American Cancer Society awards 'Shine A Light' Funds to neuroblastoma researcher
(American Cancer Society) The American Cancer Society has selected Dr. Andras Heczey of Texas Children's Cancer Center as the recipient of a four-year grant funded by TODAY Show viewers through its 'Shine A Light' campaign. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 16, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Hope for Kids with Neuroblastoma
(Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features)
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 15, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Grant to CHOP funds personalized treatments for children with neuroblastoma
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) A new $1.5 million grant to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation supports an innovative approach to treating relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma, a high-risk childhood cancer. CHOP researchers are launching a pediatric clinical trial with a dynamic design allowing them to quickly incorporate new treatments by matching gene changes in an individual patient's tumor to available drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Change in a single DNA base drives a childhood cancer
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Pediatric oncology researchers have pinpointed a crucial change in a single DNA base that both predisposes children to an aggressive form of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma and makes the disease progress once tumors form. The gene change results in a 'super enhancer' that drives the cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 11, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Promising results in study of pediatric neuroblastoma
Scientists have identified a new treatment approach for a highly aggressive and usually fatal subtype of neuroblastoma. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A way to target the Achilles heel of neuroblastoma
(Children's Cancer Institute Australia) Australian scientists have identified a critical molecular 'feedback loop' that helps initiate and drive neuroblastoma, a cancer of the nervous system in children that is triggered in embryonal nerve cells. The research team have also identified an experimental drug, currently in clinical trials for adult cancer, with the potential to interrupt the loop and halt tumor progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 4, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Childhood cancer: ‘Little Miss Sunshine’ who beat her aggressive disease
IN RECENT weeks viewers of Coronation Street have seen actress Jennie McAlpine’s character, Fiz Stape, plunged into a nightmare as her five-year-old daughter Hope battles neuroblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Blastoma: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatments
Find out what blastoma is and about its numerous types such as neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma. Also learn how blastomas are almost always treatable. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer-driving signals cause high-risk neuroblastoma
Researchers have discovered details of the abnormal molecular signals and biological events that drive a high-risk form of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. Having investigated a signaling network involving three cancer-causing genes, the scientists aim to use these findings to develop more effective targeted treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 15, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cancer-driving signals cause high-risk neuroblastoma
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers have discovered details of the abnormal molecular signals and biological events that drive a high-risk form of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. Having investigated a signaling network involving three cancer-causing genes, the scientists aim to use these findings to develop more effective targeted treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 15, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Analyses of Tumor Burden In Vivo and Metastasis Ex Vivo Using Luciferase-Expressing Cancer Cells in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma
Cancer xenograft mouse models are useful for examining and understanding tumor growth and cancer progression in vivo. With the development of bioluminescent imaging, these parameters can now be monitored noninvasively with relative ease. Herein we describe imaging of luciferase-expressing cancer cells to quantitatively measure tumor burden in vivo and metastases ex vivo. Specifically, we detail the methodology to examine the effect of shRNA-mediated knockdown of a target gene on the growth and spread of neuroblastoma tumors in immune-deficient mice. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Imaging/Radiology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Imaging/Radiology - October 11, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Orphan-Drug Designation From FDA And Positive Scientific Advice From EMA
Ability Pharmaceuticals, a drug development biopharmaceutical company specialized in oncology, recently announced that it has received from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), orphan-drug designation (ODD) for ABTL0812, its PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitor, for the treatment of the pediatric cancer neuroblastoma and that it has received positive Scientific Advice from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for its development in the same indication. (Source: Pharmaceutical Online News)
Source: Pharmaceutical Online News - October 9, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Rosannah Searle with tumour the size of a soccer ball and weighing 8 kilos
Rosannah Searle, from Baradine, NSW, was diagnosed with stage three neuroblastoma at just three months old. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why United Therapeutics is selling priority review voucher
United Therapeutics (Nasdaq: UTHR) is selling a voucher designed to speed up approval for rare pediatric disease treatments to Chicago-based pharmaceutical company AbbVie Inc. for $350 million. The Wall Street Journal reports the Silver Spring-based biotechnology company landed the voucher when it received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for Unituxin, its drug designed to treat neuroblastoma. The voucher is part of an FDA incentive program designed to encourage drug development for… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 19, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Nycz-Conner Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Neuroblastoma cancer cells weaken immune system 'like kryptonite'
A molecule found in the cancer cells of neuroblastoma act like 'kryptonite’ to weaken the body's immune system, a new study reveals, making them lethargic and ineffective. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Childhood cancer cells drain immune system's batteries
(Cancer Research UK) Cancer cells in neuroblastoma contain a molecule that breaks down a key energy source for the body's immune cells, leaving them too physically drained to fight the disease, according to new research published in the journal Cancer Research today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Devon Still Accepts Jimmy V Perseverance Award On Behalf Of Daughter Leah
  Devon Still accepted the Jimmy V Perseverance Award at the 2015 ESPYs on Wednesday on behalf of his 5-year-old daughter, Leah, who has struggled over the past year with a particularly dangerous form of pediatric cancer.  "When my daughter was first diagnosed with cancer, I felt like I was in a nightmare," he told the audience. After thanking his team and his fiancé for standing by him, the Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle took the time to specifically thank Leah.  "I know you wish you could be here, but I know you're watching. I just want to thank you," he said....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New drug for neuroblastoma shows promise in phase I study
(Spectrum Health) Researchers at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have completed the first clinical trial of a new treatment for children suffering from neuroblastoma. In a clinical trial led by Giselle Sholler, M.D., and the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium, DFMO, an investigational agent, showed minimal side effects with long-term survival of three patients. This is the first clinical study of an oral dosing form of DFMO in any pediatric population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 1, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pinpointing mutations in a relapsed children's cancer may lead to improved treatments
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers studying the pediatric cancer neuroblastoma have detailed how cancer-driving mutations evolve during chemotherapy, and they hope to exploit this knowledge to design better treatments for children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

