Dr. Paul Stoffels, Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer of Johnson & Johnson To Retire, Effective December 31, 2021
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (October 12, 2021) – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) today announced that Paul Stoffels M.D., currently Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer of Johnson & Johnson, will retire from the Company effective December 31, 2021.As the Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Stoffels spearheaded the company’s research and product pipeline leading teams across sectors to set the company-wide mandate to discover and develop transformational healthcare solutions. Under his leadership, Johnson & Johnson revitalized its innovati...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - October 12, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Just Endorsed The World ’s First Malaria Vaccine
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization (WHO) on Wednesday endorsed the world’s first malaria vaccine and said it should be given to children across Africa in the hope that it will spur stalled efforts to curb the spread of the parasitic disease. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called it “a historic moment” after a meeting in which two of the U.N. health agency’s expert advisory groups recommended the step. “Today’s recommendation offers a glimmer of hope for the continent, which shoulders the heaviest burden of the disease. And we expect many more African child...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Chang / AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease wire Source Type: news

Pay ballots continue to dominate
General secretary Christina McAnea updated the NEC on a series of pay disputes across the union, and did not disguise how member turnout was still proving to be a major obstacle to future action. Recently, 79% of local government members voted to reject their 1.75% pay offer, with the NJC committee agreeing to move to an industrial action ballot. NHS members in England also voted by a similar margin (80%) to oppose the government over the 3% pay increase, with their SGE deciding to embark on further consultation prior to a strike ballot. The union’s Cymru/Wales NHS pay consultation found that 87% of healthcare worker...
Source: UNISON Health care news - October 6, 2021 Category: UK Health Authors: Martin Cullen Tags: Article local government pay – the National Joint Council (NJC) NEC One Team2K Source Type: news

Major analysis that sparked alcohol fears was flawed, experts insist
The 'occasional glass of wine or glass of beer' with is perfectly safe, University College London and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine scientists have claimed in a study. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rules and advice don ’t slow the spread of the virus – human behaviour does | David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters
Surveys can help us understand how the pandemic is influenced by our choicesRecent queues for fuel have shown the consequences of abrupt changes in behaviour. Almost as sudden were the changes around the first lockdown in March 2020, when close meetings between people plummeted by about three-quarters. We know this through theCoMix contact survey from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), which has continued to askUK adults about their “direct contacts”, that is any sort of skin-to-skin contact or anyone to whom at least a few words were exchanged in person. Can you remember how many such...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters Tags: Coronavirus Psychology Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Ebola Vaccine Regimen Demonstrated Robust and Durable Immune Response in Adults and Children in Data Published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., September 13, 2021 – Data from two papers published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases demonstrated that the Johnson & Johnson (the Company) Ebola vaccine regimen, Zabdeno® (Ad26.ZEBOV) and Mvabea® (MVA-BN-Filo), generated robust humoral (antibody) immune responses in adults and children (ages 1-17) with the immune responses persisting in adults for at least two years. The data also showed that booster vaccination with Ad26.ZEBOV, administered to adults two years after the initial vaccination, induced a strong anamnestic (immune) response within seven days. These findings support the p...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - September 13, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UNISON wins outsourcing battle at London medical university
UNISON has won a decision to bring outsourced workers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) back in house at the end of the current contract in August 2022. The move follows months of negotiations, after the union submitted a claim for the insourcing of staff employed by Samsic UK in 2019 on behalf of the dedicated cleaners and security staff at the school. In a huge win for the outsourced workers, parity of terms and conditions will now be offered to the staff, many of whom have worked tirelessly on the front line throughout COVID-19 to keep the researchers safe and the school open to help com...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 2, 2021 Category: UK Health Authors: Janey Starling Tags: Article News higher education insourcing Source Type: news

Innovative Use of World ’s First Malaria Vaccine Generates Remarkable Results and a Life-Saving Opportunity
Malaria still kills 400,000 people every year, most of them African children under five years old. RTS,S is the first malaria vaccine shown to reduce malaria and life-threatening severe malaria in young children. Credit: Mercedes Sayagues/IPSBy Kesete AdmasuSep 1 2021 (IPS) In the midst of the tragedy and turmoil caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s gratifying to see work continuing in Africa to find new ways of fighting malaria, a very old disease that has been a formidable foe for thousands of years and still kills 400,000 people every year, most of them African children under five years old. Scientists from the ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kesete Admasu Tags: Africa Headlines Health Malaria Source Type: news

