Bronchiolitis: What parents of infants need to know

Follow me on Twitter @drClaire It starts as a runny nose and a slight cough — and quickly makes babies miserable. Bronchiolitis is a very common illness in babies during the fall, winter, and early spring. It mostly affects children under the age of two, but is most common in babies three to six months old. While the majority of babies who get it do just fine, some can get very sick. So it’s important that parents of infants know what bronchiolitis is, what to watch for, and what to do. Ultimately, bronchiolitis is just a really bad cold. There are a few different viruses that can cause it. The most common one is Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV. As opposed to most colds that stay in the upper part of the respiratory tract (the nose and throat), bronchiolitis gets down into the lungs. It affects the small airways called the bronchioles (hence the name bronchiolitis) and can cause them to be irritated and swollen. When this happens, it can lead to wheezing and trouble breathing. For most babies, this is just a bad cough that lasts for a week or so and then gets better. But some babies can get very ill, either from the swelling of the airways, exhaustion from all the coughing, or complications like pneumonia or dehydration. That’s why parents need to be watchful for any of the following, and call the doctor if they happen: fever of 102º F or higher (or a fever of 100.4º F or more in a baby less than three months old), or a lower fever that lasts ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Lung disease Parenting Source Type: blogs

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Authors: Rombauts A, Abelenda-Alonso G, Cuervo G, Gudiol C, Carratalà J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite adequate antibiotic coverage, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality worldwide. It induces both a local pulmonary and a systemic inflammatory response, particularly significant in severe cases. The intensity of the dysregulated host response varies from patient to patient and has a negative impact on survival and other outcomes. AREAS COVERED: This comprehensive review summarizes the pathophysiological aspects of the inflammatory response in CAP, brie...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Xyloglucan/gelose plus ORS was effective and safe in treating acute diarrhea in children. PMID: 33028102 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Xiaoqin Liu, Trine Munk-Olsen, Clara Albiñana, Bjarni J. Vilhjálmsson, Emil M. Pedersen, Vivi Schlünssen, Marie Bækvad-Hansen, Jonas Bybjerg-Grauholm, Merete Nordentoft, Anders D. Børglum, Thomas Werge, David M. Hougaard, Preben B. Mortensen, Esben Agerbo
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Authors: Tamai H, Shingaki N, Ida Y, Shimizu R, Maeshima S, Okamura J, Kawashima A, Nakao T, Hara T, Matsutani H, Nishikawa I, Higashi K Abstract BACKGROUND: Although clinical use of sofosbuvir plus ribavirin has been approved for patients infected with genotype 2 hepatitis C virus, patients ≥ 75-years-old have not been included in previous clinical trials. AIM: To evaluate the real-world safety and efficacy of sofosbuvir plus ribavirin for elderly patients (≥ 75-years-old) compared to nonelderly patients, we conducted a post-marketing prospective cohort study. METHODS: We treated 265 patients with ge...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Manuel Jorge Rial, Marcela Valverde, Victoria del Pozo, Francisco Javier González-Barcala, Carlos Martínez-Rivera, Xavier Muñoz, José María Olaguibel, Vicente Plaza, Elena Curto, Santiago Quirce, Pilar Barranco, Javier Domínguez-Ortega, Joaquin Mullol, César Picado, Antonio Valero, Irina Bobolea, Ebymar Arismendi, Paula Ribó, Joaquín Sastre
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Yamaya T, Baba T, Hagiwara E, Ikeda S, Niwa T, Kitayama T, Murohashi K, Higa K, Sato Y, Ogura T Abstract Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been recognized as a worldwide pandemic. However, the clinical course of COVID-19 remains poorly characterized. Although some cases of pneumothorax have been reported, they all had pulmonary complications or were managed with mechanical ventilation. We herein report a case of pneumothorax that developed even though the patient had no pulmonary underlying diseases and had never been managed with mechanical ventilation. In the present case, a lung bulla was found on...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Authors: Takahashi M, Horio Y, Takihara T, Enokida K, Miyaoka M, Hirabayashi K, Ohshinden K, Hattori S, Takahashi F, Takahashi G, Tanaka J, Takiguchi H, Niimi K, Ito Y, Hayama N, Oguma T, Asano K Abstract A 72-year-old man was treated with prednisolone and cyclosporine A for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A nodule with a diameter of 19 mm was found in the right lung and diagnosed as lung squamous cell carcinoma. Anti-cancer treatments were not performed because of the presence of advanced interstitial pneumonia and chronic respiratory failure. Cyclosporine A was tapered to avoid suppression of anti-tumor immunity, ...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Purpose of Study: Explore the perceptions of primary care physicians (PCPs) from community health care centers (CHCs) in Franklin County, Ohio, regarding factors that contribute to their inability to consistently provide sustainable asthma management services to their uninsured patient population. Primary Practice Setting: Asthmatic patients are not consistently receiving sustainable asthma management in CHCs in Ohio. Primary care physicians in CHCs play a pivotal role in closing health care gaps for asthmatic patients. To minimize the barriers that impede the efforts of PCPs to control asthma for their uninsured pati...
Source: Professional Case Management - Category: Health Management Tags: Articles Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology &TherapeuticsAuthor(s): Osamu Matsuno, Seijiro Minamoto
Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 October 2020Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology &TherapeuticsAuthor(s): Noriyuki Ohkura, Masaki Fujimura, Johsuke Hara, Yusuke Nakade, Miki Abo, Takashi Sone, Hideharu Kimura, Kazuo Kasahara
Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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