Job vacancies in evidence synthesis with Cochrane Infectious Diseases group - Liverpool, UK
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine ’s Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane ’s premier groups, with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors, and is well-linked with the World Health Organization.Two job positions are currently being advertised with the Centre (Research Assistant and Clinical Research Associate in evidence synthesis)...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 8, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Brazil at high risk of dengue outbreaks after droughts because of temporary water storage
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Dengue risk is exacerbated in highly populated areas of Brazil after extreme drought because of improvised water containers housing mosquitoes, suggests a new study in Lancet Planetary Health.The research was led by the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine's (LSHTM) Centre on Climate Change& Planetary Health and Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Three Ways the US Can Promote Equity in Ending the COVID-19 Pandemic Globally
Continued inequity in COVID-19 vaccination means virus mutations occur and newer variants emerge that may be resistant to currently available vaccines. Credit: United Nations.By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Apr 2 2021 (IPS) As richer western nations continue hoarding COVID-19 vaccines to the detriment of poorer nations, there is some light on the horizon. On April 15, 2021, the U.S. will join the Global Vaccine Alliance (GAVI) and co-host the launch of the Investment Opportunity for COVAX Advance Market Commitment. The aim of the event is to raise more funds to ensure at least 1.8 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines are available ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

Vulnerable newborns being separated from their mothers in COVID-19 pandemic
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the quality of care given to small and sick newborn babies in all regions of the world and threatening implementation of life-saving interventions, suggests new research published in BMJ Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New AJTMH supplement offers guidance on severe COVID-19 management in resource-limited settings
(Burness) A new supplement offering guidance on severe COVID-19 management in resource-limited settings is now available on the American Journal of Tropical Medicine (AJTMH) website. Pragmatic Recommendations for the Management of Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients in Low- and Middle-Income Countries was coordinated by a COVID-LMIC Task Force headed by Alfred Papali, MD, of Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC, and Marcus Schultz, MD, PhD, of Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; University of Oxford, United Kingdom; and Amsterdam University Medical Centers, The Netherlands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 Cases Are Rising in Europe, and the Vaccine Rollout Is Lagging. How Did It All Go So Badly Wrong?
Europe was one of the first regions to be hit hard by COVID-19 last spring. In mid-May 2020, the World Health Organization declared it the “epicenter” of the pandemic, with more reported cases and deaths than the rest of the world combined. From there, in many ways, the European experience of COVID-19 mirrored the U.S. and its neighbor the U.K., two of the other worst-hit parts of the globe: In the summer, many bars, restaurants and clubs reopened their doors, and international visitors were welcomed back. Then cases began to surge again in the autumn and winter, in large part thanks to the holidays, and lockdo...
Source: TIME: Health - March 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Londontime Source Type: news

Frontiers Removes Controversial Ivermectin Paper Pre-Publication
A review article containing contested claims about the tropical medicine drug as a COVID-19 treatment was listed as "provisionally accepted" on the journal's website before being removed this week. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 2, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

‘I’ve had my vaccine - how well will it protect me and for how long?’
The latest answers to the important medical questions about the vaccines and the pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe prospects of vaccines failing to trigger immune responses are dismissed as remote by scientists. “If a vaccine has not been properly refrigerated that might pose problems but doctors take great care to ensure that doesn’t happen,” said Professor Helen Fletcher at the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine. “Frankly the only other way to get a failed reaction is for the doctor to miss your arm – which isn’t likely.”Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Vaccines and immunisation UK news Source Type: news

TB vaccine may protect newborns against other infectious diseases
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The tuberculosis (TB) vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) could protect newborns against a variety of common infections, such as upper respiratory tract infections, chest infections and diarrhoea, according to a new study in Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 17, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

