KU Leuven researchers discover new piece of the puzzle for Parkinson's disease
(KU Leuven) Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven have discovered that a defect in the ATP13A2 gene causes cell death by disrupting the cellular transport of polyamines. When this happens in the part of the brain that controls body movement, it can lead to Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny magnetic structures enhance medical science
(American Institute of Physics) Magnetic nanostructures have interesting properties that enhance novel applications in medical diagnosis and allow the exploration of new therapeutic techniques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Human Bones
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Wild / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research syndication Source Type: news

3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Human Bones
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - January 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Wild / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research syndication Source Type: news

Study: Drinking Tea May Help You Live Longer, Especially If It ’ s Green
This study strengthens the body of evidence that habitual tea drinking is associated with lower rates of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, though it cannot prove that it’s definitely the tea that’s responsible,” Dr. Jenna Macciochi, a lecturer in immunology at the University of Sussex, told the SMC. However, she noted that “a body of evidence in nutrition suggests that whole diet patterns are more informative of diet-disease relationships than any isolated food or nutrient.” Dr. Duane Mellor, a registered dietitian and senior teaching fellow at Aston Medical School, Aston University, sai...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Green Tea Source Type: news

Viewpoint: Medical Science Is Due for a Software Patch
No abstract available (Source: Emergency Medicine News)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - January 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Viewpoint Source Type: news

Here ’s How Conservatives Are Using Civil Rights Law to Restrict Abortion
Six states passed laws in 2019 banning abortions once a “fetal heartbeat” is detected, which can be as early as six weeks into pregnancy. While most of these new laws were challenged in court and are temporarily blocked, the trend has continued: another 10 states introduced similar bills in 2019 and more are expected this year. The sudden success of these measures is not an accident. They are the result of a concerted new strategy by abortion opponents, researchers have found. Instead of focusing on religious or women’s health concerns, supporters of Georgia’s “heartbeat” bill advanced...
Source: TIME: Health - January 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Invest in MSLs to reap bigger gains
  If authenticity, data analysis and good customer rapport are the superpowers pharma needs most today, MSLs are the superheroes most able to wield them.  As the MSL ’s role continues to evolve from a supporting to a far more strategic one, pharma companies have much to gain from getting the most from this ever more important set of colleagues. Pharma therefore needs to invest in them and build MSLs ’ skills and knowledge in new areas, helping them adapt to new ways of interacting and use new technologies that can magnify their impact, says Emma Booth, Director, Medical Capabilities, EU Medical...
Source: EyeForPharma - December 31, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

From cancer to stroke, the past ten years have seen astounding advances in medical science
Breakthrough cancer therapies, life-saving stroke procedures and 'rebooted' donor hearts - these are just a few of the medical advances over the past decade that are transforming our health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pharmacies Don ’t Know How to Dispose of Leftover Opioids and Antibiotics
Today (Dec. 30), a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco and the Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., published the results of an investigation into whether or not pharmacy workers could provide accurate information on the disposal of two classes of drugs: opioids and antibiotics. The results are frightening: The researchers enlisted volunteers to place calls to nearly 900 pharmacies in California, posing as parents with leftover antibiotics and opioids from a “child’s” recent surgery. They asked the pharmacy employees on the line—either pharmacists...
Source: TIME: Health - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized data visualization embargoed study Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Pharmacies Don ’t Know How to Dispose of Leftover Opioids and Antibiotics
Today (Dec. 30), a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco and the Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., published the results of an investigation into whether or not pharmacy workers could provide accurate information on the disposal of two classes of drugs: opioids and antibiotics. The results are frightening: The researchers enlisted volunteers to place calls to nearly 900 pharmacies in California, posing as parents with leftover antibiotics and opioids from a “child’s” recent surgery. They asked the pharmacy employees on the line—either pharmacists...
Source: TIME: Science - December 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized data visualization embargoed study Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

20 Ways the World Got Better in 2019, in Charts
The last 12 months have felt chaotic, destabilizing, and on occasion apocalyptic. Toxic nationalist movements have risen across the globe; politics in democratic nations have increasingly polarized; wealth gaps continue to expand; and the specter of climate change lurking at a remove has become an actual monster inside the house. It’s difficult, in the context of the daily onslaught of bad news and its demands on our attention, to remember that when you look at the long arc of human civilization, there are many, many things that continue to get better. As a sort of balm for the pains of a traumatic year, here are 20 ...
Source: TIME: Science - December 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized climate change data visualization health Source Type: news

