Africa: 2021 White House Budget Proposal Threatens Public Health, Warns Tropical Medicine Society
[ASTMH] Arlington, Va. -White House's 2021 budget proposal released Monday is short-sighted and threatens the health and safety of Americans at home and abroad. The Trump Administration's proposal includes drastic reductions to the following: (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 13, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Short-Term Mortality Link Identified for Increased Ozone Exposure
TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 -- An increase in ozone is associated with short-term mortality risks, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in The BMJ. Ana M. Vicedo-Cabrera, Ph.D., from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Coronavirus: drop in number of new cases is positive, says a cautious WHO – latest news
Total infections pass 30,000 as Wuhan whistleblower doctor dies and Singapore reports three new casesDoctor who blew whistle over virus diesProfile of whistleblower doctorFirst British national to get virus had been in SingaporeShare your stories1.19pmGMTMore fall-out to the spread of the coronavirus outside China as Swedish telecoms giant Ericsson has become the latest firm to pull out of an international conference in Barcelona later this month because of the outbreak.The telecoms equipment manufacturer has withdrawn from the Mobile World Congress in the Spanish city, which is scheduled to take place between 24 and 27 Fe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 7, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Murray (now) and Alison Rourke (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus outbreak China Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Science World news Hong Kong Source Type: news

LSTM to host global health research symposium ahead of vaccine summit in London
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Over 100 scientists, doctors, along with representatives from industry, charities and Government agencies to meet in Liverpool. Focus on the importance of sustaining effective vaccinations and developing new vaccines within global health research to counter growing threat of infectious diseases. Event to support world's biggest vaccine summit in London in June. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Zika vaccine could save suffering and costs
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) A new study led by researchers at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) and the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine found that routinely giving the Zika vaccine to women of childbearing age could save money if the risk of Zika is around that of other mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and chikungunya. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A roadmap for adding ivermectin to the malaria toolbox
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) A group of experts led by Regina Rabinovich and Carlos Chaccour from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has published a roadmap to evaluate -- and subsequently implement -- ivermectin as a complementary vector control tool against malaria. The Ivermectin Roadmap, published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, includes a foreword signed by Nobel laureate William C. Campbell, co-discoverer of the drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

In the Elusive Grip of an Abusive Partner: A Migrant ’s Story
Credit: UN WomenBy Fairuz AhmedNEW YORK, Jan 14 2020 (IPS) To live in a home with family, to have a safe environment, food and basic human necessities, are some of the essentials that most people expect to have without giving it all much thought. When a child is born, parents or caregivers are likely to provide these things. These expectations get renewed whenever someone gets married and moves to a new home, a different neighborhood, or a city. We can hardly find someone who will say that they were not expecting happiness and safety when stepping into a new relationship, or starting a new chapter of life. But these expect...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fairuz Ahmed Tags: Crime & Justice Development & Aid Education Gender Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Migration & Refugees North America Population Women's Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify that mosquitoes can sense toxins through their legs
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers at LSTM have identified a completely new mechanism by which mosquitoes that carry malaria are becoming resistant to insecticide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Four Lessons to Reverse Inequity in the Global Health Workforce
An eight-month-old boy is examined by a doctor in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Credit: Kristin Palitza/IPS By Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha NageshABUJA, Dec 16 2019 (IPS) Recently, Madhukar Pai, the Director of McGill University Global Health Program wrote about the inequity in global health research. He observed that researches are skewed in favor of the global north. We agree that this inequity exists. However, we also have found that global fellowships such as the Atlantic Fellowship, of which we are both Senior Fellows, are platforms to reverse this inequity, foster international partnerships and amplify voices ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha Nagesh Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Pathways Between Natural Disasters and Violence Against Children: A Conversation Between Research and Practice
Source: Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action. Published: 12/16/2019. This 46-minute webinar features a conversation between practitioners from UNICEF and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and researchers from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Columbia University on the interaction between natural disasters and violence against children. It discusses innovative programming in the Asia/Pacific region to prevent sexual and gender-based violence during natural disasters, and discusses areas of development for knowledge and programming. (Video or Multimedia)...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

