Central Europe Largely Avoided the First Coronavirus Wave. Why Are Cases Spiking Now?
Central Europe in the past week has seen a spike in daily confirmed coronavirus cases, a major setback for a region that largely avoided the first wave of the virus in the spring. The Czech Republic, an E.U. member state of 10.7 million, registered a country record of 1,382 new infections on Sep. 11, bringing the country’s total cases to over 32,400. In the last week, nearby countries Hungary, Slovakia and Slovenia have also recorded their highest daily caseloads since the pandemic began. Infections in the Czech Republic previously peaked at around 3 cases per capita (per 100,000 residents) in late March but reached ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 europe Explainer Londontime Source Type: news

Vaccine Confidence Recently Increased in Some of Europe
MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2020 -- Vaccine confidence has increased in parts of Europe in recent years, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in The Lancet. Alexandre de Figueiredo, Ph.D., from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Show more empathy to boost confidence in vaccines, scientists told
Expert behind vaccine confidence report points to halting of Oxford Covid trial as exampleDoctors and scientists need to show more empathy towards volunteers in coronavirus vaccine trials who fall ill if the public is to have full confidence in the safety of the vaccines being developed, say experts.The temporary halting of theOxford University/AstraZeneca trial after one volunteer in the UK was admitted to hospital was good news, not bad, said Heidi Larson, who leads the Vaccine Confidence Project at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, as it showed that scientists and the company were putting safety first....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Vaccines and immunisation Health Infectious diseases Medical research Science Society World news UK news AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals industry University of Oxford Source Type: news

Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and drug resistance are extremely common in patients living with HIV who are admitted to hospital in Malawi, according to new research published in Lancet HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Following 'Eatwell Guide' diet could reduce your risk of dying early and lower your environmental footprint
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Adhering to Public Health England's 'Eatwell Guide' of a balanced diet could reduce your chance of dying prematurely and lower your environmental footprint, according to a new study in BMJ Open. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus Doctors Battle Another Scourge: Misinformation
Physicians say they regularly treat people more inclined to believe what they read on Facebook than what a medical professional tells them. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Satariano Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Rumors and Misinformation Doctors Social Media Hydroxychloroquine (Drug) Emergency Medical Treatment Twitter American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: Up to 135k may get infected A DAY in winter
Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, as well as Oxford and Warwick University, made the estimate based on immunity lasting only three months. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Councils forced to pick up the pieces from failing test and trace
Evidence published today (Tuesday) shows that England’s privately-run test and trace system is unlikely to prevent a second wave of COVID-19. UNISON has labelled the system ‘a mess’ and warned that councils are being forced to pick up the pieces. The ineffective test and trace system, alongside the opening of schools and the wider return to the workplace, could lead to a damaging second spike in the virus. Researchers at UCL and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) have modelled what may happen when schools reopen and some parents return to the workplace. In order to avoid a second ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - August 4, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: Janey Starling Tags: Article Covid-19 private contractors schools Source Type: news

