Wicked, wicked Wikipedia: The corruption and collapse of the legendary people's encyclopedia
(Natural News) It is time to take a serious, critical look at Wikipedia and its mission. Is it everything it purports to be as an objective encyclopedic source of knowledge or just another anti-democratic social media dynasty resorting to the censorship and suppression of unorthodox medical science, social criticism and political dissent contrary to its... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cross Section: David Spiegelhalter – Science Weekly podcast
Prof Sir David Spiegelhalter has a passion for statistics but some argue this type of number crunching is losing its influence and its ability to objectively depict reality.Nicola Davis andIan Sample investigate how significant statistics are in today ’s ‘post-truth’ worldProf Sir David Spiegelhalter has a love of statistics and has done ever since he was inspired by a teacher at university. Today, though, some are arguing that this type of number crunching islosing its power and its ability to depict reality. This, they say, has in part led to increasing levels of distrust in statistics.Nicola Davis andI...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and Ian Sample and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Mathematics University of Cambridge Source Type: news

Deep Medicine: Restoring the Doctor-Patient Relationship Deep Medicine: Restoring the Doctor-Patient Relationship
Siddhartha Mukherjee talks with Eric Topol about Topol's new book and how AI can prevent burnout, improve efficiency, and renew our faith in medical science.Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine Expert Interview Source Type: news

An Alzheimer ’ s Drug Trial Gave Me Hope, and Then It Ended
I was a small piece in the search to find a cure. Now I feel as if I ’ m getting erased, and medical science doesn ’ t have any answers. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PHILLIP S. GUTIS Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Memory Dementia Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Screening service in 'meltdown' as more women attend smears
Public health campaign triggers surge in numbers attending cervical screenings at ‘worst possible time’Women could be forced to wait months for cervical cancer screening results because the planned closure of dozens of laboratories has left the service in “meltdown”, the Guardian has been told.The crisis has been triggered by a surge in numbers of women attending smear tests following a governmentpublic awareness campaign launched earlier this month. The campaign coincides with an exodus of biomedical scientists due to a restructuring process that will reduce nearly 50 hospital screening laboratorie...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: NHS Health Cervical cancer Health policy Public services policy Science Society Politics UK news Source Type: news

Science Saturday: What do Yellowstone rocks teach us about kidney stones?
Mayo Clinic researchers are turning to Yellowstone National Park to unlock the secrets of?kidney stones. Medical science long has been mystified by a cause and cure for this painful condition that affects more than 1 in 10 Americans. Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine?and?NASA Astrobiology Institute?research?finds kidney stones grow in dynamic ways that are similar [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 9, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Marshall University researcher receives nearly $500,000 NIH grant for thrombosis research
(Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine) Wei Li, M.D., Ph.D., an associate professor in the department of biomedical science at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine was recently awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to further his research on thrombosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Students swap backpacks for lab coats at upcoming 'Celebration of Research'
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Area high school students will meet Mayo Clinic researchers and tour their laboratories at the upcoming 18th biennial Celebration of Research. The daylong conference on Tuesday, Feb. 26, enables students in grades 10-12 to learn about biomedical science and research careers. "We are excited to welcome students from our Minnesota communities, so [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 21, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Guidance Agenda: Guidance Documents CBER is Planning to Publish During Calendar Year 2019
Guidance agenda outling guidance documents CBER is planning to publish during calendar year 2019. (Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - February 20, 2019 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Measles is on the rise. But telling anti-vaxxers they ’re stupid won’t fix it | Ellie Mae O’Hagan
Simply telling people they are ignorant has failed. We need to find a better way to communicateAfter reading the news that cases of measles havesoared by 50% in the last year, I recalled the first time I heard an anti-vaccination conspiracy theory. It wasn ’t from a member of Donald Trump’s administration, or part of a frenetic, grammatically challengedFacebook post– it was from a classmate when I was at school. Her family wasn’t waging a crusade against medical science: they simply gave credence todisgraced former doctorAndrew Wakefield’s study that wrongly asserted a link between the MMR vac...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ellie Mae O ’Hagan Tags: Vaccines and immunisation MMR Health Society UK news Climate change Science Source Type: news

Cochrane's 30 under 30: Shalini Suresh
Cochrane is made up of  13,000 members and over 50,000 supporters come from more than 130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.  Many  of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