novel bednet design improves safety, affordability and lethality to resistant mosquitoes
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM have designed a new bednet that can kill mosquitoes more efficiently than existing nets, in a way that increases the choice of insecticide used, while minimising risk to the person inside the bednet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Malaria deaths could be reduced thanks to Warwick engineers
(University of Warwick) The resurgence of Malaria in high risk areas calls for new methods to combat the potentially dangerous situation. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Warwick and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have found adding a barrier above a bednet can significantly improve the bednet's performance, reduce the quantity of insecticide while expanding the range of insecticides that can be safely delivered via a bednet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa: Lack of Equity and Diversity Still Plague Global Health Research
[The Conversation Africa] The field of global health has evolved from colonial and military medicine, tropical medicine and international health. While it is evolving for the better, research shows that global health is still struggling to shake off its colonial past. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 22, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Eczema patients are 13% more likely to break their bones
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine experts trawled through almost two decades worth of fractures in England. The study is considered to be the largest on the topic to-date. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study led by Tulane researchers outlines America's losing battle to lose weight
(Tulane University) It comes as no surprise that Americans struggle with weight loss, but a new study led by researchers at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine reveals the extent to which many people try, and fail, to shed extra pounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochrane seeks Research Assistant in Evidence Synthesis (disease control) - Liverpool, UK
Job type: Fixed-term for 1 yearWorking hours:Full time, 80% FTE considered on requestSalary:£29,176Location:Liverpool, UKApplication deadline:24 November 2019, 23:45Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine's department of Clinical Sciences has an exciting opportunity for a Research Assistant to join the team working as part of the “Research, Evidence and Development Initiative” (READ-It)LSTM ’S Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health leads developments in evidence synthesis for tropical medicine and global health. In the 1990s, we helped establish Cochrane. We now run the Cochrane Infectious Dis...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - October 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Tranexamic acid could save lives of people with head injuries
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine believe  transexamic acid (TXA) could slash Britain's death toll from traumatic brain injuries by 20 per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UNISON appoints national nursing officer
Stuart Tuckwood has been appointed UNISON’s national nursing officer to help the union promote and defend the interests of nurses. He took up the position this month (September). A registered adult nurse, Stuart spent the past five years at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, where he worked in major trauma rehabilitation and later as a charge nurse in the neurosurgery and neurology departments. Most recently Stuart has specialised in critical care outreach at Addenbrooke’s, where he was part of the trust’s rapid-response team, managing deteriorating patients and delivering advanced life support. A...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 25, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release health NHS nursing unis Source Type: news

Polio outbreak – The Philippines
On 19 September 2019, the Philippines declared an outbreak of polio. Two cases have been reported to date, both caused by vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (VDPV2). Environmental samples taken from sewage in Manila on 13 August and a waterway in Davao on 22 August have also tested positive for VDPV2. The first case was confirmed on 14 September following testing by the National Polio Laboratory at the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, the Japan National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID) and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The case-patient is a 3-year-old girl from Lanao del...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - September 24, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Youngest children in a school year are 30% more likely to have depression
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine analysed the GP records of more than a million children from across the UK. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Does the Next 25 Years Hold for Global Health?
Source: Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (RSTMH). Published: 9/17/2019. This 30-page report is an analysis of survey data looking at 25 years of progress in and the future challenges for tropical medicine and global health. According to its findings, the biggest challenges to global health are the climate crisis; drug resistance, including antimicrobial resistance and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis; and emerging epidemics. Mass migration, and the health and nutrition implications of climate-ravaged food supplies were also highlighted as major challenges to global health. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resou...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - September 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Podcast: Effects of starting antiretroviral therapy within one week of diagnosis on people living with HIV
Among the dozens of Cochrane Reviews of various treatments for people with HIV or AIDS, are some that look more at how the treatments should be used, rather than the treatments themselves. One of these examines the timing of the start of treatment, and it was published in June 2019. Lead author, Alberto Mateo from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in the UK, tells us about the evidence base and the findings for this important question." When people are diagnosed with HIV, they normally have to attend several clinic visits before they are offered treatment. This is to make sure that they are ready and that it i...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 13, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Calorie tax on cakes, sweets and biscuits 'could cut the UK's obesity rate by 2.7% in a YEAR'
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine looked at shopping habits of 36,000 British households and found price rises could cut almost 9,000 calories out of their shopping bags. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer Survivors Face Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk
THURSDAY, Aug. 29, 2019 -- Cancer survivors face an increase in the long-term risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in The Lancet. Helen Strongman, from the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 29, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Superbug C. difficile is evolving to 'spread in hospitals and thrive on the Western diet' 
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine discovered the bacteria Clostridium difficile, which causes diarrhoea, is gradually 'splitting' into two species. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uganda Launches Largest Trial of Experimental Ebola Vaccine As Outbreak Spreads in Neighboring Congo
(KAMPALA, Uganda) — Researchers in Uganda have launched the largest-ever trial of the experimental Ebola vaccine that is expected to be deployed in neighboring Congo, where a deadly outbreak has killed over 1,800 people. The trial of the Janssen Pharmaceuticals vaccine involves up to 800 people in the western district of Mbarara and is supported by Doctors without Borders and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Pontiano Kaleebu, a Ugandan researcher who leads the trial, said Friday that he regrets that the Janssen vaccine has not yet been deployed in Congo. The health minister there who stepped down l...
Source: TIME: Health - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RODNEY MUHUMUZA / AP Tags: Uncategorized congo ebola onetime Uganda vaccine Source Type: news

Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group seeks Research Assistant in Evidence Synthesis - Liverpool, UK
Salary:£28,660 per annumContract type:Full-time, fixed-term for up to 12 monthsClosing date:14 August 2019 Founded in 1898 and the oldest of its kind in the world, the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for teaching and research in tropical diseases.  LSTM ’S Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health leads developments in evidence synthesis for tropical medicine and global health. In the 1990s, we helped establish Cochrane. We now run the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG), with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors throug...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 30, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Understanding the mode of action of the primaquine: New insights into a 70 year old puzzle
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers at LSTM have taken significant steps in understanding the way that the anti-malarial drug primaquine (PQ) works, which they hope will lead to the development of new, safer and more effective treatments for malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Menstrual Cups Seem Safe for Menstruation Management
WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 -- Menstrual cups appear to be safe for menstruation management, according to a review published online July 16 in The Lancet Public Health. Anna Maria van Eijk, Ph.D., from Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

In Hawaii, Rat Lungworm Disease Infects People but Eludes Researchers
A brain-invading parasite has made nearly 100 people sick in Hawaii in the last decade. How worried should health officials be? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Knvul Sheikh Tags: Parasites Worms Rats Snails Invasive Species Research American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Centers for Disease Control and Prevention University of Hawaii your-feed-science Source Type: news

AJTMH tip sheet for July 2019
(Burness) Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on July 8, 2019 in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 8, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Too much cleanliness not bad for health, report on hygiene says
Royal Society for Public Health says need to expose children to germs is ‘dangerous myth’The notion that too much cleanliness can be bad for your health and that children need to be exposed to germs is a dangerous myth, according to a public health body.The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) said the hygiene hypothesis – that allergies are caused by too much cleanliness, by killing off the bugs we need to challenge our immune systems – has entered the public imagination and is being misinterpreted.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Hygiene UK news Science London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Health Society Source Type: news

£ 3.54 million boost for Liverpool-based antimicrobial resistance research
(University of Liverpool) The University of Liverpool (UoL) and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have been awarded £ 3.54 million for a research project that aims to develop a 'personalized health' approach to prevent and treat antimicrobial resistance (AMR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘They’re Chipping Away.’ Inside the Grassroots Effort to Fight Mandatory Vaccines
Christina Hildebrand went down a rabbit hole and emerged at the statehouse in Sacramento. That’s how she describes it–going down a rabbit hole–and in her case it happened 14 years ago, when she was pregnant with her first child. In a world filled with chemicals and toxins, processed foods and GMOs, she decided her baby would be brought up as naturally and chemical-free as possible. It was when she was researching how best to achieve that goal that she bumped into vaccines. That was a bad time to begin thinking about such things. The fraudulent 1998 paper by British physician Andrew Wakefield ostensibly li...
Source: TIME: Health - June 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger/Sacramento Tags: Uncategorized vaccines Source Type: news

Dengue fever to spread in the US, Africa and even the Mediterranean putting billions at risk by 2080
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Washington have predicted 60 per cent of the global population will live alongside disease-spreading mosquitoes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Xpert Ultra test for diagnosing TB now included in Cochrane Review
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Tuberculosis causes more deaths globally than any other infectious disease and is a top 10 cause of death worldwide. Globally in 2017, of the estimated 10 million people with TB, 3.6 million were not reported to national TB programs, many of whom were not being diagnosed with their disease. If detected early and effectively treated, TB is largely curable, but in 2017, around 1.6 million people died of tuberculosis, including 300,000 people living with HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Just 7% of practice managers are GP surgery partners, survey reveals
Only 7% of practice managers are partners in their practice, although more than eight in 10 think they should be given the opportunity, research has shown. The study, carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2017 and funded by the Health Foundation, found that only 95 of 1,285 practice manager respondents were business partners. However, 82% thought they should be able to become one.Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - May 23, 2019 Category: Practice Management Authors: costanzapearce Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Latest News Source Type: news

