Ubiquitin-dependent chloroplast-associated protein degradation in plants
Chloroplasts contain thousands of nucleus-encoded proteins that are imported from the cytosol by translocases in the chloroplast envelope membranes. Proteolytic regulation of the translocases is critically important, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We applied forward genetics and proteomics in Arabidopsis to identify factors required for chloroplast outer envelope membrane (OEM) protein degradation. We identified SP2, an Omp85-type β-barrel channel of the OEM, and CDC48, a cytosolic AAA+ (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) chaperone. Both proteins acted in the same pathway as the ...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ling, Q., Broad, W., Trösch, R., Töpel, M., Demiral Sert, T., Lymperopoulos, P., Baldwin, A., Jarvis, R. P. Tags: Botany, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Chloroplast-associated protein degradation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Botany, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Intuitive Surgical wins FDA clearance for robotic-assisted lung biopsy system
Intuitive Surgical’s Ion system includes an articulating robotic catheter able to navigate through small and tortuous airways during lung biopsy procedures. [Image courtesy of Intuitive Surgical]Intuitive Surgical (NSDQ:ISRG) said today that FDA has cleared its Ion system — a robotic-assisted, catheter-based platform meant to enable minimally invasive biopsy deep within the lung. Sunnyvale, Calif.–based Intuitive plans to start selling the Ion system in the U.S. in a measured fashion; it’ll start shipping to customers in coming months. The Ion system includes an articulating robotic cathet...
Source: Mass Device - February 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: 510(k) Business/Financial News Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) News Well Robotics Surgical Intuitive Surgical surgical robotics Source Type: news

Researcher earns federal grant to study molecule's potential as cancer drug target
(University of Oklahoma) Ralf Janknecht, Ph.D., a researcher in the Department of Cell Biology at the OU College of Medicine, has been analyzing the behavior of a particular molecule that is over produced in breast cancer. This year, he was awarded a five-year, $1.78 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to further evaluate the molecule's potential in reducing cancer metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professional societies unveil consortium on sexual harassment in STEMM
(American Society for Cell Biology) The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) and 52 other leading academic and professional societies announced the creation the Societies Consortium on Sexual Harassment in STEMM at a panel discussion during the AAAS Annual Meeting on February 15, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Explore Cells from the Inside Out
Download this eBook from Molecular Devices to learn about the wide variety of applications used in modern cell biology! (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Marketplace The Scientist Source Type: news

A bioengineered factory for T-cells
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard engineers and stem cell biologists have developed an injectable sponge-like gel that enhances the production T-cells after a bone marrow transplant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCI-led study reveals how blood cells help wounds heal scar-free
(University of California - Irvine) New insights on circumventing a key obstacle on the road to anti-scarring treatment have been published by Maksim Plikus, an associate professor in development and cell biology at the UCI School of Biological Sciences and colleagues in Nature Communications. The research team discovered that the natural scar-free skin repair process relies partially on assistance from circulating blood cells. The results point the way toward possible treatments for scar-free wound healing that target the body's own blood cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sponge Cytology - Sampling Device Promising for Barrett Esophagus Dx
Swallowable sampling device combined with methylation biomarker panel IDs Barrett esophagus (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Pathology, Journal, Source Type: news

Sponge Cytology-Sampling Device Promising for Barrett Esophagus Dx
MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 -- A swallowable cellular retrieval capsule sponge cytology-sampling device, EsophaCap, in combination with a methylation biomarker panel represents a promising strategy for diagnosing Barrett esophagus (BE), according to a... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Human insulin-producing cells can be grown in the lab
A newin vitro methodology can differentiate human pancreatic stem cells into mature insulin-producing beta cells, according to research published inNature Cell Biology. Science Alert (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 4, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

HPV genotype screening with dual  stain cytology cost effective
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - February 1, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

How rhomboid proteases act so quickly
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Algae suggest eukaryotes get many gifts of bacteria DNA
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Pennisi, E. Tags: Cell Biology, Evolution In Depth Source Type: news

