Bladder overactivity and post-void residual: Which relates more to systemic atherosclerotic markers?
Several studies have shown relationship between the lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and atherosclerosis. However, no study is available to see which LUTD relates more to atherosclerosis, among detrusor overactivity and post-void residual. In order to answer this question, we present data of urodynamic and atherosclerosis tests. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - November 18, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ayami Shimizu, Ryuji Sakakibara, Osamu Takahashi, Fuyuki Tateno, Yosuke Aiba Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - November 13, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Breathlessness and dysfunctional breathing in patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS): The impact of a physiotherapy intervention
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a chronic, multifactorial syndrome with complex symptoms of orthostatic intolerance. Breathlessness is a prevalent symptom, however little is known about the aetiology. Anecdotal evidence suggests that breathless POTS patients commonly demonstrate dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome (DB/HVS). There are, however, no published data regarding DB/HVS in POTS, and whether physiotherapy/breathing retraining may improve patients' breathing pattern and symptoms. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - November 12, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Charles C. Reilly, Sarah V. Floyd, Kai Lee, Geoffrey Warwick, Stephen James, Nicholas Gall, Gerrard F. Rafferty Source Type: research

Effects of high-fat diet on sympathetic neurotransmission in mesenteric arteries from Dahl salt-sensitive rat
Obesity hypertension is driven sympathetic neurotransmission to the heart and blood vessels. We tested the hypothesis that high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hypertension is driven by sympathetic neurotransmission to mesenteric arteries (MA) in male but not female Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl ss) rat. Rats were fed a control diet (CD; 10  kcal% from fat) or HFD (60 kcal% from fat) beginning at 3 weeks (wk) of age; measurements were made at 10-, 17- and 24-wk. Body weight increased with HFD, age and sex. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was higher in HFD versus CD rats from both sexes at 17- and 24-wk. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscien...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - October 31, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Kibrom M. Alula, Rebecca Biltz, Hui Xu, Hannah Garver, Erinn L. Laimon-Thomson, Gregory D. Fink, James J. Galligan Source Type: research

Elimination of spurious absent sweat response in QSWEAT recordings
Forearm QSWEAT recordings are occasionally absent in females, likely due to high skin resistance. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - October 23, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jeanne Corfits, Wolfgang Singer, Paola Sandroni, Robert D. Fealey, Elizabeth A. Coon, Eduardo E. Benarroch, Sarah E. Berini, Michelle L. Mauermann, David M. Sletten, Jeremy K. Cutsforth-Gregory, James D. Schmelzer, Phillip A. Low Source Type: research

Blood pressure and orthostatic hypotension as measures of autonomic dysfunction in patients from the transthyretin amyloidosis outcomes survey (THAOS)
Autonomic dysfunction, an early symptom of transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR amyloidosis), requires investigations not readily available in many clinics. Although monitoring of orthostatic hypotension (OH) will not be a substitute for more specialized tests, it can add important information about initiation of dysautonomia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether simple blood pressure (BP) monitoring may be a useful tool for evaluation of disease progression and an early sign of autonomic dysfunction. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - October 23, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alejandra Gonz ález-Duarte, Fabio Barroso, Rajiv Mundayat, Bryan Shapiro Source Type: research

Exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in type 2 diabetes: Potential role of oxidative stress
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) leads to exaggerated cardiovascular responses to exercise, in part due to an exaggerated exercise pressor reflex. Accumulating data suggest excessive oxidative stress contributes to an exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in cardiovascular-related diseases. Excessive oxidative stress is also a primary underlying mechanism for the development and progression of T2DM. However, whether oxidative stress plays a role in mediating the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in T2DM is not known. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - October 21, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ann-Katrin Grotle, Audrey J. Stone Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - October 12, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