AJTMH tipsheet for May 2019
(Burness) Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on May 20, 2019 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Revealed: Twice as many male than female practice managers earn over £50k a year
More than twice as many male practice managers in the UK earn over£50,000 a year compared to their female counterparts, a study has revealed. The research, carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2017 and funded by the Health Foundation, found that 30% of male practice managers earn over£50,000 but only 14% of female practice managers are in the same salary range. A much larger proportion of female practice managers are in the lower income brackets than male practice managers, the study showed.Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - May 13, 2019 Category: Practice Management Authors: costanzapearce Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Latest News Source Type: news

Revealed: Twice as many male as female practice managers earn over £50k a year
More than twice as many male practice managers in the UK earn over£50,000 a year compared to their female counterparts, a study has revealed. The research, carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2017 and funded by the Health Foundation, found that 30% of male practice managers earn over£50,000 but only 14% of female practice managers are in the same salary range. A much larger proportion of female practice managers are in the lower income brackets than male practice managers, the study showed.Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - May 13, 2019 Category: Practice Management Authors: costanzapearce Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Latest News Source Type: news

Revealed: nearly half of practice managers have been in the job more than a decade
Practice managers are remaining in their jobs for long periods of time, despite the growing demands of the role, a new study has found. Research by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that 48% of the 1,424 practice managers surveyed across the UK had been in the role for ten years or more, and 22% for between five and 10 years.Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - May 8, 2019 Category: Practice Management Authors: costanzapearce Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Latest News Source Type: news

Fewer than HALF of men and women now have sex at least once a week 
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine analysed data for more than 34,000 men and women aged 16 to 44 to make the finding. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When doctors and nurses can disclose and discuss errors, hospital mortality rates decline
(Bocconi University) The diffusion of a culture of openness in hospitals is associated with lower hospital mortality, according to a study conducted among 137 acute trusts in England by Veronica Toffolutti (Bocconi University and London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) and David Stuckler (Bocconi University). A one-point increase in their standardized openness score is associated with a 6.48% decrease in hospital mortality rates. Between 2012 and 2014 the score increase from 13.63 to 16.49. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More than two-thirds of practice managers attend CCG meetings, research reveals
More than two-thirds of practice managers attend CCG or equivalent meetings, new research has revealed. The study, carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2017, explores the role of 1,424 practice managers across the UK. On average, 67% of practice managers said they attend CCG or health board meetings– the equivalent primary care organisations outside England.Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - May 1, 2019 Category: Practice Management Authors: costanzapearce Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Latest News Source Type: news

LSHTM awarded £ 7 million to help improve the health of disabled people in LMICs
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) is to lead a major new projectthat aims to reveal which interventions should be implemented to improve the well-being ofpeople with disabilities in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Stop ignoring the dangers of vaping', scientist warns Public Health England
Professor Martin McKee, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, accused Public Health England of 'doing everything it can to promote e-cigarettes' without good evidence. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In India, a Renewed Fight Against Leprosy
Health workers thought they had vanquished the disease in 2005. But it lived on, cloaked in stigma and medical mystery. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: APOORVA MANDAVILLI Tags: Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Disabilities Bacteria Rumors and Misinformation Skin Tuberculosis Discrimination Politics and Government London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine World Health Organization India your-feed-science Source Type: news

Continuing PC vaccine in Kenya at full price cost-effective and could save thousands of lives
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Continuing the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in Kenya after the country transitions away from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, support is highly cost-effective and estimated to save thousands of children's lives, according to new research published in The Lancet Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NEJM applying universal standards of care to Ebola virus disease
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) LSTM's Senior Clinical Lecturer, Dr. Shevin Jacob, is corresponding author on a perspective piece published in the New England Journal of Medicine calling for universal standards of care to be applied in relation to ebola virus disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mass drug administration reduces scabies cases by 90% in Solomon Islands' communities
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Mass drug administration of two antibiotics can be highly effective at reducing cases of scabies and the bacterial infection impetigo, according to new research published in Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news