Chronic opioid treatment may raise risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, study finds

While opioids are often prescribed to treat people with trauma-related pain, a new UCLA-led study suggests doctors should use caution before prescribing the drug to those they believe may experience severe stress in the future, in order to reduce the risk the patient will develop PTSD.In the study, researchers administered doses of the opioid morphine to a group of 22 mice for one week, then gave the mice relatively strong foot shocks. After the morphine wore off, the mice were given mild electric foot shocks. These mice showed a substantially longer “freezing response” than a second, control group of 24 mice that had not been given morphine. When mice recall a frightening memory, they freeze. Their heart rates and blood pressure go up, and the more frightening the memory, the more they freeze.“While we are generally aware that drug use, such as that in the current opioid crisis, has many deleterious effects, our results suggest yet another effect — increased susceptibility to developing anxiety disorders,” said senior author Michael Fanselow, UCLA distinguished Staglin family profe ssor of psychology and director of UCLA’s Staglin Family Music Festival Center for Brain and Behavioral Health. “As opioids are often prescribed to treat symptoms such as pain that may accompany trauma, caution may be needed because this may lead to a greater risk of developing PTSD, if exposed to further traumatic events, such as an accident, later o...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 24 January 2020Source: Arthroscopy TechniquesAuthor(s): Jeong Woo Kim, Dae Jin NamAbstractThe treatment of massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for shoulder surgeons. When treating patients with chronic rotator cuff tears, especially those with severe fatty degeneration, severe tendon retraction, or muscle atrophy, the risk of re-tear and persistent severe pain persists. Therefore, surgeons can choose from numerous options. Superior capsular reconstruction (SCR) was introduced as a technique to maintain the stability of the upper shoulder and stabilize the muscle...
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
.
Source: Journal of Sports Sciences - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical RheumatologyAuthor(s): Ay┼če A. KüçükdeveciAbstractThe goals in the management of established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are to control pain and disease activity, prevent further joint damage, and enhance functioning and quality of life. Despite the fact that aggressive and the early use of biological and nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have been associated with substantial gains in clinical, radiological, and disability outcomes, a considerable proportion of patients still report significant p...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: PharmaNutritionAuthor(s): F. Tomazini, A.C. Santos-Mariano, V.A. Andrade-Souza, V.C. Sebben, C.A. De Maria, D.B. Coelho, R. Bertuzzi, M.D. Silva-Cavalcante, A.E. Lima-SilvaAbstractAcetaminophen has been combined with caffeine for therapeutic purpose, but the effect of co-ingestion of acetaminophen and caffeine on exercise performance has not been investigated. To determine the effect of isolated and combined ingestion of caffeine and acetaminophen on performance during a 4-km cycling time-trial (4 T T). Eleven men, completed a 4 T T one h...
Source: PharmaNutrition - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article.
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology syndication Source Type: news
DiscussionAs detailed above, the “elements” in both a classical and a contemporary sense have effects on our mental health and are potentially modifiable aspects that can be harnessed as therapeutic interventions. The most robust interventional evidence currently available shows tentative support for several use of the elements via horticultural and nature-exposure therapy, green exercise/physical activity, sauna and heat therapy, balneotherapy, and breathing exercises. It should be noted that, in many cases, these interventions were not studied in definitive diagnosed psychiatric disorders and thus it is prema...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) vs.Mindstrong HealthMood Monitoring via Invasive Brain Recordings or Smartphone SwipesWhich Would You Choose?That's not really a fair question. The ultimate goal of invasive recordings is one of direct intervention, by delivering targeted brain stimulation as a treatment. But first you have to establish a firm relationship between neural activity and mood. Well, um, smartphone swipes (the way you interact with your phone) aim to establish a firm relationship between your “digital phenotype” and your mood. And then refer you to an app for a precision intervention. Or to your t...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
By Susan Blumenthal, M.D. and Alexandrea Adams The recent commemoration of National Women’s Health Week provided an important time to mark the progress that has been made in advancing women’s health over the past two decades and to highlight what more needs to be done to achieve women’s health equity in America. Historically, women have experienced discrimination in health care despite making 80 percent of health care decisions for their families, using more medical services than men, and suffering greater disability from chronic disease. Before the mid 1990’s, women were often excluded as subjects ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Evaluating the potential harms of a commonly used drug—especially a complex substance like marijuana—is a challenging but vital task. Fully informed awareness of both the potential and proven benefits and the potential and proven harms of marijuana are necessary in order to have rational discussions with patients, teens, and decision makers regarding marijuana use. Based on a review of the current literature, we suggest the mnemonic DDUMB (dependence, driving, underachievement, mental illness, and “bad to worse”) as a tool that captures several of the more well-supported, brain-based risk...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Child Adol Mental Disorders Cognition Current Issue Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Psychiatry Psychopharmacology Review Substance Use Disorders Cannabis dependence drug-related har Source Type: research
More News: Accidents | Anxiety | Back Pain | Brain | Cardiology | Chronic Pain | Fentanyl | Heart | Hydrocodone | Learning | Lortab | Men | Methadone | Morphine | Neurology | Neuroscience | Oxycodone | OxyContin | Pain | Post Traumatic Stress Disorder | Psychology | Science | Study | Substance Abuse | Substance Abuse Disorders | Universities & Medical Training | Vicodin