The effects of varying Mg2+ ion concentrations on contractions to the cotransmitters ATP and noradrenaline in the rat vas deferens
This study aimed to determine the effect of Mg2+ concentration on nerve cotransmitter-mediated contractions. Rat vasa deferentia were sequentially bathed in increasing (0, 1.2, 3 mM) or decreasing (3, 1.2, 0 mM) Mg2+ con centrations. At each concentration a single field pulse was applied, and the biphasic contraction recorded. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - October 5, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Amna C. Mazeh, James A. Angus, Christine E. Wright Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Study of baicalin on sympathoexcitation induced bymyocardial ischemia via P2X3 receptor in superior cervical ganglia” [Auton. Neurosci. 189, May 2015, 8–15]
We mistakenly used same images for the Fig. 2 on the hematoxylin and eosin staining of myocardial tissues between normal control group (upper left) and baicalin control group (lower right) panels. We repeated the experiment again, and the data accorded with the trend of the original results. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - September 5, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jun Zhang, Shuangmei Liu, Baohua Xu, Guodong Li, Guilin Li, An Huang, Bing Wu, Lichao Peng, Miaomiao Song, Qiuyu Xie, Weijian Lin, Wei Xie, Shiyao Wen, Zhedong Zhang, Xiaoling Xu, Shangdong Liang Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Role of P2X3 receptor in myocardial ischemia injury and nociceptive sensory transmission” [Auton. Neurosci.: Basic Clin. volume 139, (issues 1–2), (30 May 2008), pages 30–37]
Due to the authors' carelessness, we mistakenly used same image in situ hybridization between the Fig. 6a [control group (A)] and Fig. 6c [myocardial ischemic rat treated with A-317491 (C)] for the expression of P2X3 mRNA in the myocardium cells of rat. We repeated the experiment again, and the data accorded with the trend of the original results. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - September 5, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Yunxia Wang, Guiling Li, Shangdong Liang, Aixia Zhang, Changshui Xu, Yun Gao, Chunping Zhang, Fang Wan Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research

Reproducibility of post-exercise heart rate recovery indices: A systematic review
Heart rate recovery (HRR) has been widely used to evaluate the integrity of the autonomic nervous system with a slower HRR being associated with greater cardiovascular risk. Different HRR indices have been proposed. Some evaluate HR changes from the end of exercise to a specific recovery moment (e.g. 60s – HRR60s; 120s – HRR120s; 300s – HRR300s) and others calculate time-constant decays of HR for different recovery intervals (e.g. first 30s – T30; the entire period – HRRt). Several studies have examined the reproducibility of these commonly-used HRR indices, but reported discordant finding s. ...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - August 27, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Rafael Y. Fecchio, Leandro Brito, Anthony Leicht, Cl áudia Forjaz, Tiago Peçanha Source Type: research

The effects of sympathetic nerve damage on satellite glial cells in the mouse superior cervical ganglion
Neurons in sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic ganglia are surrounded by satellite glial cell (SGCs). There is little information on the effects of nerve damage on SGCs in autonomic ganglia. We studied the consequences of damage to sympathetic nerve terminals by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on SGCs in the mouse superior cervical ganglia (Sup-CG). Immunostaining revealed that at 1 –30 d post-6-OHDA injection, SGCs in Sup-CG were activated, as assayed by upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - August 24, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Rachel Feldman-Goriachnik, Menachem Hanani Source Type: research

Shrinkage of the myenteric neurons of the small intestine in patients with multiple system atrophy
This study aimed to determine whether enteric neurons are involved in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Four- μm-thick slices of small intestine were prepared from 10%-formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded materials obtained from autopsied cases. Enteric neurons were stained using an anti-peripherin antibody. Immunostaining of phosphorylated α-synuclein was also performed. Areas of the cytoplasm and nucleu s that showed nucleoli were measured using computer software. Both areas of myenteric neurons were significantly smaller in MSA cases (n = 3) than in control subjects (n = 3) (P  (Source: Autonomic Neurosc...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - August 22, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tetsutaro Ozawa, Hiroshi Shimizu, Hideaki Matsui, Osamu Onodera, Akiyoshi Kakita Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research

The effect of steady-state CO2 on regional brain blood flow responses to increases in blood pressure via the cold pressor test
The pressure-passive cerebrovasculature is affected by alterations in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and arterial blood gases (e.g., pressure of arterial [Pa]CO2), where acute changes in either stimulus can influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). The effect of superimposed increases in CPP at different levels of steady-state PaCO2 on regional CBF regulation is unclear. In 17 healthy participants, we simultaneously recorded continuous heart rate (electrocardiogram), blood pressure (finometer), pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2; gas analyzer), and middle (MCA) and posterior (PCA) cerebral artery blood velocity (CBV; transcra...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - August 20, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Brittney A. Herrington, Scott F. Thrall, Leah M. Mann, Michael M. Tymko, Trevor A. Day Source Type: research

