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UCLA research may explain some causes of infertility and miscarriage
A new study in the journal Nature Cell Biology has uncovered information about a key stage that human embryonic cells must pass through just before an embryo implants. The research, led by UCLA biologist Amander Clark, could help explain certain causes of infertility and spontaneous miscarriage.Infertility affects around 10 percent of the U.S. population, and roughly 15 to 20 percent of all pregnancies in the U.S. end in miscarriage. In many cases, the causes of infertility and miscarriage are unknown.A team led by Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology and member of the  Eli and Edythe Br...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hologic wins FDA PMA for ThinPrep automated Pap test imager
Hologic (NSDQ:HOLX) said today it won FDA premarket approval for its ThinPrep integrated imager designed for the automated imaging of Pap tests. The Marlborough, Mass.-based company’s ThinPrep imager is designed to aid cytology technicians in identifying abnormal cells, and combines an imaging station and review scope into a single unit. The system takes approximately 90 seconds to analyze samples, the company said. “Approval of the ThinPrep Integrated Imager brings the benefits of ThinPrep automated Pap imaging to small- and mid-sized laboratories in the United States, and of course to their patients...
Source: Mass Device - April 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Imaging Pre-Market Approval (PMA) Women's Health Hologic Source Type: news

DOR protein deficiency favors the development of obesity
(Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)) According to a recent study published by researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and CIBERDEM in Nature Cell Biology, deficiency in the protein DOR (also called TP53INP2) stimulates the generation of new adipose cells (which store fat) and leads to a less harmful kind of obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Continuing the resolution revolution
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology, Physics twis Source Type: news

An innovative approach for a rare disease
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kelly, P. N. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases twis Source Type: news

MFN2 agonists reverse mitochondrial defects in preclinical models of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A
Mitofusins (MFNs) promote fusion-mediated mitochondrial content exchange and subcellular trafficking. Mutations in Mfn2 cause neurodegenerative Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A). We showed that MFN2 activity can be determined by Met376 and His380 interactions with Asp725 and Leu727 and controlled by PINK1 kinase–mediated phosphorylation of adjacent MFN2 Ser378. Small-molecule mimics of the peptide-peptide interface of MFN2 disrupted this interaction, allosterically activating MFN2 and promoting mitochondrial fusion. These first-in-class mitofusin agonists overcame dominant mitochondrial defects provoked in ...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rocha, A. G., Franco, A., Krezel, A. M., Rumsey, J. M., Alberti, J. M., Knight, W. C., Biris, N., Zacharioudakis, E., Janetka, J. W., Baloh, R. H., Kitsis, R. N., Mochly-Rosen, D., Townsend, R. R., Gavathiotis, E., Dorn, G. W. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Observing the cell in its native state: Imaging subcellular dynamics in multicellular organisms
True physiological imaging of subcellular dynamics requires studying cells within their parent organisms, where all the environmental cues that drive gene expression, and hence the phenotypes that we actually observe, are present. A complete understanding also requires volumetric imaging of the cell and its surroundings at high spatiotemporal resolution, without inducing undue stress on either. We combined lattice light-sheet microscopy with adaptive optics to achieve, across large multicellular volumes, noninvasive aberration-free imaging of subcellular processes, including endocytosis, organelle remodeling during mitosis...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Liu, T.-L., Upadhyayula, S., Milkie, D. E., Singh, V., Wang, K., Swinburne, I. A., Mosaliganti, K. R., Collins, Z. M., Hiscock, T. W., Shea, J., Kohrman, A. Q., Medwig, T. N., Dambournet, D., Forster, R., Cunniff, B., Ruan, Y., Yashiro, H., Scholpp, S., M Tags: Cell Biology, Online Only, Physics r-articles Source Type: news

Google unveils prototype augmented-reality, AI-powered light microscope system
Google (NSDQ:GOOG) this week presented initial data from a prototype augmented reality microscope platform it’s developing for advanced cancer detection, according to a research blog post from the tech giant. The platform consists of a modified light microscope for real-time image analysis and presents analysis from a machine-learning algorithm directly into the users field of view, Google said. Google said the platform could be retrofitted into existing light microscopes generally used in hospitals and clinics using low-cost, readily-available components without the need for digital versions of the scopes. The ...
Source: Mass Device - April 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Imaging Research & Development google Source Type: news