Rhomboid distorts lipids to break the viscosity-imposed speed limit of membrane diffusion
Enzymes that cut proteins inside membranes regulate diverse cellular events, including cell signaling, homeostasis, and host-pathogen interactions. Adaptations that enable catalysis in this exceptional environment are poorly understood. We visualized single molecules of multiple rhomboid intramembrane proteases and unrelated proteins in living cells (human and Drosophila) and planar lipid bilayers. Notably, only rhomboid proteins were able to diffuse above the Saffman-Delbrück viscosity limit of the membrane. Hydrophobic mismatch with the irregularly shaped rhomboid fold distorted surrounding lipids and propelled rhomboi...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kreutzberger, A. J. B., Ji, M., Aaron, J., Mihaljevic, L., Urban, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Mimicking nature for programmable and adaptive synthetic materials
(National Centre for Biological Sciences) In a recently published work in Nature Communications on Jan 25, 2019, scientists from the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Science and Research (JNCASR) and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine (inStem) have successfully created a minimalistic synthetic mimic of aforementioned cytoskeletal networks with structural and temporal programming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer ’ s Disease Up To 16 Years Before Symptoms Begin, Study Says
(CNN) — A simple blood test could predict if a patient will develop Alzheimer’s disease up to 16 years before symptoms begin, a new study finds. By measuring changes in the levels of a protein in the blood, called neurofilament light chain (NfL), researchers believe any rise in levels of the protein could be an early sign of the disease, according to the study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine. NfL is a “marker in the blood which gives an indication of nerve cell loss in the brain,” explained lead researcher Mathias Jucker, professor of cell biology of neurological diseases at the Germ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease CNN Local TV Source Type: news

UCLA scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting T cells
A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells — which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab — into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells.The technique uses structures called artificial thymic organoids, which work by mimicking the environment of the thymus, the organ in which T cells develop from blood stem cells.T cells are cells of the immune system that fight infections, but also have the potential to eliminate cancer cells. The ability to create them from self-renewing pluripotent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Fever boots immune cell trafficking through a thermal sensory Hsp90- & #945;4 integrin pathway
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Recently, researchers at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues, demonstrated that fever promotes T lymphocyte trafficking through heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-inducedα4 integrin activation and signaling in T cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Flagellar microtubule doublet assembly in vitro reveals a regulatory role of tubulin C-terminal tails
Microtubule doublets (MTDs), consisting of an incomplete B-microtubule at the surface of a complete A-microtubule, provide a structural scaffold mediating intraflagellar transport and ciliary beating. Despite the fundamental role of MTDs, the molecular mechanism governing their formation is unknown. We used a cell-free assay to demonstrate a crucial inhibitory role of the carboxyl-terminal (C-terminal) tail of tubulin in MTD assembly. Removal of the C-terminal tail of an assembled A-microtubule allowed for the nucleation of a B-microtubule on its surface. C-terminal tails of only one A-microtubule protofilament inhibited t...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Schmidt-Cernohorska, M., Zhernov, I., Steib, E., Le Guennec, M., Achek, R., Borgers, S., Demurtas, D., Mouawad, L., Lansky, Z., Hamel, V., Guichard, P. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Assembly of the ciliary microtubule doublet
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

The brain's traffic problems
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dolgin, E. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Neuroscience Feature Source Type: news

MobileODT touts colposcope-based cervical cancer detection AI
MobileODT said last week that it is implementing a new artificial intelligence algorithm in its EVA system Colposcope that it claims can detect cervical cancer more effectively than existing testing. The new technology, known as Automated Visual Evaluation, has been validated by the National Cancer Institute and the National Library of Medicine, the Israel-based company said, and is able to identify problematic lesions with greater reliability than traditional Pap Cytology testing. MobileODT said that it is working with the NCI and other researchers to continue validating the AVE algorithm, and that it is launching a ...
Source: Mass Device - January 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Imaging Software / IT Women's Health mobileodt Source Type: news

Genome doubling, cell size and novelty
(University of Chicago Press Journals) In the 2019 Coulter Review, 'Polyploidy, the Nucleotype, and Novelty: The Impact of Genome Doubling on the Biology of the Cell,' published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences (180:1-52), Jeff J. Doyle and Jeremy E. Coate examine the effects of genome doubling on cell biology and the generation of novelty in plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can AI Really Be a Game Changer in Cervical Cancer Screenings?
An artificial intelligence solution (AI) can accurately identify precancerous changes that could require medical attention in images from a woman’s cervix. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good developed the computer algorithm, which is called automated visual evaluation. Researchers created the algorithm by using more than 60,000 cervical images from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) archive of photos collected during a cervical cancer screening study that was carried out in Costa Rica in the 1990s. More than 9,400 women participated in that population study, with follow up t...
Source: MDDI - January 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Software Imaging Source Type: news