Effect of vagus nerve stimulation on tissue damage and function loss in a mouse myocardial ischemia-reperfusion model
In cardiac ischemia, acute inflammatory responses further increase the detrimental effect on myocardial tissue. Since vagus nerve stimulation (VS) attenuates inflammatory responsiveness this study examines the effect of VS on myocardial damage development in a cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR) mouse model. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - August 16, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: M.G.J. Nederhoff, D.E. Fransen, S.A.M.W. Verlinde, G. Pasterkamp, R.L.A.W. Bleys Source Type: research

Developmental and age-dependent plasticity of GABAA receptors in the mouse colon: Implications in colonic motility and inflammation
Lifelong functional plasticity of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is essential for health, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The enteric nervous system (ENS) regulates all aspects of the gut function, via a range of neurotransmitter pathways, one of which is the GABA-GABAA receptor (GABAAR) system. We have previously shown that GABAA receptor subunits are differentially expressed within the ENS and are involved in regulating various GI functions. We have also shown that these receptors are involved in mediating stress-induced colonic inflammation. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - August 15, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Mohsen Seifi, Jerome D. Swinny Source Type: research

Normal versus abnormal: What normative data tells us about the utility of heart rate in postural tachycardia
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - August 7, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jacquie Baker, Kurt Kimpinski Tags: Short communication Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - July 20, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Symbolic analysis of heart rate fluctuations identifies cardiac autonomic modifications during LPS-induced endotoxemia
The present study aimed to compare linear and symbolic dynamics (SD) indicies for detecting the autonomic cardiac changes produced by endotoxemia in freely-moving rats. In this context, we analyzed ECG-derived R-R time series in freely moving Dark Agouti rats, which received lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n  = 9), or vehicle (V, n = 7). Five minutes R-R time series were assessed every hour up to +12 h and + 24 h post-LPS injection.We found that SD indicies showed significant differences at +7 h between V vs. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - July 16, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jos é Javier Reyes-Lagos, Claudia Ivette Ledesma-Ramírez, Martin Hadamitzky, Miguel Ángel Peña-Castillo, Juan C. Echeverría, Laura Lückemann, Manfred Schedlowski, Karsten Berg, Niels Wessel, Gustavo Pacheco-López Source Type: research

Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and autonomic dysfunction
Autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been extensively explored in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).Autonomic alterations in these patients have been described by means of several methods, evaluating ANS function both directly with microneurography and indirectly through baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, by the sequence method or the cross-spectral approach), heart rate variability analysis (HRV, both in the time and frequency domain) during sleep and wake, or conventional laboratory tests, including cold pressor test, hand grip test or measurement of urinary cathecolamine excretion. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - July 10, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: C. Lombardi, M.F. Pengo, G. Parati Tags: Review Source Type: research

Special issue, ‘Circadian Rhythms: Autonomic & Endocrine Function in Health and Disease ’
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 19, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: M.P. Gilbey Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Pure autonomic failure presenting as Harlequin syndrome
We present a patient with unilateral anhidrosis, contralateral facial flushing and hyperhidrosis consistent with Harlequin syndrome that, over 6  years, progressed to PAF, suggesting that PAF may present with focal autonomic impairment prior to generalized autonomic failure. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 18, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: James D. Triplett, Eduardo E. Benarroch, Jeremy K. Cutsforth-Gregory Source Type: research

Urinary impairment and prognosis in patients with multiple system atrophy
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 16, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tomoyuki Kawada Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Changes in excitability and ion channel expression in neurons of the major pelvic ganglion in female type II diabetic mice
Bladder cystopathy and autonomic dysfunction are common complications of diabetes, and have been associated with changes in ganglionic transmission and some measures of neuronal excitability in male mice. To determine whether type II diabetes also impacts excitability of ganglionic neurons in females, we investigated neuronal excitability and firing properties, as well as underlying ion channel expression, in major pelvic ganglion (MPG) neurons in control, 10-week, and 21-week Leprdb/db mice. Type II diabetes in Leprdb/db animals caused a non-linear change in excitability and firing properties of MPG neurons. (Source: Auto...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 15, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Michael Gray, Kawasi M. Lett, Virginia B. Garcia, Cindy W. Kyi, Kathleen A. Pennington, Laura C. Schulz, David J. Schulz Source Type: research

Restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movements during sleep and cardiovascular risk
Multiple mechanisms may modulate an association between restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), including chronic sleep deprivation, intermittent, periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS)-related autonomic fluctuations and possible autonomic dysfunction intrinsically associated with RLS per se. The purpose of this paper is to review the existing RLS/WED literature focusing on the pathophysiologic evidence for possible associations between RLS/WED and PLMS with CVD and events (CVE). (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 15, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Giacomo Chiaro, Mauro Manconi Tags: Review Source Type: research