Google ’s $10 Billion Investment in India Should be Inclusive of Persons with Disabilities
Unless diversity is accepted and inclusion becomes everyone’s business, it will be impossible to achieve the goal of universal health coverage because 15% of the global population who have some form of disability will be left behind. Credit: Bigstock. By Shubha Nagesh and Ifeanyi NsoforJul 30 2020 (IPS) Over the next seven years, Google will invest a whopping $10 billion in India to improve technology, health and education, according to CEO Sundar Pichai. This is unprecedented and could be a game changer that could improve health, education and economic empowerment.  While Google should be commended f...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Shubha Nagesh and Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Asia-Pacific Education Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: Testing arrivals could catch 94% infections
Modelling by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found a swab after seven days could catch 94 per cent of infections flying from high risk countries. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk of Zika virus transmission from mother to unborn child much higher than expected
FINDINGSAccording to a new study by UCLA researchers and colleagues conducted in Brazil, 65% of children born to mothers infected withthe Zikavirusalsotested positive for the mosquito-borneinfection— a much higher rate than expected.The findings indicatethat even babies whohave no outward neurological or other symptoms associated with Zika can still be infected with the virus andare potentially at risk offuturedevelopmental problems.  BACKGROUNDThe study representsthe first time that the mother-to-child transmission rate of Zika has been reportedfor a group of children who were tracked over several years —...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 27, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Has the handshake gone forever? Public health experts say traditional greeting may never return
Baron Peter Piot, a microbiologist from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said that individual behaviour needs to change across the UK. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AJTMH July updates
(Burness) Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH). We've highlighted below those that we think may of interest for your reporting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Up to 3,500 cancer patients in England will die early due to coronavirus, study claims
Researchers led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine modelled what effect the disruption of cancer services will have on health outcomes by 2025. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: Herd immunity could develop from 10% infected
Researchers led by Dr Gabriela Gomes of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine suggested that immunity among the people most likely to spread the virus would protect others. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine Dr. Peter Hotez speaks with CNN's John Berman and Alisyn Camerota about the current state of the coronavirus in our nation, and what he perceives as a misinformation campaign by the Whtte House. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Streamlining acute malnutrition treatment brings same recovery in children at lower cost
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) A new streamlined approach to treating acute malnutrition is as effective as standard treatment but will free up funds to reach more children with life-saving care, according to new research published in PLOS Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 9, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How We Can Ensure the Safety of Our Health Workers
Credit: Jeffrey Moyo/IPS.By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jul 8 2020 (IPS) Recently, Barcelona’s Liceu opera opened its 2020-2021 season by serenading a full house of plants with classical music. The plants will then be given to over 2,200 health workers who serve at the frontlines to battle the pandemic. The performance was both an appreciation for the workers and it also celebrated the return to normalcy following the devastations caused by COVID-19. It is commendable that health workers are being celebrated this way. However, from the beginning of this pandemic, health workers have been victims. For instance...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Headlines Health COVID-19 Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces European Commission Approval for Janssen ’s Preventive Ebola Vaccine
Discussions with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have taken place to define the required data set for filing US licensure. About Janssen’s Ebola Vaccine Regimen The Janssen preventive Ebola vaccine regimen, Ad26.ZEBOV and MVA-BN-Filo, utilizes a non-replicating viral vector strategy in which viruses – in this case adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) – are genetically modified so that they cannot replicate in human cells. In addition, these vectors carry the genetic code of several Ebola virus proteins in order to trigger an immune response.Janssen’s vac...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 1, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Dangerous tick-borne bacterium extremely rare in New Jersey
(Rutgers University) There's some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium. Rutgers researchers examined more than 3,000 ticks in the Garden State and found only one carrying Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever. But cases of tick-borne spotted fevers have increased east of the Mississippi River, and more research is needed to understand why, according to a study in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Testing ALL of Britain for coronavirus every week 'could prevent second lockdown'
Researchers led by one at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine said that doing 10million tests per day in the UK could 'quite quickly' stamp out Britain's Covid-19 epidemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women Leadership Is Key to Successful Post-COVID-19 Era, Says Cherie Blair
Cherie Blair meets with graduates from the Asian University for Women (AUW) at the Rohingya refugee camps at Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. More than 40 women from the university are involved in humanitarian work in the area. By Cecilia RussellLondon, Cox’s Bazaar, Johannesburg, Jun 17 2020 (IPS) The impact of COVID-19 lockdowns falls heavily on the shoulders of women even in the global north. Women take the brunt of housework and caretaking duties, homes schooling, working from home and perhaps looking after elderly parents, says Cherie Blair. “Imagine you’re a woman in the Rohingya refugee camp (near C...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Cecilia Russell Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Featured Gender Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Women & Economy Women's Health Source Type: news

UK failure to lock down earlier cost many lives, top scientist says
Sage member also says Covid-19 ‘definitely not over’ and urges caution in easing lockdownCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOne of the UK government ’s leading scientific advisers has said the failure to enter lockdown sooner “has cost a lot of lives” and that Britain should not relax its guard, as ministers push ahead with an accelerated programme of easing restrictions.Prof John Edmunds, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said the coronavirus epidemic was “definitely not over” and cautioned that loosening measur...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 7, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rowena Mason Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science Medical research UK news Health Society Source Type: news

