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USPSTF Offers Updated Cervical Cancer Screening Regimen
A new draft statement from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force includes a recommendation to screen women ages 30-65 for cervical cancer every three years using cytology alone or every five years using high-risk HPV testing alone. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - September 22, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Research Technician in Molecular and Cell Biology at Imperial College London
Salary: £27,190 -£29,250 per annumContract: Full Time Fixed Term up to four yearsCampus: Hammersmith Campus Closing Date: Tuesday 3 October 2017 (Midnight BST)A Research Technician position in Molecular and Cell Biology is available in the Department of Medicine, Imperial College London. You will work on a programme funded by a Wellcome Trust Joint Investigator Award entitled Cellular thyroid hormone availability: regulation of development and tissue repair, and pathogenesis of degenerative disease.&nb...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 21, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Location, location, location
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology, Engineering twis Source Type: news

Phase separation and cellular organization
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ray, L. B. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

RNA localization feeds translation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gaspar, I., Ephrussi, A. Tags: Cell Biology, Engineering perspective Source Type: news

Global mRNA polarization regulates translation efficiency in the intestinal epithelium
Asymmetric messenger RNA (mRNA) localization facilitates efficient translation in cells such as neurons and fibroblasts. However, the extent and importance of mRNA polarization in epithelial tissues are unclear. Here, we used single-molecule transcript imaging and subcellular transcriptomics to uncover global apical-basal intracellular polarization of mRNA in the mouse intestinal epithelium. The localization of mRNAs did not generally overlap protein localization. Instead, ribosomes were more abundant on the apical sides, and apical transcripts were consequently more efficiently translated. Refeeding of fasted mice elicite...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Moor, A. E., Golan, M., Massasa, E. E., Lemze, D., Weizman, T., Shenhav, R., Baydatch, S., Mizrahi, O., Winkler, R., Golani, O., Stern-Ginossar, N., Itzkovitz, S. Tags: Cell Biology, Engineering reports Source Type: news

Liquid phase condensation in cell physiology and disease
Phase transitions are ubiquitous in nonliving matter, and recent discoveries have shown that they also play a key role within living cells. Intracellular liquid-liquid phase separation is thought to drive the formation of condensed liquid-like droplets of protein, RNA, and other biomolecules, which form in the absence of a delimiting membrane. Recent studies have elucidated many aspects of the molecular interactions underlying the formation of these remarkable and ubiquitous droplets and the way in which such interactions dictate their material properties, composition, and phase behavior. Here, we review these exciting dev...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Shin, Y., Brangwynne, C. P. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology review Source Type: news

Primary HPV Testing Bests Cytology for Cervical Screening Primary HPV Testing Bests Cytology for Cervical Screening
Primary HPV testing is better than cytology for detecting high-grade precancerous cervical lesions, according to results from the Compass trial in Australia.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Primary HPV Screening Detects More Lesions Than Cytology in Vaccinated Population (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening — compared with cytology-based screening — is associated with higher detection rates for precancerous cervical … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - September 20, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Screening for cervical abnormalities in women offered HPV vaccination
(PLOS) Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing detects a higher number of precancerous cervical lesions than cytology-based Pap smears in a female population including a proportion offered HPV vaccination, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Karen Canfell of Cancer Council New South Wales, Australia, researchers at the Victorian Cytology Service, Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

IUPUI cell biologist tackles age-related hearing loss
(Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science) Cell biologist Benjamin J. Perrin at the School of Science at IUPUI is advancing knowledge of age-related hearing loss with the goal of informing possible therapeutic cell-regeneration approaches to the often-debilitating problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sponsored Collection | SPReading the word: The importance of binding kinetics
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Botany, Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases, Neuroscience, Pharmacology, Toxicology opms-sups Source Type: news

Webinar | Deciphering cancer: Understanding tumor invasion and the metastatic microenvironment
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lyden, D. C., Rafii, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Development, Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology opms-sups Source Type: news