20 Ways the World Got Better in 2019, in Charts
The last 12 months have felt chaotic, destabilizing, and on occasion apocalyptic. Toxic nationalist movements have risen across the globe; politics in democratic nations have increasingly polarized; wealth gaps continue to expand; and the specter of climate change lurking at a remove has become an actual monster inside the house. It’s difficult, in the context of the daily onslaught of bad news and its demands on our attention, to remember that when you look at the long arc of human civilization, there are many, many things that continue to get better. As a sort of balm for the pains of a traumatic year, here are 20 ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized climate change data visualization health Source Type: news

'Women have been woefully neglected': does medical science have a gender problem?
Women ’s symptoms are ignored and their health problems are under-researched. What’s going wrong?When Lynn Enright had a hysteroscopy to examine the inside of the womb, her searing pain was dismissed by medical professionals. She only understood why when she started working on her book on female anatomy, Vagina: A Re-education. She was looking for research on pain and women ’s health, only to be shocked by how little data she found.It wasn ’t just the topic of pain that was poorly researched. The lack of evidence was a problem she encountered time and time again, which is no surprise when you look a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Slawson Tags: Universities Global research Education Higher education Women Health Science Medicine Medical research Students Source Type: news

Low-Dose Aspirin May Not Reduce Heart Risks for Black Americans, Study Finds
It’s fairly established medical science that people who have had heart attacks can take regular low doses of aspirin to significantly lower their risk of having another heart attack, or other heart problems including stroke. But it is still an open question whether or not people who haven’t had a heart event, but are at higher risk of one (because, for example) they have diabetes, high blood pressure, or elevated cholesterol levels), can also benefit from the over-the-counter painkiller and anti-inflammatory drug. A new study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, adds to that debate by ad...
Source: TIME: Health - December 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized aspirin Drugs Heart Disease Source Type: news

Drug decreases gut leakiness associated with ulcerative colitis
(University of California - Riverside) A research team led by biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found that a drug approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis can repair permeability defects in the gut's epithelium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Guys, your cup of joe comes with compounds that fight prostate cancer
(Natural News) How’s this for a good excuse to have another cup of joe: Research suggested that drinking coffee might lower a man’s risk of prostate cancer. Researchers from Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science in Japan identified compounds in coffee called kahweol acetate and cafestol that may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Space travel can make the gut leaky
(University of California - Riverside) Bacteria, fungi, and viruses can enter our gut through the food we eat. Fortunately, the epithelial cells that line our intestines serve as a robust barrier to prevent these microorganisms from invading the rest of our bodies. A research team led by a University of California, Riverside, biomedical scientist has found that simulated microgravity, such as that encountered in spaceflight, disrupts the functioning of the epithelial barrier even after removal from the microgravity environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychological well-being at 52 years could impact on cognitive functioning at 69 years
(IOS Press) Miharu Nakanishi, Chief Researcher of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, and her colleagues finds that psychological well-being at 52 years were prospectively associated with cognitive function at 69 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Geffen School of Medicine honors doctor for his groundbreaking research on immune response
In recognition of his groundbreaking work on the mechanisms underlying the cellular response to infection, Dr. Zhijian “James” Chen of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas has received the 2019 Switzer Prize awarded by the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.At the prize ceremony on the UCLA campus, during which Chen delivered a lecture about his research focused on the role of DNA in triggering immune defense and autoimmune diseases, the scientist said he was honored to receive the award and then joked that “to this day, I still don’t know who nominated me.”C...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cochrane in Practice - Dentistry
Cochrane does not make clinical recommendations, instead it provides unbiased and high-quality health evidence so that health decisions, policies, and clinical guidelines can be informed by the best available evidence. ‘Cochrane Evidence in Practice’ series collects stories about clinical professionals using Cochrane evidence - the everyday healthcare professional making sure their patients and clients are getting the best care!Dental Student Nicole's story:Name: Nicole Meerah ElangoPosition: Second Year Dental Student at Peninsula Dental SchoolLocation: EnglandCochrane has been an invaluable resource throughou...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

