Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Distinct proteomic, transcriptomic and epigenetic stress-responses in dorsal and ventral hippocampus
Acutely stressful experiences can trigger neuropsychiatric disorders and impair cognitive processes, by altering hippocampal function. Although the intrinsic organization of the hippocampus is highly conserved throughout its long dorsal-ventral axis, the dorsal (anterior) hippocampus mediates spatial navigation and memory formation, whereas the ventral (posterior) hippocampus is involved in emotion regulation. To understand the molecular consequences of stress, detailed genome-wide screens are necessary and need to distinguish between dorsal and ventral hippocampus. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amalia Floriou-Servou, Lukas von Ziegler, Luzia Stalder, Oliver Sturman, Mattia Privitera, Anahita Rassi, Alessio Cremonesi, Beat Th öny, Johannes Bohacek Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Default mode connectivity in major depressive disorder measured up to 10 days after ketamine administration
This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the effect of a single ketamine infusion on the resting state default mode network (DMN) at two and 10 days after a single ketamine infusion in unmedicated MDD subjects as well as healthy controls (HCs). (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jennifer W. Evans, Joanna Szczepanik, Nancy Brutsch é, Lawrence T. Park, Allison C. Nugent, Carlos A. Zarate Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Translating Schizophrenia Population Genetics Findings to Neurobiological Mechanisms: The Case of KALRN-9
In the “post–genome-wide association study era,” we are increasingly being faced with the question: so what’s next? How do we derive biological meaning from single nucleotide variants (SNVs)? In this issue of Biological Psychiatry, Russell et al. (1) explore the neurobiological impact of a rare SN V (rs143835330, kalirin [KALRN] gene) associated with schizophrenia, on neuron morphology, protein function, and transcript stability. Their approach represents one informative way of inferring how genetic risk mechanisms impinge upon the brain. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Timothy R. Powell Tags: Early Career Investigator Commentary Source Type: research

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: A Promising Biomarker for Antipsychotic Treatment?
The major inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is thought to play a role in the pathophysiology of numerous psychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Although hypotheses of GABA dysfunction in schizophrenia extend back more than 4 decades (1) and have evolved into a cogent, well-accepted conceptual framework (2), there remains sparse in  vivo supporting evidence. Most evidence supporting an abnormal GABA system in schizophrenia spectrum disorders stems from postmortem brain studies that consistently reported diminished messenger RNA or protein of the GABA-synthesizing en...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Laura M. Rowland, S. Andrea Wijtenburg Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

The Ups and Downs of Thalamocortical Connectivity in Schizophrenia
In this issue of Biological Psychiatry, Giraldo-Chica et  al. (1) replicate and expand on findings in one of the most rapidly evolving stories about functional connectivity abnormalities in psychiatry. Using probabilistic tractography of diffusion-weighted images, they hypothesized that mediodorsal (MD) thalamus connections to the prefrontal cortex (PFC) would be reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and that this would relate to impairments in cognitive control. Their study therefore takes an important next step in understanding this crucial circuit. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ian S. Ramsay, Angus W. MacDonald Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Excitatory Amino Acids in Schizophrenia: Both What You Have, and What You Do With Them
Excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmitters, including glutamate, glycine, and D-serine, have been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. As pointed out by Kim et  al. (1), symptoms of schizophrenia in general resemble the pattern associated with reduced activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). The basis for the reduction at present is unknown and may involve causes as a diverse as reduced integrity of pre- and postsynaptic glutamate terminals, reduced neurotransmitter concentrations, or increased concentration of endogenous antagonists (2). (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Daniel C. Javitt Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

In This Issue
Volume 83, Number 6, March 15, 2018 (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: In This Issue Source Type: research

