Nigeria:Health Partnership Trains Stakeholders On Emergency Obstetrics, Newborn Care in Kwara
[Guardian] A groundbreaking Emergency Obstetrics and Newborn Care (EmONC) training has been scheduled for healthcare facilities in Kwara State.The project is a partnership by Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBFA), Johnson& Johnson, as well as Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.The programme, which has been active in seven of the 16 local council areas of the state, is expected to improve health outcomes for mothers and their newborns. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - August 8, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Nigeria:Ground-breaking Health Partnership to Expand Across Kwara State
[Wellbeing Foundation] Ilorin -The ground-breaking partnership between the Wellbeing Foundation Africa (WBFA), Johnson& Johnson and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine is set to expand across the whole of Kwara State, in an announcement due to take place today. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - August 6, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

They ate raw centipedes -- and then the headaches began
After two people in Guangzhou, China, were admitted to the hospital with headaches and other neurological symptoms, doctors pinpointed an infection with a unusual backstory: They had eaten raw centipedes, according to a report published Monday in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

£ 2 Million for sepsis research in Africa
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) LSTM is to lead a new multinational project on sepsis following a £ 2 million award from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global Health: Maybe You Were Thinking About Eating Raw Centipedes. Don ’ t.
Dried or powdered centipedes are used in Chinese traditional medicine. But uncooked specimens may contain a parasite that infects the brain, scientists report. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Alternative and Complementary Medicine Insects Parasites American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene China Guangzhou (China) Centipedes lungworm Source Type: news

Researchers in China link dangerous foodborne pathogen to centipedes
(Burness) A dangerous foodborne parasite typically found in snails and other mollusks was detected in two patients in a Chinese hospital and traced to their consumption of raw centipedes, according to a new case report published today by the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 30, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Africa:MTV Shuga Launches New Campaigns On HIV Prevention
[Daily Trust] Unitaid, the MTV Staying Alive Foundation (MTV SAF) and the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine on Wednesday announced a three-year partnership to introduce and evaluate storylines on HIV innovation, including HIV self-testing and preventive drugs (PrEP) into the award-winning drama series, MTV Shuga. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Are boys more cliquey than girls?
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Children's friendship groups in secondary school remain consistent over time and are often structured around gender, with boys forming the most tight-knit bands, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. The findings suggests boys might be more 'cliquey' than girls, and that factors such as location and timetable may have an impact on the social networks that children develop. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA marks in adults tracked back to changes in earliest days of life
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Scientists have gained a glimpse of how marks on our genes that could be linked to adverse health outcomes in later life behave differently in the first few days after conception, according to new research published in Science Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LSTM led consortium awarded £ 3 million to study the impact of human behavior on AMR
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) An LSTM led consortium called DRUM (Drivers of Resistance in Uganda and Malawi) has been awarded £ 3 million to investigate the way in which human behaviour drives the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed in current malaria regimen
(PLOS) Current recommended dosing regimens for the most widely used treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria may be sub-optimal for the most vulnerable populations of patients, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine, led by Professor Joel Tarning of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network and the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Network. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Yuck! Why there ’s more to disgust than not getting sick
From rotten food to weeping sores, our sense of squeamishness can help save our lives. But why are some people more susceptible ​to disgust ​than others – and what does it mean?One of the fun parts of being a disgustologist – as researchers who study the emotion of disgust sometimes call themselves – must be coming up with revolting scenarios. Repulsive enough to test a theory, but not quite so stomach-turning as to repel the people who have volunteered to take the test. In a recent study led by Prof Val Curtis, di rector of the environmental health group at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical M...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner Tags: Science Evolution Psychology Source Type: news

Ribavirin for treating Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever -- latest Cochrane review
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) In a viral hemorrhagic disease where up to 40 percent of people developing it die, it is remarkable that doctors still do not agree whether the only recognized treatment, an antiviral drug called ribavirin, makes a difference. In a new Cochrane Review a team of authors at LSTM, along with colleagues in London, the Philippines and in Greece, evaluated the evidence to assess the effectiveness of treating Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why women are more likely to view life with disgust
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine researchers asked 2,500 people to rate how revolted they were by 75 different scenarios - including treading barefoot on a slug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A filthy first -- the 6 common types of disgust that protect us from disease revealed
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Poor hygiene, animals or insects carrying disease and risky sexual behavior are among the distinct kinds of disgust that can help us to avoid disease and infection, according to new research published in a special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Severe Atopic Eczema Tied to Higher CV Disease Risk
FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 -- Adults with severe atopic eczema are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online May 23 in The BMJ. Richard J. Silverwood, Ph.D., from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 25, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Link found between severe eczema and heart problems
Individuals with severe eczema face a higher risk of cardiovascular problems such as heart attacks, heart failure and strokesPeople with severe eczema have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems, new research suggests.About 10% of the population are thought to have atopic eczema, but evidence for a connection to cardiovascular problems had been mixed, said Dr Sin éad Langan, lead author of the research from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The new study, she said, suggests such a link exists.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Eczema Health Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

