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SECOND OPINION | Are animals born with the ability to count?
In this week's roundup of interesting and eclectic news in health and medical science, we look at Canadian drug prices, Ontarians on opioids and how to slow down sperm. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Measles, Mumps and Rubella Virus Vaccine, Live
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 17, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Fluzone Quadrivalent
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 11, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Blood Grouping Reagents, Anti-Wra ALBAsera
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 11, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Seraclone Blood Grouping Reagent Anti-Fya(Monoclonal)
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 11, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Sewage Saved This Man's Life. Someday It Could Save Yours.
When Thomas Patterson woke up from a two-month coma in March 2016, he learned two things he couldn’t believe: Donald Trump was soon to become the Republican nominee for president, and his wife, Steffanie Strathdee, had saved him from dying of an antibiotic-resistant superbug by injecting him with viruses harvested from sewage. It took a lot of convincing for him to accept these weren’t just more hallucinations. Patterson and Strathdee met while serving on a National Institutes of Health grant review panel almost 16 years ago. Strathdee doesn’t usually find review panels a riveting experience, but when she...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sewage Saved This Man's Life. Someday It Could Save Yours.
This article has been updated to amend overstatements of the length of time it took the Texas A&M team to secure the phages they sent to Patterson, as well as the number of researchers to whom Strathdee reached out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

CroFab
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 8, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Ain't no sunshine on Canadian doctors' conflicts of interest
Hello and happy Saturday! Here’s our roundup of the week’s interesting and eclectic news in health and medical science. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

‘ God Knows Where I Am ’ — documentary explores the mental health system ’ s failures through one woman ’ s own words
No one knows exactly when Linda Bishop drew her last breath, though it was likely Jan. 13, 2008, or soon thereafter. What is known is where she died — in an empty New Hampshire farmhouse she’d entered illegally — and that she died of starvation. Her badly decomposed body wasn’t found until that May, along […]Related:Five big wins: Congress boosts medical science funding in key areasYou just learned you have breast cancer. What’s next?What makes someone donate a kidney to a stranger? (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - May 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Five big wins: Congress boosts medical science funding in key areas
Congress unveiled a bipartisan budget late Sunday that contains a number of welcome surprises for researchers who had been panicking since March, when President Trump proposed deep funding cuts for science and health. Under the deal, the National Institutes of Health will get a $2 billion boost in fiscal year 2017, as it did the previous year. […]Related:You just learned you have breast cancer. What’s next?What makes someone donate a kidney to a stranger?A mysterious illness kills 11 young people in Liberia, where Ebola raged (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

STERILE ALCOHOL PREP PADS (Isopropyl Alcohol Swab) Swab [Taizhou Kangping Medical Science And Technology Co., Ltd]
Updated Date: May 1, 2017 EST (Source: DailyMed Drug Label Updates)
Source: DailyMed Drug Label Updates - May 1, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Second Opinion: A dietary dust-up over saturated fat story
Second Opinion is our round-up of the week’s interesting and eclectic news in health and medical science from reporter Kelly Crowe and Darryl Hol at CBC Health. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: April 28, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From FDA and Health Canada approvals to joint ventures, here are 7 medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA clears Joimax Endovapor 2 Joimax announced in an April 26 press release that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance to market its Endovapor 2 Multi-Radio Frequency System. The device generates electricity for monopoly and bipolar cutting and coagulation of tissue structures in surgery. It has programs designed for spinal cord surgery with an interdisciplinary application. It also has 2 monopolar and 2 bipolar sockets with an easy touchpad technolo...
Source: Mass Device - April 28, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) News Well Surgical Anaconda Biomed Creganna Medical Eclipse Aesthetics Joimax Mederi Therapeutics MedTech Millennium Medical Technologies SiBone Theraclion Source Type: news

BabyBIG
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - April 28, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Thymoglobulin
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - April 27, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL SWAB (Para-Aid Sterile Alcohol Prep Pads) Swab [Taizhou Kangping Medical Science And Technology Co., Ltd]
Updated Date: Apr 27, 2017 EST (Source: DailyMed Drug Label Updates)
Source: DailyMed Drug Label Updates - April 27, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