HCPC fee increase is an unjustified ‘tax on practising’
The proposal by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) to increase its registration fee by 18% is excessive and unreasonable, says UNISON. A letter signed by 47 MPs and peers denouncing the increase has been sent to the HCPC ahead of its meeting tomorrow (Thursday) when the board is voting on the proposal. The changes will affect 15 health and care professions regulated by the HCPC across the UK. This includes paramedics, radiographers, occupational therapists and biomedical scientists. Regulated professionals are required to pay an annual fee to be allowed to practise. If the fee increase is imposed, HCPC fees wil...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - February 13, 2019 Category: Food Science Authors: Anna Mauremootoo Tags: Press release HCPC Sara Gorton Source Type: news

The Guardian view on the science of hangovers: no more research needed | Editorial
Raise a glass, though only one, to the selfless German students and Swedish sailors who have offered up their livers to scienceAsa recent scientific paper points out, “acute alcohol-induced hangover constitutes a significant, yet understudied, global hazard and a large burden to society”. There can be few readers wholly unaware of this, yet the authors go on to point out that acute hangover-associated symptoms give rise to “reduced productivity, impaired pr ofessional performance (eg falling asleep at work), workplace absenteeism, and academic underperformance”. Never on Mondays, of course.So it is ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Alcohol Science Hangover cures Health & wellbeing Life and style Society Source Type: news

Immigrant scientists lead charge in understanding human biology and disease
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Vilcek Foundation Prizes for Biomedical Science, awarded to immigrants who have made significant contributions to the field. Dr. Angelika Amon will receive the $100,000 Vilcek Prize, while Drs. Amit Choudhary, Jeanne T. Paz, and Mikhail G. Shapiro will each receive the $50,000 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Long-term memory encoding engram neurons are established by the transcriptional cycling
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) Long-term memory (LTM) is formed by repetitive training trials with rest intervals and LTM formation requires transcription factors, including CREB and c-Fos. Miyashita et al. found that ERK activity is increased during rest intervals to induce transcriptional cycling between c-Fos and CREB in a subset of mushroom body neurons. Significantly, LTM is encoded in these mushroom body neurons, and blocking outputs from these neurons suppress recall of LTM whereas activating these neurons produces memory-associated behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Accidental Fentanyl Overdose is Not a Thing'
"Fake news" stories that tell tales of law enforcement officers, firefighters and emergency medical personnel being hurt or injured by touching or inhaling fentanyl are prevalent today. In this article from Emergency Medicine News, author Dan Runde, MD, fact checks these "stories" and addresses the fear these articles spread--fear that's promtping unnecessary expenditures on overprotecting first responders and medical personnel as well as potentiallty harming patients. Read more at Emergency Medicine News.   Editor's Take: JEMS was alerted to this excellent article in Emergency Medicine News by S...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

'Accidental Fentanyl Overdose is Not a Thing'
"Fake news" stories that tell tales of law enforcement officers, firefighters and emergency medical personnel being hurt or injured by touching or inhaling fentanyl are prevalent today. In this article from Emergency Medicine News, author Dan Runde, MD, fact checks these "stories" and addresses the fear these articles spread--fear that's promtping unnecessary expenditures on overprotecting first responders and medical personnel as well as potentiallty harming patients. Read more at Emergency Medicine News.   Editor's Take: JEMS was alerted to this excellent article in Emergency Medicine News by S...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Global network of research infrastructures promotes bioimaging technologies
Advanced imaging technologies are revolutionising biological and biomedical science. An EU-funded project enabled researchers worldwide to better access cutting-edge biological and medical imaging technologies, to accelerate the great societal benefits this technological revolution will provide. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - December 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

#MayoClinicRadio podcast: 12/8/18
Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio 12/8/18 On the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast, Dr. John Kisiel, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, discusses screening, treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer.?Also on the podcast, Dr. Matthew Ferber, a medical geneticist at Mayo Clinic, explains?Mayo Clinic GeneGuide. GeneGuide is the new personal DNA product backed by Mayo medical science and [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 10, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Many Americans Unaware of Promise of Personalized Medicine
THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 -- Medical science has made tremendous advances in personalized medicine. However, the American public is still struggling to understand the implications of these targeted treatments, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll has... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Many Americans Unaware of Promise of Targeted,'Personalized' Medicine: Poll
THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 -- Medical science has made tremendous advances in " personalized medicine " -- drugs that fight cancer and other diseases by boosting the immune system or targeting specific genetic traits. Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Google taps ex-Geisinger CEO Feinberg to lead consolidated Google Health biz | Personnel Moves – November 14, 2018
Google (NSDQ:GOOG) has picked up former Geisinger Health CEO David Feinberg to lead its fragmented health divisions under the Google Health moniker, according to a recent CNBC report. The tech giant had been searching for a head for several months, with artificial intelligence head Jeff Dean heavily involved in the process, according to the report. Other candidates include execs from health consulting, hospital management and insurance. In his new position, Feinberg will work closely with CEO Sundar Pichai, according to CNBC, which references individuals familiar with the search process. Feinberg will oversee multiple...
Source: Mass Device - November 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Accuray Inc. Alphabet BioCardia Bovie Medical Corp. Clearside Biomedical Eos Imaging Geisinger Health System Getinge google hancockjaffelabs Intact Vascular Integra LifeSciences Intuitive Surgic Source Type: news