Reply to the Letter to the Editor of Tomoyuki Kawada concerning “Self-reported urinary impairment identifies ‘fast progressors’ in terms of neuronal loss in multiple system atrophy”
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 15, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Carlos Guevara Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Somatosensory regulation of resting muscle blood flow and physical therapy
Somatosensory stimulation can affect skeletal muscle blood flow (MBF) at rest in anesthetized animals via pressor reflex response or antidromic and local vasodilation. Increase in MBF due to reflex pressor response occurs generally in the skeletal muscles of the entire body, while antidromic and local vasodilation are limited to the peripheral stimulation site. Since increased MBF improves several disorders (muscle stiffness, pain, etc.), it is reasonable to further explore the effective use of somatic stimulation in physical therapies, such as massage, acupuncture, anma, and shiatsu or acupressure, in treating skeletal mu...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 12, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ikuko Sato-Suzuki, Fusako Kagitani, Sae Uchida Source Type: research

Repeated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation of nonspecific acupoints of the upper body attenuates stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in rats
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common stress-related gastrointestinal disorder and visceral hypersensitivity (VH) is characteristically found in IBS patients. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) applied to certain acupoints has been shown to benefit IBS patients. Here, we investigated whether nonspecific acupoint is involved in the efficacy of TENS treatment for IBS. Twenty-five male rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups and one sham-control group. The four experimental groups were defined as TENS-RR, TENS-RL, TENS-LR, and TENS-LL based on the location of the two TENS patches [right (R...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 4, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Chung-Shin Huang, Ya-Hui Sun, Yi-Ting Wang, Yu-Hung Pan, Ying-Chia Huang, Chung-Ming Hsu, Yuan-Feen Tsai Source Type: research

Impaired hemodynamic response to tilt, handgrip and Valsalva manoeuvre in patients with takotsubo syndrome
Long-term β-adrenolytics treatment in takotsubo syndrome (TTS) patients is based on the premise, that TTS is strongly associated with sympathetic nervous system overactivity. The aim of the study was to establish hemodynamic response to tilt, handgrip and Valsalva manoeuvre in patients with takotsubo syndrom e compared to healthy subjects (CONTROL) and patients after ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI). (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - June 3, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Anna St ępniewska, Monika Budnik, Krzysztof Krzemiński, Wiktor Niewiadomski, Anna Gąsiorowska, Grzegorz Opolski, Janusz Kochanowski, Katarzyna Mieczkowska, Katarzyna Żukowska, Katarzyna Szepietowska, Robert Kowalik Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - May 21, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Autonomic impairment as a potential biomarker in idiopathic REM-sleep-behavior disorder
This article summarizes the current literature on autonomic impairment in iRBD, with specific focus on the role of autonomic impairment as a potential biomarker of disease progression. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - May 20, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jennifer Zitser, Emmanuel H. During, Giacomo Chairo, Mitchell G. Miglis Tags: Review Source Type: research

Correlation between sonographic morphology and function of the cervical vagus nerves
The heart receives parasympathetic and to a lesser degree sympathetic input via the vagus nerve. Here, we investigated whether morphological changes of the cervical vagus nerves (VN) as assessed by high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) correlated with the autonomic cardiac innervation. Measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) and HRUS of the VNs were performed in 88 healthy subjects (50 female; mean age 56  ± 18 years). HRV parameters and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the VNs correlated both inversely with age. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - May 17, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Johann Otto Pelz, Elena Belau, Ina Menze, Timo Bj örn Woost, Joseph Classen, David Weise Source Type: research

Insomnia and cardiovascular autonomic control
Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder, particularly among middle and older aged adults, and is associated with a variety of negative health consequences, including higher risk for cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the mechanisms linking insomnia with cardiovascular risk remain largely unknown, thus limiting targeted therapeutic interventions. The hyperarousal hypothesis has attracted the most support, positing that insomnia is a result of multisystem over-activation, including sympathetic hyperactivity, which promotes wakefulness and blocks the occurrence of sleep at the desired time. (Source: Autonomic Neuros...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - May 16, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Daniela Grimaldi, Michael R. Goldstein, Jason R. Carter Tags: Review Source Type: research

