Genetic Test Helps ID Benign Versus Malignant Thyroid Nodules
FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 -- A multigene genomic classifier (GC) test for thyroid nodules with indeterminate cytology shows high sensitivity and negative predictive value, according to a study published online Nov. 8 in JAMA Oncology. David L. Steward,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Stop Cervical Cancer Screening at 75, or 55 if HPV Test Negative Stop Cervical Cancer Screening at 75, or 55 if HPV Test Negative
Women with a negative HPV test at age 55 can stop screening, but women using cytology testing should continue to age 75, authors say.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Age to Stop Cervical Cancer Screening Depends on Test Used
Negative HPV test, HPV - cytology co - test tied to low remaining lifetime cancer risk for unvaccinated (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - November 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pathology, Journal, Source Type: news

Age to Stop Cervical Cancer Screening Depends on Test Used
FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 -- Continuing regular cytology screening up to age 75 years or performing an exit human papillomavirus (HPV) test to confirm the absence of oncogenic HPV strains past the age of 55 years offers preventive benefit for older women... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Lancet Oncology: For new HPV DNA test, study finds there may be little benefit in screening women aged 55 with a negative test
(The Lancet) Regular cytology screening (pap or smear test) is still the most commonly used HPV screening method, and can prevent cancers up to age 75 years, although benefits decline with age.For the newly introduced HPV DNA test, which offers a higher degree of accuracy, women aged 55 who have a negative test were predicted to be at low risk of cervical cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Clodagh O'Shea receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to study genome
(Salk Institute) Clodagh O'Shea, a professor in Salk's Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Faculty Scholar, has been selected as a recipient of The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group's Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) program. She will be awarded $1.5 million over three years to conduct research into how DNA and its associated proteins (known collectively as chromatin) are packaged in the nucleus of cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Will Be Your Next Move in the In Vitro Diagnostic Space?
When it comes to in vitro diagnostic (IVD) technologies, medical device and diagnostic companies have been chomping at the bit to produce the next big innovation. The last few years have seen a surge in IVD technologies in the market, as device makers expand their knowledge and resources surrounding IVD technologies. With new products in the marketplace for direct-to-consumer tests (DTC), point-of-care diagnostics, and next-generation sequencing, we may be on the threshold of a new wave of diagnostic technologies that could have an impact on other diagnostic areas as well, such as gene sequencing and editing. These new IVD...
Source: MDDI - October 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: BIOMEDevice San Jose IVD Source Type: news

Super-resolution chromatin tracing reveals domains and cooperative interactions in single cells
We report an imaging method for tracing chromatin organization with kilobase- and nanometer-scale resolution, unveiling chromatin conformation across topologically associating domains (TADs) in thousands of individual cells. Our imaging data revealed TAD-like structures with globular conformation and sharp domain boundaries in single cells. The boundaries varied from cell to cell, occurring with nonzero probabilities at all genomic positions but preferentially at CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)- and cohesin-binding sites. Notably, cohesin depletion, which abolished TADs at the population-average level, did not diminish TAD-lik...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bintu, B., Mateo, L. J., Su, J.-H., Sinnott-Armstrong, N. A., Parker, M., Kinrot, S., Yamaya, K., Boettiger, A. N., Zhuang, X. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Imaging chromatin spatial organization
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Pancreatic α and δ cells can produce insulin
Research, published inNature Cell Biology, suggests that pancreaticα andδ cells can produce insulin, when insulin producingβ cells become damaged or die. Phys (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 24, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Researchers have discovered a new cell structure
(Karolinska Institutet) A new structure in human cells has been discovered by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden in collaboration with colleagues in the UK. The structure is a new type of protein complex that the cell uses to attach to its surroundings and proves to play a key part in cell division. The study is published in the journal Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stem cell biologist Sean Morrison elected to the National Academy of Medicine
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) UT Southwestern Professor Dr. Sean Morrison, Director of the Children's Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supracellular contraction at the rear of neural crest cell groups drives collective chemotaxis
Collective cell chemotaxis, the directed migration of cell groups along gradients of soluble chemical cues, underlies various developmental and pathological processes. We use neural crest cells, a migratory embryonic stem cell population whose behavior has been likened to malignant invasion, to study collective chemotaxis in vivo. Studying Xenopus and zebrafish, we have shown that the neural crest exhibits a tensile actomyosin ring at the edge of the migratory cell group that contracts in a supracellular fashion. This contractility is polarized during collective cell chemotaxis: It is inhibited at the front but persists at...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shellard, A., Szabo, A., Trepat, X., Mayor, R. Tags: Cell Biology, Development reports Source Type: news