High public support for strict COVID measures but lower level of trust in gov
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) High levels of public support for strict measures to control COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic did not reflect high levels of public trust in the UK government's honesty, transparency or motives, suggests a new study published in PLOS One. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Self-testing trebles HIV testing rate amongst trans people in randomised trial
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) HIV self-testing could reduce the time between HIV infection and HIV diagnosis amongst trans people when compared to standard testing services, suggests new research inEClinicalMedicine.The project was a collaboration between the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), University College London (UCL), and the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit. It involved more than 100 trans men and trans women in England and Wales, and is the largest HIV self-testing trial in this community to be reported. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 11, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Job vacancies with Cochrane Infectious Diseases - Liverpool, UK
The   Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane ’s premier groups, with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors, and is well-linked with the World Health Organization. Two job positions are currently being advertised with the Centre.Take a look at  www.evidence4health.org/  and  https://cidg.cochrane.org/ where you will find annua...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 10, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Uganda: HIV Research Has Fast-Tracked Development of Covid-19 Vaccine - Prof Kaleebu
[Observer] Prof PONTIANO KALEEBU is the executive director of the Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI), the lead agency in Uganda's race to get the Covid-19 vaccine and at the same time the director of the partner organization the Medical Research Council/UVRI& London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Uganda Research Unit. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 10, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gambia: MRCG Holds Open Day On ETVAX Study On Diarrhoea On Children
[The Point] MRC-The Gambia London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in collaboration with the government of The Gambia on Wednesday organized an open day forum on ETVAX study project dubbed 'a vaccine trial study focus on diarrhoea diseases to see the safety and efficacy of the ETEC vaccine.' (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 5, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Protecting Mental Health of Families in a Pandemic
Credit: Unsplash /Melanie Wasser. By Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha NageshABUJA, Jan 22 2021 (IPS) Dealing with COVID-19-related city lockdowns has been exceptionally stressful, particularly for those parents who have had to balance work, personal life, children and elderly, providing home schooling or facilitating virtual learning, managing infection control within the home, and more, all while being disconnected from support services. Beyond all this, other mediators and moderators play a key role in outcomes for parents and children, including their function and adaptation – sociodemographic, exposure, negative events,...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha Nagesh Tags: Education Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Symptomless cases in schools could be key driver in spread of Covid-19
Up to 70% of schoolchildren infected with coronavirus may not know they have it until after a positive test resultWhen will vaccines bring results?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA key factor in the spread of Covid-19 in schools issymptomless cases. Most scientists believe that between 30% and 40% of adults do not display any Covid symptoms on the day of testing, even if they have been infected. For children, however, this figure is higher.“It is probably more like 50% for those in secondary school while for boys and girls in primary school, around 70% may not be displaying symptoms ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Children Young people Schools Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society Education UK news World news Source Type: news

New mutations in malaria parasite encourage resistance against key preventive drug
(PLOS) In the ongoing arms race between humans and the parasite that causes malaria, Taane Clark and colleagues at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) report that new mutations that enhance resistance to a drug used to prevent malaria in pregnant women and children are already common in countries fighting the disease. The new results are published Dec. 31 in PLOS Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 31, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine Approval May Be the Most Globally Important Yet
The COVID-19 vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca wasn’t the first to be OK’d by regulators in the U.K.—health officials authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech jab nearly four weeks earlier. And it’s not the most effective—Stage 3 clinical trials suggest it prevents COVID-19 symptoms about 70% of the time vs. about 95% for the Pfizer vaccine and a similar one from Moderna (which is authorized in the U.S., but not the U.K.). But the greenlight from the British Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency on Wednesday could be a big step toward bringing the COVID-19 pande...
Source: TIME: Health - December 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Zennie Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer overnight Source Type: news

Women Need Support and Understanding after Miscarriage
Miscarriage is the most common reason for losing a baby during pregnancy. It happens for up to 15% of women who knew they were pregnant.. Credit: UNSPLASH/Claudia Wolff.By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Dec 29 2020 (IPS) Recently, Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, wrote a piece sharing about her miscarriage. I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second, she wrote. She is part of a growing list of celebrities who have publicly shared their experiences with miscarriages. Model Chrissy Teigen also recently shared the pain she and her husband singer John Legend felt about the miscarriage ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Gender Headlines Health Women's Health Source Type: news