What Public Health Officials Can Learn from a New Long COVID Survey
Fifty percent of vaccine-hesitant Americans believe the message that “Getting the COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to prevent COVID-19 and its potential long-term complications”. Credit: UNICEF/Nahom Tesfaye By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jul 30 2021 (IPS) A new survey on public awareness of long COVID by ‘Resolve to Save Lives” showed that among the 40% of Americans who were not vaccinated, seeing testimonials of those who suffer from long COVID inspired nearly two-thirds to consider the vaccine. A representative sample of nearly 2,000 Americans 18 and older took the survey between May 21 and Ju...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 30, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

Jeremy Farrar: ‘A September 2020 lockdown would have saved a lot of lives’
The Wellcome Trust director and Sage member on what politicians and scientists got right and wrong on Covid and why we need an immediate public inquiryCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageJeremy Farrar is the director of the Wellcome Trust, a former professor of tropical medicine at the University of Oxford and a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage). He has just published his account of the Covid crisis –Spike: The Virus vthe People - in which he attacks the government for delaying a lockdown last autumn and describes the scientific and medical efforts that went ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Science Politics books Chris Whitty Patrick Vallance Source Type: news

Left out in the cold
This report was prompted by our awareness of the cuts over the last few years which are affecting a broad range of healthcare services, specifically specialist sex worker services throughout London. As an organisation, DOTW is interested in identifying gaps in support for people excluded from healthcare and other services, and so began conversations with partners, including colleagues at LSHTM, to see how we could broaden our understanding of this issue, and to understand better what sex workers were asking for in terms of support. The relocation of the DOTW clinic to Newham two year ago was one of the reasons we cho...
Source: Doctors of the World News - July 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Dominic Stevenson Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Launches Network of Global Health Discovery Centers that Aim to Speed Up Science and Tackle Pandemic Threats
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., July 9, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson (the Company) today announced the launch of the J&J Centers for Global Health Discovery (J&J Centers), a new, global network of unique research partnerships that will leverage the institutional strengths of Johnson & Johnson and leading academic institutions to accelerate discovery research to address the world’s most pressing global health challenges. The first J&J Satellite Center for Global Health Discovery (Satellite Center) was launched at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) at an event co-hosted by Johnson &...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 9, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Nearly 8% of men who have sex with men estimated to have syphilis globally
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The global burden of syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been estimated for the first time in a new study published in The Lancet Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Being clean and hygienic need not impair childhood immunity
(University College London) The theory that modern society is too clean, leading to defective immune systems in children, should be swept under the carpet, according to a new study by researchers at UCL and the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Regional Advisors Will Guide Frontline Health Workers Coalition ’s Policy and Advocacy Work
July 02, 2021This week the Frontline Health Workers Coalition welcomed four new regional advisors from low- and middle-income countries to its steering committee, where they will help guide the coalition’s health workforce policy and advocacy work over the next year. IntraHealth International serves as the secretariat for the coalition.“We are working to address longstandingpower imbalances in the global health arena, and reflecting on ways to more comprehensively address health workforce needs,” says David Bryden, director of the Coalition.“We do not simply want to speak on behalf of health workers...
Source: IntraHealth International - July 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Health Workers Source Type: news