This South San Francisco entrepreneur is laser-focused on precision medicine
Mission Bio aims to help researchers and clinicians unlock single-cell biology to enable the discovery, development and delivery of precision medicine. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 10, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Shane Downing Source Type: news

This South San Francisco entrepreneur is laser-focused on precision medicine
Mission Bio aims to help researchers and clinicians unlock single-cell biology to enable the discovery, development and delivery of precision medicine. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 10, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Shane Downing Source Type: news

Algorithm Evaluates Cervical Images to ID Precancer, Cancer
THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 -- A deep learning-based visual evaluation algorithm can detect cervical precancer/cancer with higher accuracy than conventional cytology, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 10, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Bristol academic awarded prestigious cell biology medal
An academic from the University of Bristol's School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine has been honoured with a prestigious medal from the British Society of Cell Biology (BSCB). (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Grants and Awards, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Press Release Source Type: news

A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria
(University of Connecticut) In a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers, led by UConn associate professor of molecular and cell biology Spencer Nyholm, sequenced the genome of this little squid to identify unique evolutionary footprints in symbiotic organs, yielding clues about how organs that house bacteria are especially suited for this partnership. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

Tumors backfire on chemotherapy
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Chemotherapy is an effective treatment for breast cancer, yet some patients develop metastasis in spite of it. Researchers at EPFL have discovered that chemotherapy-treated mammary tumors produce small vesicles that may help them spread to other organs. The study is published in Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDx Diagnostics Continues to Shine with Strong Data
A newly published study of CDx Diagnostics’s WATS3D, which employs artificial intelligence (AI), continues to show the effectiveness of the test for the detection Barrett’s esophagus. The nearly 13,000-patient study was published in Diseases of the Esophagus. The results come right in the middle of the AI Renaissance that is occurring in healthcare. The Suffern, NY-based company’s published data showed that the addition of WATS3D to standard targeted and random forceps biopsy (FB) markedly increases the overall detection of esophageal dysplasia by 242% and the overall d...
Source: MDDI - December 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Imaging Source Type: news

Interrogating Ras-ERK Interactions and Roles in Tumor Cell Biology
Cancer Network spoke with Dr. Chuan-Hsiang Huang about his lab ’s research on Ras-ERK protein interactions within cancer cells. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - December 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Chuan-Hsiang Huang, MD, PhD Source Type: news

E-C coupling structural protein junctophilin-2 encodes a stress-adaptive transcription regulator
Junctophilin-2 (JP2) is a structural protein required for normal excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. After cardiac stress, JP2 is cleaved by the calcium ion–dependent protease calpain, which disrupts the E-C coupling ultrastructural machinery and drives heart failure progression. We found that stress-induced proteolysis of JP2 liberates an N-terminal fragment (JP2NT) that translocates to the nucleus, binds to genomic DNA, and controls expression of a spectrum of genes in cardiomyocytes. Transgenic overexpression of JP2NT in mice modifies the transcriptional profile, resulting in attenuated pathological remodeling ...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guo, A., Wang, Y., Chen, B., Wang, Y., Yuan, J., Zhang, L., Hall, D., Wu, J., Shi, Y., Zhu, Q., Chen, C., Thiel, W. H., Zhan, X., Weiss, R. M., Zhan, F., Musselman, C. A., Pufall, M., Zhu, W., Au, K. F., Hong, J., Anderson, M. E., Grueter, C. E., Song, L. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

ATP-dependent force generation and membrane scission by ESCRT-III and Vps4
The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) catalyze reverse-topology scission from the inner face of membrane necks in HIV budding, multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, and other pathways. We encapsulated ESCRT-III subunits Snf7, Vps24, and Vps2 and the AAA+ ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) Vps4 in giant vesicles from which membrane nanotubes reflecting the correct topology of scission could be pulled. Upon ATP release by photo-uncaging, this system generated forces within the nanotubes that led to membrane scission in a manner dependent upon Vps4 catalytic activity and Vps4 coupling to th...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Schöneberg, J., Pavlin, M. R., Yan, S., Righini, M., Lee, I.-H., Carlson, L.-A., Bahrami, A. H., Goldman, D. H., Ren, X., Hummer, G., Bustamante, C., Hurley, J. H. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Membrane scission by ESCRTs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Protecting the heart
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