The mitoCPR unclogs mitochondria
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

A close-up view of oligosaccharyltransferase
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Autoantibody redemption through rapid mutations
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: Cell Biology, Immunology twis Source Type: news

Structural basis for coupling protein transport and N-glycosylation at the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum
Protein synthesis, transport, and N-glycosylation are coupled at the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum by complex formation of a ribosome, the Sec61 protein-conducting channel, and oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). Here we used different cryo–electron microscopy approaches to determine structures of native and solubilized ribosome-Sec61-OST complexes. A molecular model for the catalytic OST subunit STT3A (staurosporine and temperature sensitive 3A) revealed how it is integrated into the OST and how STT3-paralog specificity for translocon-associated OST is achieved. The OST subunit DC2 was placed at the interface between...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Braunger, K., Pfeffer, S., Shrimal, S., Gilmore, R., Berninghausen, O., Mandon, E. C., Becker, T., Förster, F., Beckmann, R. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Germinal center antibody mutation trajectories are determined by rapid self/foreign discrimination
Antibodies have the specificity to differentiate foreign antigens that mimic self antigens, but it remains unclear how such specificity is acquired. In a mouse model, we generated B cells displaying an antibody that cross-reacts with two related protein antigens expressed on self versus foreign cells. B cell anergy was imposed by self antigen but reversed upon challenge with high-density foreign antigen, leading to germinal center recruitment and antibody gene hypermutation. Single-cell analysis detected rapid selection for mutations that decrease self affinity and slower selection for epistatic mutations that specifically...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Burnett, D. L., Langley, D. B., Schofield, P., Hermes, J. R., Chan, T. D., Jackson, J., Bourne, K., Reed, J. H., Patterson, K., Porebski, B. T., Brink, R., Christ, D., Goodnow, C. C. Tags: Cell Biology, Immunology reports Source Type: news

MitoCPR--A surveillance pathway that protects mitochondria in response to protein import stress
Mitochondrial functions are essential for cell viability and rely on protein import into the organelle. Various disease and stress conditions can lead to mitochondrial import defects. We found that inhibition of mitochondrial import in budding yeast activated a surveillance mechanism, mitoCPR, that improved mitochondrial import and protected mitochondria during import stress. mitoCPR induced expression of Cis1, which associated with the mitochondrial translocase to reduce the accumulation of mitochondrial precursor proteins at the mitochondrial translocase. Clearance of precursor proteins depended on the Cis1-interacting A...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Weidberg, H., Amon, A. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Automated Cervical Screening Matches Cytology Triage (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Study has'groundbreaking'potential, tech could extend screening/triage services (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - April 11, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Cell biology: Dynamics of microtubules
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Filamentous polymers called microtubules play vital roles in chromosome segregation and molecular transport. An LMU team has now examined how microtubule lengths vary in response to changes in the availability of their protein components. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Triggered recruitment of ESCRT machinery promotes endolysosomal repair
Endolysosomes can be damaged by diverse materials. Terminally damaged compartments are degraded by lysophagy, but pathways that repair salvageable organelles are poorly understood. Here we found that the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery, known to mediate budding and fission on endolysosomes, also plays an essential role in their repair. ESCRTs were rapidly recruited to acutely injured endolysosomes through a pathway requiring calcium and ESCRT-activating factors that was independent of lysophagy. We used live-cell imaging to demonstrate that ESCRTs responded to small perforations in endoly...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Skowyra, M. L., Schlesinger, P. H., Naismith, T. V., Hanson, P. I. Tags: Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Hepatic thrombopoietin is required for bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell maintenance
Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) maintenance depends on extrinsic cues. Currently, only local signals arising from the bone marrow niche have been shown to maintain HSCs. However, it is not known whether systemic factors also sustain HSCs. We assessed the physiological source of thrombopoietin (TPO), a key cytokine required for maintaining HSCs. Using TpoDsRed-CreER knock-in mice, we showed that TPO is expressed by hepatocytes but not by bone marrow cells. Deletion of Tpo from hematopoietic cells, osteoblasts, or bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells does not affect HSC number or function. However, when Tpo is deleted from he...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Decker, M., Leslie, J., Liu, Q., Ding, L. Tags: Cell Biology, Development reports Source Type: news

A quick fix for leaky endosomes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Signaling hematopoietic stem cells from afar
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Development twis Source Type: news