Supracellular cable drives collective cell movement
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Cell Biology, Development twis Source Type: news

Supracellular contractions propel migration
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Adameyko, I. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

New connections: VEGF beyond the vasculature
The growth factor VEGF promotes cancer-associated stem cell biology and pain, as well as angiogenesis. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Dimerization quality control ensures neuronal development and survival
Aberrant complex formation by recurrent interaction modules, such as BTB domains, leucine zippers, or coiled coils, can disrupt signal transduction, yet whether cells detect and eliminate complexes of irregular composition is unknown. By searching for regulators of the BTB family, we discovered a quality control pathway that ensures functional dimerization [dimerization quality control (DQC)]. Key to this network is the E3 ligase SCFFBXL17, which selectively binds and ubiquitylates BTB dimers of aberrant composition to trigger their clearance by proteasomal degradation. Underscoring the physiological importance of DQC, SCF...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mena, E. L., Kjolby, R. A. S., Saxton, R. A., Werner, A., Lew, B. G., Boyle, J. M., Harland, R., Rape, M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Systemic control of legume susceptibility to rhizobial infection by a mobile microRNA
Nitrogen-fixing root nodules on legumes result from two developmental processes, bacterial infection and nodule organogenesis. To balance symbiosis and plant growth, legume hosts restrict nodule numbers through an inducible autoregulatory process. Here, we present a mechanism where repression of a negative regulator ensures symbiotic susceptibility of uninfected roots of the host Lotus japonicus. We show that microRNA miR2111 undergoes shoot-to-root translocation to control rhizobial infection through posttranscriptional regulation of the symbiosis suppressor TOO MUCH LOVE in roots. miR2111 maintains a susceptible default ...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tsikou, D., Yan, Z., Holt, D. B., Abel, N. B., Reid, D. E., Madsen, L. H., Bhasin, H., Sexauer, M., Stougaard, J., Markmann, K. Tags: Botany, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

A way to prevent deadly interaction
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Keeping the doors open for symbiosis
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Botany, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Glia as architects of central nervous system formation and function
Glia constitute roughly half of the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) but were long-considered to be static bystanders to its formation and function. Here we provide an overview of how the diverse and dynamic functions of glial cells orchestrate essentially all aspects of nervous system formation and function. Radial glia, astrocytes, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, oligodendrocytes, and microglia each influence nervous system development, from neuronal birth, migration, axon specification, and growth through circuit assembly and synaptogenesis. As neural circuits mature, distinct glia fulfill key roles in synapt...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Allen, N. J., Lyons, D. A. Tags: Neuroscience special/review Source Type: news

Dimerization quality control via ubiquitylation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Herhaus, L., Dikic, I. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

Arizona bioscience community honors two of TGen's top scientists
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) Top scientists from TGen, an affiliate of the City of Hope, will be honored today at the 2018 AZBio Awards. Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, TGen Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief, will receive the Arizona Bioscience Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement. Dr. Michael E. Berens, TGen Professor, Deputy Director for Research Resources, and Director of the Cancer and Cell Biology Division, is the Jon W. McGarity Arizona Bioscience Leader of the Year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Silver nanoparticles are toxic for aquatic organisms
(University of the Basque Country) Silver nanoparticles are increasingly being used in consumer products, such as clothing and personal care products, in the medical and pharmaceutical industry, and in the food industry. That is why their presence is expected to increase in the environment where they can exert harmful effects on organisms. The UPV/EHU's 'Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology' research group has analysed adult zebrafish to find out the effects that in the long term can be caused by these silver particles present in fresh water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New cancer-fighting cells enter trials
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Leslie, M. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases In Depth Source Type: news

ER-SURF protein import into mitochondria
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

