More data confirm single dose of 2 vaccines work
The research has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal but is based on data from nose and throat swabs taken from more than 370,000 participants in England and Wales between December and April. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 23, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Pollen count moderate to high countrywide today - best treatment for hay fever
TREE pollen season has peaked, with moderate to high levels countrywide today. For hay fever sufferers, what's the best treatment to prevent and relieve a stuffy nose, an itchy throat and red eyes? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Non-Emergency Surgeries Are Rebounding, But Backlogs Remain
FRIDAY, April 9, 2021 -- The coronavirus pandemic put elective ear, nose and throat surgeries in the United States on the back burner last spring, but a new study finds those numbers largely rebounded within a few months. Still, " as the pandemic... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 9, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Why do I cough all the time as if I have to clear my throat? DR ELLIE CANNON answers your questions 
DR ELLIE CANNON: Feeling as though there's phlegm always in the throat is incredibly common. And more often than not, the underlying cause lies with the nose or stomach. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deactivating cancer cell gene boosts immunotherapy for head and neck cancers
By targeting an enzyme that plays a key role in head and neck cancer cells, researchers from theUCLA School of Dentistry were able to significantly slow the growth and spread of tumors in mice and enhance the effectiveness of an immunotherapy to which these types of cancers often become resistant.Their findings,  published online in the journal Molecular Cell, could help researchers develop more refined approaches to combatting highly invasive head and neck squamous cell cancers, which primarily affect the mouth, nose and throat.Immunotherapy, which is used as a clinical treatment for various cancers, harnesses t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cancer symptoms: The first warning sign of nasopharyngeal cancer - a painless swelling
CANCER at the back of the nose, down to the throat - a type of head and neck disease - is called nasopharyngeal cancer. What are the symptoms of this deadly condition? And what are the risk factors? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Protection protocols involving ear, nose and throat patients during COVID-19
The COVID-19 virus spreads through respiratory droplets. This means treating patients who have diseases or injuries involving the ears, nose or throat, or the head and neck, requires particular precautions. "COVID-19 taught us all to be more nimble," says Dr. Devyani Lal, a Mayo Clinic otolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon. She says the COVID-19 [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 19, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Non-invasive skin swab tests can quickly detect COVID-19: Lancet study
The most widely used approach to testing for COVID-19 requires a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, which involves taking a swab of the back of the throat and far inside the nose. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - March 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Patterns of referral for fractured nose during major sporting events: a 10-year follow up - Hamrang-Yousefi S, Kingsley-Smith H, Munroe-Gray T, Anyanechi M, Rollin M.
INTRODUCTION: Nasal fracture is a common form of ear, nose and throat (ENT) trauma with prompt referral required for assessment and potentially manipulation of nasal bones. The aetiology of nasal fracture is multifactorial, and injury occurs across all age... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Had Sinus Surgery? Better Skip Nasal Swab COVID Test
TUESDAY, March 9, 2021 -- If you've had major sinus or skull base surgery, you should talk with your ear, nose and throat doctor before getting a COVID-19 nasal swab test, researchers advise. It's also crucial for health workers performing swab... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 8, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Special Collection - Chronic suppurative otitis media: effectiveness of non-surgical treatments
Supported byCochrane Ear ,Nose and Throat anew Cochrane Library Special Collection curates the latest Cochrane evidence on non-surgical treatments for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM).  CSOM is estimated to have a global incidence of 31 million episodes per year, disproportionately affecting people at socio-economic disadvantage.  Many people who are affected by CSOM do not have good access to modern primary healthcare, let alone specialised ear, nose and throat care. Given this evidence need, Cochrane ENT have prioritized the production of systematic reviews on non-surgical treatments for CSOM. This up-to...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - March 2, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Who Gets Pott ’ s Puffy Tumor?
Discussion Pott’s puffy tumor (PPT) was first described by Sir Percivall Pott in 1775 and who also described other orthopaedic and oncological diseases subsequently named for him. “It is a subperiosteal abscess of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus associated with underlying frontal osteomyelitis.” The tender edema and swelling of the forehead is the sign of PPT. Associated fever, headache, and rhinorrhea along with similar problems such as postnasal drip or nasal congestion are common. Associated ophthalmological problems include peri-orbital or eyelid edema and/or preseptal cellulitis. Ptosis and di...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - March 1, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