ESCRTs offer repair service
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gutierrez, M. G., Carlton, J. G. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

Shedding New Light on Cell Sizing and Division
A study by a team of researchers at Geisel School of Medicine, featured in the Journal of Cell Biology, is revealing new details about cell cycle progression. Lead author James Moseley, PhD, describes how his team was able to track an elusive protein called Wee1 at the cell surface, and determine how it helps to regulate cell size and division. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - April 4, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: News Research Source Type: news

Binding of ISRIB reveals a regulatory site in the nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B
We describe a 4.1-angstrom-resolution cryo–electron microscopy structure of human eIF2B with an ISRIB molecule bound at the interface between the β and regulatory subunits. Mutagenesis of residues lining this pocket altered the hierarchical cellular response to ISRIB analogs in vivo and ISRIB binding in vitro. Our findings point to a site in eIF2B that can be exploited by ISRIB to regulate translation. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zyryanova, A. F., Weis, F., Faille, A., Alard, A. A., Crespillo-Casado, A., Sekine, Y., Harding, H. P., Allen, F., Parts, L., Fromont, C., Fischer, P. M., Warren, A. J., Ron, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

CDx & #039;s WATS3D Highly Effective in Real World Setting
CDx Diagnostics said results from a recent multicenter prospective trial show the use of its WATS3D test increases the detection of both Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal dysplasia by more than 80%. The results were published in the latest issue of United European Gastroenterology Journal and featured in the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE’s) Scope Tech Talk Video Series. The trial was conducted at 25 community-based gastrointestinal (GI) centers across the U.S. In the study, 4,203 patients were tested for esophageal disease. The findings show that with the inclusion of WATS3D overal...
Source: MDDI - March 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Design News Source Type: news

Locally translated mTOR controls axonal local translation in nerve injury
How is protein synthesis initiated locally in neurons? We found that mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) was activated and then up-regulated in injured axons, owing to local translation of mTOR messenger RNA (mRNA). This mRNA was transported into axons by the cell size–regulating RNA-binding protein nucleolin. Furthermore, mTOR controlled local translation in injured axons. This included regulation of its own translation and that of retrograde injury signaling molecules such as importin β1 and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Deletion of the mTOR 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) in mi...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Terenzio, M., Koley, S., Samra, N., Rishal, I., Zhao, Q., Sahoo, P. K., Urisman, A., Marvaldi, L., Oses-Prieto, J. A., Forester, C., Gomes, C., Kalinski, A. L., Di Pizio, A., Doron-Mandel, E., Perry, R. B.-T., Koppel, I., Twiss, J. L., Burlingame, A. L., Tags: Cell Biology, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

Local control of localized protein synthesis
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Lysosome activation clears aggregates and enhances quiescent neural stem cell activation during aging
In the adult brain, the neural stem cell (NSC) pool comprises quiescent and activated populations with distinct roles. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that quiescent and activated NSCs exhibited differences in their protein homeostasis network. Whereas activated NSCs had active proteasomes, quiescent NSCs contained large lysosomes. Quiescent NSCs from young mice accumulated protein aggregates, and many of these aggregates were stored in large lysosomes. Perturbation of lysosomal activity in quiescent NSCs affected protein-aggregate accumulation and the ability of quiescent NSCs to activate. During aging, quiescent NSCs di...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Leeman, D. S., Hebestreit, K., Ruetz, T., Webb, A. E., McKay, A., Pollina, E. A., Dulken, B. W., Zhao, X., Yeo, R. W., Ho, T. T., Mahmoudi, S., Devarajan, K., Passegue, E., Rando, T. A., Frydman, J., Brunet, A. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Diurnal transcriptome atlas of a primate across major neural and peripheral tissues
We report the diurnal transcriptome of 64 tissues, including 22 brain regions, sampled every 2 hours over 24 hours, from the primate Papio anubis (baboon). Genomic transcription was highly rhythmic, with up to 81.7% of protein-coding genes showing daily rhythms in expression. In addition to tissue-specific gene expression, the rhythmic transcriptome imparts another layer of functional specialization. Most ubiquitously expressed genes that participate in essential cellular functions exhibit rhythmic expression in a tissue-specific manner. The peak phases of rhythmic gene expression clustered around dawn and dusk, with a &qu...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mure, L. S., Le, H. D., Benegiamo, G., Chang, M. W., Rios, L., Jillani, N., Ngotho, M., Kariuki, T., Dkhissi-Benyahya, O., Cooper, H. M., Panda, S. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Chemically induced proximity in biology and medicine
Proximity, or the physical closeness of molecules, is a pervasive regulatory mechanism in biology. For example, most posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, methylation, and acetylation promote proximity of molecules to play deterministic roles in cellular processes. To understand the role of proximity in biologic mechanisms, chemical inducers of proximity (CIPs) were developed to synthetically model biologically regulated recruitment. Chemically induced proximity allows for precise temporal control of transcription, signaling cascades, chromatin regulation, protein folding, localization, and degradation, ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stanton, B. Z., Chory, E. J., Crabtree, G. R. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Online Only review Source Type: news