4 Ways Researchers Are Pushing The Boundaries Of Making Babies
Infertility treatment is more common than ever, thanks to technology.  More than 70,000 babies were born through in-vitro fertilization in 2014, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. That’s an increase of nearly 10,000 babies, compared with five years earlier. Men and women are increasingly likely to seek medical help for reasons that include reduced stigma and more employers offering coverage for IVF. But one big reason for the trend is clear: Fertility doctors are getting better at making babies. “Science is moving at a pace that’s very different th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

4 Ways Researchers Are Pushing The Boundaries Of Making Babies
Infertility treatment is more common than ever, thanks to technology.  More than 70,000 babies were born through in-vitro fertilization in 2014, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. That’s an increase of nearly 10,000 babies, compared with five years earlier. Men and women are increasingly likely to seek medical help for reasons that include reduced stigma and more employers offering coverage for IVF. But one big reason for the trend is clear: Fertility doctors are getting better at making babies. “Science is moving at a pace that’s very different th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL SWAB (Para-Aid Sterile Alcohol Prep Pads) Swab [Taizhou Kangping Medical Science And Technology Co., Ltd]
Updated Date: Apr 25, 2017 EST (Source: DailyMed Drug Label Updates)
Source: DailyMed Drug Label Updates - April 25, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Apr 21 Cardiology News Apr 21 Cardiology News
High-sensitivity troponin, statin eligibility, FDA letter to Abbott, azithromycin risks, trans-fat ban, and trust in medical science are discussed by Dr John Mandrola in this week's podcast.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging
Research has demonstrated a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. The research team's new cost-effective fabrication method can be used to proliferate practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging devices that can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology, and other related interdisciplinary fields. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging
(Pohang University of Science& Technology (POSTECH)) Research conducted by Professor Junsuk Rho's team at POSTECH, South Korea, has demonstrated a scalable and reliable fabrication process of a large scale hyperlens device based on direct pattern transfer techniques. The research team's new cost-effective fabrication method can be used to proliferate practical far-field and real-time super-resolution imaging devices that can be widely used in optics, biology, medical science, nanotechnology, and other related interdisciplinary fields. This achievement has been published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Clinical Investigator Status (Biologics)
Clinical Investigator Inspection List from inspections of clinical investigators who have conducted studies with investigational new drugs or investigational devices reviewed by CBER (Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - April 20, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Cochrane Eyes and Visions seeks Methodologist - Baltimore, USA
MethodologistClassified Title: Sr. Research Data AnalystSalary: $49,957 - $68,721  Contract: Minimum 2-year commitment, with funding for up to 5 years. John Hopkins University  will arrange for work visas for qualified candidates.Status: Full Time, Monday - Friday 37.5 hrs.Location: Baltimore, USAClosing Date: 26 May, 2017 This position is with theCochrane Eyes and Vision (CEV) US Project. Primary duties include providing methodological support for the production of systematic reviews of interventions to prevent and treat eye disease and visual impairment and coordinating the activities of CEV systematic rev...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 20, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

America's First Addiction Crisis Had Some Striking Parallels To Today
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  Sign up for the HuffPost Must Reads newsletter. Each Sunday, we will bring you the best original reporting, long form writing and breaking news from The Huffington Post and around the web, plus behind-the-scenes looks at how it’s all made. Click here to sign up! -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

America's First Addiction Crisis Had Some Striking Parallels To Today
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  Sign up for the HuffPost Must Reads newsletter. Each Sunday, we will bring you the best original reporting, long form writing and breaking news from The Huffington Post and around the web, plus behind-the-scenes looks at how it’s all made. Click here to sign up! -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Want More Trust in Medical Science? Embrace Uncertainty and Cut the Hype Want More Trust in Medical Science? Embrace Uncertainty and Cut the Hype
On Earth Day, concerned citizens will March to defend the virtues of science. Dr Mandrola explores reasons that mainstream medical science has developed a problem with trust.Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 18, 2017 Category: Cardiology Tags: Internal Medicine Expert Column Source Type: news

Scientists engineer human-germ hybrid molecules to attack drug-resistant bacteria
Taking a cue from viruses that infect and kill bacteria, the researchers engineered molecules capable of targeting the bugs in a way the human immune system cannot—an approach that could be particularly valuable against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 17, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News antibiotic resistance Assaf Raz immunology Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Immunology lysibodies lysins microbiology Vincent A. Fischetti Virology Source Type: news