Philanthropist donates $200M towards Harvard biomedical science
A foundation headed by philanthropist Len Blavatnik has given Harvard Medical School its largest gift, $200 million, with the overarching aim of transforming new medical discoveries into patient treatments. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - November 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome
(Queensland University of Technology) Newborn breastfed babies' saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies' mouths, biomedical scientists have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

South Florida health network recruits Newcomer as CEO
South Florida Behavioral Health Network, the managing entity for 39 provider agencies in Miami-Dade and Monroe counties, has named Dr. John W. Newcomer president and CEO. Newcomer was recruited from Florida Atlantic University, where he was a professor of integrated medical science at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine. Newcomer, who previously worked at the University of Miami and Washington University in St. Louis, has been the principal investigator on m ultiple research projects funded… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brian Bandell Source Type: news

Babylon chatbot could ‘perform worse’ than doctors, review suggests
Private provider Babylon’s chatbot could offer patients a less effective service than a GP, a letter published in medical journal The Lancet has suggested.  In a study published in June, Babylon, which also provides the GP at Hand service to NHS patients, analysed the efficacy of its AI chatbot in primary care triage and diagnosis.  The letter was written by Associate Professor of medical science Hamish Fraser, medical informatics Professor Enrico Coiera and Lecturer in health informatics David Wong.  Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - November 7, 2018 Category: Practice Management Authors: vfiore Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Patient Access Practice development Latest News Source Type: news

Insufficient evidence that Babylon chatbot can perform better than doctors, experts suggest
Private provider Babylon’s chatbot could offer patients a less effective service than a GP, a letter published in medical journal The Lancet has suggested.  In a study published in June, Babylon, which also provides the GP at Hand service to NHS patients, analysed the efficacy of its AI chatbot in primary care triage and diagnosis.  The letter was written by Associate Professor of medical science Hamish Fraser, medical informatics Professor Enrico Coiera and Lecturer in health informatics David Wong.  Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - November 7, 2018 Category: Practice Management Authors: vfiore Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Patient Access Practice development Latest News Source Type: news

Drs. William A. Gahl and Charles N. Rotimi elected into the National Academy of Medicine
The National Academy of Medicine welcomed two NHGRI senior investigators, William A. Gahl, M.D., Ph.D., and Charles N. Rotimi, Ph.D. Recognized as one of the highest honors scientists can receive, members elect new recruits based on their accomplishments in advancing medical science. As a medical geneticist, Dr. Gahl focuses on rare metabolic disorders and the discovery of new genomic diseases. Dr. Rotimi probes the genomic causes of disease and health disparities in a cultural context. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - October 13, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

New Mayo Clinic GeneGuide DNA testing application provides genetic testing, insights backed by Mayo Clinic expertise
ROCHESTER, Minn. ? Mayo Clinic released a new DNA product with Helix, a personal genomics company, called "Mayo Clinic GeneGuide." The DNA-powered product provides healthy individuals with genetic testing and insights with a focus on education. This product is backed by Mayo medical science and expertise. ?The Mayo Clinic GeneGuide app uses the highest quality [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Business News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Business News - October 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Understanding epilepsy in pediatric tumors
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) A KAIST research team led by Professor Jeong Ho Lee of the Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering has recently identified a neuronal BRAF somatic mutation that causes intrinsic epileptogenicity in pediatric brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NAS, NAM Members Receive Prestigious Lasker Awards
The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced today that National Academy of Sciences members Michael Grunstein and C. David Allis share the 2018 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for discoveries into how gene expression is influenced by the chemical modification of histones— the proteins that package DNA within chromosomes. Joan Argetsinger Steitz, a member of both the NAS and the National Academy of Medicine, is the recipient of the 2018 Lasker~Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science for four decades of leadership in biomedical science— exemplified by pioneering discoveries in RNA bio...
Source: News from the National Academies - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Michael Grunstein wins 2018 Lasker Award for medical research
Michael Grunstein, a distinguished professor of biological chemistry at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been awarded the 2018 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for his groundbreaking research on gene expression. He shares the award with C. David Allis of Rockefeller University in New York.Grunstein provided the first demonstration that histones — the proteins that package DNA within chromosomes — are more than inert structures that serve simply as spools for DNA. Working with his team at UCLA, he showed via experiments with yeast that histones actually play an important role in gene exp...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