'Tier 5': England faces possible new Covid restrictions, source says
Experts warn tier 4 may not be enough to contain new, highly transmissible variantCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageFurther coronavirus restrictions could be introduced in England akin to a “tier 5” lockdown, a government source has suggested, as experts warn the current curbs might not be enough to shrink the epidemic.Tier 4 restrictions came into force in London and parts of the south-east and the east of Englandon 20 December and havesince been extended to a swathe of the country, from Cambridgeshire to Sussex and parts of Hampshire.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Science UK news Education England Source Type: news

Coronavirus Variant Is Indeed More Transmissible, New Study Suggests
Researchers warn that the British variant is so contagious that new control measures, including closing down schools and universities, may be necessary. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer and Benedict Carey Tags: your-feed-science your-feed-healthcare Shutdowns (Institutional) Disease Rates Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Vaccination and Immunization London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Hanage, William P Great Britain Source Type: news

expert reaction to brief summary of NERVTAG opinion from the NERVTAG meeting on SARS-CoV-2 variant under investigation VUI-202012/01, Science Media Centre
A New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) meeting on the SARS-CoV-2 variant under investigation, VUI-202012/01, took place on the 18 December.Prof Martin Hibberd, Professor of Emerging Infectious Disease, London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), Prof Rowland Kao, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh and Dr Julian Tang, Honorary Associate Professor/Clinical Virologist, University of Leicester give their expert reaction to the NERVTAG opinion. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aren ’t We Missing Food Security Experts in the Incoming President-Elect Biden-Kamala Harris Administration?
We never imagined that we would witness food insecurity being an issue in developed countries such as the US. Credit: Stephen Leahy/IPS.By Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi NsoforURBANA, Illinois / ABUJA, Dec 17 2020 (IPS) Food insecurity across the U.S. continues to be on the rise because of the effects of COVID-19. According to Feeding America, over 50 million Americans will experience food insecurity, including 17 million children.  We both grew up in countries referred to as “developing countries,” Ifeanyi in Nigeria and Esther in Kenya. At the time, we never imagined that we would witness food insecurity...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Source Type: news

Scientists solve 100-year-old cerebral malaria mystery using neuroimaging techniques
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Scientists have shown for the first time that cerebral malaria causes death in adults by triggering oxygen-deprivation in the brain, in new research published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.Already available treatments, such as hypothermia, may slow brain oxygen-deprivation in cerebral malaria patients. The researchers say these neuronal survival-enhancing approaches could soon be trialled in adults with cerebral malaria, alongside existing anti-malarial treatments, to hopefully improve survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Shutting Britain's borders at the start of coronavirus could have prevented major outbreak
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) said closing borders could be beneficial in the early stages of the pandemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer survivors at higher risk of hospitalization or dying from flu
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Survivors from a wide range of cancers are more likely than people in the general population to be hospitalised or die from seasonal influenza even several years after their cancer diagnosis, according to new data published in EClinicalMedicine. Given that flu and COVID-19 are both epidemic respiratory viruses with broadly similar risk factors, the findings suggest that cancer survivors are also likely to be at raised risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 30, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Africa's largest Covid treatment clinical trial launched by 13-country network
Anticov study with international research institutions aims to stop disease progression and protect fragile health systemsA network of 13 African countries has joined forces with global researchers to launch the largest clinical trial of potential Covid-19 treatments on the continent.The Anticov study, involving Antwerp ’s Institute of Tropical Medicine and international research institutions, aims to identify treatments that can be used to treat mild and moderate cases of Covid-19 early and prevent spikes in hospitalisation that could overwhelm fragile and already overburdened health systems in Africa.Continue readi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Peter Beaumont Tags: Global health Coronavirus Global development Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Science Africa World news Source Type: news