Overreliance on ventilators led to coronavirus deaths, study shows
(Natural News) The use of ventilators to treat COVID-19 patients has come under scrutiny after a new study stated that the devices may be doing more harm than good. The study, published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, said that mechanical ventilation can damage the lungs of COVID-19 patients, especially those who are elderly or have... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Genuine Evidence Of Improvement ’ : Remdesivir Helped Some Coronavirus Patients In Study
(CNN) — A five-day course of the antiviral drug remdesivir sped recovery in moderately ill patients with pneumonia from Covid-19, drugmaker Gilead Sciences announced in a statement Monday. It’s more evidence that the drug can help patients, however outside experts are not calling this a “game changer” quite yet. Coronavirus patients who were hospitalized, but not sick enough to need oxygen from a ventilator, were more likely to recover after a five-day course of remdesivir than those given the current standard of care alone, Gilead said. The results from the Phase III clinical trial on the drug have...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN Coronavirus remdesivir Source Type: news

K number: what is the coronavirus metric that could be crucial as lockdown eases?
The K value sheds light on how the transmission rate varies and can help identify clustersCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen deciding how and when lockdown restrictions will be lifted across the UK, the government has said theR value, denoting how many people on average one infected person will themselves infect, is crucial. But experts say another metric is becoming increasingly important: K.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology World news Epidemics London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Receives Positive CHMP Opinion for Janssen ’s Investigational Preventive Ebola Vaccine Regimen
Discussions with the FDA are ongoing to define the required data set for filing Janssen’s Ebola vaccine regimen under the FDA’s Animal Rule licensure pathway. About Janssen’s Ebola Vaccine Regimen The Janssen investigational preventive Ebola vaccine regimen (Ad26.ZEBOV, MVA-BN-Filo) utilizes a viral vector strategy in which viruses – in this case adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) – are genetically modified so that they cannot replicate in human cells. In addition, these vectors are modified to safely carry the genetic code of an Ebola virus protein in order...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - May 29, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Remdesivir drug to be available for selected NHS Covid-19 patients
Drug pioneered for Ebola to be used in UK under emergency medicines provisionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA drug that reduces recovery time from Covid-19 will be made available to a number of NHS patients in “probably the biggest step forward in the treatment of coronavirus” since the pandemic began, the UK health secretary has said.Matt Hancock on Tuesday welcomed the authorisation of the experimental antiviral drug remdesivir, which has been shown to reduce recovery time for patients in hospital with Covid-19 from 15 days to 11 days.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Coronavirus outbreak UK news Drugs NHS UCL (University College London) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science US news China World news Source Type: news

Coronavirus symptoms: The symptoms that may linger for weeks if not months
CORONAVIRUS mysteries still persist, such as why some people experience debilitating symptoms that linger for weeks and months after first appearing. Writing in the BMJ, a professor at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine has detailed his stubborn symptoms. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

There Isn ’t a COVID-19 Vaccine Yet. But Some Are Already Skeptical About It
Amid the American flags, “Make America Great Again” hats and “freedom is essential” posters appearing at recent protests against coronavirus lockdowns in Sacramento, Calif., another familiar slogan has materialized: “We do not consent.” It’s long been a popular rallying cry among antivaccine activists, who claim without evidence that vaccines cause autism or other conditions. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, those activists have become intertwined with demonstrators who want businesses to reopen despite public health experts’ warnings. Offline, the “anti-vaxxers&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

UK researchers hope dogs can be trained to detect coronavirus
£500,000 government funding for project that ‘could revolutionise’ screeningCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDogs are to be trained to try to sniff out the coronavirus before symptoms appear in humans, under trials launched with £500,000 of government funding.Dogs have already beensuccessfully trained to detect the odour of certain cancers, malaria and Parkinson ’s disease, and a new study will look at whether labradors and cocker spaniels can be trained to detect Covid-19 in people.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Frances Perraudin Tags: Medical research Coronavirus outbreak UK news Infectious diseases Microbiology Science London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Durham University Higher education Academic experts Dogs Animals Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: Contract tracing may mean 770k self-isolate a day
Contact tracing could impact thousands of people every day, according to researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Finally, a virus got me': Ebola expert on nearly dying of coronavirus
Peter Piot tells of his brush with death and predicts people will suffer effects of the virus for yearsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePeter Piot, the scientist who helped discover the Ebola virus, and the director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, has told of his brush with death after contracting Covid-19.The professor had never previously been seriously ill, but after 40 years studying and leading the global response to infectious diseases including HIV and Aids, he said that “finally, a virus got me”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lisa O'Carroll Tags: Global development Global health Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Ebola World news UK news Source Type: news