Ethiopia: A Good Surgeon Doesn't Cross the Red Line Without Having the Necessary Help of His Colleagues - Professor Adem Ali
[Ethiopian Herald] Professor Adem Ali has has been serving for three and half decades at Addis Ababa University School of Medical Science, Department of Surgery. He has contributed vastly to the establishment and development of various national and international academic societies. Besides, he served as president of the Ethiopian Medical Association. The Ethiopian Herald had a short stay with Prof. Ali with the intention of familiarizing his personal and professional life with the general public. Excerpts: (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 17, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Viral fossils reveal how our ancestors may have eliminated an ancient infection
Some viruses can insert their genetic material into the genome of their host, creating a genetic fossil record. Researchers have uncovered how our ancestors may have wiped out one such virus around 11 million years ago. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 13, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News ancient infections Laboratory of Retrovirology Paul Bieniasz retroviruses viral fossils Source Type: news

Shooting the messenger: how one protein allows germ cells to develop
Researchers have identified a molecule that guides the formation of eggs and sperm by preventing a host of factors related to cell death and inflammation from killing the precursors to these cells. Their findings reveal new knowledge about how a mutation in this molecule leads to male sterility. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 13, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News germ cells Laboratory of RNA Molecular Biology RNA binding protein stem cells sterility Thomas Tuschl Source Type: news

Researchers track fish migration by testing DNA in seawater
For the first time, researchers have successfully recorded fish migration by conducting DNA tests on water samples. Using this method to estimate the abundance and distribution of fish species could help scientists more easily understand the impact certain environmental factors are having on local fish populations. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 12, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News eDNA fish migration Jesse Ausubel Mark Stoeckle Program for the Human Environment Source Type: news

Asbestos Contaminates Canadian University Labs
Fear and frustration best describes emotions felt by University of Toronto faculty and students after they say administration delayed notification that asbestos contaminated some of the university’s science labs. “The emotional experience is really devastating,” said physiology and medicine professor Adria Giacca in an interview with CBC News. Another professor, who didn’t want to be identified, told the Globe and Mail: “I’ve lost confidence, and my lab people have lost confidence…[It] perpetuates fear whenever you see dust, you now worry. Am I going to get cancer 20 years from no...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 12, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Tags: asbestos ban in canada asbestos exposure in canada asbestos exposure in schools asbestos in canada Source Type: news

Scientists discover how crucial DNA sequences endure
The centromere region of chromosomes retains the same DNA from one generation to the next. Scientists have gained new insights into how it avoids being scrambled in normal cells, and how it becomes unstable in cancer. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 10, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News cancer centromere DNA recombination Hironori Funabiki Laboratory of Chromosome and Cell Biology Source Type: news

Rockefeller tops ranking of 1,300 universities in measures of scientific impact and productivity
Released by the European Commission–funded U-Multirank, the survey placed Rockefeller first in categories related to scientific impact and research productivity. The results incorporate data on more than 1,300 institutions in over 90 countries. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 10, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News U-Multirank Source Type: news

In the News – NBC News – Young
This Night Owl Gene Mutation Turns People Into Sleep Martians “‘It’s as if these people have perpetual jet lag, moving eastward every day,’ said Michael Young, who oversaw the study. ‘In the morning, they’re not ready for the next day … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 7, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: In the News genetics Michael W. Young sleep Source Type: news

Rockefeller president Richard P. Lifton releases statement on proposed federal budget cuts to science
Responding to a White House budget proposal that calls for an 18 percent decrease in funding for the National Institutes of Health, Rockefeller President Richard P. Lifton today released a statement outlining the detrimental impact such cuts would have on health, national security, and the economy. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 6, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Zach Veilleux Tags: Campus News Source Type: news

Study identifies “night owl” gene variant
Scientists have discovered a common mutation that might explain why some people have trouble going to sleep at night and getting up early. The gene alteration slows the internal biological clock that regulates our sleeping patterns. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 6, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News Alina Patke circadian clock circadian rhythm CRY1 DSPD insomnia Laboratory of Genetics Michael W. Young molecular and cell biology sleep Source Type: news

For microbes fighting viruses, a fast response means a better defense
Researchers have found that the bacterial immune system targets an invading virus as soon as it enters the cell. This discovery answers a long-standing question about how microbes defend themselves. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 29, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News CRISPR CRISPR-Cas9 immunology Joshua W. Modell Laboratory of Bacteriology Luciano Marraffini microbiology spacer acquisition Virology Source Type: news