Thirst-associated preoptic neurons encode an aversive motivational drive
Water deprivation produces a drive to seek and consume water. How neural activity creates this motivation remains poorly understood. We used activity-dependent genetic labeling to characterize neurons activated by water deprivation in the hypothalamic median preoptic nucleus (MnPO). Single-cell transcriptional profiling revealed that dehydration-activated MnPO neurons consist of a single excitatory cell type. After optogenetic activation of these neurons, mice drank water and performed an operant lever-pressing task for water reward with rates that scaled with stimulation frequency. This stimulation was aversive, and instr...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Allen, W. E., DeNardo, L. A., Chen, M. Z., Liu, C. D., Loh, K. M., Fenno, L. E., Ramakrishnan, C., Deisseroth, K., Luo, L. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Thirst-quenching neural mechanisms
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stern, P. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Neurons that drive and quench thirst
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gizowski, C., Bourque, C. W. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

USPSTF Backs Cervical Cancer Screening With Cytology or hrHPV
Recommendations for screening with cytology alone every three years or hrHPV testing every five years (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - September 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Nursing, Oncology, Pathology, Institutional, Source Type: news

USPSTF Draft Recommendation Eliminates Cervical Cytology-HPV Cotesting for Women Over 30 (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM Women aged 30 –65 should undergo cervical cancer screening with either cervical cytology alone every 3 years or high-risk human papillomavirus … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - September 12, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Muscle nuclei: May the force be with you
(Instituto de Medicina Molecular) A group of researchers at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa has revealed the mechanism by which cellular nuclei reach their position within muscle cells. This discovery, now published in Nature Cell Biology, can have important implications in therapeutic strategies to treat muscular diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Science of Size
Cell biologist Rebecca Heald studies the factors that determine an animal ’s size.Read more. (Source: NIGMS Findings)
Source: NIGMS Findings - September 7, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

The road to Crohn's disease
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kaser, A., Blumberg, R. S. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

Foiling bad bugs' sneaky tricks
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Paneth cells secrete lysozyme via secretory autophagy during bacterial infection of the intestine
Intestinal Paneth cells limit bacterial invasion by secreting antimicrobial proteins, including lysozyme. However, invasive pathogens can disrupt the Golgi apparatus, interfering with secretion and compromising intestinal antimicrobial defense. Here we show that during bacterial infection, lysozyme is rerouted via secretory autophagy, an autophagy-based alternative secretion pathway. Secretory autophagy was triggered in Paneth cells by bacteria-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, required extrinsic signals from innate lymphoid cells, and limited bacterial dissemination. Secretory autophagy was disrupted in Paneth ce...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bel, S., Pendse, M., Wang, Y., Li, Y., Ruhn, K. A., Hassell, B., Leal, T., Winter, S. E., Xavier, R. J., Hooper, L. V. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

New book on Targeting Cancer from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press) The 81st Cold Spring Harbor Symposium focused on Targeting Cancer. The implications of how the underlying science can drive improvements in diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches was a major theme throughout the Symposium. The topics covered at the meeting included: cancer genes and genomes; cancer pathways; tumor cell biology; cancer growth& progression; innate& adaptive immune responses; and enabling technologies. Several speakers participated in interviews during the course of the Symposium week and transcripts of those videos and the Dorcas Cummings lecture are ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How microtubules organize in embryos
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Development twis Source Type: news

A microtubule-organizing center directing intracellular transport in the early mouse embryo
The centrosome is the primary microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) of most animal cells; however, this organelle is absent during early mammalian development. Therefore, the mechanism by which the mammalian embryo organizes its microtubules (MTs) is unclear. We visualize MT bridges connecting pairs of cells and show that the cytokinetic bridge does not undergo stereotypical abscission after cell division. Instead, it serves as scaffold for the accumulation of the MT minus-end–stabilizing protein CAMSAP3 throughout interphase, thereby transforming this structure into a noncentrosomal MTOC. Transport of the cell adhesi...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zenker, J., White, M. D., Templin, R. M., Parton, R. G., Thorn-Seshold, O., Bissiere, S., Plachta, N. Tags: Cell Biology, Development reports Source Type: news