Young asymptomatic 'super spreaders' keep malaria viable by infecting local mosquitoes
(Burness) The new findings, reported today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), reveal a hidden reservoir that's a barrier to long-term efforts to eliminate malaria and an immediate threat for disease resurgence if control measures like bednets and indoor spraying falter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Evidence shows human transmission in deadly outbreak of mysterious disease in Bolivia
(Burness) Researchers have discovered that a deadly virus found in Bolivia can spread from person to person in healthcare settings, raising potential concerns of additional outbreaks in the future, according to new findings presented today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). The research also provides preliminary evidence regarding the species of rodent that carries the virus and may spread it to people or to other animals that can infect humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nine out of ten people WOULD get a coronavirus vaccine
Two studies from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine looked at how willing the public would be to accept a coronavirus vaccine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA-led research proposes strategies to control pandemic with fewer restrictions on the economy
An international team led by UCLA Fielding School of Public Health researchers has developed and tested two strategies for sustaining economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic. If used together and followed closely, they write, the approaches could reduce transmission of the coronavirus by an amount comparable to that of a strict lockdown, while also maintaining economic activity.The team, made up of researchers from nine institutions and led byDr. Akihiro Nishi, a UCLA assistant professor of epidemiology, put forward two concepts that Nishi describes as rationing time and rationing capacity.“Although lockdown a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Four-week cancer treatment delay raises death risk by 10% – study
Concern for NHS cancer patients after record numbers miss treatment due to pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDelaying cancer treatment by just four weeks increases the risk of death by up to 10%, according to new research that shows the devastating impact of missed NHS treatment targets due to Covid.Earlier this year, Dr Ajay Aggarwal at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine estimated that diagnostic delays caused by lockdown measures and changes to patient behaviour as a result of Covid-19 would result in3,500 avoidable deaths from breast, lung, oesophageal or bowel can...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Cancer Health Society NHS Bowel cancer Breast cancer Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science UK news Source Type: news

Dr. Maureen Lichtveld named to lead Pitt Graduate School of Public Health
Maureen Lichtveld comes to Pittsburgh from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 2, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Dr. Maureen Lichtveld named to lead Pitt Graduate School of Public Health
Maureen Lichtveld comes to Pittsburgh from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 2, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

COVID-19: A Global Survey Shows Worrying Signs of Vaccine Hesitancy
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post COVID-19: A Global Survey Shows Worrying Signs of Vaccine Hesitancy appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Mental Health Consequences of the Lekki Toll Gate Attack
Protesters hold up their placards in front of the Lagos State House. Credit: TobiJamesCandids/Wikimedia Commons.By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Oct 28 2020 (IPS) On October 20, 2020, young Nigerians who were protesting against police brutality were shot by men in Nigerian military uniforms. Unarmed, peaceful citizens were massacred at the Lekki Toll Gate in Lagos, southwest Nigeria. The Governor of Lagos state, Jide Sanwo-Olu earlier in the day had announced a 24-hour curfew to curb violence that erupted following the #EndSARS Campaign. SARS is Special Anti-Robbery Squad, established in 1984 to combat arme...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Africa Democracy Headlines Health Human Rights #EndSARS Campaign mental health Nigeria Source Type: news

Europe ’s Second Wave of COVID-19 is Being Driven by Two Countries. Here’s Why
Europe is clearly in the grip of a second wave of the coronavirus pandemic. In the past week, countries throughout Europe—including Belgium, Croatia, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, the U.K, and Ukraine—have all recorded their highest daily caseloads since the pandemic started. But two of these stand out. As of Oct. 25, Belgium and the Czech Republic are currently reporting about 146 and 115 new daily cases per 100,000 people, respectively, according to TIME’s coronavirus tracker, which compiles data from Johns Hopkins University. That’s dramatically higher ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Londontime Source Type: news