An ER surface retrieval pathway safeguards the import of mitochondrial membrane proteins in yeast
In this study, we used a genome-wide screen in yeast and identified factors critical for the intracellular sorting of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein Oxa1. The screen uncovered an unexpected path, termed ER-SURF, for targeting of mitochondrial membrane proteins. This pathway retrieves mitochondrial proteins from the ER surface and reroutes them to mitochondria with the aid of the ER-localized chaperone Djp1. Hence, cells use the expanse of the ER surfaces as a fail-safe to maximize productive mitochondrial protein targeting. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hansen, K. G., Aviram, N., Laborenz, J., Bibi, C., Meyer, M., Spang, A., Schuldiner, M., Herrmann, J. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Ripley Named New Director of Mesothelioma Center at Baylor
Thoracic surgeon Dr. R. Taylor Ripley comes to the Mesothelioma Treatment Center at Baylor College of Medicine with the highest possible endorsement. Dr. David Sugarbaker, the world’s most prominent mesothelioma specialist and former director of the prestigious Baylor Lung Institute, recruited Ripley. It was like being anointed by the king. Ripley spent the previous four years at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he built a sterling reputation for surgical, clinical and investigational research excellence. “Dr. Sugarbaker wanted someone to help grow his program. He recruited me to...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Dr. R. Taylor Ripley Leads Mesothelioma Center at Baylor
Thoracic surgeon Dr. R. Taylor Ripley comes to the Mesothelioma Treatment Center at Baylor College of Medicine with the highest possible endorsement. Dr. David Sugarbaker, the world’s most prominent mesothelioma specialist and director of the prestigious Baylor Lung Institute, recruited Ripley. It was like being anointed by the king. Ripley spent the previous four years at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he built a sterling reputation for surgical, clinical and investigational research excellence. “Dr. Sugarbaker wanted someone to help grow his program. He recruited me to do tha...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

New technology transforming vaccine development through faster viral detection
(LumaCyte) Could we finally have a faster, more objective analytical tool to rapidly measure viral infectivity for vaccine development and production? Scientists and bioengineers at Thermo Fisher Scientific and LumaCyte believe we do. This peer reviewed work will be published on Sept. 12 in the prestigious journal, Vaccine, by Elsevier, detailing how LumaCyte's RadianceTM instrument, based on Laser Force Cytology (LFC), offers researchers the ability to rapidly analyze viral vaccines to speed development and production and ensure their effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study links BAP1 protein to tumor suppression in kidney, eye, bile duct and mesothelioma cancers
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have shown how BRCA-associated protein 1 (BAP1) serves as a tumor suppressor gene in kidney, eye, bile duct, mesothelioma and other cancers by regulating a form of cell death called ferroptosis, opening up a potential new area of therapy research. Findings from the study, led by Boyi Gan, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, were published in the Sept. 10 online issue of Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Changes in the architecture around cancer cells can fuel their spread
FINDINGSUCLA researchers have found that the extracellular matrix, the dense network of proteins and carbohydrates that surround a cell, can influence how cells move within the body by regulating their sugar consumption. The study shows that acute changes in a single component of the extracellular matrix can trigger a very rapid change in the metabolism and migration of the cell.  BACKGROUNDGiven its importance in the growth and migration in cancer cells, scientists have intensely studied how glucose metabolism can be regulated in response to a variety of both internal and external cues. But little research has focuse...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dynamics of cell signaling and decoding
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ray, L. B. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases twis Source Type: news

Cancer mutations and targeted drugs can disrupt dynamic signal encoding by the Ras-Erk pathway
The Ras-Erk (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway encodes information in its dynamics; the duration and frequency of Erk activity can specify distinct cell fates. To enable dynamic encoding, temporal information must be accurately transmitted from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. We used optogenetic profiling to show that both oncogenic B-Raf mutations and B-Raf inhibitors can cause corruption of this transmission, so that short pulses of input Ras activity are distorted into abnormally long Erk outputs. These changes can reshape downstream transcription and cell fates, resulting in improper decisions to proli...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bugaj, L. J., Sabnis, A. J., Mitchell, A., Garbarino, J. E., Toettcher, J. E., Bivona, T. G., Lim, W. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Biomembranes 2018 conference: World's leading molecular and cell biologists will meet at MIPT
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) From Oct. 1-5, MIPT will host the fourth Biomembranes conference. This international event is part of the conference series Virtual Human -- Imaging Across Scales. The program of the conference features over 40 lectures by researchers from Russia, the US, Germany, France, China, Japan, and elsewhere, as well as a poster session. The proceedings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USPSTF Updates Cervical Cancer Screening Regimen
A final recommendation statement from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force includes a screening option that says women ages 30-65 may undergo high-risk HPV testing combined with cytology every five years. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

New cervical cancer screening guidelines offer more options
New cervical cancer screening guidelines published in the Journal of the American Medical Association include more screening options including longer intervals between tests for women over 30. The two types of cervical cancer screening include cervical cytology, also known as a Pap smear, and high-risk HPV (hrHPV) testing, both of which can be done by swabbing the cervix during a pelvic exam. A Pap smear can detect abnormal cells or tissues while the hrHPV test looks for the presence of a virus… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Severing enzymes amplify microtubule arrays through lattice GTP-tubulin incorporation
Spastin and katanin sever and destabilize microtubules. Paradoxically, despite their destructive activity they increase microtubule mass in vivo. We combined single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy to show that the elemental step in microtubule severing is the generation of nanoscale damage throughout the microtubule by active extraction of tubulin heterodimers. These damage sites are repaired spontaneously by guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–tubulin incorporation, which rejuvenates and stabilizes the microtubule shaft. Consequently, spastin and katanin increase microtubu...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vemu, A., Szczesna, E., Zehr, E. A., Spector, J. O., Grigorieff, N., Deaconescu, A. M., Roll-Mecak, A. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