From childhood cancer to mapping human development
(Academy of Medical Sciences (UK)) Professor Muzlifah Haniffa from Newcastle University and the Wellcome Sanger Institute* has won the 2019 Foulkes Foundation Medal for her ground-breaking contributions to biomedical science, it was announced today [Tuesday 19 November, 2019]. Professor Haniffa's research achievements include providing a better understanding of the developing human immune system and childhood kidney cancer, mapping the maternal-fetal interface and discovering new immune cells in the skin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could cytotoxic T-cells be a key to longevity?
(RIKEN) Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science (IMS) and Keio University School of Medicine in Japan have used single-cell RNA analysis to find that supercentenarians--meaning people over the age of 110--have an excess of a type of immune cell called cytotoxic CD4 T-cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prevalence, associated factors and consequences of substance use among health and medical science students of Haramaya University, eastern Ethiopia, 2018: a cross-sectional study - Alebachew W, Semahegn A, Ali T, Mekonnen H.
BACKGROUND: Substance use has a terrible impact on health, behavior and country's economy because the number of people particularly the youngsters being involved in this practice is increasing rapidly. However, the prevalence, determinants and consequence ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Man on a mission
During his last three years as an undergraduate, Cody Aros spent a lot of time asking strangers deeply personal questions.As a volunteer intake coordinator at a free clinic in Menlo Park, California, Aros ’ duties included asking the people seeking care about their interest in HIV testing. For a lot of people, asking strangers about their sexual histories would be a nightmare. But not Aros. With every interaction, he tried to create a safe space, in which people could share their histories and conc erns without fearing judgment.“There is an element of vulnerability in medicine that I found myself really drawn t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

South Africa: Health Professionals and Cadavers - the Quest for an Ethical Approach
[The Conversation Africa] The study of anatomy has been the foundation for the training of students in medical and allied health sciences - dentistry, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, pharmacy, nursing and medical science - for hundreds of years. To most teachers of human structural anatomy, knowledge of this complex subject is inseparably linked to dissection of the human body. Dissection remains a fundamental aspect of anatomy and is considered to be the "gold standard" for teaching human anatomy in many parts of the world. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 29, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

12 Innovations That Will Change Health Care and Medicine in the 2020s
Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - October 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news

The Director of the NIH Lays Out His Vision of the Future of Medical Science
Our world has never witnessed a time of greater promise for improving human health. Many of today’s health advances have stemmed from a long arc of discovery that begins with strong, steady support for basic science. In large part because of fundamental research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which traces its roots to 1887, Americans are living longer, healthier lives. Life expectancy for a baby born in the U.S. has risen from 47 years in 1900 to more than 78 years today. Among the advances that have helped to make this possible are a 70% decline in the U.S. death rate from cardiovascular disease ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dr. Francis S. Collins Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare medicine Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine Annual Meeting Begins
NAM is holding its annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Events include a scientific program on the evolution of technology in biomedical science and a President’s Forum on the societal implications of emerging science and technology in health and medicine. Agenda | Webcast (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 18, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

David Pegg obituary
Clinical scientist and academic who pioneered groundbreaking cooling techniques for use in organ transplantationIn the early days of organ transplantation one of the thorniest problems facing medical science was how to keep an organ functional in the period between harvesting it from a donor and inserting it into a grateful recipient. David Pegg, who has died aged 86, did much towards solving that conundrum, and so enabled us to take for granted our capacity to stop the clock of life by freezing or cooling an organ before restarting its normal function.One of the pioneers in the field of low temperature biology – bui...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Colin Green Tags: Medical research Science People in science London Medicine Biology University of Cambridge Source Type: news

Chinese activists protest the use of traditional treatments - they want medical science
In the West, the number of people challenging scientific authority has been growing in past decades. This has, among other things, led to a decline in the support for mass vaccination programmes and to an increase in alternative forms of treatment. In China, however, activists are defending modern medical science and criticising Traditional Chinese Medicine, which hospitals are obliged to offer to patients on an equal footing with modern medical care. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - October 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