China Deploys Anal Swab Tests To Detect High-Risk Covid-19 Cases
Experts say the test, rolled out before millions are expected to travel for the Lunar New Year, could be more accurate than throat and nose swabs. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 27, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Hart, Forbes Staff Tags: Business /business Policy /policy Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Science /science Editors' Pick editors-pick Breaking breaking-news Coronavirus Source Type: news

What Causes Lethargy?
Discussion Lethargy is a common word used to describe a person who is drowsy, sluggish, listless and apathetic. Concentration may be difficult and they may have problems doing simple tasks. Many people actual mean fatigue or lassitude or being more tired when they use the word. In medical terms, lethargy is usually used to describe patients who have some type of excessive tiredness and usually have mental status changes with decreased alertness or arousal. Patients and health care providers both usually qualify the term and give more description to better communicate what is implied when using the term. This is true of man...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 25, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

CDC: Flu continues to have 'low' impact as COVID-19 pandemic rages
The effects of the seasonal flu in the United States remain " lower than usual for this time of year, " with just 0.1% of nose and throat samples tested nationally coming back positive for the virus, according to the CDC. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cochrane ENT vs COVID-19 - Providing targeted evidence for clinicians
Healthcare workers supporting people with ear, nose and throat (ENT) issues needed to know how COVID-19 may impact on their care and how to protect themselves from infection when providing this.Cochrane ENT wanted to use their team ’s skills to curate and deliver targeted evidence to support healthcare professionals and patients.Cochrane ENT drew together an online repository of guidance and evidence about caring for people with ear, nose, throat, hearing and balance problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. They also worked with Cochrane Oral Health to fast-track three systematic reviews, are undertaking living systema...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - January 22, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Saliva-based COVID-19 tests as accurate as those using nose, throat samples
COVID-19 tests that use patients' saliva to screen for the virus are just as effective as those that use swabs collected from the nose and throat, an analysis published by JAMA Internal Medicine found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Past COVID-19 infection provides some immunity but people may still carry and transmit virus
People infected with COVID-19 in the past are likely to be protected against reinfection for at least 5 months, a Public Health England (PHE) study has found, although experts cautioned those with immunity may still be able carry the virus in their nose and throat and therefore have a risk of transmitting to others. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - January 15, 2021 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Past COVID-19 infection provides some immunity but people may still carry and transmit virus, PHE
People infected with COVID-19 in the past are likely to be protected against reinfection for several months, a Public Health England () study has found, although experts cautioned those with immunity may still be able carry the virus in their nose and throat and therefore have a risk of transmitting to others. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FAU develops simplified COVID-19 diagnostic method to ramp up widespread testing
(Florida Atlantic University) A simplified COVID-19 testing protocol can detect minimal quantities of the SARS-CoV-2 using samples from the nose and throat as well as saliva and may be useful in testing patients with low viral titers such as asymptomatic patients or testing individuals prior to quarantine release. The high sensitivity method can be used in laboratories with minimal molecular biology equipment and expertise, and enables several patient samples to be pooled, decreasing the number of tests required for larger populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Disposable helmet retains cough droplets, minimizes transmission to dentists
(American Institute of Physics) Dentists and otolaryngologists are at particular risk of infection of COVID-19, since they need direct access to the mouth, nose, and throat of patients. The current solutions are expensive, not highly effective, and not very accessible. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their design of an open-faced helmet that is connected to a medical-grade air filtration pump from the top that creates a reverse flow of air to prevent cough droplets from exiting the helmet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Consumer Health: It's flu season -- have you been vaccinated?
Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system, including your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza is commonly called the flu, but it's not the same as stomach flu, which is an intestinal infection marked by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea or vomiting, and sometimes fever. For most people, the flu resolves on its own. But [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Here ’s Why Vaccinated People Still Need to Wear a Mask
The new vaccines will probably prevent you from getting sick with Covid. No one knows yet whether they will keep you from spreading the virus to others — but that information is coming. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: your-feed-science Clinical Trials Tests (Medical) Preventive Medicine Nose Antibodies Disease Rates Immune System Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Throat Influenza AstraZeneca PLC Johnson & Moderna Inc Pfizer Inc Source Type: news