Advance genetics study identifies virulent strain of TB
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) LSTM's Dr Maxine Caws is co-lead investigator on an advanced genetics study published in Nature Genetics(link is external), which has shown that a virulent strain of tuberculosis (TB) has adapted to transmit among young adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Uganda:UVRI Partners With London School for Cancer Research
[Monitor] Kampala -The Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI) have partnered with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) to conduct research into cancer and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 14, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cochrane Reviews on vision screening and reading aids updated
The College of Optometrists, UK has funded two Cochrane Review updates in support of theCochrane Eyes and Vision (CEV) group based at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). The global review updates were used to answer questions on the topics ofVision screening for correctable visual acuity deficits in school-age children and adolescents andReading aids for adults with low vision.The review updates produced the following key findings:Vision screeningThere are no studies comparing vision screening with no vision screening highlighting a gap in evidence.Vision screening with the provision of free spectac...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 30, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Taxing sweet snacks may bring greater health benefits than taxing sugar-sweetened drinks
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) A 10 percent tax on sweet snacks could lead to a similar reduction in consumer demand as taxing sugar-sweetened drinks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Universal snake bite cure may be possible
Antivenoms are usually made for a specific snake and don't work for different types of venom, but scientists from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have made a breakthrough. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Selection of a pyrethroid metabolic enzyme CYP9K1 by malaria control activities
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM, with partners from a number of international institutions, have shown the rapid selection of a novel P450 enzyme leading to insecticide resistance in a major malaria vector. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children infected with malaria parasites produce odor more attractive to mosquitoes
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Researchers smell opportunity for new malaria test and control methods after odor study carried out with Kenyan children. Finding is a major step forward in malaria research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

International Coordinator for the Quality of Medical Devices
DepartmentMSF currently operates activities in 35 countries with a wide spectrum of programs. The Medical Project Unit in MSF New York is part of the Medical Department of Operational Center – Paris (OCP) and provides technical support for: Tropical Medicine, Infectious Diseases (including antimicrobial resistance (AMR), medical quality, and medical article writing and publication.  ProjectLanguage English (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - April 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Rosanna Perri Source Type: news

Novel mosquito net provides children with greater protection against malaria
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) A novel class of bed net that neutralizes mosquitoes' ability to resist pyrethroid insecticide is shown to significantly reduce malaria infection in children, according to new research published in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stay Hungry, Not Foolish: What We Can Learn From A Career In Fighting AIDS and Ebola
What can we learn from someone who spent his career chasing highly mortal disease like ebola, and convincing the world to use condoms to combat AIDS? Peter Piot, the former head of UNAIDS and head of The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, did it all. Here are his career lessons. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 4, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: World Economic Forum, Contributor Source Type: news

'Exciting' pill can make blood poisonous to mosquitoes
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine experts discovered the disease-carrying flies died after feeding on the blood of humans given super-strength doses of ivermectin. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Exciting' pill can make blood POISONOUS to mosquitos
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine experts discovered the disease-carrying flies died after feeding on the blood of humans given super-strength doses of ivermectin. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study shows drug that kills mosquitoes could be used to fight malaria
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have shown the large potential impact of a completely new type of antimalarial drug that kills mosquitoes, as opposed to existing drugs that target the parasite, to reduce the spread of malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flu makes people six times more likely to suffer a heart attack
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine found the virus increases sufferers risk of a heart attack for up to a week and stroke for up to one month. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH experts call for transformative research approach to end tuberculosis
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A more intensive biomedical research approach is necessary to control and ultimately eliminate tuberculosis (TB), according to a perspective published in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. In the article, authors Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Robert W. Eisinger, Ph.D., special assistant for scientific projects at NIAID, discuss the need to modernize TB research by applying new diagnostic, therapeutic, and vaccine approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Brief education intervention boosts tetanus vaccination rates in rural India
(PLOS) Education of mothers on the benefits of tetanus vaccination increased immunization coverage in a randomized trial set in rural India, according to new research this week in PLOS Medicine by Timothy Powell-Jackson of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Vaccine-Autism Myth Started 20 Years Ago. Here ’s Why It Still Endures Today
Anti-vaccination headlines—like “HPV vaccine leaves another 17-year-old-girl paralyzed”—populate the Internet. That, and “Mom researches vaccines, discovers vaccination horrors, goes vaccine free,” are just a few examples of the fake science news stories shared this month on Facebook. If you are a parent on social media, you’ve likely seen many posts just like these. Maybe you’ve even clicked on one, curious. What’s the harm, right? As a family physician with four decades of experience fighting preventable disease around the globe and a professor of anthropology, risk a...
Source: TIME: Health - February 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH and Heidi Larson Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Global Health: Measles Cases in Europe Quadrupled in 2017
Outbreaks across the continent infected 21,000 and killed at least 35 people. Now governments are moving to make vaccinations mandatory. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Epidemics Measles Vaccination and Immunization Romani People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine World Health Organization Europe Source Type: news