Webinar | Proteogenomic strategies to advance drug development and precision medicine
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mälarstig, A., Gyllensten, U. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Development, Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology opms-sups Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. on the FDA ’ s new policy steps and enforcement efforts to ensure proper oversight of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine
One of the most promising new fields of science and medicine is the area of cell therapies and their use in regenerative medicine. These new technologies, most of which are in early stages of development, hold significant promise for transformative and potentially curative treatments for some of humanity ’ s most troubling and intractable maladies. Recent advances in our basic knowledge of the pathways involved in tissue damage and regeneration have combined with remarkable progress in adult stem cell biology to put us at a genuine inflection point in the history of medicine. The prospect of clinical tissue repair st...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - August 28, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. on the FDA ’s new policy steps and enforcement efforts to ensure proper oversight of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine
One of the most promising new fields of science and medicine is the area of cell therapies and their use in regenerative medicine. These new technologies, most of which are in early stages of development, hold significant promise for transformative and potentially curative treatments for some of humanity ’s most troubling and intractable maladies. Recent advances in our basic knowledge of the pathways involved in tissue damage and regeneration have combined with remarkable progress in adult stem cell biology to put us at a genuine inflection point in the history of medicine. The prospect of clinic al tissue repair st...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - August 28, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Actin protects mammalian eggs against chromosome segregation errors
Chromosome segregation is driven by a spindle that is made of microtubules but is generally thought to be independent of actin. Here, we report an unexpected actin-dependent mechanism that drives the accurate alignment and segregation of chromosomes in mammalian eggs. Prominent actin filaments permeated the microtubule spindle in eggs of several mammalian species, including humans. Disrupting actin in mouse eggs led to significantly increased numbers of misaligned chromosomes as well as lagging chromosomes during meiosis I and II. We found that actin drives accurate chromosome segregation by promoting the formation of func...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mogessie, B., Schuh, M. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Actin helps chromosome segregation in eggs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Actin divides to conquer
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Maiato, H., Ferras, C. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology perspective Source Type: news

How a non-coding RNA encourages cancer growth and metastasis
(Medical University of South Carolina) A pro-tumor environment in the cell can encourage a gene to produce an alternative form of RNA that enables cancer to spread, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Peroxisomes identified as 'fighters' in the battle against bacterial infections
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) University of Alberta researchers have found that peroxisomes are required for cells in the innate immune response to bacteria and fungi. Research Associate Francesca Di Cara, together with Richard Rachubinski, professor and chair of the Department of Cell Biology, and Andrew Simmonds, cell biology associate professor, found that peroxisomes are necessary for proper functioning of the innate immune system, the body's first line of defense against microorganisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Webinar | Humanized mouse models in checkpoint inhibitor development
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Joyce-Shaikh, B., Keck, J. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Development, Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology opms-sups Source Type: news

UCLA scientists identify a new way to activate stem cells to make hair grow
In this study, Christofk and Lowry, ofEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, found that hair follicle stem cell metabolism is different from other cells of the skin. Cellular metabolism involves the breakdown of the nutrients needed for cells to divide, make energy and respond to their environment. The process of metabolism uses enzymes that alter these nutrients to produce “metabolites.” As hair follicle stem cells consume the nutrient glucose — a form of sugar — from the bloodstream, they process the glucose to eventually produce a metabolite called py...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cytology versus HPV testing for cervical cancer screening in the general population: a DTA Review from the Cochrane Gynaecological, Neuro-oncology and Orphan Cancers Group, (CGNOC)
Cochrane Reviews are systematic reviews of research in health care and policy. They are internationally recognized as a high-quality source of evidence for decision-making. They collate and summarize all the best available research evidence on the effects of healthcare interventions or the accuracy of diagnostic tests into a systematic review.Diagnostic Test Accuracy Reviews (DTA) provide essential information regarding the accuracy of the available diagnostic tools for key decision makers, including patients, clinicians, guideline developers and researchers.  The purpose of a Cochrane DTA review is very like the purp...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 14, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Genomic exploration of the diversity, ecology, and evolution of the archaeal domain of life
About 40 years ago, Archaea were recognized as a major prokaryotic domain of life besides Bacteria. Recently, cultivation-independent sequencing methods have produced a wealth of genomic data for previously unidentified archaeal lineages, several of which appear to represent newly revealed branches in the tree of life. Analyses of some recently obtained genomes have uncovered previously unknown metabolic traits and provided insights into the evolution of archaea and their relationship to eukaryotes. On the basis of our current understanding, much archaeal diversity still defies genomic exploration. Efforts to obtain and st...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Spang, A., Caceres, E. F., Ettema, T. J. G. Tags: Evolution, Online Only review Source Type: news

