In India, a Renewed Fight Against Leprosy
Health workers thought they had vanquished the disease in 2005. But it lived on, cloaked in stigma and medical mystery. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: APOORVA MANDAVILLI Tags: Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Disabilities Bacteria Rumors and Misinformation Skin Tuberculosis Discrimination Politics and Government London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine World Health Organization India your-feed-science Source Type: news

Continuing PC vaccine in Kenya at full price cost-effective and could save thousands of lives
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Continuing the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in Kenya after the country transitions away from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, support is highly cost-effective and estimated to save thousands of children's lives, according to new research published in The Lancet Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NEJM applying universal standards of care to Ebola virus disease
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) LSTM's Senior Clinical Lecturer, Dr. Shevin Jacob, is corresponding author on a perspective piece published in the New England Journal of Medicine calling for universal standards of care to be applied in relation to ebola virus disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mass drug administration reduces scabies cases by 90% in Solomon Islands' communities
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Mass drug administration of two antibiotics can be highly effective at reducing cases of scabies and the bacterial infection impetigo, according to new research published in Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research into tropical eye worm yields new tests to assess safety of anti-filarial drugs
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers at the LSTM's Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics, and University of Buea, Cameroon have developed new models of the tropical eye worm, Loa loa for the development of new drugs against filariasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dramatic housing transformation in sub-Saharan Africa revealed for first time
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Housing with improved water and sanitation, sufficient living area and durable construction has doubled in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2015, according to new research published in Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 27, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cochrane seeks Clinical Research Associate - Liverpool, UK
 Liverpool school of Tropical Medicine's Centre for Evidence Synthesis in Global Health has led developments in systematic reviews in tropical medicine and international health. In the 1990s, staff contributed to setting up Cochrane, and established theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG). This is now recognised as one of Cochrane's premier groups, with over 150 Cochrane reviews and 600 authors, and is well-linked with the World Health Organization.We are looking to expand the centre. As part of this, we are recruiting staff for the "Research, Evidence and Development Initiative " (READ-It) programme th...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - March 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Drinking Very Hot Tea Almost Doubles Risk Of Cancer, New Study Says
This study, published Wednesday in the International Journal of Cancer, was the first to pinpoint a specific temperature, according to the authors. Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world and is often fatal, killing approximately 400,000 people every year, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer. It is usually caused by repeated injury to the esophagus due to smoke, alcohol, acid reflux and — maybe — hot liquids. The esophagus is a long tube through which swallowed food and liquids travel to reach the stomach. The American Cancer Society estimates that 13,750 new cas...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News tea Source Type: news

People Affected by Leprosy in Latin America Unite for Their Rights and Their Voice
Family photo of part of the 111 participants in the First Latin American and Caribbean Assembly of Organisations of People Affected by Hansen's Disease, on the steps of the Morisco Palace, the headquarters of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, which hosted the three-day meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Credit: Mario Osava/IPSBy Mario OsavaRIO DE JANEIRO, Mar 14 2019 (IPS) With the decision to found a regional coalition to promote rights and greater participation in national and international forums and decisions, the First Latin American and Caribbean Assembly of Organisations of People Affected by Hansen’s disease, popu...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Mario Osava Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Conferences Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Population Regional Categories Ter Source Type: news

Secrets of early life revealed from less than half a teaspoon of blood
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) A global team of scientists have mapped the developmental pathway of a newborn's life for the first time. The research, published in Nature Communications, could transform our understanding of health and disease in babies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

AJTMH tipsheet for March 2019
(Burness) Your advance look at three new studies publishing online on March 11, 2019 in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Diagnostic uncertainty in children with fever impacts health service resources
(University of Liverpool) The management of febrile illness (fever) in children has a substantial impact on National Health Services resources, predominantly due to diagnostic uncertainty resulting from a lack of accurate tests to distinguish between viral and bacterial illness, a new study reports.Uncertainty over the causes of fever, and associated added cautiousness by clinicians, results in increased observation times, inpatient admissions, and precautionary use of antibiotics, say researchers at the University of Liverpool and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochrane Infectious Disease Group works with WHO on latest guidelines for malaria vector control
The World Health Organization publishedGuidelines for malaria vector control, drawing on seven Cochrane reviews specially prepared for them by theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG).  With its editorial base at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), CIDG was asked to review all of the evidence that was used in bringing together what WHO have described as a “one-stop shop” for countries and partners working to implement effective malaria vector control measures. Consolidating more than 20 sets of WHO recommendations and good practice statements into one user friendly document, the guidelines su...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - March 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Study confirms and quantifies Zika-microcephaly link in Brazil
(PLOS) Women infected with Zika virus early in pregnancy are almost 17 times more likely to have a child with microcephaly, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Oliver Brady of the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine, UK, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Test and Treat' reduces new HIV infections by a third in southern Africa communities
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Results from largest ever HIV prevention trial suggest strategy could make a significant contribution to controlling epidemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A quick path to antimalarial resistance
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Resistance to antimalarial drugs is thought to result mainly from changes in the parasite's genome. However, P. falciparum can also develop resistance to some antimalarial compounds by epigenetic changes, according to a new study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa,' and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. This is of concern because resistance acquired at the epigenetic level can arise quickly, even during the course of a single infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Leprosy Remains a Stubborn, Unseen Problem in the Philippines
The Philippines has the highest incidence of leprosy of any country in the region – about 1,700 new cases have been identified in each of the last three years. Credit: moyerphotos/CC by 2.0By Ben KritzMANILA, Mar 2 2019 (IPS)The stubborn challenge of diagnosis and treatment of leprosy among difficult to reach populations in the Philippines should soon become easier with the rollout of a mobile app connecting field health workers with physicians and clinics.Officially launched at the end of January after years of testing, the app was created by Philippine developer MetaHelix in cooperation with the Department of Healt...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ben Kritz Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Population Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations leprosy Nippon Foundation Philippines Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation (SMHF) Source Type: news