UK scientists hit back at attempts to discredit scientific basis for lockdown
Letter seeks to dispel view that Prof Neil Ferguson was single architect of lockdown ideaCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA group of leading UK scientists have insisted that the scientific basis for the coronavirus lockdown is the work of a large group of experts, and that epidemiologist Prof Neil Ferguson is just one voice among many.In a letter co-ordinated by Dr Thibaut Jombart, an associate professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,more than 25 prominent scientists said debates after Ferguson ’s “individual error” – in which he flouted lockd...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mattha Busby Tags: UK news Coronavirus outbreak Science Politics Source Type: news

Tracking Public Health and Social Measures: A Global Dataset, WHO
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations began tracking implementation of Public health and social measures (PHSMs) around the world. A unique collaboration between WHO, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, ACAPS, University of Oxford, Global Public Health Intelligence Network, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Complexity Science Hub Vienna has brought these datasets together into a single, open-content dataset for public use. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lipophilic guanylhydrazone analogues as promising trypanocidal agents: An extended SAR study
In this report, a team of researchers lead by Dr. Grigoris Zoidis at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Athens, Greece), in collaboration with researchers at the Ruder Boskovic Institute (Zagreb (Croatia), and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (London, United Kingdom) have attempted to extend the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a number of lipophilic guanylhydrazone analogues with respect to in vitro growth inhibition of T. brucei and T. cruzi. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Global Advocacy and Communications Effort Launched to Drive Action Against COVID-19 and Stop Future Pandemics
April 22, 2020, Seattle, WA – A network of leading international organizations announced today the creation of an advocacy initiative to ignite a global movement to help accelerate an end to the COVID-19 pandemic and enhance our preparedness to stop future pandemics. The Pandemic Action Network will advocate for policy changes and increased support and resources to ensure countries are better prepared to prevent, detect and respond to pandemic threats. This initiative will also host “For Humankind”, a new effort to promote accurate information to ensure people around the world understand what they need to...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 23, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Coronavirus Could Hit the U.K. Harder Than Any Other European Country. Here ’s What Went Wrong
Every Thursday evening for the past month, the streets of the U.K. have erupted with noise as people stand on doorsteps or balconies, clapping or banging pots and pans, in a weekly sign of appreciation for healthcare workers. But many doctors, nurses and carers say they don’t want applause—they want better testing and equipment. The U.K. has more than 100,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, making it the sixth-worst affected in the world—but its real number is widely believed to be far higher due to a shortage of test kits. And more than 14,500 people are confirmed to have died in U.K. hospitals from COVID-1...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo/London Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
(American College of Physicians) The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation model for predicting the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has attracted considerable attention, including from the U.S. government. According to the authors from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine, the appearance of certainty of model estimates is seductive when the world is desperate to know what lies ahead, but caution is warranted regarding the validity and usefulness of the mode projections for policymakers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Governments Are Weighing How to Ease Coronavirus Lockdowns. Letting Young Adults Out First Could Be One Option
As European countries settle into weeks of tough measures to limit the spread of COVID-19, governments are beginning to chart possible routes out of their lockdowns. Austria and Denmark have both announced an easing of restrictions, with the opening of small stores and elementary schools. Researchers in the U.K. have presented the government with a different proposal, under which young people aged 20-30 would be the first to be allowed to leave their homes and get back to work—once the infection rate has been brought under control in the next few months —leaving their parents and bosses stuck at home. A resea...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer United Kingdom Source Type: news

UK coronavirus: record daily death toll of 938, as Rishi Sunak says Boris Johnson is 'sitting up in bed'
This live blog is closed.Follow latest updates on our global live blogBoris Johnson improving and sitting up in bed, chancellor saysUK schools will not reopen straight after Easter, officials sayVolunteering: how can I help in the UK?See all of our coronavirus coverage6.10pmBSTLive updates continue on our global blog:Related:Coronavirus live news: global trade forecast to fall by up to a third as US sees highest one-day death toll5.57pmBSTAxel Scheffler, illustrator of the beloved Gruffalo stories, has created an ebook to help children understand thecoronavirus pandemic.The book, written in collaboration with theLondon Sch...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lucy Campbell (now) and Sarah Marsh (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science Politics UK news London NHS Hospitals Source Type: news