An intrinsic S/G2 checkpoint enforced by ATR
The cell cycle is strictly ordered to ensure faithful genome duplication and chromosome segregation. Control mechanisms establish this order by dictating when a cell transitions from one phase to the next. Much is known about the control of the G1/S, G2/M, and metaphase/anaphase transitions, but thus far, no control mechanism has been identified for the S/G2 transition. Here we show that cells transactivate the mitotic gene network as they exit the S phase through a CDK1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1)–directed FOXM1 phosphorylation switch. During normal DNA replication, the checkpoint kinase ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia a...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Saldivar, J. C., Hamperl, S., Bocek, M. J., Chung, M., Bass, T. E., Cisneros-Soberanis, F., Samejima, K., Xie, L., Paulson, J. R., Earnshaw, W. C., Cortez, D., Meyer, T., Cimprich, K. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

An additional cell cycle checkpoint
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Severing to build microtubules
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Karin Reinisch named the Wallace Professor of Cell Biology
Reinisch focuses her research on molecular mechanisms in membrane trafficking and membrane biology. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - August 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Biology experts take center stage at the 2018 North of England Cell Biology Forum
(University of Huddersfield) The event at the University of Huddersfield will showcase the research of doctoral students and early career researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biology experts take centre stage at the 2018 North of England Cell Biology Forum
(University of Huddersfield) The event at the University of Huddersfield will showcase the research of doctoral students and early career researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Madden Launches DartCF
Dean Madden, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Director of the COBRE Institute for Biomolecular Targeting, has received a new NIH program project award to establish the Dartmouth Cystic Fibrosis Research Center (DartCF). This collaborative effort supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases will […] Read More (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - August 17, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Heather Smith Tags: News Source Type: news

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional 'protein knockdown' in vertebrates
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) The research groups led by Dr. J ö rg Mansfeld of the Biotechnology Center of the TU Dresden (BIOTEC) and Dr. Caren Norden of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) have developed a novel synthetic antibody that paves the way for an improved functional analysis of proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A molecular mechanism for Wnt ligand-specific signaling
Wnt signaling is key to many developmental, physiological, and disease processes in which cells seem able to discriminate between multiple Wnt ligands. This selective Wnt recognition or "decoding" capacity has remained enigmatic because Wnt/Frizzled interactions are largely incompatible with monospecific recognition. Gpr124 and Reck enable brain endothelial cells to selectively respond to Wnt7. We show that Reck binds with low micromolar affinity to the intrinsically disordered linker region of Wnt7. Availability of Reck-bound Wnt7 for Frizzled signaling relies on the interaction between Gpr124 and Dishevelled. T...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eubelen, M., Bostaille, N., Cabochette, P., Gauquier, A., Tebabi, P., Dumitru, A. C., Koehler, M., Gut, P., Alsteens, D., Stainier, D. Y. R., Garcia-Pino, A., Vanhollebeke, B. Tags: Cell Biology, Development, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

How Wnt ligands achieve specificity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Development twis Source Type: news

Moving Toward an Earlier Diagnosis of Mesothelioma
This study provided proof of concept for the presence of ctDNA in blood of treatment-naive MPM [malignant pleural mesothelioma] patients by the detection of somatic variants that were identified by analysis of a tumor sample,” the authors wrote. “This opens perspective towards its use in MPM.” The post Moving Toward an Earlier Diagnosis of Mesothelioma appeared first on Mesothelioma Center - Vital Services for Cancer Patients & Families. (Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News)
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 13, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Apoptosis propagates through the cytoplasm as trigger waves
Apoptosis is an evolutionarily conserved form of programmed cell death critical for development and tissue homeostasis in animals. The apoptotic control network includes several positive feedback loops that may allow apoptosis to spread through the cytoplasm in self-regenerating trigger waves. We tested this possibility in cell-free Xenopus laevis egg extracts and observed apoptotic trigger waves with speeds of ~30 micrometers per minute. Fractionation and inhibitor studies implicated multiple feedback loops in generating the waves. Apoptotic oocytes and eggs exhibited surface waves with speeds of ~30 micrometers per minut...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Cheng, X., Ferrell, J. E. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news