UBE2O is a quality control factor for orphans of multiprotein complexes
Many nascent proteins are assembled into multiprotein complexes of defined stoichiometry. Imbalances in the synthesis of individual subunits result in orphans. How orphans are selectively eliminated to maintain protein homeostasis is poorly understood. Here, we found that the conserved ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2O directly recognized juxtaposed basic and hydrophobic patches on unassembled proteins to mediate ubiquitination without a separate ubiquitin ligase. In reticulocytes, where UBE2O is highly up-regulated, unassembled α-globin molecules that failed to assemble with β-globin were selectively ubiquitin...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Yanagitani, K., Juszkiewicz, S., Hegde, R. S. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Removing orphan proteins from the system
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

New developments for protein quality control
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hampton, R. Y., Dargemont, C. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

UBE2O remodels the proteome during terminal erythroid differentiation
During terminal differentiation, the global protein complement is remodeled, as epitomized by erythrocytes, whose cytosol is ~98% globin. The erythroid proteome undergoes a rapid transition at the reticulocyte stage; however, the mechanisms driving programmed elimination of preexisting cytosolic proteins are unclear. We found that a mutation in the murine Ube2o gene, which encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme induced during erythropoiesis, results in anemia. Proteomic analysis suggested that UBE2O is a broad-spectrum ubiquitinating enzyme that remodels the erythroid proteome. In particular, ribosome elimination, a hallma...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nguyen, A. T., Prado, M. A., Schmidt, P. J., Sendamarai, A. K., Wilson-Grady, J. T., Min, M., Campagna, D. R., Tian, G., Shi, Y., Dederer, V., Kawan, M., Kuehnle, N., Paulo, J. A., Yao, Y., Weiss, M. J., Justice, M. J., Gygi, S. P., Fleming, M. D., Finley Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Understanding the constant dialogue that goes on between our gut and our brain
Just past midnight on Sept. 26, 1983, Lt. Colonel Stanislav Petrov, a member of the Soviet Air Defense Forces serving as the command-center duty officer for a nuclear early-warning system, faced a decision with unimaginable consequences.Cold War tensions were running hot. The Soviet Union had recently shot down Korean Air Lines Flight 007, killing all 269 passengers and crew aboard the Boeing 747. The Soviets claimed the plane was on a spy mission and represented a deliberate provocation by the United States.Now, in a bunker outside of Moscow where Petrov was stationed, alarm bells blared as Soviet satellites detected five...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 26, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat subtype of ovarian cancer identified
(The Wistar Institute) A potential new therapeutic strategy for a difficult-to-treat form of ovarian cancer has been discovered by Wistar scientists. The findings were published online in   Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research targets long-term brain deficits in cardiac arrest survivors
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) Research conducted by Jason Middleton, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy, and Neuroscience at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and colleagues may lead to a treatment to prevent long-term sensory problems by restoring normal brain function in survivors of cardiac arrest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Noninvasive Urine Test Predicts Bladder Cancer Recurrence Noninvasive Urine Test Predicts Bladder Cancer Recurrence
A new noninvasive test was more predictive of bladder cancer recurrence than standard cytology and cystoscopy.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Lorenz Studer awarded the 2017 Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize
(Gladstone Institutes) Lorenz   P. Studer, MD, was announced today as the winner of the 2017 Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize by the Gladstone Institutes. Studer is the director of the Center for Stem Cell Biology and a member of the Developmental Biology Program at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HPV Triage After Abnormal Cervical Cytology Detects CIN Earlier
Women who undergo HPV testing following a test showing abnormal cytology have earlier detection of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, compared to those who do not undergo HPV testing. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - July 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: Cervical Cancer Gynecologic Cancers News Source Type: news

ASHG honors Nicholas Katsanis with 2017 Curt Stern Award
(American Society of Human Genetics) ASHG has named Nicholas Katsanis, PhD, Director of the Center for Human Disease Modeling, Professor of Cell Biology, and Brumley Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics at Duke University, as the 2017 recipient of the Curt Stern Award. This annual award, named for the late pioneering geneticist Curt Stern, PhD, recognizes genetics and genomics researchers who have made significant scientific contributions during the past decade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

HPV Testing Speeds Cancer Diagnosis When Cytology Is Confusing HPV Testing Speeds Cancer Diagnosis When Cytology Is Confusing
Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in women with cytology showing atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) in the cervix leads to faster and more complete diagnosis, according to new research published in JAMA Oncology.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news