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Oregon woman first human infected with eye worms once only seen in cattle
(Burness) North Americans may be more vulnerable than previously thought to irritating and potentially dangerous infections with two different types of tiny but tenacious eye worms, according to two studies published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

OHSU, CDC unravel mysterious eye infection
(Oregon Health& Science University) A 26-year-old Oregon woman was the first known case of a human being infected with the cattle eyeworm Thelazia gulosa, which normally affects large animals. She was likely infected while being around cows near her rural home, experts conclude in a paper published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mini-primaquine does help stop people infecting mosquitoes with malaria
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) A single dose of primaquine is thought to stop people with P. falciparum malaria infecting mosquitoes, which could help bring down malaria transmission. In this Cochrane Review update co-ordinated through the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, researchers added recent data to examine this question. Their findings are relevant to the global recommendation by the WHO that mini-primaquine be given to all people unwell with malaria in areas where transmission is low to reduce transmission further. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to avoid the hookworm skin infection on your next winter vacation to Mexico and the Caribbean
Cases of the hookworm-related skin infection that afflicted one Ontario couple Katie on a recent trip to the Dominican Republic are not that uncommon among travellers to developing countries, a tropical medicine specialist says. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

How to avoid a hookworm skin infection on your next vacation
Cases of the hookworm-related skin infection that afflicted one Ontario couple Katie on a recent trip to the Dominican Republic are not that uncommon among travellers to developing countries, a tropical medicine specialist says. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Polio labs equipped to study rare tropical diseases
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM have investigated the possibility of utilising the Polio network of 145 labs set up around the world to help tackle neglected tropical diseases which impact on the lives of about a billion of people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sugar tax on soft drinks may drive up alcohol consumption
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine found raising the price of sugary drinks causes people to purchase greater amounts of lager as their spending habits change. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WHO accused of 'institutional ageism' over five-year work programme
Academics strongly criticise World Health Organisation for leaving older people and dementia off its proposed list of funding prioritiesThe World Health Organisation (WHO) is being accused of institutional ageism by academics, who say older people and dementia have been left out of its work programme for the next five years.In aletter published in the Lancet medical journal, the academics say WHO is “washing its hands” of older people. “This is entirely unacceptable. If the proposed programme is approved, it will considerably diminish WHO’s global authority and will brand it as a champion of age dis...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: World Health Organization Ageing Dementia Science Society Source Type: news

Experts call for World Health Organization to rethink 'unacceptable' plans
(University of East Anglia) The World Health Organization (WHO) has been accused of 'washing its hands of older people' in its proposed priorities for future work.In a letter published online in The Lancet, experts on ageing from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) say the draft WHO 13th General Programme of Work makes no reference to older people or to conditions associated with later life, such as dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Introducing internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughs
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Providing internet-based testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) could increase the number of people being tested for syphilis, HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea, including among high-risk groups, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dennis Bidwell obituary
My father-in-law, Dennis Bidwell, who has died aged 88, played a crucial part in the development in 1976 of the microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa), a laboratory tool that has had a lasting impact on the diagnosis of disease.The microplate consists of an eight-by-12 plastic grid of 96 small indentations numbered A1 to H12, which enables multiple tests to be carried out at the same time, rapidly and cheaply, using very small volumes ofblood or other liquid samples. Research carried out by Dennis and his colleague Alister Voller demonstrated that the Elisa was superior to existing diagnostics for diseases in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Brian Higgins Tags: Immunology Viruses Medicine Science London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine World Health Organization Source Type: news

New chronic kidney disease audit published
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships, Clinical Commissioning Groups and primary care practices must all work together to improve outcomes for patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), according to the national Chronic Kidney Disease Audit published today. The Audit was commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) and conducted by the Informatica Systems, the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine, UCL (University College London) and Queen Mary University of London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