Covid: SAGE expert says school restrictions should stay in place until all children are vaccinated
Professor John Edmunds, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, insisted the 'safest time' to lift measures at schools would be after all children have had a jab. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ivermectin treatment in humans for reducing malaria transmission
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Malaria still kills millions. Researchers are excited by a new intervention: giving people a drug which kills mosquitoes that bite them. Incredibly, this is a reality, as the drug ivermectin, widely used for the control of parasite infections such as lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, appears to do this. With some mosquitoes now resistant to the insecticides used in treated bed nets, this is a potentially important new control measure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 30, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Children with asymptomatic malaria a 'hidden risk' to disease control efforts
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The role of people infected with malaria without showing symptoms presents a hidden risk to efforts to control the disease after they were found to be responsible for most infections in mosquitoes, according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Naomi Osaka ’s Bravery can be a Teachable Moment about Mental Health
There is no health without mental health. Credit: Unsplash /Melanie Wasser. By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jun 2 2021 (IPS) Recently, Naomi Osaka, the number 2 ranked women’s tennis player in the world, said she would not participate in the press conference at the French Open (Rolland-Garros) because she wanted to protect her mental health. The organizers of the tournament were incensed, imposed a fine on her and threatened to disqualify her.  Would the organizers have reacted differently if Naomi Osaka said she could not participate in the tournament’s press briefing because of a physica...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Machine learning brings an early diagnostic for pancreatic cancer a step closer to reality
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Individuals at higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer could be identified earlier using machine learning (ML) techniques which would result in a greater number of patients surviving the disease, suggests a new study published in PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 2, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Global warming already responsible for one in three heat-related deaths
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Between 1991 and 2018, more than a third of all deaths in which heat played a role were attributable to human-induced global warming, according to a new article in Nature Climate Change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infrared imaging to detect lymphatic filariasis
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM's Centre for Neglected Tropical Diseases (CNTD) have been using an infrared thermal imaging camera to detect subclinical cases and predict the progression of lymphatic filariasis in Bangladesh. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Covid-19: England's lifting of lockdown on June 21 is 'not inevitable', government adviser warns
Lifting lockdown on June 21 is 'not inevitable', Adam Kucharski, assistant professor in Infectious Disease Epidemiology at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, has warned. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Faster than a PCR test: dogs detect Covid in under a second
Study in London used six enthusiastic dogs in a double-blind trialCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageFaster than PCR and more accurate than lateral flow tests, the latest weapons against Covid-19 have four legs and a wet nose.A study published on Monday found that people who are infected with coronavirus give off a distinct odour, which these highly trained dogs can detect with pinpoint precision.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Dogs London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Animals Pets UK news Infectious diseases Medical research World news Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Joins World Health Organization in Efforts to Prevent Spread of Ebola in West Africa
Discussions are ongoing with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regarding the approval of the vaccine regimen in the U.S. WHO Prequalification is often a prerequisite for national registrations of new vaccines and medicines in developing countries. Johnson & Johnson now looks forward to collaborating with the WHO’s African Vaccine Regulatory Forum (AVAREF) to progress national registrations of the Company’s Ebola vaccine regimen. The Company’s Ebola vaccine regimen is designed to be used proactively to induce immunity against Ebola virus disease in adults and children. Johnson & Johnson’s...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - May 13, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Compulsory vaccinations for care staff are the wrong approach
This study makes plain any talk of compulsory vaccination could damage take-up ​severely. “​Care workers need clear, accurate information from their employers about when and how they ​to get their jab​s. “If ​achieving maximum ​coverage is the goal, employers and policymakers w​ill get better results through encouragement, reassurance and removal of any practical barriers ​for staff. ​Forced ​injections ​simply aren’t the answer.” Notes to editors: – UNISON is the UK’s largest union, with more than 1.3 mill...
Source: UNISON Health care news - May 12, 2021 Category: UK Health Authors: Anthony Barnes Tags: News Press release social care vaccination Source Type: news

How West African Leaders Can Tackle Youth and Gender Inequities
Women informal cross-border traders. Credit: Trevor Davies/IPSBy Ifeanyi Nsofor, Adaeze Oreh, and John Lazame TindabilMay 6 2021 (IPS) Recently, both Republics of Benin and Chad held their 2021 national elections. These countries are among thirteen countries on the continent billed to elect new political leaders in 2021 alone. This is a good opportunity to improve conditions on the continent. Indeed, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified other issues on the continent like youth unemployment that better leadership could help improve. These are three ways West African leaders can better help their nations at thi...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor, Adaeze Oreh, and John Lazame Tindabil Tags: Africa Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

T ü bingen study raises hope for effective malaria vaccine
(German Center for Infection Research) At the University Hospital of Tuebingen, a clinical trial led by Prof. Dr. Peter Kremsner, Director of the Institute of Tropical Medicine and Dr. Rolf Fendel, Research Group Leaderat the Institute of Tropical Medicine partnered with the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), was able to show that the vaccine, " Sanaria ® PfSPZ-CVac " , which is being developed in Tuebingen together with the biotechnology company Sanaria Inc., provides 77 percent cross-strain protection against malaria parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why Variants are Most Likely to Blame for India ’ s COVID Surge
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Why Variants are Most Likely to Blame for India’s COVID Surge appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Asia-Pacific Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

