Potential for therapeutic use of hydrogen sulfide in oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative diseases.

Potential for therapeutic use of hydrogen sulfide in oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative diseases. Int J Med Sci. 2019;16(10):1386-1396 Authors: Tabassum R, Jeong NY Abstract Oxidative phosphorylation is a source of energy production by which many cells satisfy their energy requirements. Endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) are by-products of oxidative phosphorylation. ROS are formed due to the inefficiency of oxidative phosphorylation, and lead to oxidative stress that affects mitochondrial metabolism. Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The immediate consequences of oxidative stress include lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) mutation, which induce neuronal cell death. Mitochondrial binding of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein has been identified as a contributing factor in AD. In PD and HD, respectively, α-synuclein (α-syn) and huntingtin (Htt) gene mutations have been reported to exacerbate the effects of oxidative stress. Similarly, abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics and the respiratory chain occur in ALS due to dysregulation of mitochondrial complexes II and IV. However, oxidative stress-induced dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases can be mitigated by the antioxidant function of hydrogen sulfide (...
Source: International Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Int J Med Sci Source Type: research

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Conclusions: HWE deviation of particular variants in relation to global populational HWE, could be, at least in part, associated with the differential susceptibility of specific populations and ethnicities to neurodegenerative diseases. Our data might contribute to the epidemiology and diagnostic/prognostic methods for neurodegenerative diseases.RESUMO Introdu ção: Mitocôndrias defeituosas ou danificadas resultam em alterações do metabolismo energético, equilíbrio redox e dinâmica celular e são, portanto, identificadas como o ponto central da patogênese em ...
Source: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract Disruption of cellular functions with aging-induced accumulation of neuronal stressors causes cell death which is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases. Studies in a variety of neurodegenerative disease models demonstrate that poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent cell death, also named parthanatos, is responsible for neuronal loss in neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Parthanatos has distinct features that differ from caspase-dependent apoptosis, necrosis or autophagic cell death. Parth...
Source: International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Int Rev Cell Mol Biol Source Type: research
We report a new class of natural-product-inspired covalent inhibitors of telomerase that target the catalytic active site. Age-Related Epigenetic Changes that Suppress Mitochondrial Function https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/age-related-epigenetic-changes-that-suppress-mitochondrial-function/ Today's open access research reports on two specific epigenetic changes observed in old individuals that act to reduce mitochondrial function. This joins an existing list of genes for which expression changes are known to impact mitochondrial function with age. A herd of hundreds of mitochondria are found ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Age-related upregulation of CD38 is quite closely related to the decline of NAD+ levels in mitochondria. That in turn causes some fraction of the age-related loss of mitochondrial quality control and mitochondrial function. As mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, providing chemical energy store molecules (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) to power cellular operations, this causes a broad range of issues in tissues throughout the body. Mitochondrial decline is particularly influential in the aging of the brain, given the high energy demands of that organ. Due to the lack of effective treatment to at least slow...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
ino A Abstract Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people around the world. Several studies point out caspase-3 as a key player in the development and progression of neurological disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Furthermore, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in neurodegenerative pathologies leading to neuronal damage and cell death. Pharmacological properties of nitrones such as free radical trapping and neuroprotection has been previously described. In the present work, we have assessed ten non-cyt...
Source: European Journal of Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharmacol Source Type: research
Abstract The global burden of neurodegenerative diseases is alarmingly increasing in parallel to the aging of population. Although the molecular mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration are not completely understood, excitotoxicity, defined as to the injury and death of neurons due to an excessive or prolonged exposure to excitatory amino acids, has been shown to play a pivotal role. The increased release and/or decreased uptake of glutamate results in a dysregulation of neuronal calcium homeostasis, leading to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunctions, disturbances in protein turn-over and neuroinflammation. De...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: Molecular and Cellular NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Kevin McAvoy, Hibiki KawamataAbstractMitochondria play essential metabolic roles in neural cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction has profound effects on the brain. In primary mitochondrial diseases, mutations that impair specific oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proteins or OXPHOS assembly factors lead to isolated biochemical defects and a heterogeneous group of clinical phenotypes, including mitochondrial encephalopathies. A broader defect of OXPHOS function, due to mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial DNA maint...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Abstract NAD+ is a pivotal metabolite involved in cellular bioenergetics, genomic stability, mitochondrial homeostasis, adaptive stress responses, and cell survival. Multiple NAD+-dependent enzymes are involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal stress resistance. Here, we review emerging findings that reveal key roles for NAD+ and related metabolites in the adaptation of neurons to a wide range of physiological stressors and in counteracting processes in neurodegenerative diseases, such as those occurring in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Advances in underst...
Source: Cell Metabolism - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Metab Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 July 2019Source: MitochondrionAuthor(s): Yuanbo Wu, Meiqiao Chen, Jielong JiangAbstractMitochondrial dysfunction is becoming one of the most emerging pathological process in the etiology of neurological disorders. Other common etiologies of the neurological disorders are aging and oxidative stress. Neurodegenerative disorders for instance Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Multiple sclerosis, Neuropathic pain and Alzheimer's disease involves mitochondrial dysfunction and is regarded as the core of their pathological process...
Source: Mitochondrion - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Conclusion The key problem with the ND field is the lack of understanding in the events preceding the development of protein-based markers – such as Tau – currently used to diagnose NDs. By this stage, the diseases become more difficult to treat. SncRNAs play an important regulatory role in the maintenance of the homeostatic brain. Therefore, changes in their concentration levels can be indicative of mechanistic changes that could precede protein-based markers. One single sncRNA biomarker is unlikely to differentiate between diseases. However, a combination of sncRNA biomarkers could be illustrative of the me...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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