Editorial Board Page
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Subscribers Page
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Guide for Authors
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Increased alcohol seeking in mice lacking Gpr88 involves dysfunctional mesocorticolimbic networks
Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs) are devastating and poorly treated, and innovative targets are actively sought for prevention and treatment. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR88 is enriched in mesocorticolimbic pathways, and Gpr88 knockout mice show hyperactivity and risk-taking behavior, but a potential role for this receptor in drug abuse has not been examined. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Sami Ben Hamida, Sueli Netto, Tanzil Mahmud Arefin, Md. Taufiq Nasseef, Laura-Joy Boulos, Michael McNicholas, Aliza Toby Ehrlich, Eleanor Clarke, Luc Moquin, Alain Gratton, Emmanuel Darcq, Harsan Laura Adela, Rafael Maldonado, Brigitte Lina Kieffer Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Conference Report: ‘Psychiatric Genomics Consortium meeting: Pathways to Drugs’ London, March 2017
The Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC; https://pgc.www.med.unc.edu/pgc) is delivering an increasing flow of discoveries about the fundamental basis of psychiatric disorders. Moving from discovery of GWAS loci towards delivering new therapeutic approaches is a challenge which requires a new wave of multidisciplinary work and close liaison between academia and industry. The PGC has recently initiated a new research program to deliver “actionable” findings that (a) reveal the fundamental biology of psychiatric disorders, (b) inform clinical practice, and (c) deliver new therapeutic targets. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: H éléna A. Gaspar, David A. Collier, Daniel H. Geschwind, Cathryn M. Lewis, Qingqin Li, Bryan Roth, Patrick Sullivan, Gerome Breen Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Habits are negatively regulated by histone deacetylase 3 in the dorsal striatum
Optimal behavior and decision making result from a balance of control between two strategies, one cognitive/goal-directed and one habitual. These systems are known to rely on the anatomically distinct dorsomedial (DMS) and dorsolateral (DLS) striatum, respectively. But the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms required to learn and transition between these strategies are unknown. Here we examined the role of one chromatin-based transcriptional regulator, histone modification via histone deacetylases (HDACs), in this process. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Melissa Malvaez, Venuz Y. Greenfield, Dina P. Matheos, Nicolas A. Angelillis, Michael D. Murphy, Pamela J. Kennedy, Marcelo A. Wood, Kate. M. Wassum Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Importance of statistical methods for assessing performance and moderator effects in neuroimaging-based classification models
In our recent publication, we report a meta-analysis of the diagnostic performance of neuroimaging-based classification models for the differentiation of patients with a depressive disorder from healthy control individuals https://paperpile.com/c/AGY9NR/nGdv(1). In summary, our results indicate that across studies patients can be identified with an estimated accuracy of 77 %. Moderator analysis provided some evidence for effects of moderating factors including neuroimaging modality. However, despite theoretical arguments and similar findings in comparable analyses in schizophrenia https://paperpile.com/c/AGY9NR/C57a+6hON(2...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joseph Kambeitz, Carlos Cabral, Matthew D. Sacchet, Ian H. Gotlib, Roland Zahn, Mauricio H. Serpa, Martin Walter, Peter Falkai, Nikolaos Koutsouleris Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Sample size, model robustness, and classification accuracy in diagnostic multivariate neuroimaging analyses
The interesting article by Kambeitz et al. (1), published September 1st in Biological Psychiatry, contributes an important meta-analysis on diagnostic single-subject classification of depression using structural and functional neuroimaging. The authors found about 77 % balanced classification accuracy across imaging studies and argued these results be robust against potential confounds such as age, gender, or sample size. The latter, however, is almost uniformly recognized as a most important factor for generating robust models during classifier training, which, in turn, are presupposed to obtain reliable classification re...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Andres H. Neuhaus, Florin Popescu Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Noncoding RNAs: Stress, Glucocorticoids and PTSD
Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a pathological response to trauma that impacts ∼8% of the population and is highly comorbid with other disorders, such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). PTSD affects multiple biological systems throughout the body, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis), cortical function, and the immune system, and while the study of the biological underpinnings of PTSD and related disorders are numerous, the roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are just emerging. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Nikolaos P. Daskalakis, Allison C. Provost, Richard G. Hunter, Guia Guffanti Tags: Review Source Type: research

A Mitochondrial Health Index Sensitive to Mood and Caregiving Stress
Chronic life stress, such as the stress of caregiving, can promote pathophysiology, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Chronic stress may induce recalibrations in mitochondria leading to either changes in mitochondrial content per cell, or in mitochondrial functional capacity (i.e., quality). (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Martin Picard, Aric A. Prather, Eli Puterman, Alexanne Cuillerier, Michael Coccia, Kirstin Aschbacher, Yan Burelle, Elissa Epel Tags: Priority Communication Source Type: research