40 years after first Ebola outbreak, survivors show signs they can stave off new infection
Survivors of the first known Ebola outbreak, which occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1976, may be key to development of vaccines and therapeutic drugs to treat future outbreaks, according to a new study led by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.UCLA researchers located the 14 Ebola survivors of the 1976 outbreak who, in January 2016, were still living in the same small, remote villages in the forests of the Équateur Province of northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The researchers obtained blood samples and health history reports from them. The data revealed evidence ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Epidemiologist (Fever Diagnostic Program) (part-time consultancy)
DepartmentMSF currently operates activities in 35 countries with a wide spectrum of programs. The Medical Project Unit in MSF New York is part of the Medical Department of Operational Center – Paris (OCP) and provides technical support for: Tropical Medicine, Infectious Diseases (including antimicrobial resistance (AMR), medical quality, and medical article writing and publication. Language English (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Rosanna Perri Source Type: news

Cochrane review of effectiveness of strategies to improve access to treatment for TB
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) In a new Cochrane Review, researchers from Tanzania working with colleagues in LSTM have evaluated the effectiveness of strategies to improve people's access to treatment for tuberculosis (TB). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young people in sub-Saharan Africa integral to shaping future HIV/AIDS policy
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) 'To end HIV/AIDS it's crucial we start engaging with young people in sub-Saharan Africa who are affected -- interventions to improve their lives needn't be complex and costly, just sustainable, targeted and developed closely with them,' said Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine and Handa Professor of Global Health, today, World AIDS Day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gastric acid suppressant lansoprazole may target tuberculosis
(University College London) A cheap and widely used drug, used to treat conditions such as heartburn, gastritis and ulcers, could work against the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), according to new research published in PLOS Medicine, from UCL and the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Up to one in five millennials have had anal sex
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine and UCL believe young people, particularly girls, may feel pressured into having anal sex, which can be painful or not involve condoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Changes in young people's sexual practices over the last 20 years revealed
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Young people today are taking part in a wider range of sexual practices, such as oral and anal sex, with opposite-sex partners compared to 20 years ago, according to new analysis by the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine and UCL. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa:New Breath Examination for Malaria
[East African] People with malaria exhale a distinctive "breathprint," insights scientists have used to develop a new breath test for diagnosing the killer disease in a group of African children, according to a new study published in the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - November 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Inducing older first-time mums earlier reduces stillbirths
Inducing women over 35 on their due date reduced stillborn cases by two thirds, found researchers from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and University of Cambridge. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa:The Trial Explained
[The WOMAN Trial] The WOMAN trial, coordinated by the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) is an international clinical trial of the effect of tranexamic acid on death, hysterectomy and other maternal outcomes, in women with PPH. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - November 10, 2017 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Africa:Toyin Saraki Says Why Drug Trial for Women is Close to Her Heart
[allAfrica] London -Toyin Saraki was speaking at the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine to raise awareness of the issue of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), which kills around 100,000 women each year, and to highlight the findings of the WOMAN trial, which uses tranexamic acid to treat PPH. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 10, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New study finds extra bite of blood transforms invasive Asian tiger mosquito from poor to potent spreader of Zika virus
(Burness) The invasive Asian tiger mosquito now rapidly spreading in parts of the United States and Europe may have been significantly underestimated as a potential source of Zika and dengue virus infections -- and for one simple reason: they were underfed, according to a new study presented today at the 66th American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

MRIs of West Nile virus victims -- even symptom-free -- show evidence of long-term neurological damage
(Burness) Brain images of people who developed neurological complications from West Nile virus found that many of them -- including those who had experienced mild symptoms or none all -- showed evidence of brain damage years after the original infection, according to a new study presented today at the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Severely bleeding patients must receive lifesaving drug within minutes, not hours
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Major bleeds must be treated with tranexamic acid (TXA) as fast as possible since deaths occur quickly and the drug's life-saving benefits diminish with each passing minute, according to a new study published in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Group B Streptococcus infection causes estimated 150,000 stillbirth & infant death
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) 21.7 million pregnant women carry this bacteria according to the first global study of Group B Strep -- most of them are currently unidentified and untreated. Study shows for first time that a maternal vaccine may prevent 231,000 infant and maternal GBS cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