What You Need to Know About COVID-19 and Flu
Every winter is a bit of a roulette wheel when it comes to influenza. Flu vaccines work, but aren’t 100% effective in preventing disease, so it’s always a challenge convincing people to get their flu shots. And while the symptoms are generally bearable, infections can become more severe and even deadly among people who are older or who have underlying health conditions. Last flu season, even though experts considered it a relatively mild year, about 400,000 people in the U.S. were hospitalized and 22,000 people died from the flu. This winter, the influenza virus has a rival—the coronavirus fueling the COV...
Source: TIME: Health - December 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Do physical measures such as hand ‐washing or wearing masks stop or slow down the spread of respiratory viruses? What are respiratory viruses? Respiratory viruses are viruses that infect the cells in your airways: nose, throat, and lungs. These infections can cause serious problems and affect normal breathing. They can cause flu (influenza), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and COVID‐19. How do respiratory viruses spread? People infected with a respiratory virus spread virus particles into the air when they cough or sneeze. Other people become infected if they come into contact with these virus particles in th...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Govt authorises post-grad Ayurveda practitioners to be trained to perform surgical procedures
The notification by the Central Council of Indian Medicine, a statutory body under the AYUSH Ministry to regulate the Indian systems of medicine, listed 39 general surgery procedures and around 19 procedures involving the eye, ear, nose and throat by amending the Indian Medicine Central Council (Post Graduate Ayurveda Education) Regulations, 2016. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - November 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Covid or flu? Bothell firm makes test that can tell the difference
Elitech Group submitted a coronavirus test manufactured at its facility in Bothell to the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use authorization, the company announced this week. Elitech’s product is a four-in-one diagnostic test that detects and differentiates the coronavirus from other common flus, such as influenza A and B and respiratory syncytial virus. The test requires a sample from the nose or throat. It is designed for diagnostic laboratories that collect sampl es from health care… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 20, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Nat Rubio-Licht Source Type: news

Covid or flu? Bothell firm makes test that can tell the difference
Elitech Group submitted a coronavirus test manufactured at its facility in Bothell to the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use authorization, the company announced this week. Elitech’s product is a four-in-one diagnostic test that detects and differentiates the coronavirus from other common flus, such as influenza A and B and respiratory syncytial virus. The test requires a sample from the nose or throat. It is designed for diagnostic laboratories that collect sampl es from health care… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 20, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Nat Rubio-Licht Source Type: news

How accurate are routine laboratory tests for diagnosis of COVID-19?
What are routine laboratory tests?Routine laboratory tests are blood tests that assess the health status of a patient. Tests include counts of different types of white blood cells (these help the body fight infection), and detection of markers (proteins) that indicate organ damage, and general inflammation. These tests are widely available and in some places they may be the only tests available for diagnosis of COVID-19.What did the authors want to find out?People with suspected COVID-19 need to know quickly whether they are infected so that they can self-isolate, receive treatment, and inform close contacts.Currently, the...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 19, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rachel Klabunde Source Type: news

Featured Review: Physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses
An updated Cochrane review published today in the Cochrane Library summarizes randomized trial evidence about face masks, hand washing and physical distancing to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses. The review will inform revised guidance due to be released by the World Health Organisation.  Lisa Bero, Cochrane Public Health and Health Systems Senior Editor and an author on anEditorial published to accompany this review said, “The results of this review should be interpreted cautiously, and the uncertain findings should not be taken as evidence that these measures are not effective. Most of the...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rachel Klabunde Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Feeling better when you have the flu
Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system -- your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza is commonly called the flu, but it's not the same as stomach flu, which is an intestinal infection marked by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea or vomiting, and sometimes fever. For most people, the flu resolves on its [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - November 5, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Is It a Cold, the Flu, Allergies, or COVID-19?
Respiratory illnesses can share  so many of the same symptoms -- a fever, chills, coughing, tiredness, a sore throat, body aches, a headache, and a stuffed nose -- so it's not easy to tell the difference. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctor Explains Why You Should Avoid Thanksgiving, Christmas Gatherings: ‘ Not Worth The Risk ’
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Travel & Outdoors Christmas Holiday Travel Holidays Katie Johnston Thanksgiving Source Type: news

