10,000 cases of monkeypox would be spotted worldwide. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 21, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ivermectin for preventing and treating COVID-19
Is ivermectin effective for COVID ‐19? Updated Cochrane review'Ivermectin for preventing and treating COVID ‐19 'Key messagesWe found no evidence to support the use of ivermectin for treating COVID ‐19 or preventing SARS‐CoV‐2 infection. The evidence base improved slightly in this update, but is still limited.Evaluation of ivermectin is continuing in 31 ongoing trials, and we will update this review again when their results become available.  What is ivermectin?Ivermectin is a medicine used to treat parasites, such as intestinal parasites in animals, and scabies in humans. It is inexpensive and is widely used in...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - June 21, 2022 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Opens First Satellite Center for Global Health Discovery in Asia Pacific at Duke-NUS to Advance Dengue Research
SINGAPORE, June 21, 2022 – Johnson & Johnson (the Company) today announced the launch of the new J&J Satellite Center for Global Health Discovery (Satellite Center) at Singapore’s Duke-NUS Medical School, jointly established by Duke University and the National University of Singapore (NUS) as a graduate-entry medical school and research powerhouse. As the first of the J&J Centers for Global Health Discovery (J&J Centers) in the Asia-Pacific region, the Satellite Center at Duke-NUS aims to help drive new solutions to address flaviviruses, which disproportionately impact communities across the region, by ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 21, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Why the monkeypox outbreak is mostly affecting men who have sex with men
Ever since monkeypox started sickening thousands of people worldwide this spring, two big questions have loomed: Why is a virus that has never managed to spread beyond a few cases outside Africa suddenly causing such a big, global outbreak? And why are the overwhelming majority of those affected men who have sex with men (MSM)? A long history of work on sexually transmitted infections and early studies of the current outbreak suggest the answers may be linked: The virus may have made its way into highly interconnected sexual networks within the MSM community, where it can spread in ways that it cannot in the ge...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

COVID-19 Schools Infection Survey, England: round 3 questionnaire analysis, March 2022 - Long COVID, ONS
Analysis of findings on from round 3 of the Schools Infection Survey ' s headteacher, parent and pupil questionnaires. The Schools Infection Survey is jointly led by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK Health Security Agency and the Office for National Statistics. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 16, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nearly 15% of People Worldwide Have Had Lyme Disease, Study Says
Lyme disease was first named nearly 50 years ago in Lyme, Connecticut, but the tick-borne disease is now found around the world. A new study published in BMJ Global Health estimates that 14.5% of the world’s population has, at some point, been infected with Lyme disease, which can cause short-term symptoms including a skin rash, fever, headache, and fatigue—as well as long-term ones, including damage to the joints, heart, and nervous system. The scourge also appears to be getting worse. Lyme prevalence has doubled from 2010 to 2021, compared to 2001 to 2010. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] The stu...
Source: TIME: Health - June 14, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Top Local Changemakers Addressing Health Equity Gaps Across the U.S. Named Johnson & Johnson Health Equity Innovation Challenge Awardees
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., June 14, 2022 – After an extensive search for the top changemakers in six key U.S. cities, Johnson & Johnson today announced the 14 awardees of its Health Equity Innovation Challenge. The awardees, who possess lived experience and a deep understanding of the communities they serve, were selected for their work in generating solutions to help close racial health and mortality gaps in six cities where Black and Brown individuals experience significant health inequities: Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York City and Philadelphia.The Health Equity Innovation Challenge was created by J...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 14, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Are we going to live with monkeypox like flu and Covid? Experts fear virus will never be eliminated
Dr Adam Kucharski, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, warned the 'biggest risk' of monkeypox is that 'case numbers will slow down but not be eliminated'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 27, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

There ’s Already a Monkeypox Vaccine. But Not Everyone May Need It
Case counts of monkeypox continue to grow worldwide, raising concerns about how people can protect themselves. So far, the World Health Organization reports that in 12 countries, 92 cases have been confirmed in this recent emergence of the virus, and 28 possible cases are still being investigated. What alarms public health officials about the recent outbreaks is that monkeypox is generally not common or known to circulate in these nations; it’s endemic in parts of central and western Africa, but not in the European and North American nations—including the U.S.—that are currently seeing an uptick in infect...
Source: TIME: Health - May 23, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Public Health Source Type: news

There ’ s Already a Monkeypox Vaccine. But Not Everyone May Need It
Case counts of monkeypox continue to grow worldwide, raising concerns about how people can protect themselves. So far, the World Health Organization reports that in 12 countries, 92 cases have been confirmed in this recent emergence of the virus, and 28 possible cases are still being investigated. What alarms public health officials about the recent outbreaks is that monkeypox is generally not common or known to circulate in these nations; it’s endemic in parts of central and western Africa, but not in the European and North American nations—including the U.S.—that are currently seeing an uptick in infect...
Source: TIME: Health - May 23, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Public Health Source Type: news

As the Virus Evolves, COVID-19 Reinfections Are Going to Keep Happening
After the Omicron variant caused massive numbers of infections this past winter, lots of people looked on the bright side, hoping it would be “a free shot for the country,” says Eli Rosenberg, deputy director for science at the New York State Department of Health’s Office of Public Health. Even though lots of people got infected with the highly contagious variant, at least they would then have immunity against the virus, protecting them from getting sick in the future. In theory. But that hasn’t turned out to be true. Many people—even those who are vaccinated, boosted, and previously infected&...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news