Typhoid vaccine may protect against other infections
(University of Liverpool) New research by the University of Liverpool and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine shows that vaccination with weakened strains of Salmonella may also protect against other infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 27, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Intervention can boost rates of exclusive breastfeeding
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Providing additional support to women in Burkina Faso can boost rates of exclusive breastfeeding. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LSTM receives grant to accelerate evaluation of next-generation malaria control tools
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) LSTM has been awarded a new $3.9 million grant from the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation for the ESSENTIALS project. This initiative aims to speed up the evaluation process for new malaria control tools, to ensure they are deployed as early as possible in affected communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

LSTM and Imperial College Researchers design new anti-influenza drugs
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Needle and syringe programmes are highly cost-effective at preventing hepatitis C transmission
Providing clean injecting equipment through needle and syringe programmes is a highly cost-effective way of preventing hepatitis C (HCV) transmission among people who inject drugs and could save millions of pounds in infection treatment costs in the UK, according to research led by the University of Bristol and London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

LSTM awarded £ 11.8 million to improve the lives of people living in informal settlements
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) has been awarded £ 11.8 million by the UK government's Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) for a grant to help improve the health of people living in informal settlements in low and middle-income countries. The UKRI GCRF Accountability for Informal Urban Equity Hub, or ARISE, will support precarious and marginalized people claim their rights to health and build accountability and capacity to provide them with security and services. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

World Health Organization is 'underestimating' how many people will die because of global warming
Experts from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Washington say 'many millions' of people will perish by 2050 because of soaring global temperatures. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Planetary Health Diet ’ : Scientists Say Cutting Red Meat, Sugar Can Save Lives And The Planet
(CNN) — An international team of scientists has developed a diet it says can improve health while ensuring sustainable food production to reduce further damage to the planet. The “planetary health diet” is based on cutting red meat and sugar consumption in half and upping intake of fruits, vegetables and nuts. And it can prevent up to 11.6 million premature deaths without harming the planet, says the report published Wednesday in the medical journal The Lancet. The authors warn that a global change in diet and food production is needed as 3 billion people across the world are malnourished — which in...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Source Type: news

Women and men are losing virginity before they are ready – study
Contraceptive use and peer pressure can affect whether first sexual experience is positive, says researchMore than half of women and two in five men are losing their virginity before they are ready, potentially affecting their wellbeing and health, researchers say.The team add that focusing only on age is misguided, noting the research showed issues around willingness, peer pressure and contraceptive use can all affect whether the first experience of sex is positive, regardless of age.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Sex Health Young people Sex education Society UK news Schools Science Contraception and family planning London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Higher education Source Type: news

Many in UK lose virginity before they are ready – study
Contraceptive use and peer pressure can affect whether first sexual experience is positive, says researchMore than half of women and two in five men are losing their virginity before they are ready, potentially affecting their wellbeing and health, researchers say.The team add that focusing only on age is misguided, noting the research showed issues around willingness, peer pressure and contraceptive use can all affect whether the first experience of sex is positive, regardless of age.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Sex Health Young people Sex education Society UK news Schools Science Contraception and family planning London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Higher education Source Type: news

Did YOU have sex too YOUNG?
Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine asked nearly 3,000 sexually experienced 17 to 24-year olds about the experience of losing their virginity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) A team at LSTM with their collaborators in Malawi and Denmark have provided, for the first time, evidence which links the ability of red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite to bind to the cells lining the blood vessels of the brain, with the clinical syndrome cerebral malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Being HIV positive and staying on antiretroviral therapy in Africa: A systematic review
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) An international team of researchers have carried out a review of the evidence examining what influences people who are HIV positive to go to health services and then stay on antiretroviral drugs in Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Septin proteins act as cellular police to identify, imprison and kill 'superbug' Shigella
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) A protein family found naturally in our cells could help stop the spread of dangerous drug resistant infections by using 'detective' like powers to collect evidence of bacterial infection and imprison it, according to new research published in the journal Cell Host& Microbe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers at LSTM identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peter Hotez: ‘What happens when the anti-vaccine movement moves into India?’
The American scientist, whose new book explains why vaccines didn ’t cause his daughter’s autism, on why conspiracy theorists need to be challengedPeter Hotez is dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He has worked on developing vaccines for hookworm andschistosomiasis, and is a vocal opponent of the anti-vaccine movement. His daughter Rachel is autistic and he has written a book,Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel ’s Autism, in which he describes her illness and tackles the newly resurgent anti-vaccine movement.Why did you decide to write this book thr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Science Autism Andrew Wakefield Source Type: news