2018 Lasker Awards for basic and clinical medical research and special achievement
(Rubenstein Associates, Inc.) The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation today announced the winners of its 2018 Lasker Awards: C. David Allis from Rockefeller University and Michael Grunstein from the University of California, Los Angeles will receive the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award; John B. Glen, formerly from AstraZeneca, will be honored with the Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award; and Joan Argetsinger Steitz from Yale University will receive the Lasker~Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Joan A. Steitz receives 2018 Lasker~Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science
(Howard Hughes Medical Institute) Lasker Award honors leadership in RNA biology and in scientific mentorship. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The English NHS pay deal – in six charts
July saw the implementation of the new NHS pay deal in England, negotiated by UNISON and other unions. The pay deal marked the biggest changes to the NHS pay structure since 2004, when Agenda for Change was introduced. A lot has already been published about the impact on individuals but in this piece we’re going to look at the structure as a whole and how it benefits staff at different stages of their career. Beginnings, journeys and destinations To understand the changes we need to look at the old structure and why trade unions wanted to change it. It is over 13 years since Agenda for Change was introduced. It intro...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - September 10, 2018 Category: Food Science Authors: Rosa Ellis Tags: Article P.S data agenda for change health NHS England nhs pay Source Type: news

Big Strides in Miniaturization
MD+DI has been tracking miniaturization for some time, as we’ve seen trends deepen in minimally invasive surgeries, wearable devices, advanced drug delivery, and more. Lindsay Mann, director of marketing for MTD Micro Molding, tells MD+DI that about 25% of the micro medical device components they produce are for miniaturized devices. We asked her for an update on miniaturization, including recent advancements in materials and manufacturing.   What is driving the current trend toward medical device miniaturization? Mann: As less invasive procedures and technology-driven advancements...
Source: MDDI - August 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis Molding Source Type: news

It ’s Not Yet Clear How to Boost the Microbiome. But Diet Is the Best Bet
The gut microbiome—the billions of bacteria that live inside the human digestive tract—is the focus of some of today’s most exciting and compelling medical research. Studies have linked microbiome-related imbalances to health conditions ranging from depression and Parkinson’s disease to heart disease. Some researchers have even started referring to the microbiome as a “forgotten organ” because of the indispensable role it plays in human health. It’s fairly clear that the foods a person eats—or doesn’t eat—can affect the composition of his or her microbiome. Resear...
Source: TIME: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Why you should NEVER refreeze ice cream if it's melted a lot
Amreen Bashir, a lecturer in Biomedical Science at Aston University in the UK, explains how to lower your risk of sickness from ice cream and fruit. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Optimal diet and lifestyle strategies for the management of cardio-metabolic risk (Pre-recorded- various dates available)
The first hot topic webinar of the series, hosted by Professor Bruce Griffin, University of Surrey, who is a biomedical scientist with expertise in lipid metabolism, nutritional biochemistry and cardiovascular disease,  will highlight the important role of diet and lifestyle in the management of cardio-metabolic risk factors, for the purpose of preventing premature cardiovascular diseases (CVD).   The content of the webinar will reflect, and provide insight into  the topics of the2018 Winter Conference's four symposia.   After setting the scene with an overview of the origins, prevalence and i...
Source: The Nutrition Society - July 30, 2018 Category: Nutrition Authors: Jade Mitchell Source Type: news

Is UK science and innovation up for the climate challenge?
The government has shaken up the UK research system. But fossil fuels, not low-carbon technologies, still seem to be in the driving seat.A new report by Richard Jones and James Wilsdon invites us toquestion the biomedical bubble - the slow but steady concentration of research and development (R&D) resources in the hands of biomedical science.A provocative case, it ’s already generated some discussion. Here, I want to pick up a point that might be easily missed amongst fights over the role of biomedicine: the all-too-small amount of resource being put towards decarbonising energy.Continue reading... (Source: Guard...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Bell Tags: Science Environment Climate change Energy Research funding Higher education Science policy Politics Source Type: news