TGen, Dell expand pediatric cancer fight to Europe and Middle East
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) Dell today announced its extended partnership with the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) to help clinical researchers and doctors globally expand the reach and impact of the world's first FDA-approved precision medicine trial for pediatric cancer. The renewed commitment includes an additional $3 million Dell grant to support continued collaboration with TGen and support the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium's expanded pediatric cancer clinical trials in EMEA, starting with sites in France and Lebanon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Is it Safe to Use G-CSF in Neuroblastoma Patients?Is it Safe to Use G-CSF in Neuroblastoma Patients?
A new study suggests that granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor (G-CSF) promotes the growth of cancer stem cells within neuroblastoma. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Green Light for Cancer Immunotherapies in Europe Green Light for Cancer Immunotherapies in Europe
The EU authorities have recommended for approval pembrolizumab for melanoma, nivolumab for lung cancer, and dinutuximab for neuroblastoma. News Alerts (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - May 23, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

An Award-Winning Cancer Researcher Says U.S. Science Has Never Been More Imperiled
WASHINGTON -- Around 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, 150 or so people gathered in an otherwise empty National Press Club in downtown D.C. Hours earlier, in the room down the hall, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) had drawn throngs of press during an appearance before the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Now, none remained. Instead, attendees still in their work attire sat around tables sipping wine and eating moderately moist chicken dinners, waiting to hear from the guest of the night, a doctor from the Boston Children's Hospital whom few in D.C. -- outside those walls -- knew of. Dr. Frederick Alt, a 66-year-old Harvard professor of gene...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

[Research Article] Temporal proteomics of NGF-TrkA signaling identifies an inhibitory role for the E3 ligase Cbl-b in neuroblastoma cell differentiation
Proteomic analysis of neurotrophin signaling identifies an inhibitory E3 ubiquitin ligase. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - April 27, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Kristina B. Emdal, Anna-Kathrine Pedersen, Dorte B. Bekker-Jensen, Kalliopi P. Tsafou, Heiko Horn, Sven Lindner, Johannes H. Schulte, Angelika Eggert, Lars J. Jensen, Chiara Francavilla, Jesper V. Olsen Source Type: news

Maternal stress increases development of fetal neuroblastoma in animal model
Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center have shown in mice genetically predisposed to develop neuroblastoma that maternal stress can push onset of the cancer. Their study was presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015. Medical News Today (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 22, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Maternal stress increases development of fetal neuroblastoma in animal model
While genetics play a substantial role in development of neuroblastoma, scientists say that something else is in play that elevates the risk: stress. Researchers have shown in mice genetically predisposed to develop neuroblastoma that maternal stress can push onset of the cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A common nerve protein elevated in aggressive neuroblastomas
A protein produced by nerve cells appears to be elevated in the blood of those with an aggressive form of neuroblastoma. The finding could potentially lead to a prognostic test for the disease or be used to monitor its progress. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Boy beats cancer donning Ninja Turtles costume for bravery
Harley Renshaw, five, from Manchester, is overjoyed to find out he is free of cancer, after battling an aggressive and rare neuroblastoma for a year. He donned a Ninja Turtles mask to feel brave during radiotherapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nanoparticles may exploit tumor weaknesses to selectively attack cancers
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Delving into the world of the extremely small, researchers are exploring how biodegradable nanoparticles can precisely deliver anticancer drugs to attack neuroblastoma, an often-deadly children's cancer. The approach may represent a new fourth arm of targeted pediatric cancer treatment, joining T-cell immunotherapy, radioactive isotopes and kinase inhibitors that disrupt cancer-driving signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 2, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Microenvironment provides growth factor for metastasis
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) When a person has cancer that spreads to the bone and bone marrow, the tissue becomes increasingly fragile, often leading to increased bone resorption. In a surprising discovery, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that when neuroblastoma cells metastasize to the bone, there initially occurs an increase in bone deposition, not resorption. They also determined that this process is driven by a chemical messenger called VEGFA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Unituxin Approved for Deadly Pediatric Cancer
Neuroblastoma typically strikes children under age 5 (Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - March 12, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma Approved by FDAFirst Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma Approved by FDA
Dinutuximab, an antibody targeting glycolipids on the neuroblastoma cell, used in combination with other therapies has been shown to improve survival. FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - March 10, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