2 Canadians win Gairdner Awards for contributions to medical science
Two Canadian researchers are among the winners of this year's Gairdner Awards, which recognize some of the most significant medical discoveries made by scientists around the globe. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Exceptions and Alternative Procedures Approved Under 21 CFR 640.120
Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 640.120(a) - The Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, may approve an exception or alternative procedures to any requirement in subchapter F (Biologics) of Chapter I (Parts 600 - 680) of title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations regarding blood, blood components or blood products. Both licensed and unlicensed blood establishments must submit requests for an exception or alternative procedure to the requirements in Parts 600-680. (Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - March 28, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

To Translate Medical Science Effectively, Researchers Must Understand Commercialization
We need to get past the patronizing and paternalistic concern that teaching physicians and researchers how scientific knowledge gets implemented and, yes, commercialized will somehow offend their delicate sensibilities, corrupt their moral integrity, and seduce them to “the dark side.” (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 28, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: David Shaywitz, Contributor Tags: NASDAQ:IRTC NASDAQ:GOOG Source Type: news

Bridge Medicines appoints William J. Polvino as Chief Executive Officer
As Chief Executive Officer of the newly formed drug discovery company, founded by Rockefeller University and its two neighboring institutions, Polvino will be responsible for building a portfolio of early-stage drug discovery projects and advancing each program from animal proof of principle to clinical trials. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 27, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Campus News Bridge Medicines drug discovery Tri-I TDI William J. Polvino Source Type: news

Deadliest Enemy ​: Our War Against Killer Germs​
University of Minnesota, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. 03/21/2017 This one-hour, 24-minute lecture discusses the global outbreaks of Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), yellow fever, and Zika that have demonstrated how infectious diseases have the power to disrupt daily life, overwhelm public and private resources, and bring trade and transportation to a halt. It discusses a book of the same name that draws on the latest medical science, case studies, policy research, and epidemiological lessons to explore the resources and programs needed to keep people safe from infectious disease. (Video...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

New study resolves the structure of the human protein that causes cystic fibrosis
In order to better understand how genetic mutations give rise to cystic fibrosis, researchers need to map the protein responsible for the disorder. The new structure has led to new insights on how this molecular channel functions. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 23, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News CFTR cystic fibrosis David C. Gadsby Jue Chen Laboratory of Cardiac and Membrane Physiology Laboratory of Membrane Biology and Biophysics structural and chemical biology Source Type: news

TED Talks parody video exposes the total bulls##t of TED-fabricated "thought leaders" who spew pseudoknowledge pretending to be "big ideas"
(Natural News) TED Talks famously issued a dictatorial order in 2013 that banned all presentations critical of GMOs or promoting “food as medicine.” TED also banned a brilliant talk by Graham Hancock entitled “The War on Consciousness,” which sought to inform humanity of how governments, institutions and even “medical science” deliberately isolated humans from ethnobotanical... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Changes in the vascular system may trigger Alzheimer ’s disease
In some people whose cognitive functions are weakened due to Alzheimer’s, the disease can be traced back to changes in the brain’s blood vasculature. Scientists have found that a protein involved in blood clotting and inflammation might offer a potential path to new drugs. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 21, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News Alzheimer’s disease beta-amyloid neuroscience and behavior patricia and john rosenwald laboratory of neurobiology and genetics Sidney Strickland Zu-Lin Chen Source Type: news

In the News – Wall Street Journal – Brivanlou
Researchers Seek Guidelines for Embryo-Like Entities Created in Labs   “Some researchers say the concern is premature. Scientists in the lab of Ali Brivanlou at the Rockefeller University in 2014 published work describing how they reprogrammed cells taken from human … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 21, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: In the News 14-day rule Ali Brivanlou bioethics embryo development Source Type: news

David Rockefeller, university benefactor for 76 years, dies at 101
The entire Rockefeller University community deeply mourns the loss of David Rockefeller, our beloved friend and benefactor, Honorary Chairman, and Life Trustee. During its long and storied history, no single individual had a more profound influence on the University than David. His inspired leadership, extraordinary vision, and immense generosity have been essential factors in the University’s success. His values—especially his unequivocal commitment to excellence—shaped the University and made it the powerhouse of biomedical discovery it is today. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 20, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Zach Veilleux Tags: Campus News Source Type: news