A PLOS Medicine Collection on Plasmodium vivax--a neglected cause of malaria
(PLOS) Strenuous efforts to prevent in recent decades have brought great benefits, particularly against disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum in countries in Africa and the Americas. But malaria caused by its " stealthier and more resilient cousin " , P. vivax, now needs to be confronted with high priority, say Lorenz von Seidlein and Nicholas White of the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit in Bangkok, Thailand in a Perspective. The piece introduces a Collection on the prevention and treatment of P. vivax malaria in PLOS Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Babies surviving Group B strep more likely to require special educational support
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease, notably meningitis, during the first days and months of a baby's life can have persistent effects for children and hence their families, according to new research. Published in the Lancet Child& Adolescent Health, the study is the first evidence of long-term effects including after GBS sepsis (infection in the bloodstream). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Will Trust in the Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Recover? Europe ’s AstraZeneca Experience Suggests Not
When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended stopping use of the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine on April 13, they declared the action a “pause”—a brief intermission as the government investigates a possible link between the vaccine and blood clots in a small number of recipients. The agencies may lift that recommendation as soon as this week, and vaccination with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna shots has continued. However temporary it might be, a recent YouGov/Economist survey suggests that the J&J pause has already hurt U.S. pu...
Source: TIME: Health - April 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Job vacancies in evidence synthesis with Cochrane Infectious Diseases group - Liverpool, UK
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine ’s Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane ’s premier groups, with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors, and is well-linked with the World Health Organization.Two job positions are currently being advertised with the Centre (Research Assistant and Clinical Research Associate in evidence synthesis)...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 8, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Job vacancy: Research Associate (Evidence Synthesis)- Liverpool, UK
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine ’s Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane ’s premier groups, with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors, and is well-linked with the World Health Organization.Based in Liverpool, an exciting opportunity has arisen for a Research Associate to join the team of 11 staff to contribute to the broad programme of ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 8, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Brazil at high risk of dengue outbreaks after droughts because of temporary water storage
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Dengue risk is exacerbated in highly populated areas of Brazil after extreme drought because of improvised water containers housing mosquitoes, suggests a new study in Lancet Planetary Health.The research was led by the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine's (LSHTM) Centre on Climate Change& Planetary Health and Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Three Ways the US Can Promote Equity in Ending the COVID-19 Pandemic Globally
Continued inequity in COVID-19 vaccination means virus mutations occur and newer variants emerge that may be resistant to currently available vaccines. Credit: United Nations.By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Apr 2 2021 (IPS) As richer western nations continue hoarding COVID-19 vaccines to the detriment of poorer nations, there is some light on the horizon. On April 15, 2021, the U.S. will join the Global Vaccine Alliance (GAVI) and co-host the launch of the Investment Opportunity for COVAX Advance Market Commitment. The aim of the event is to raise more funds to ensure at least 1.8 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines are available ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

Vulnerable newborns being separated from their mothers in COVID-19 pandemic
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the quality of care given to small and sick newborn babies in all regions of the world and threatening implementation of life-saving interventions, suggests new research published in BMJ Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New AJTMH supplement offers guidance on severe COVID-19 management in resource-limited settings
(Burness) A new supplement offering guidance on severe COVID-19 management in resource-limited settings is now available on the American Journal of Tropical Medicine (AJTMH) website. Pragmatic Recommendations for the Management of Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients in Low- and Middle-Income Countries was coordinated by a COVID-LMIC Task Force headed by Alfred Papali, MD, of Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC, and Marcus Schultz, MD, PhD, of Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; University of Oxford, United Kingdom; and Amsterdam University Medical Centers, The Netherlands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 Cases Are Rising in Europe, and the Vaccine Rollout Is Lagging. How Did It All Go So Badly Wrong?
Europe was one of the first regions to be hit hard by COVID-19 last spring. In mid-May 2020, the World Health Organization declared it the “epicenter” of the pandemic, with more reported cases and deaths than the rest of the world combined. From there, in many ways, the European experience of COVID-19 mirrored the U.S. and its neighbor the U.K., two of the other worst-hit parts of the globe: In the summer, many bars, restaurants and clubs reopened their doors, and international visitors were welcomed back. Then cases began to surge again in the autumn and winter, in large part thanks to the holidays, and lockdo...
Source: TIME: Health - March 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Londontime Source Type: news