X chromosome: how genetics becomes egalitarian
(Universit é de Gen è ve) In cell biology, men and women are unequal: men have an X chromosome, while women have two. How can we get around this difference? Geneticists from the UNIGE observed how the second X chromosome in females gradually becomes inactive in order to avoid an overdose of genes encoded by the X. They also found that several genes bypassed this inactivation, which varied according to the tissue and life phases of the cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cochrane Review Series Covers Skin Cancer Technologies Cochrane Review Series Covers Skin Cancer Technologies
The naked eye alone can't rule out skin cancer, but a variety of technologies - imaging techniques, cytology, smart phones, and artificial intelligence (AI) - can help, according to a collection of 11 systematic reviews published December 6 by the Cochrane Library.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

More Evidence of HPV Link to Cervical Cancer
(MedPage Today) -- Positive test IDs high-risk women with normal cervical cytology (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - December 15, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Montana State researcher awarded grant for research of fluorescent proteins
(Montana State University) Rosana Molina, doctoral candidate in cell biology and neuroscience, has received a three-year grant to continue her work of improving a neuroscience tool that uses fluorescent proteins found in some coral and jellyfish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells 'dance' through endocytosis, metastasis
(American Society for Cell Biology) Celldance, a program of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), helps researchers tell the story of their research through video. Two new Celldance videos premiere at the Society's annual meeting, held jointly with the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO), in San Diego, CA. Videos will be shown Dec 11 at 1:00 pm in Theatre 3 of the Learning Center at the San Diego Convention Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How skin cells protect themselves against stress
(University of M ü nster) Cell biologists at the University of M ü nster have developed a new method for measuring how mechanical forces in cells are processed. The results have been published in the journal " Nature Communications " . (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CZI announces support for open-source software efforts to improve biomedical imaging
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced funding for open-source software efforts to improve image analysis and visualization in biomedicine. Microscopy -- critical to modern cell biology -- generates large volumes of complex data that pose significant challenges for analysis and visualization. The funding will support developers ('Imaging Software Fellows') from three projects to develop and maintain software tools, and begin collaborating to help create a cohesive, shared ecosystem of resources that can accelerate basic research and benefit the entire field. (Source: EurekAlert! ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LZTR1 is a regulator of RAS ubiquitination and signaling
In genetic screens aimed at understanding drug resistance mechanisms in chronic myeloid leukemia cells, inactivation of the cullin 3 adapter protein-encoding leucine zipper-like transcription regulator 1 (LZTR1) gene led to enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activity and reduced sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Knockdown of the Drosophila LZTR1 ortholog CG3711 resulted in a Ras-dependent gain-of-function phenotype. Endogenous human LZTR1 associates with the main RAS isoforms. Inactivation of LZTR1 led to decreased ubiquitination and enhanced plasma membrane localization of endogenous KRAS (V...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bigenzahn, J. W., Collu, G. M., Kartnig, F., Pieraks, M., Vladimer, G. I., Heinz, L. X., Sedlyarov, V., Schischlik, F., Fauster, A., Rebsamen, M., Parapatics, K., Blomen, V. A., Müller, A. C., Winter, G. E., Kralovics, R., Brummelkamp, T. R., Mlod Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

CZI awards over $51 million to fight neurodegenerative disorders
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced $64.25 million in funding and its selection of 17 early career investigators and nine collaborative science teams to launch the CZI Neurodegeneration Challenge Network. This new network brings together experimental scientists from diverse research fields -- neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and genomics -- along with computational biologists and physicians, to understand the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CZI awards over $64 million to fight neurodegenerative disorders
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced $64.25 million in funding and its selection of 17 early career investigators and nine collaborative science teams to launch the CZI Neurodegeneration Challenge Network. This new network brings together experimental scientists from diverse research fields -- neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and genomics -- along with computational biologists and physicians, to understand the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news