At ASTMH Annual Meeting, researchers report breakthrough in malaria breathprinting that could pave way to electronic nose to ‘ smell ’ disease
(Burness) Scientists have discovered that people with malaria exhale a distinctive 'breathprint,' insights they have used to develop a new breath test which was highly successful in diagnosing malaria in a group of African children, according to a new study presented today at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cochrane review looks at the effectiveness and side effects of mefloquine
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group publish two systematic reviews this week about the safety of mefloquine (Lariam) for preventing malaria in travellers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 30, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New combination therapy of registered drugs shortens anti-Wolbachia therapy
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM's Research Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics have found a way of significantly reducing the treatment required for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis from several weeks to seven days. By targeting Wolbachia, a bacterial symbiont that the filarial parasites need to live, the team has discovered a drug synergy that enables effective treatment over a shorter time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

HIV prevention drug could save NHS £1 billion over 80 years
Conclusion Evidence to support the use of Prep is building. Studies have shown that it is very effective at reducing the chances of becoming infected with HIV, for men at risk of infection through unprotected sex with men. The question is more about the cost of treatment – and who should fund it – than whether it works. NHS England previously went to court to say that it should not be responsible for funding Prep, as it is a preventive treatment, and therefore should come under health promotion budgets held by local authorities. The High Court ruled that the NHS was able to fund the drug. NHS England has since ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news

Many new cancer drugs show 'no clear benefit', argues review
Conclusion Most of us assume that when a drug has been approved by a regulator for use, that means it has been shown to work. This study suggests that is not necessarily the case, or that even if it works they might not make a meaningful difference. The absence of evidence about the two outcomes that matter most to patients and their families – how long they will live, and how good their quality of life will be during that time – from half of the cancer drugs approved during a five-year period, is worrying. Patients cannot be expected to make informed decisions about which treatments to take, without good quali...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Women more likely than men to lose interest in sex
Conclusion This study appears to suggest that many factors increase the likelihood of both men and women reporting a lack of interest in sex. Overall, women seem to be more likely to lose interest than men. While this large study provides some insight into the possible reasons behind having a lack of interest in sex, it has a few limitations: As so many factors were considered, there were bound to be some that showed statistical significance – this could just be by chance. The cross-sectional nature of the study means we can't be sure if the specific factors reported on caused the lack of interest, or vice versa. Peo...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Interventions for treating tuberculous pericarditis
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from South Africa and Canada have carried out a Cochrane review update to assess the safety and effectiveness of corticosteroids for treating tuberculous pericarditis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Drinks industry accused of downplaying 'alcohol-cancer risk'
Conclusion This qualitative analysis aimed to determine the accuracy of health information circulated by the alcohol industry on the links between alcohol and cancer. It found the industry and affiliated organisations use three main approaches: denial of the link between alcohol and cancer misinterpretation of the risk distraction by focusing on other risk factors This analysis highlights how these strategies could be detrimental to public health. Of course, it's possible, given this data was collected in 2016, that some of the websites and documents analysed by the researchers have since been updated. Regardless, the...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Alcohol industry misleading the public about alcohol-related cancer risk
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The alcohol industry (AI) is misrepresenting evidence about the alcohol-related risk of cancer with activities that have parallels with those of the tobacco industry, according to new research published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Review. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Guardian view on veganism: high in moral fibre | Editorial
Vegans are often unfairly mocked. They should instead be praisedJeremy Corbyn is “going through the process” of eating more vegan food, he has said – he just has to bring himself to give up the brie, verboten under vegan rules, along with eggs, milk and everything animals produce. Later, as if fearful of a backlash, his spokesperson issued a statement denying he was vegan. But the Labour leader was right to be proud of his efforts. Vegans are often unreasonably mocked as do-gooders and sniped at for making dinner parties awkward for those who don’t like lentils quite so much. This is unfair: the die...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Veganism Life and style Food Environment Food science Source Type: news