Frontiers Removes Controversial Ivermectin Paper Pre-Publication
A review article containing contested claims about the tropical medicine drug as a COVID-19 treatment was listed as "provisionally accepted" on the journal's website before being removed this week. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 2, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

‘I’ve had my vaccine - how well will it protect me and for how long?’
The latest answers to the important medical questions about the vaccines and the pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe prospects of vaccines failing to trigger immune responses are dismissed as remote by scientists. “If a vaccine has not been properly refrigerated that might pose problems but doctors take great care to ensure that doesn’t happen,” said Professor Helen Fletcher at the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine. “Frankly the only other way to get a failed reaction is for the doctor to miss your arm – which isn’t likely.”Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Vaccines and immunisation UK news Source Type: news

TB vaccine may protect newborns against other infectious diseases
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The tuberculosis (TB) vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) could protect newborns against a variety of common infections, such as upper respiratory tract infections, chest infections and diarrhoea, according to a new study in Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 17, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

High public support for strict COVID measures but lower level of trust in gov
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) High levels of public support for strict measures to control COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic did not reflect high levels of public trust in the UK government's honesty, transparency or motives, suggests a new study published in PLOS One. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Self-testing trebles HIV testing rate amongst trans people in randomised trial
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) HIV self-testing could reduce the time between HIV infection and HIV diagnosis amongst trans people when compared to standard testing services, suggests new research inEClinicalMedicine.The project was a collaboration between the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), University College London (UCL), and the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit. It involved more than 100 trans men and trans women in England and Wales, and is the largest HIV self-testing trial in this community to be reported. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 11, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Job vacancies with Cochrane Infectious Diseases - Liverpool, UK
The   Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane ’s premier groups, with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors, and is well-linked with the World Health Organization. Two job positions are currently being advertised with the Centre.Take a look at  www.evidence4health.org/  and  https://cidg.cochrane.org/ where you will find annua...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 10, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Uganda: HIV Research Has Fast-Tracked Development of Covid-19 Vaccine - Prof Kaleebu
[Observer] Prof PONTIANO KALEEBU is the executive director of the Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI), the lead agency in Uganda's race to get the Covid-19 vaccine and at the same time the director of the partner organization the Medical Research Council/UVRI& London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Uganda Research Unit. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 10, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gambia: MRCG Holds Open Day On ETVAX Study On Diarrhoea On Children
[The Point] MRC-The Gambia London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in collaboration with the government of The Gambia on Wednesday organized an open day forum on ETVAX study project dubbed 'a vaccine trial study focus on diarrhoea diseases to see the safety and efficacy of the ETEC vaccine.' (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 5, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Protecting Mental Health of Families in a Pandemic
Credit: Unsplash /Melanie Wasser. By Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha NageshABUJA, Jan 22 2021 (IPS) Dealing with COVID-19-related city lockdowns has been exceptionally stressful, particularly for those parents who have had to balance work, personal life, children and elderly, providing home schooling or facilitating virtual learning, managing infection control within the home, and more, all while being disconnected from support services. Beyond all this, other mediators and moderators play a key role in outcomes for parents and children, including their function and adaptation – sociodemographic, exposure, negative events,...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha Nagesh Tags: Education Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Symptomless cases in schools could be key driver in spread of Covid-19
Up to 70% of schoolchildren infected with coronavirus may not know they have it until after a positive test resultWhen will vaccines bring results?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA key factor in the spread of Covid-19 in schools issymptomless cases. Most scientists believe that between 30% and 40% of adults do not display any Covid symptoms on the day of testing, even if they have been infected. For children, however, this figure is higher.“It is probably more like 50% for those in secondary school while for boys and girls in primary school, around 70% may not be displaying symptoms ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Children Young people Schools Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society Education UK news World news Source Type: news

New mutations in malaria parasite encourage resistance against key preventive drug
(PLOS) In the ongoing arms race between humans and the parasite that causes malaria, Taane Clark and colleagues at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) report that new mutations that enhance resistance to a drug used to prevent malaria in pregnant women and children are already common in countries fighting the disease. The new results are published Dec. 31 in PLOS Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 31, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news