FDA approves United Therapeutics' drug for treating cancer in children
(Reuters) - The Food and Drug Administration said it approved United Therapeutics Corp's drug to treat neuroblastoma, a rare cancer that typically occurs in children below 5 years. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

FDA Okays Neuroblastoma Drug for Kids
(MedPage Today) -- Monoclonal antibody approved as part of first-line therapy for pediatric neuroblastoma. (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - March 10, 2015 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

NeuroBreak: 'Your Brain on Drugs' Not So Bad? New Neuroblastoma Rx
(MedPage Today) -- News and commentary from the world of neurology and neuroscience. (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - March 10, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Unituxin Approved for Deadly Pediatric Cancer
Neuroblastoma typically strikes children under age 5 (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 10, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Oncology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, FDA Approvals, Source Type: news

Unituxin Approved for Deadly Pediatric Cancer
Neuroblastoma typically strikes children under age 5 Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Medicines, Neuroblastoma (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA approves first therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Unituxin (dinutuximab) as part of first-line therapy for pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma, a type of cancer that most often occurs in young children. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - March 10, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Vanessa Moss' parents bid to raise £400k for pioneering treatment in New York
Vanessa Moss was just four-years-old when she was diagnosed with neuroblastoma - a rare and aggressive form of childhood cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A novel immunotherapy technique to treat patients with osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma
(Solving Kids' Cancer) A novel phase 1 clinical trial that leverages T-cell immunotherapy is now under way at Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, bringing new hope to children and young adults with osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma. This new clinical trial is being funded by charity partners Solving Kids' Cancer and Fishin' For The Cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why death of Jake Croft shows you must never dismiss a child's aches as 'growing pains' 
Jake Croft from Barnsley, South Yorkshire was four-and-a-half when he passed away last October. He had advanced-stage neuroblastoma, an aggressive children's cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Department of Defense Doubles Cancer Research Funding in 2015
Doctors and researchers seeking a cure for mesothelioma will soon be able to tap into millions of dollars set aside by the U.S. Department of Defense for cancer research. The Office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) invested $50 million in the Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP) for 2015 — an amount that doubles the money awarded to the program last year. With the additional funding, asbestos-related cancer researchers can extend current studies and launch new ones to improve traditional treatments, introduce emerging therapies or test new cancer drugs. Funding in 2014 was $25 m...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 5, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Alternative DNA repair mechanism could provide better treatment for neuroblastoma in kids
(University of Michigan Health System) Targeting DNA repair pathways could provide new treatment options for children with high-risk cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 21, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Alex's Lemonade Stand tops $100M fund-raising mark
The Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation has surpassed the $100 million fundraising mark. The Wynnewood, Pa., nonprofit organization grew out of a front yard lemonade stand started by cancer patient Alexandra "Alex" Scott, who lost her battle with cancer in 2004 at 8 years old. Alex had neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer. She was born in Connecticut, but moved to Wynnewood to be closer to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where she was being treated. Alex started selling lemonade in her… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 15, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Father arrested in Australia for successfully treating his dying cancer-ridden toddler with cannabis oil
(NaturalNews) On Christmas Eve in 2014, two-year-old Rumer Rose Maujean was diagnosed with stage IV neuroblastoma cancer, a rare solid tumor disease that occurs mostly in children under five years of age. Neuroblastoma is a cancer that attacks the nervous system's channel along the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Antibiotic Version May Eliminate Hearing Loss Risk
On Christmas Eve, 2002, Bryce Faber was diagnosed with a deadly cancer called neuroblastoma. The 2-year-old's treatment, which, in addition to surgery, included massive amounts of radiation followed by even more massive amounts of antibiotics, no doubt saved his life. But those same mega-doses of antibiotics, while staving off infections in his immunosuppressed body, caused a permanent side effect: deafness. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - January 5, 2015 Category: Disability Tags: Pharmaceutical Source Type: news

For one child, cancer recovery ends with parade
On New Year's Day, a mom and her adopted son will celebrate their victory over neuroblastoma aboard a float at the Rose Parade (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Thriving 2014: A look back
Looking back on 2014, I find it incredibly difficult to select the top stories of the year. It seems every patient and every caregiver has a magical, very real and wholly inspirational story to share. From tiny newborns to celebrities and professional athletes to healers, there is no shortage of heroes here at Boston Children’s. It’s a privilege to play a small role in sharing their journeys. Here’s to looking back and looking ahead to a healthy and happy new year. Cancer diagnosis can’t shake these first-time parents Early last year, we first met Joey Lauzon, an adorable newborn with bright eyes an...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 31, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Source Type: news

Child Neuroblastoma Survivors at Risk for Psych Impairment
Psychological impairment seen particularly in those with chronic health conditions (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - November 11, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Neurology, Oncology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

Classification of gene mutations in a children's cancer may point to improved treatments
Oncology researchers studying gene mutations in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are refining their diagnostic tools to predict which patients are more likely to respond to drugs called ALK inhibitors that target such mutations. Removing some of the guesswork in diagnosis and treatment may lead to more successful outcomes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 10, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news