Air pollution exposure during fetal life, brain morphology, and cognitive function in school-age children
Air pollution exposure during fetal life has been related to impaired child neurodevelopment but it is unclear if brain structural alterations underlie this association. The authors assessed whether air pollution exposure during fetal life alters brain morphology and whether these alterations mediate the association between air pollution exposure during fetal life and cognitive function in school-age children. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: M ònica Guxens, Małgorzata J. Lubczyńska, Ryan Muetzel, Albert Dalmau-Bueno, Vincent W.V. Jaddoe, Gerard Hoek, Aad van der Lugt, Frank C. Verhulst, Tonya White, Bert Brunekreef, Henning Tiemeier, Hanan El Marroun Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Dopamine D1 receptor positive neurons in the lateral nucleus of the cerebellum contribute to cognitive behavior
Studies in humans and non-human primates have identified a region of the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum (DCN), or lateral nucleus in rodents (LCN), activated during performance of cognitive tasks involving complex spatial and sequential planning. Whether such a subdivision exists in the rodent is not known. Dopamine and its receptors, which are implicated in cognitive function, are present in the cerebellar nuclei but their function is unknown. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Timothy M. Locke, Marta E. Soden, Samara M. Miller, Avery Hunker, Cerise Knakal, Julia A. Licholai, Karn S. Dhillon, C. Dirk Keene, Larry S. Zweifel, Erik S. Carlson Tags: Priority Communication Source Type: research

Essential role of ovarian hormones in susceptibility to the consequences of witnessing social defeat in female rats
Women are at greater risk of developing depression and comorbid disorders such as cardiovascular disease compared with men. This enhanced risk begins at puberty and ends following menopause, suggesting a role for ovarian hormones in this sensitivity. Here, we used a model of psychosocial witness stress for the first time in female rats to determine the stress-induced neurobiological adaptations that underlie stress susceptibility in an ovarian hormone dependent manner. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Julie E. Finnell, Brandon L. Muniz, Akhila R. Padi, Calliandra M. Lombard, Casey M. Moffitt, Christopher S. Wood, L. Britt Wilson, Lawrence P. Reagan, Marlene A. Wilson, Susan K. Wood Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Effective use of animal models for therapeutic development in psychiatric and substance use disorders
Athina Markou and others argue forcefully for the adoption of a “translational-back translational strategy” for CNS drug discovery involving novel application of drugs with established safety profiles in proof of principle studies in humans, which in turn encourage parallel studies using experimental animals to provide vital data on the neural systems and ne uropharmacological mechanisms related to the actions of the candidate drugs. Encouraged by the increasing adoption of drug development strategies involving reciprocal information exchange between preclinical animal studies and related clinical research prog...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Anthony G. Phillips, Mark A. Geyer, Trevor W. Robbins Tags: Review Source Type: research

Insula-Retrosplenial Cortex Overconnectivity Increases Internalizing Via Reduced Insight in Autism
Internalizing symptoms like anxiety and depression are common and impairing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we test the hypothesis that aberrant functional connectivity between three brain networks [salience network (SN), default-mode network (DMN), and frontoparietal network (FPN)] plays a role in the pathophysiology of internalizing in ASD. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jeremy Hogeveen, Marie K. Krug, Matthew V. Elliott, Marjorie Solomon Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Opposite molecular signatures of depression in men and women
Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects women approximately twice as often as men. Women are three times as likely to have atypical depression, with hypersomnia and weight gain. This suggests that the molecular mechanisms of MDD may differ by sex. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marianne L. Seney, Zhiguang Huo, Kelly Cahill, Leon French, Rachel Puralewski, Joyce Zhang, Ryan W. Logan, George Tseng, David A. Lewis, Etienne Sibille Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Presynaptic effects of NMDA receptors enhance parvalbumin cell-mediated inhibition of pyramidal cells in mouse prefrontal cortex
Testing hypotheses regarding the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction in schizophrenia requires understanding the mechanisms of NMDAR regulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuit function. NMDAR antagonists are thought to produce pyramidal cell (PC) disinhibition. However, inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PVBCs) have modest NMDAR-mediated excitatory drive, and thus are unlikely to participate in NMDAR antagonist-mediated disinhibition. Interestingly, recent studies demonstrated that presynaptic NMDARs enhance transmitter release at central synapses. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Diego E. Pafundo, Takeaki Miyamae, David A. Lewis, Guillermo Gonzalez Burgos Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Genomic Approaches to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: the Psychiatric Genomic Consortium Initiative
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after exposure to a traumatic event is a highly prevalent psychiatric disorder. Heritability estimates from twin studies as well as from recent molecular data (h2SNP) indicate moderate to high heritability, yet robust genetic variants for PTSD have not yet been identified and the genetic architecture of this polygenic disorder remains largely unknown.To date, less than ten large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of PTSD have been published, with findings that highlight the unique challenges for PTSD genomics, including a complex diagnostic entity with contingency of PTSD dia...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caroline M. Nievergelt, Allison E. Ashley-Koch, Shareefa Dalvie, Michael A. Hauser, Rajendra A. Morey, Alicia K. Smith, Monica Uddin Tags: Review Source Type: research