Defining the earliest step of cardiovascular lineage segregation by single-cell RNA-seq
Mouse heart development arises from Mesp1-expressing cardiovascular progenitors (CPs) that are specified during gastrulation. The molecular processes that control early regional and lineage segregation of CPs have been unclear. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing of wild-type and Mesp1-null CPs in mice. We showed that populations of Mesp1 CPs are molecularly distinct and span the continuum between epiblast and later mesodermal cells, including hematopoietic progenitors. Single-cell transcriptome analysis of Mesp1-deficient CPs showed that Mesp1 is required for the exit from the pluripotent state and the induction of th...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lescroart, F., Wang, X., Lin, X., Swedlund, B., Gargouri, S., Sanchez-Danes, A., Moignard, V., Dubois, C., Paulissen, C., Kinston, S., Göttgens, B., Blanpain, C. Tags: Cell Biology, Development reports Source Type: news

C1orf106 is a colitis risk gene that regulates stability of epithelial adherens junctions
Polymorphisms in C1orf106 are associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the function of C1orf106 and the consequences of disease-associated polymorphisms are unknown. Here we demonstrate that C1orf106 regulates adherens junction stability by regulating the degradation of cytohesin-1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that controls activation of ARF6. By limiting cytohesin-1–dependent ARF6 activation, C1orf106 stabilizes adherens junctions. Consistent with this model, C1orf106–/– mice exhibit defects in the intestinal epithelial cell barrier, a phenotype observed in IB...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mohanan, V., Nakata, T., Desch, A. N., Levesque, C., Boroughs, A., Guzman, G., Cao, Z., Creasey, E., Yao, J., Boucher, G., Charron, G., Bhan, A. K., Schenone, M., Carr, S. A., Reinecker, H.-C., Daly, M. J., Rioux, J. D., Lassen, K. G., Xavier, R. J. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Committing the heart
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Development twis Source Type: news

Overcoming a barrier to IBD
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kelly, P. N. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases twis Source Type: news

Regulating molecule proximity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Major step found in cellular response to stress caused by pathological insult
(The Wistar Institute) A new study conducted by researchers at The Wistar Institute revealed how a key protein residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) helps cells respond to stress. This process is especially important for B cells to respond to severe stress conditions and their ability to produce antibodies. The research was published online in the Journal of Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

AIBS Selects 2018 EPPLA Winners
The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) has selected Joanna “Jo” Downes Bairzin and Karena Nguyen to receive the 2018 AIBS Emerging Public Policy Leadership Award (EPPLA). The EPPLA recognizes graduate students in the biological sciences who have demonstrated leadership skills and an aptitude for future professional success working at the intersection of science and public policy. Joanna Bairzin is a doctoral candidate in molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley, where her research is focused on the regulation of developmental patterning genes by an oncoprotein, which c...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 5, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

How a yeast cell helps crack open the 'black box' behind artificial intelligence
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a visible neural network and used it to build DCell, a virtual model of a functioning brewer's yeast cell. To do this, they amassed all knowledge of cell biology in one place and created a hierarchy of these cellular components. Then they mapped standard machine learning algorithms to this knowledgebase. DCell can be viewed at d-cell.ucsd.edu. The technical details are published March 5 in Nature Methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Improved spy tactics for single cells
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kelly, P. N. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