The circadian clock control of adipose tissue physiology and metabolism
The circadian clock organizes the timing of physiological processes in anticipation of diurnal environmental changes that originate from the rotation of the Earth. Several of the metabolic functions of adipose tissues are under regulation by the circadian clock to achieve temporal coordination and whole body homeostasis. Adipose tissues, once believed to only express physiological phenotypes that are downstream of central nervous system regulation, are now well described to communicate not only to other peripheral tissues, but also to the central nervous system for temporal orchestration of metabolism. (Source: Autonomic N...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - May 7, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Damien Lekkas, Georgios K. Paschos Tags: Review Source Type: research

Reduced heart rate variability and lower cerebral blood flow associated with poor cognition during recovery following concussion
Although physiological deficits such as altered cerebral blood flow (CBF), and autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysregulation have been reported following a concussion, the relationship between CBF and ANS with functional outcome post-injury remains unclear. Our present study was designed to examine heart-rate variability (HRV) using percentage of successive NN intervals (pNN50) and CBF on day-3 (T1), day-21 (T2), and day-90 (T3) following a concussion in collegiate athletes (N  = 31) in comparison to non-injured controls (N = 31). (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - April 29, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Sushmita Purkayastha, Benjamin Williams, Megan Murphy, Sydney Lyng, Tonia Sabo, Kathleen R. Bell Source Type: research

Diagnostic performance of resting and post-exercise heart rate variability for detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus
Post-exercise recovery phase is associated with clustering of various cardiovascular events and, therefore, monitoring of cardiac autonomic control via heart rate variability (HRV) during this phase may allow identification of autonomic alterations that are not evident under resting conditions in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - April 24, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Pooja Bhati, Jamal Ali Moiz, Irshad Hussain Naqvi, M. Ejaz Hussain Source Type: research

Sex and gender influence symptom manifestation and survival in multiple system atrophy
In conclusion, our data show longer survival from diagnosis in females and slight overall survival benefit which may be related to initial motor manifestations. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - April 24, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Elizabeth A. Coon, Renee M. Nelson, David M. Sletten, Mariana D. Suarez, J. Eric Ahlskog, Eduardo E. Benarroch, Paola Sandroni, Jay N. Mandrekar, Phillip A. Low, Wolfgang Singer Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research

Quality of life improves in vasovagal syncope patients after clinical trial enrollment regardless of fainting in follow-up
Frequent syncope is linked to poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Recurrent syncope has been observed to reduce in all groups after seeing a syncope expert and enrolling in a clinical trial. It is unknown if HRQoL improves with this reduction in syncope recurrence. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - April 12, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jessica Ng, Robert S. Sheldon, Connor Maxey, Debbie Ritchie, Vidya Raj, Derek V. Exner, Satish R. Raj Source Type: research

Region specific differences in the effect of propofol on the murine colon result in dysmotility
Propofol is the most widely used intravenous anaesthetic agent for maintenance of anaesthesia and sedation. Studies in varying regions of the bowel have shown conflicting differences on the effects of propofol on motility. There the aim of this study was to understand the influence of propofol on colonic function and explore by which mechanism any changes occur. Functional studies were conducted using isolated colonic tissue from C57BL6 mice which were exposed to 5  μM propofol. Faecal pellet motility, colonic migratory motor complexes (CMMCs) and functional bioassays were utilised to monitor colonic function and nitr...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 29, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Lucy B. Diss, Shannon Villeneuve, Kim R. Pearce, Mark S. Yeoman, Bhavik A. Patel Source Type: research

Effects of chronic lead exposure on the sympathoexcitatory response associated with the P2X7 receptor in rat superior cervical ganglia
In this study, a rat model of chronic lead exposure was used to explore the changes in sympathoexcitatory response and possible involvement of P2X7 receptor in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Gaochun Zhu, Bo Dai, Zhenying Chen, Liyun He, Jingjing Guo, Yu Dan, Shangdong Liang, Guilin Li Source Type: research

Regional variations in the number distribution of intrinsic myenteric neurons and coinnervated motor endplates on the striated muscles in the rat esophagus
We examined the number distribution of intrinsic neurons and coinnervated motor endplates on the striated muscles in the rat esophagus using immunohistochemistry to investigate whether these neurons and coinnervated striated muscles may be relevant to the local control of esophageal motility. The number of PGP9.5-positive neurons was higher in the cervical esophagus (segment 1) and gradually decreased toward the aboral, with a moderate increase in the abdominal (segment 5). (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 25, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Hirofumi Kuramoto, Ryoichi Yoshimura, Hiroshi Sakamoto, Makoto Kadowaki Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 17, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