Peripheral Activity and Central Substrates of BACE1: Therapeutic Implications for Alzheimer ’s Disease
Amongst neurodegenerative diseases of the elderly, Alzheimer ’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent. Core to the pathology of AD is the progressive aggregation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in brain parenchyma and cerebral vasculature, which begins years or even decades before symptom onset (1). Aβ production is mediated by the sequential clea vage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a type I integral membrane protein, at two distinct cleavage sites. Juxtamembrane ectodomain cleavage of APP is mediated by beta-secretase 1 (BACE1), a 501–amino acid glycosylated type I transmembrane ...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michael D. Ehlers Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Micromanaging Memory
Making human memories involves a complicated orchestration of genetic, biochemical, and cellular processes. Although much remains unknown, considerable progress has been made in the study of memory processing, consolidation, storage, and retention. In addition, molecular pathways underlying memory impairments in neurodegenerative and other neurological diseases are beginning to be revealed. In this issue of Biological Psychiatry, Wang et  al. (1) contribute to this ever-growing field of research by uncovering a novel molecular signaling pathway that mediates memory deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). (Source: ...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Wang-Xia Wang Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

In This Issue
Volume 83, Number 5, March 1, 2018 (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: In This Issue Source Type: research

Editorial Board Page
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Subscribers Page
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Guide for Authors
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Understanding the molecular mechanisms underpinning G ×E interactions in psychiatric disorders: the FKBP5 model
Epidemiologic and genetic studies suggest common environmental and genetic risk factors for a number of psychiatric disorders, including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Genetic and environmental factors, especially adverse life events, not only have main effects on disease development but may also interact to shape risk and resilience. Such gene × adversity interactions have been described for FK binding protein 5 (FKBP5), an endogenous regulator of the stress-neuroendocrine system, conferring risk for a number of psychiatric disorders. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Natalie Matosin, Thorhildur Halldorsdottir, Elisabeth B. Binder Tags: Review Source Type: research

Dose-related target occupancy and effects on circuitry, behavior, and neuroplasticity of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor, PF-03463275, in healthy and schizophrenia subjects
Glycine transporter-1 (GlyT1) inhibitors may ameliorate cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). The dose-related occupancy and target engagement of the GlyT1 inhibitor, PF-03463275 were studied to inform optimal dose selection for a clinical trial for CIAS. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Deepak Cyril D ’Souza, Richard E. Carson, Naomi Driesen, Jason Johannesen, Mohini Ranganathan, John H. Krystal, Yale GlyT1 Study Tags: Priority Communication Source Type: research

Combined Analysis of Mifepristone for Psychotic Depression; Plasma Levels Associated with Clinical Response
We present a combined analysis of all controlled Phase 2/3 studies to report antipsychotic differences between treatment with mifepristone or placebo and to evaluate the relative contributions to response of attaining an a priori –defined, high-mifepristone plasma level and markers of GR antagonism (increases in ACTH and cortisol) with treatment. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thaddeus Block, Harvey Kushner, Ned Kalin, Craig Nelson, Joseph Belanoff, Alan Schatzberg Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Dynamic changes of the mitochondria in psychiatric illnesses: new mechanistic insights from human neuronal models
Mitochondria play a crucial role in neuronal function, especially in energy production, generation of reactive oxygen species, and calcium signaling. Multiple lines of evidence have suggested possible involvement of mitochondrial deficits in major psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. In the first half, this review will outline the current understanding of the physiological role of mitochondria and their dysfunction under pathological conditions, particularly in psychiatric disorders. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rupali Srivastava, Travis Faust, Adriana Ramos, Koko Ishizuka, Akira Sawa Tags: Review Source Type: research