Thanksgiving, Christmas Gatherings: ‘ Not Worth The Risk ’
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Travel & Outdoors Christmas Holiday Travel Holidays Katie Johnston Thanksgiving Source Type: news

The greatest tragedy of England's second wave is that it wasn't inevitable | Charlotte Summers
Over the summer, the government ignored advice about controlling Covid. A new study shows we ’re paying the priceThe number of Covid infections is doubling every nine days in England, and in some areas, such as the south-east, London and the south-west, the R number is now above two. These are the alarming findings from thereport of theReact-1 study by researchers at Imperial College London, released today.The study, which obtained nose and throat swabs from a random sample of the population in England that were analysed using a “gold standard” PCR test, shows the prevalence of coronavirus infection in En...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Charlotte Summers Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Politics NHS Health UK news Society Medical research Source Type: news

At-Home Saliva Tests for COVID-19 Could Be Coming Soon
There is a universe of ways to get tested for COVID-19, and each has its pros and cons. Most, however, require a medical professional to insert a long, flexible swab up your nose to sample the back of your throat in an invasive, painful and unpleasant procedure. It’s reliable, yes, but not the most encouraging way to convince people to get tested. Saliva-based tests are likely much more welcome. Most people can spit into a container at home and so don’t need to go to a health clinic or drive-through testing facility—a plus when an infectious disease is roaming the world—and it doesn’t involve ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Medico-legal aspects of otorhinolaryngeal, face and neck injuries in Upper Egypt: a prospective analysis and retrospective evaluation of claimed disabilities - Omran GA, Ragaey MA, El Shehaby DM.
BACKGROUND: Trauma to the ear, nose, throat and face regions is of medicolegal importance as these regions are vulnerable to injury and often associated with mortality and varying degrees of physical, functional and psychological damages. The long-run comp... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Featured Review: Thoracic imaging tests for the diagnosis of COVID-19
How accurate is chest imaging for diagnosing COVID-19?Why is this question important?People with suspected COVID-19 need to know quickly whether they are infected, so that they can self-isolate, receive treatment, and inform close contacts. Currently, formal diagnosis of COVID-19 infection requires laboratory analysis of blood or nose and throat samples. The laboratory test, called RT-PCR, requires specialist equipment and takes at least 24 hours to produce a result. Further, RT-PCR is not completely accurate and a second RT-PCR or a different test may be required to confirm the diagnosis.COVID-19 is a respiratory infectio...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 29, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rachel Klabunde Source Type: news

Updated Review: Thoracic imaging tests for the diagnosis of COVID-19
How accurate is chest imaging for diagnosing COVID-19?Why is this question important?People with suspected COVID-19 need to know quickly whether they are infected, so they can receive appropriate treatment, self-isolate, and inform close contacts. Currently, formal diagnosis of COVID-19 requires a laboratory test (RT-PCR) of nose and throat samples. RT-PCR requires specialist equipment and takes at least 24 hours to produce a result. It is not completely accurate, and may require a second RT-PCR or a different test to confirm diagnosis. COVID-19 is a respiratory disease. Clinicians may use chest imaging to diagnose people ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 29, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rachel Klabunde Source Type: news

Poll Finds 1 In 3 Parents Won ’ t Get Children Vaccinated For The Flu This Year
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Flu Vaccine Source Type: news