Featured Review: Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) combined with pyrethroids in insecticide ‐treated nets to prevent malaria in Africa
Review confirms that using pyrethroid-PBO treated nets to prevent malaria is more effective at killing mosquitoes in areas where there is a high level of resistance to pyrethroids.The distribution of nets treated with pyrethroid insecticides has been very effective in reducing malaria transmission during the past two decades in Africa. However, there has been a rise in the number of mosquitoes developing resistance to pyrethroids, which is the only class of insecticides currently used to treat nets.In a new Cochrane review, an independent team of review authors led byKatherine Gleave andNatalie Lissenden at the Liverpool S...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 29, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Here ’s Why People Are Obsessed With Popping Pimples
You know it’s a bad idea to pop your pimples. Dermatologists say so. “If the inflamed or infected material”—i.e., the pimple pus—“is not easily extruded with a little pressure, you could force it deep and spread the extent of the inflammation, and even cause permanent scarring and pitting of the skin,” says Dr. Michael Olding, a dermatologist and chief of plastic surgery at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. But despite these warnings, many find it hard to resist evicting the unsightly little squatters that set up shop in their skin. One dermat...
Source: TIME: Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

The anti-vaxxer maps of America: Where the trend is taking hold
Peter Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine, at Baylor College of Medicine, reveals the 18 US states that allow nonmedical vaccine exemptions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Health: Dogs Can Detect Malaria. How Useful Is That?
Canine can sniff out the socks worn by children carrying the mosquito-borne parasites, a study finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Dogs Malaria Smells and Odors American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Durham University Africa Gambia Source Type: news

Humanitarian Evidence Week
Evidence Aid uses knowledge from systematic reviews to provide reliable, up-to-date evidence on interventions that might be considered in the context of natural disasters and other major healthcare emergencies. It was established after the Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004, with input from several members of Cochrane, Cochrane groups, and other individuals and became an independent charity in 2015.  For the second year Evidence Aid has organised Humanitarian Evidence Week in collaboration with The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford, to promote a more evidence-based approach. Webinars, blog...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 1, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

Prenatal exposure to malaria may determine disease susceptibility early in life
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Prenatal exposure to malaria considerably alters the newborn's innate immune response (i.e. its first line of defence), particularly when the placenta has been infected, according to a study led by ISGlobal, the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp (ITM). The results, published in BMC Medicine, could help explain why some babies are more susceptible to malaria than others during their first year of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 1, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Global Health: In Congo ’ s Ebola Outbreak, Experimental Treatments Are Proving Effective
More than half of the patients who received treatment survived, scientists reported. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Ebola Virus ZMapp (Drug) Epidemics Vaccination and Immunization Deaths (Fatalities) American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene University of North Carolina Congo, Democratic Republic of (Congo-Kinshasa) William A. Fischer II Source Type: news

New report finds tropical disease causing heart problems in dogs assisting with homeland security duties
(Burness) More than 100 working dogs employed by the federal government across the United States have been infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease, which may lead to heart problems, according to a new study presented today at the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. Chagas disease is a tropical infection spread by a blood-sucking triatomine or 'kissing bug' that may pose a growing threat in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

High BMIs linked to a greater risk of death from every major cause
The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine analysed 3.6 million people and nearly 370,000 deaths to get a greater insight into BMI. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Body mass index associated with deaths from most causes
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Body mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat, is linked to risk of death from every major cause except transport accidents, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New evidence of durable immune response to 3 experimental Ebola vaccines helps drive new wave of vaccine development targeting a number of diseases with epidemic potential
(American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene) In the midst of an increasingly volatile Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a new study presented today finds that the immune response generated by three experimental Ebola vaccines -- including one already deployed in the DRC -- persists for at least two and a half years. The study, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, could have implications far beyond the Ebola fight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 29, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Millennials are more sceptical of vaccines
A report by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that people who are aged between 18 and 24 are 24 per cent less likely than over-65s to believe vaccines are safe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 67th Annual Meeting
(Burness) Fighting the Latest Ebola Scare, Tackling Disease Outbreaks, Pandemic Flu Concerns, Probing Tick Spit for Cures, Diseases in the Aftermath of Hurricanes, Emerging Infectious Diseases and More at World's Leading Meeting of Global Health and Tropical Disease Experts (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa:Global Handwashing Day - Innovative 'Surprise Soap' Gets Children Washing Hands in Emergencies, With Lifesaving Implications
[savethechildren_uk] Children who had fled their homes because of conflict were four times more likely to wash their hands with soap if it was made fun in an innovative new approach, a pilot study by Save the Children, the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine and humanitarian manufacturing experts Field Ready, has shown[i]. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 15, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Putting your fingers up your nose could spread bacteria which cause pneumonia
Researchers led by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine say it would be unrealistic to tell children to stop touching their noses but hygiene could be improved around vulnerable relatives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news