Rule of six and 10pm curfew is likely to have had 'ZERO effect' on reducing contacts, study claims 
Researchers at the London School for Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) found the majority of people were seeing the same number of friends than before the rules came in. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preventive drugs halve malaria cases in African schoolchildren
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Giving preventive drugs to school-age children in Africa substantially reduces malaria infections and cases of anaemia, according to a new study in The Lancet Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: 26,688 new cases and 191 deaths in daily toll
Professor John Edmunds, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, told MPs that the three-tier lockdown system will only slow down the UK's outbreak and not shrink it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Light pollution may increase biting behavior at night in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes
(University of Notre Dame) Artificial light abnormally increases mosquito biting behavior at night in a species that typically prefers to bite people during the day, according to research from the University of Notre Dame that was published inThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can a 2-Week ‘Circuit Breaker’ Lockdown Curb COVID-19? The U.K. May Be About to Try
The coronavirus is having its way with the United Kingdom—a fact that is told starkly by the numbers. The 21st most populous country in the world, the U.K. is 11th in total number of COVID-19 infections—and climbing fast. Its daily infection rate is doubling every seven to eight days in some regions, more people are now hospitalized there than on March 23 (when the country went into general lockdown), and in some regions, hospital beds and intensive care units are at 90% capacity. With cold weather coming on and flu season beginning, things look darker still. “We could sleep-walk into a long and bleak wi...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Can a 2-Week ‘Circuit Breaker’ Lockdown Curb COVID-19? The U.K. May Be About to Find Out
The coronavirus is having its way with the United Kingdom—a fact that is told starkly by the numbers. The 21st most populous country in the world, the U.K. is 11th in total number of COVID-19 infections—and climbing fast. Its daily infection rate is doubling every seven to eight days in some regions, more people are now hospitalized there than on March 23 (when the country went into general lockdown), and in some regions, hospital beds and intensive care units are at 90% capacity. With cold weather coming on and flu season beginning, things look darker still. “We could sleep-walk into a long and bleak wi...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Covid-19: Pooled testing among recommendations to fix test, trace and isolate system
(SAGE) In a series of recommendations to fix the struggling Covid-19 test, trace and isolate system in England, health researchers from University College London and the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine say that pooled testing for Covid-19 could significantly increase testing capacity in a relatively short space of time and help with the identification of asymptomatic cases in key workers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

AJTMH tip sheet for October 2020
(Burness) Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on October 15, 2020 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Academics behind 'circuit breaker' study admit their death figures are over-estimated
Professor Graham Medley, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said it might be too late to organise a planned lockdown for October but December may be too far away. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Young adults face higher risk of severe disease from infections than school-age children
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The first systematic review of how the severity of infectious diseases changes with age suggests that the human immune system might start to lose the ability to protect against infections earlier than previously thought, according to new research published in Scientific Data.Led by the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine, the study analysed data of 32 different infectious diseases, 19 viral and 13 bacterial, looking for patterns in severity at different ages using case fatality and hospitalisation rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COVID-19: Examining Theories for Africa ’ s Low Death Rates
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post COVID-19: Examining Theories for Africa’s Low Death Rates appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Africa Headlines Health Source Type: news

‘It’s a Game for Them.’ Scientists Around the World Are Teaching Dogs to Sniff Out COVID-19
Steve Lindsay, a public health entomologist at Durham University, is midway through explaining how dogs might play a role in detecting COVID-19 infections when a decidedly less-well trained canine interrupts our conversation. “If you’ll excuse me for a minute, I’ve got a naughty black Labrador out in the back garden doing something it shouldn’t be doing,” Lindsay says. He disappears. I hear barking. He returns accompanied by a chocolate lab. “She’s not as skilled as the detection dogs,” Lindsay says as the pup tries to lick his face. “But it’s really interesting t...
Source: TIME: Health - October 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

‘It’s a Game for Them.’ Scientists Around the World Are Teaching Dogs to Sniff Out COVID-19
Steve Lindsay, a public health entomologist at Durham University, is midway through explaining how dogs might play a role in detecting COVID-19 infections when a decidedly less-well trained canine interrupts our conversation. “If you’ll excuse me for a minute, I’ve got a naughty black Labrador out in the back garden doing something it shouldn’t be doing,” Lindsay says. He disappears. I hear barking. He returns accompanied by a chocolate lab. “She’s not as skilled as the detection dogs,” Lindsay says as the pup tries to lick his face. “But it’s really interesting t...
Source: TIME: Science - October 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news