α-synuclein oligomers induce a unique toxic tau strain
The coexistence of α-synuclein and tau aggregates in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), raises the possibility that a seeding mechanism is involved in disease progression. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Diana L. Castillo-Carranza, Marcos J. Guerrero-Mu ñoz, Urmi Sengupta, Julia E. Gerson, Rakez Kayed Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Glutamatergic Ventral Pallidal Neurons Modulate Activity of the Habenula –Tegmental Circuitry and Constrain Reward Seeking
The ability to appropriately integrate and respond to rewarding and aversive stimuli is essential for survival. The ventral pallidum (VP) plays a critical role in processing both rewarding and aversive stimuli. However, the VP is a heterogeneous structure, and how VP subpopulations integrate into larger reward networks to ultimately modulate these behaviors is not known. We identify a noncanonical population of glutamatergic VP neurons that play a unique role in responding to aversive stimuli and constraining inappropriate reward seeking. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jessica Tooley, Lauren Marconi, Jason Bondoc Alipio, Bridget Matikainen-Ankney, Polymnia Georgiou, Alexxai V. Kravitz, Meaghan C. Creed Tags: Priority Communication Source Type: research

Glutamatergic ventral pallidal neurons modulate activity of the habenula - tegmental circuitry and constrain reward seeking
The ability to appropriately integrate and respond to rewarding and aversive stimuli is essential for survival. The ventral pallidum (VP) plays a critical role in processing both rewarding and aversive stimuli. However, the VP is a heterogeneous structure, and how VP subpopulations integrate into larger reward networks to ultimately modulate these behaviors is not known. We identify a non-canonical population of glutamatergic VP neurons that play a unique role in responding to aversive stimuli and constraining inappropriate reward seeking. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jessica Tooley, Lauren Marconi, Jason Alipio, Bridget Matikainen-Ankney, Polymnia Georgiou, Alexxai V. Kravitz, Meaghan C. Creed Tags: Priority Communication Source Type: research

Emerging Mechanisms in Alzheimer ’s Disease and Their Therapeutic Implications
Alzheimer ’s disease (AD) constitutes a massive and growing health care burden that is destroying the cognitive function of more than 5 million individuals in the United States and 25 million individuals worldwide. Today, therapeutic options are limited to approaches with mild symptomatic benefit and devoid of disease-modifying regimens. Given the unprecedented medical need, there is a growing societal recognition of the urgency to advance AD therapy to a level where options to slow, halt, or reverse the disease become available. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stephen M. Strittmatter Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Editorial Board Page
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Subscribers Page
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Guide for Authors
(Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

In This Issue
Volume 83, Number 4, February 15, 2018 (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: In This Issue Source Type: research

Genome-wide association study identifies a regulatory variant of RGMA associated with opioid dependence in European Americans
Opioid dependence (OD) is at epidemic levels in the United States. Genetic studies can provide insight into its biology. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Zhongshan Cheng, Hang Zhou, Richard Sherva, Lindsay Farrer, Henry R. Kranzler, Joel Gelernter Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Psychiatric symptom dimensions are associated with dissociable shifts in metacognition but not task performance
Distortions in metacognition – the ability to reflect upon and control other cognitive processes – are thought to be characteristic of poor mental health. However, it remains unknown whether such shifts in self-evaluation are due to specific alterations in metacognition and/or a downstream consequence of changes in decision -making processes. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marion Rouault, Tricia Seow, Claire M. Gillan, Stephen M. Fleming Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research

Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Co-activator-1 Alpha as a Novel Target for Bipolar Disorder and other Neuropsychiatric Disorders
Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha) is a protein that regulates metabolism and inflammation by activating nuclear receptors, especially the family of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors (PPARs). PGC-1 alpha and PPARs also regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, cellular energy production, thermogenesis, and lipid metabolism. Brain energy metabolism may also be, in part, regulated by the interaction between PGC-1 alpha and PPARs. Because neurodegenerative diseases (Huntington ’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and bipolar disorder...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Andrew A. Nierenberg, Sharmin A. Ghaznavi, Isadora Sande Mathias, Kristen K. Ellard, Jessica A. Janos, Louisa G. Sylvia Tags: Review Source Type: research

Neurogenetic Approaches to Stress and Fear in Humans as Pathophysiological Mechanisms for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
We report that genes related to the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as well as genes that modulate serotonergic, dopaminergic, and neuropeptergic functions or plasticity, play a role in this context. The strong overlap of the genetic targets involved in stress and fear learning suggests that a dimensional and mechanistic model of the development of PTSD based on these constructs is promising. (Source: Biological Psychiatry)
Source: Biological Psychiatry - January 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Frauke Nees, Stephanie H. Witt, Herta Flor Tags: Review Source Type: research