Oregon woman first human infected with eye worms once only seen in cattle
(Burness) North Americans may be more vulnerable than previously thought to irritating and potentially dangerous infections with two different types of tiny but tenacious eye worms, according to two studies published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

OHSU, CDC unravel mysterious eye infection
(Oregon Health& Science University) A 26-year-old Oregon woman was the first known case of a human being infected with the cattle eyeworm Thelazia gulosa, which normally affects large animals. She was likely infected while being around cows near her rural home, experts conclude in a paper published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mini-primaquine does help stop people infecting mosquitoes with malaria
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) A single dose of primaquine is thought to stop people with P. falciparum malaria infecting mosquitoes, which could help bring down malaria transmission. In this Cochrane Review update co-ordinated through the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, researchers added recent data to examine this question. Their findings are relevant to the global recommendation by the WHO that mini-primaquine be given to all people unwell with malaria in areas where transmission is low to reduce transmission further. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to avoid the hookworm skin infection on your next winter vacation to Mexico and the Caribbean
Cases of the hookworm-related skin infection that afflicted one Ontario couple Katie on a recent trip to the Dominican Republic are not that uncommon among travellers to developing countries, a tropical medicine specialist says. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

How to avoid a hookworm skin infection on your next vacation
Cases of the hookworm-related skin infection that afflicted one Ontario couple Katie on a recent trip to the Dominican Republic are not that uncommon among travellers to developing countries, a tropical medicine specialist says. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Polio labs equipped to study rare tropical diseases
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM have investigated the possibility of utilising the Polio network of 145 labs set up around the world to help tackle neglected tropical diseases which impact on the lives of about a billion of people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sugar tax on soft drinks may drive up alcohol consumption
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine found raising the price of sugary drinks causes people to purchase greater amounts of lager as their spending habits change. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WHO accused of 'institutional ageism' over five-year work programme
Academics strongly criticise World Health Organisation for leaving older people and dementia off its proposed list of funding prioritiesThe World Health Organisation (WHO) is being accused of institutional ageism by academics, who say older people and dementia have been left out of its work programme for the next five years.In aletter published in the Lancet medical journal, the academics say WHO is “washing its hands” of older people. “This is entirely unacceptable. If the proposed programme is approved, it will considerably diminish WHO’s global authority and will brand it as a champion of age dis...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: World Health Organization Ageing Dementia Science Society Source Type: news

Experts call for World Health Organization to rethink 'unacceptable' plans
(University of East Anglia) The World Health Organization (WHO) has been accused of 'washing its hands of older people' in its proposed priorities for future work.In a letter published online in The Lancet, experts on ageing from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) say the draft WHO 13th General Programme of Work makes no reference to older people or to conditions associated with later life, such as dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Introducing internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughs
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Providing internet-based testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) could increase the number of people being tested for syphilis, HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea, including among high-risk groups, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dennis Bidwell obituary
My father-in-law, Dennis Bidwell, who has died aged 88, played a crucial part in the development in 1976 of the microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa), a laboratory tool that has had a lasting impact on the diagnosis of disease.The microplate consists of an eight-by-12 plastic grid of 96 small indentations numbered A1 to H12, which enables multiple tests to be carried out at the same time, rapidly and cheaply, using very small volumes ofblood or other liquid samples. Research carried out by Dennis and his colleague Alister Voller demonstrated that the Elisa was superior to existing diagnostics for diseases in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Brian Higgins Tags: Immunology Viruses Medicine Science London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine World Health Organization Source Type: news

New chronic kidney disease audit published
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships, Clinical Commissioning Groups and primary care practices must all work together to improve outcomes for patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), according to the national Chronic Kidney Disease Audit published today. The Audit was commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) and conducted by the Informatica Systems, the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine, UCL (University College London) and Queen Mary University of London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

40 years after first Ebola outbreak, survivors show signs they can stave off new infection
Survivors of the first known Ebola outbreak, which occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1976, may be key to development of vaccines and therapeutic drugs to treat future outbreaks, according to a new study led by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.UCLA researchers located the 14 Ebola survivors of the 1976 outbreak who, in January 2016, were still living in the same small, remote villages in the forests of the Équateur Province of northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The researchers obtained blood samples and health history reports from them. The data revealed evidence ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Epidemiologist (Fever Diagnostic Program) (part-time consultancy)
DepartmentMSF currently operates activities in 35 countries with a wide spectrum of programs. The Medical Project Unit in MSF New York is part of the Medical Department of Operational Center – Paris (OCP) and provides technical support for: Tropical Medicine, Infectious Diseases (including antimicrobial resistance (AMR), medical quality, and medical article writing and publication. Language English (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Rosanna Perri Source Type: news