COVID-19 and Humanitarian Crises
Source: Johns Hopkins University. Published: 4/2020. This open-access, web-based platform is for use by humanitarian actors in preparedness and response to COVID-19. Many evolving COVID-19 guidance and tools exist for humanitarian settings; humanitarians in the field are creating new programs and adapting existing programs, to continue life-saving services in the safest manner possible while trying to reduce COVID-19 transmission. This platform promotes the exchange of field-based COVID-19 program adaptations and innovations, facilitating learning among organizations in different sectors and contexts. The site is managed ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 and Humanitarian Settings: Landing Page
Source: Johns Hopkins University. Published: 4/2020. The READY Initiative, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), the Center for Humanitarian Health at Johns Hopkins University, and the Center of Education and Research in Humanitarian Action (CERAH) are hosting this weekly webinar series on COVID-19 and humanitarian settings. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why Is Germany ’s Coronavirus Death Rate So Low?
With more than 63,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of March 30, Germany is one of the countries worst-affected by the pandemic, according to official statistics. But only 560 people known to be suffering from the disease caused by the novel coronavirus have died there, putting Germany’s case fatality rate at just 0.9%. That gives Germany one of the lowest rates in the world, making it an outlier compared to places like Italy, where 11.0% of confirmed patients have died from the disease, and even the U.S., which has a rate of 1.8%. According to experts, Germany’s case fatality rate is so low due to its widesp...
Source: TIME: Health - March 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Source Type: news

Neglected Diseases Kill More People than COVID-19 – It’s Time to Address Them
Credit: UNBy Ifeanyi Nsofor and Adaeze OrehABUJA, Mar 30 2020 (IPS) As COVID-19 surges globally and leaves fear and panic in its wake, global efforts are underway to find a cure. Yet, the same level of response is lacking for several other infectious diseases that kill millions annually. These kinds of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a broad group of communicable diseases which affect more than two billion people and cost developing economies billions of dollars every year. Lassa Fever is an example and is endemic in Nigeria and other West African countries such as Benin, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor and Adaeze Oreh Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) Source Type: news

Can we trust the Oxford study on Covid-19 infections? | Adam Kucharski
We don ’t know exactly how many people have already been infected with the virus, but there’s no evidence it’s half the population• Adam Kucharski is an epidemiologist and authorCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEarlier this month, the MSc students I teach at the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine ran an outbreak investigation as part of their epidemiology assessment. They were told several people had fallen ill, and it was their job to piece together various fragments of information – about symptoms, timings and locations – to work out what mi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Adam Kucharski Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science Epidemics Medical research Information UK news Source Type: news

Volunteers should be infected with the coronavirus to speed up vaccine, researchers say
Dr Peter Smith, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said a unique approach could 'shave months' off vaccine development. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus: who ’s most at risk, what we can do and will we see a vaccine soon?
Dr Tom Wingfield of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine answers our questions on Covid-19•Coronavirus latest updates•See all our coronavirus coverageWhat is the best way to strengthen the immune system?The answer to this question is straightforward: the normal approach to healthy living. Have a balanced diet, try to get as much sleep as you can, exercise, don ’t overwork. If you smoke, try to give up and reduce your intake of alcohol and other drugs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus outbreak UK news Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

China ’s Draconian Lockdown Is Getting Credit for Slowing Coronavirus. Would It Work Anywhere Else?
As COVID-19 spread rapidly across China, authorities took an aggressive stance to fight the coronavirus. They were slow to respond to the outbreak—at first suppressing information and denying that it could spread between humans even as it did just that. But, as case numbers skyrocketed, Beijing went to extraordinary lengths to fight the virus, identified at COVID-19, in a campaign Chinese President Xi Jinping has described as a “people’s war.” The most dramatic, and controversial, of the measures was the lockdown of of tens of millions of people in what is believed to be the largest quasi-quarantin...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

The experts who have guided the British public through coronavirus outbreak
Advisers such as chief medical officer Chris Whitty have restored the public ’s faith in officialdomThe public has relied on a number of key individuals to keep them informed of developments in the spread of the coronavirus, including doctors, epidemiologists, researchers and health officials. Here are five of the main players who have helped to restore British faith in the value of experts.• Chris Whitty. England’s chief medical officer, took up his post only a few months ago but has acted with calm authoritythroughout his public appearances since coronavirus emerged as a global health threat. A fo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, Observer science editor Tags: Infectious diseases Science Coronavirus outbreak World news UK news Source Type: news