The negative effects of social bond disruption are partially ameliorated by sertraline administration in prairie voles
Negative social experiences influence both depression and cardiovascular dysfunction. Many individuals who experience negative mood states or cardiovascular conditions have limited social support. Therefore, investigation of drug treatments that may protect against the consequences of social stress will aid in designing effective treatment strategies. The current study used an animal model to evaluate the protective effect of sertraline administration on behavioral and cardiovascular consequences of social stress. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 14, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Neal McNeal, W. Tang Watanasriyakul, Marigny C. Normann, Ore I. Akinbo, Ashley Dagner, Elliott Ihm, Joshua Wardwell, Angela J. Grippo Source Type: research

Cardiac autonomic function and its association with cardiometabolic disease risk factors in Black South African children
This study evaluated the associations between cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and cardiometabolic disease (CMD) risk factors among black South African children. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 13, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Anneke van Biljon, Andrew J. McKune, Katrina D. DuBose, Unathi Kolanisi, Stuart J. Semple Source Type: research

Clinical features of prolonged tilt-induced hypotension with an apparent vasovagal mechanism, but without syncope
A previous study of electroencephalography (EEG) changes with syncope led to a finding that some young patients develop prolonged periods of tilt-induced hypotension, but they do not lose consciousness. The present study aim was to compare patterns of hemodynamic changes, measures of duration, and sweating between these patients and patients with tilt-induced vasovagal syncope. (Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical)
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 9, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Geoffrey L. Heyer Source Type: research

Takotsubo syndrome and left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy: Casualty or causality?
Takotsubo syndrome (TS) is a condition of transient regional ventricular systolic dysfunction, usually presenting with acute chest pain and/or dyspnea, that is increasingly recognized especially in post-menopausal women following a psychological or physical stress. Initially considered as a benign condition with an isolated and self-limiting episode, it is now recognized that it is associated with a significant risk of in-hospital mortality and of recurrence. We herein describe a case of a 61-year-old female with left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) who experienced a recurrence of TS, highlighting the pote...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - March 1, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Marco Giuseppe Del Buono, Rocco Antonio Montone, Massimiliano Camilli, Filippo Luca Gurgoglione, Gessica Ingrasciotta, Maria Chiara Meucci, Francesco Fracassi, Giampaolo Niccoli, Filippo Crea Source Type: research

Fatal familial insomnia and Agrypnia Excitata: Autonomic dysfunctions and pathophysiological implications
Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI) is a hereditary prion disease caused by a mutation at codon 178 of the prion-protein gene leading to a D178N substitution in the protein determining severe and selective atrophy of mediodorsal and anteroventral thalamic nuclei. FFI is characterized by physiological sleep loss, which polygraphically appears to be a slow wave sleep loss, autonomic and motor hyperactivation with peculiar episodes of oneiric stupor.Alteration of autonomic functions is a great burden for FFI patients consisting in sympathetic overactivation, dysregulation of its physiological responses and disruption of circadian r...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - February 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: L. Baldelli, F. Provini Tags: Review Source Type: research

Effects of tanezumab on satellite glial cells in the cervicothoracic ganglion of cynomolgus monkeys: A 26-week toxicity study followed by an 8-week recovery period
Tanezumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-NGF antibody, has demonstrated efficacy and safety profiles in Phase III clinical trials of chronic pain. In a 24-week study in non-human primates, morphological observations of sympathetic ganglia showed decreased ganglia volume, decreased neuronal size, and increased glial cell density compared with controls after 3 tanezumab treatments. Using stereological techniques to quantify glial cells, the present 26-week study found no significant difference after weekly treatments in total cervicothoracic ganglia satellite glial cell number between placebo- or tanezumab-treated cynomolgus m...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - February 23, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Mark Evans, Mark Butt, Patrice Belanger, Thomas Cummings, Jessica-lyn Gremminger, Mark Zorbas Source Type: research

Sleep disorders, nocturnal blood pressure, and cardiovascular risk: A translational perspective
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the first cause of death globally. The nighttime is generally a period of relative protection from CVD events such as myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, and stroke, at least compared to the early morning period. The nighttime also generally entails lower values of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) and higher cardiac parasympathetic modulation. These day-night cardiovascular rhythms are ultimately driven by circadian molecular oscillators in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and in peripheral cells, including those in the heart, blood vessels, and kidn...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical - February 22, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alessandro Silvani Tags: Review Source Type: research