The great escape
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Single-cell bioluminescence imaging of deep tissue in freely moving animals
Bioluminescence is a natural light source based on luciferase catalysis of its substrate luciferin. We performed directed evolution on firefly luciferase using a red-shifted and highly deliverable luciferin analog to establish AkaBLI, an all-engineered bioluminescence in vivo imaging system. AkaBLI produced emissions in vivo that were brighter by a factor of 100 to 1000 than conventional systems, allowing noninvasive visualization of single cells deep inside freely moving animals. Single tumorigenic cells trapped in the mouse lung vasculature could be visualized. In the mouse brain, genetic labeling with neural activity se...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Iwano, S., Sugiyama, M., Hama, H., Watakabe, A., Hasegawa, N., Kuchimaru, T., Tanaka, K. Z., Takahashi, M., Ishida, Y., Hata, J., Shimozono, S., Namiki, K., Fukano, T., Kiyama, M., Okano, H., Kizaka-Kondoh, S., McHugh, T. J., Yamamori, T., Hioki, H., Maki Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

BAK/BAX macropores facilitate mitochondrial herniation and mtDNA efflux during apoptosis
Mitochondrial apoptosis is mediated by BAK and BAX, two proteins that induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, leading to cytochrome c release and activation of apoptotic caspases. In the absence of active caspases, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) triggers the innate immune cGAS/STING pathway, causing dying cells to secrete type I interferon. How cGAS gains access to mtDNA remains unclear. We used live-cell lattice light-sheet microscopy to examine the mitochondrial network in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We found that after BAK/BAX activation and cytochrome c loss, the mitochondrial network broke down and large BAK...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: McArthur, K., Whitehead, L. W., Heddleston, J. M., Li, L., Padman, B. S., Oorschot, V., Geoghegan, N. D., Chappaz, S., Davidson, S., San Chin, H., Lane, R. M., Dramicanin, M., Saunders, T. L., Sugiana, C., Lessene, R., Osellame, L. D., Chew, T.-L., Dewson Tags: Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

New analytical method provides an insight into additional chromosomes
(AKSON Russian Science Communication Association) A new technique promises to identify additional chromosomes involved in carcinogenesis. A method for analyzing additional chromosomes was proposed by a team of scientists at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Institute of Cytology and Genetics (Siberian branch of Russian Academy of Sciences), NSU Laboratory of Structural, Functional and Comparative Genomics and the University of Belgrade (Serbia) and published in the journal Chromosoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How the insulin receptor works
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen at the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus of TU Dresden together with colleagues from Rockefeller University New York succeeded for the first time in the visualization of the insulin receptor activation. The results of this collaborative work have now been published in the 'Journal of Cell Biology'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Geffen School Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lipopolysaccharide is transported to the cell surface by a membrane-to-membrane protein bridge
Gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane that serves as a barrier to noxious agents in the environment. This protective function is dependent on lipopolysaccharide, a large glycolipid located in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. Lipopolysaccharide is synthesized at the cytoplasmic membrane and must be transported to the cell surface. To understand this transport process, we reconstituted membrane-to-membrane movement of lipopolysaccharide by incorporating purified inner and outer membrane transport complexes into separate proteoliposomes. Transport involved stable association between the inner and outer membran...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sherman, D. J., Xie, R., Taylor, R. J., George, A. H., Okuda, S., Foster, P. J., Needleman, D. J., Kahne, D. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

How lipopolysaccharides bridge the gap
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

'CAMERA records cell action with new CRISPR tricks
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Cell Biology, Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

Global hematology diagnostics market estimated to expand at a robust CAGR over 2021
(Health Affairs) Hematology includes various IVD technologies such as blood analysis, flow cytometry, immunodiagnostics, molecular diagnostics, hemostasis, histology, and cytology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A pathway for mitotic chromosome formation
Mitotic chromosomes fold as compact arrays of chromatin loops. To identify the pathway of mitotic chromosome formation, we combined imaging and Hi-C analysis of synchronous DT40 cell cultures with polymer simulations. Here we show that in prophase, the interphase organization is rapidly lost in a condensin-dependent manner, and arrays of consecutive 60-kilobase (kb) loops are formed. During prometaphase, ~80-kb inner loops are nested within ~400-kb outer loops. The loop array acquires a helical arrangement with consecutive loops emanating from a central "spiral staircase" condensin scaffold. The size of helical t...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gibcus, J. H., Samejima, K., Goloborodko, A., Samejima, I., Naumova, N., Nuebler, J., Kanemaki, M. T., Xie, L., Paulson, J. R., Earnshaw, W. C., Mirny, L. A., Dekker, J. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news