How effective is an online community of practice (CoP) in reality?
Improving mechanisms for knowledge translation (KT) and connecting decision-makers to each other and the information and evidence they consider relevant to their work remains a priority for public health. Virtual communities of practices (CoPs) potentially offer an affordable and flexible means of encouraging connection and sharing of evidence, information and learning among the public health community in ways that transgress traditional geographical, professional, institutional and time boundaries. This paper reports on research into the effectiveness of such a CoP (alcohol harm reduction), undertaken by the UK Health For...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ASTMH 66th annual meeting: Preeminent meeting of infectious disease experts
(Burness) With Zika infection numbers falling but still threatening, cholera exploding in Yemen and East Africa, and an obscure mosquito-borne disease possibly on the move in South America, thousands of disease experts from around the world will gather in Baltimore in November for the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. The conference provides a vital forum for sharing the latest research and strategies for tackling some of the world's most dangerous diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BCG jab may protect against TB for nearly twice as long as previously thought
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The world's only licensed tuberculosis (TB) vaccine could offer protection against the disease for nearly twice as long as previously thought, according to new research published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

80 percent of Ebola survivors suffer disabilities one year after discharge
(University of Liverpool) New research, conducted by the University of Liverpool and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, highlights the need for long-term rehabilitation of Ebola survivors after almost 80 percent of those interviewed were found to have major limitations in mobility, cognition and vision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

It takes several generations to undo poor nutrition
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found mothers who were malnourished in the womb tend to have smaller babies, while fathers have shorter toddlers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Health: Rapid Malaria Tests Work, but With Unexpected Drawbacks
Tests that take only 15 minutes mean fewer people needlessly get malaria drugs, but many instead get antibiotics they don ’ t need, a study finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Malaria Antibiotics Tests (Medical) Africa Gates, Bill and Melinda, Foundation American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene World Health Organization Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Source Type: news

Higher education: UNISON wins SOAS commitment to end outsourcing
UNISON has won a major victory at London’s School of Oriental and African Sutides, with an agreement to end the outsourcing of core support services by September 2018 and bring more than 120 staff back in house. The announcement by the university follows and expands on an agreement reached with UNISON last year after talks at Acas, where the employer had agreed to bring all cleaning services back in house by September 2019. But more talks between the university and UNISON earlier this year have seen employer has widened the plan to include all core support services. This covers staff employed in a range of roles, inc...
Source: UNISON Health care news - August 7, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News education services Greater London higher education outsourcing privatisation universities Source Type: news

Study links malaria rapid diagnostic tests to more antibiotic use and finds ignored results
(Burness) Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are reducing overuse of malaria medications but may also produce a range of unintended results, according to a comprehensive new study published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cochrane seeks Managing Editor for Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group - Liverpool, UK
The Department of Clinical Sciences has an exciting opportunity for a Managing Editor to work in  the Cochrane Infectious Diseases GroupThe Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for research in tropical diseases.   This includes the Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health, which houses the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG), one of the first Cochrane Groups and highly successful, and well known for its exacting standards.As the Managing Editor of CIDG you will help organize review production across over 600 authors from some 52 countries. ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 1, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Taking vitamin supplements may slow down the progression of a common eye disease
Latest evidence published in the Cochrane Library suggests that taking a multivitamin supplement that includes vitamin E, carotenoids (beta-carotene or lutein or zeaxanthin), vitamin C, and zinc may slow down the progression of the common eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD).See additional resources at the bottom of the pageAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive and sight-threatening disease affecting the central area of the retina and affects large numbers of people across the world. Population-based studies suggest that in older people (80 years and older), approximately one in three people...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 31, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Taking vitamin supplements will not prevent a common eye disease
Latest evidence published in the Cochrane Library suggests that taking vitamin supplements, such as vitamin E or beta-carotene, may not prevent the common eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD).  See additional resources at the bottom of this pageAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive and sight-threatening disease affecting the central area of the retina and affects large numbers of people across the world. Population-based studies suggest that in older people (80 years and older), approximately one in three people have early signs of the disease.There are numerous unanswered questions in ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 31, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Calls for GPs to offer HIV screening in high-risk areas
Conclusion The results of this study suggest it seems to be cost-effective to screen new patients for HIV when they register at a GP practice in areas where HIV is particularly prevalent. This conclusion is based on projections making use of a wide range of data from the UK, and making certain assumptions about HIV prevalence over time and the behaviour of people who've been newly diagnosed with HIV. The researchers used good methods, and their recommendation to roll out screening in areas where there are high rates of HIV is consistent with current National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Stud...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Source Type: news