' Silent' COVID-19 Produces as Much Virus as in Patients With Symptoms: Study
FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2020 -- People who have COVID-19 but no symptoms have the same amount of virus in their nose and throat as those with symptoms and may play a major role in spreading the disease, a new study reveals. The researchers compared... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 25, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Can mouthwashes or nasal sprays protect healthcare workers and patients from COVID-19 infection?
Three new reviews have published on mouthwashes/nasal sprays to protect healthcare workers and patients from COVID-19 infection. Healthcare workers are at the forefront of the COVID-19 crisis, with repeated exposure to individuals who are, or may be, infected, and are therefore at risk themselves.These workers may be especially at risk when undertaking'aerosol-generating procedures'(AGPs). This is any medical, dental or patient-care procedure that results in the production of airborne particles (aerosols) from the upper aerodigestive tract (mouth, nose, throat, oesophagus) and lower respiratory tract where the virus is she...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

British-made surgical PPE device rolls out free to NHS
(Aston University) An innovative device designed to stop patients accidentally spreading coronavirus to ear, nose and throat surgeons is rolling out free to NHS clinics across the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do you know if the wildfires are making you sick?
The wildfires raging throughout California and Oregon have caused great concern about air quality and the safety of being outdoors. And dealing with the public health implications of the fires is further complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic.  Dr. Reza Ronaghi, a pulmonologist at the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, explains how wildfires affect air quality and what precautions people can take during the pandemic to limit exposure to smoke and other fire-generated toxins in the air.How do you know if the wildfires are making you sick?If you are healthy, minimal exposure to wildfires – such as experi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A cold, flu or coronavirus - which one do I have?
A blocked or runny nose, a sore throat and a cough are common, especially in the winter. But how do you know if you have coronavirus? (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nasal swab followed by antibody test may catch incorrect Covid-19 diagnoses
Use of dual testing could help as swabs miss around 30%-50% of infections, say UK researchersCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageTesting people twice for the coronavirus, with a nasal swab followed by an antibody finger prick test, would catch most of those people who fail to get the right Covid-19 diagnosis, researchers believe.Nose and throat swabs miss around 30% to 50% of infections, say the University of Cambridge team, as the virus can disappear from the upper respiratory tract into the lungs. But they say adding an antibody test can plug that gap. Antibodies show up from about six days ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news World news Source Type: news

Featured Review: Rapid, point-of-care antigen and molecular-based tests for diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection
How accurate are rapid tests, performed during a health-care visit (point-of-care), for diagnosing COVID-19?Why is this question important?People with suspected COVID-19 need to know quickly whether they are infected, so that they can self-isolate, receive treatment, and inform close contacts. Currently, COVID-19 infection is confirmed by sending away samples, taken from the nose and throat, for laboratory testing. The laboratory test, called RT-PCR, requires specialist equipment, may require repeat healthcare visits, and typically takes at least 24 hours to produce a result.Rapid point-of-care tests can provide a result &...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 25, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rachel Klabunde Source Type: news

What to Know About COVID-19 Tests, from PCR to Antigen to Antibody
People often talk about COVID-19 testing like it means only one thing. But in reality, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has so far granted emergency-use authorization to more than 200 different tests meant to detect a current or past infection from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Most recently, the agency made headlines for approving the first such test that uses saliva samples, the aptly named SalivaDirect test out of the Yale School of Public Health. These COVID-19 tests fall into three main categories: PCR, antigen and antibody. Dr. Aneesh Mehta, chief of infectious diseases services at Emory Univ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Doctor invents hybrid mask allowing ENT doctors to see more patients
(TechLink) An ear, nose, and throat doctor has invented a simple mask design that significantly improves safety during aerosol-generating procedures of the head and neck. The VA is seeking a company to commercialize it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Toward a coronavirus breathalyzer test
(American Chemical Society) Few people who have undergone nasopharyngeal swabs for coronavirus testing would describe it as a pleasant experience. The procedure involves sticking a long swab up the nose to collect a sample from the back of the nose and throat, which is then analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Now, researchers reporting inACS Nano have developed a prototype device that non-invasively detected COVID-19 in the exhaled breath of infected patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 19, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news