JST releases 'TogoVar', an integrated database for Japanese genome variants/variations
(Japan Science and Technology Agency) 'TogoVar' is an integrated database for human genome variants/variations in Japanese population. With 'TogoVar', you can search allele frequencies of human genome variants/variations among several databases including new data sets generated from the genome data of Japanese people registered in the NBDC Human Database. 'TogoVar' aims to be a Japanese genome information infrastructure and contribute to the development of genomic medical science, which would lead to advancement of personalized (precision) medicine including genetic counseling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Celebrating the NHS at 70
Today, the NHS celebrates its 70th birthday. Since its launch on 5 July 1948, the NHS has utilised advances in medical science to deliver a free healthcare service for all. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - July 5, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Research shows how a moderate dose of alcohol protects the heart
For at least 20 years, research has shown that for many people, moderate consumption of alcohol can protect the heart, but the reason for this is poorly understood. A study conducted at the University of São Paulo's Biomedical Science Institute (ICB-USP) in Brazil suggests that this cardioprotective mechanism may be associated with activation of ALDH2 (aldehyde dehydrogenase-2), (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Two UCLA chemists selected as 2018 Pew scholars
UCLA chemistry professors Hosea Nelson and Jose Rodriguez have been selected among 22  Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences for 2018. The honor provides funding to outstanding young researchers whose work is relevant to the advancement of human health. The scholars, who were selected from 184 nominations, will receive four-year, $300,000 grants to advance their explorations of biological mechanisms underpinning human h ealth and disease.UCLA and UC San Diego each has two 2018 Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences; no other university has more than one.“These scientists have shown the boldness and creat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Manufacturers Assistance and Technical Training Branch (MATTB)
CBER ’s Manufacturers Assistance and Technical Training Branch (MATTB) responds to public inquiries for information (by phone and email) from the biologics industry. MATTB strives to provide timely, accurate and useful information to stakeholders. (Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - June 6, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

How Theranos used the media to create the emperor ’s new startup | John Naughton
With £10bn and a pretty face, fraudster Elizabeth Holmes blinded some of the most respected journalists in the industryIt ’s a quintessential Silicon Valley story. A smart, attractive 19-year-old American woman who has taught herself Mandarin while in high school is studying chemical engineering at Stanford, where she is a president’s scholar. Her name is Elizabeth Holmes. In her first year as an undergraduate she persuades her professor to allow her to attend the seminars he runs with his PhD students. Then one day she drops into his office to tell him that she’s dropping out of college because she...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: John Naughton Tags: Theranos Medical research US crime Technology US news Science Source Type: news

Ever wonder what happens when you donate your body parts to "medical science?" Discover the horrifying truth that will leave you sickened
(Natural News) If you’ve ever toyed with – or perhaps already committed to – the idea of donating your body to medical science when you die, a shocking story out of Detroit might have you thinking again. Arthur Rathburn, 64, was recently sentenced to nine years in federal prison and fined $761,000, for selling and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Improving support for young biomedical scientists
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alberts, B., Hyman, T., Pickett, C. L., Tilghman, S., Varmus, H. Tags: Science and Policy p-forum Source Type: news

Winter Conference 2018: Optimal diet and lifestyle strategies for the management of cardio-metabolic risk
Discussion12:15  Lunch13:30 Original Communication session15:00  RefreshmentsSymposium 2: Impact of dietary fatty acids on key metabolic tissues (fat depots and muscle)15:30  The influence of dietary fatty acids on liver fat content and metabolismProfessor Leanne Hodson, University of Oxford, UK16:00 The impact of dietary fatty acids on regional and ectopic human adipose tissueDr Paul Petrus, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden16:30 Is there a role for omega 3 fatty acids in preventing sarcopenic obesity?Dr Oliver C Witard, University of Stirling, UK17:00  Panel Discussion17:30Keynote  Lec...
Source: The Nutrition Society - May 14, 2018 Category: Nutrition Authors: Miss Emily Ooi Source Type: news

Importance of Artificial Intelligence in Dentistry
ConclusionHuman history has taught us that the right and meaningful technology is always adopted by the community. We can be certain that AI will change dentistry in a way we cannot even imagine today. Dentistry has always been at the forefront when it comes to implementing new technologies. Be it practice management software, digital radiographs or 3D printing – dentists have been early adopters. AI-powered products are a natural next evolution of dental technology and the promise will be realized very soon. We hope you liked the article. If you are a dentist, then please Sign Up as a Clinical Investigator...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - May 4, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news