The FDA ’s Critical Focus on Women’s Health
The FDA takes very seriously its long-standing commitment and involvement in medical science and growth in our overall understanding of, and approach to, women ’s health. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - October 3, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Occupational Distress in UK (United Kingdom) Factual Television
Source: Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma [Columbia University]. Published: 10/2019. This 54-page report, supported by the Wellcome Trust, discusses how long-term, repeated professional exposure to “second-hand” human distress – the details of others’ traumatic experience, along with graphic imagery and other aversive content – can have significant occupational-health consequences, long recognized by medical science as “vicarious traumatization” or “secondary trauma." Its goals are to map out the drivers of occupational distress in factual TV; understand how effecti...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Single-use plastic bottles find second life in prosthetic devices  
How do you slash the cost of a prosthetic limb socket from approximately $6,000 to around $12? Simple: You fabricate it from plastic water bottles, and strike a blow against plastic waste in the process. The idea originated with Dr. Karthikeyan Kandan, a senior lecturer in Mechanical Engineering at De Montfort University (DMU) Leicester in the United Kingdom. Kandan used granulated materials from recycled plastic water bottles to spin polyester yarn that is heated to form a solid, lightweight material and molded into prosthetic limb sockets. The first-of-its-kind device could address the gap betwee...
Source: MDDI - September 5, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Plastics Today Source Type: news

Harnessing Unruly Digital Health Data
As medical devices and digital apps increasingly merge, patients, healthcare professionals, and medtech companies find themselves armed with more and richer data. Digitally-enabled medical devices can record data which, if used properly, facilitates more personalized care and drives better outcomes for patients. These advanced devices also provide medtech companies with the information they need to do two important things: continually optimize product performance and prove to key stakeholders the efficacy and value of their products. And more of these devices are on the way. Let’s consider two examples. A...
Source: MDDI - September 3, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Dan Schulman and Piotr Kula Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Seaweed forests hold key to overcoming antibiotic resistance, says study
(Natural News) One of the greatest challenges facing modern medicine today is antibiotic resistance. Almost a century since Penicillin was first discovered in strains of mold, medical science has isolated thousands of defensive, antibiotic compounds from microbes. These bio-active microbial metabolites have been mass produced as antibiotics to help humans fight infections. Because the human... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Guardian view on treating Ebola: science is the start | Editorial
Researchers have developed and trialled drugs that can cure this deadly disease. The problem now is to deliver themThis week has seen a heartening triumph of medical science: Ebola is now curable, doctors say. The announcement is also a timely one. The outbreak in the war-ravaged territories of the north-eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, which began over a year ago, has defied the sustained efforts to halt it. Last month, with the death toll above 1,600 people, the World Health Organization declared it an emergency of international concern. The even deadlier West African epidemic of 2014 killed more than 11,000 peo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Ebola Democratic Republic of the Congo World Health Organization Medical research World news Science Source Type: news

Cardiac Events and Nuclear War: Prevention by CVD Specialists Cardiac Events and Nuclear War: Prevention by CVD Specialists
In this commentary, the authors liken the threat of nuclear war to the cardiovascular events they work to prevent. Can we harness medical science to reduce the current nuclear threat?Circulation (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

States are all over the map when it comes to transgender health care
Medicaid rules in several states exclude sexual reassignment treatment, others allow it. Advocates argue restrictions stem from prejudice, not medical science. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Ollove Source Type: news

Liberia: 'Liberia Risks Disease Outbreaks Amid Sanitation Problem'
[Observer] Prominent biomedical scientist and social activist, Dr. Dougbeh Christopher Nyan, has said that, "a major outbreak of Cholera and Hepatitis A infection may be looming over Liberia, if the government does not urgently address the proper disposal of mountains of garbage and solid wastes that has accumulated and sits in and around the Capital, Monrovia and its environs." (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 17, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Working towards a future where people can live (and die) healthy
With a background in biomedical science and rich experience in medical device venture capital investment, Tomoko Inoue possesses the technical, operational and business knowledge of what makes medtech startups successful – a role perfectly suited for her current role as the CEO of OMRON Ventures.  She believes that in a hyper aging society like Japan, there is a big need for smart infrastructure in order to make healthcare deliverable remotely by transcending time and space, something that nations with aging pop ulations could do well to learn from. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - July 16, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Bentham Science announces the launch of new journal, 'Current Chinese Medical Science'
(Bentham Science Publishers) Bentham Science is pleased to announce the launch of a new subscription-based journal, Current Chinese Medical Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biomedical scientist to study how body's cannabis-like molecules influence obesity
(University of California - Riverside) Nicholas DiPatrizio, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside, has received a five-year grant of more than $1.7 million from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to identify novel gut-brain endocannabinoid signaling pathways that control feeding behavior and become impaired in obesity. More than two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Unspoken Causes Of Physician Burnout
When medical culture clashes with medical science, the only way to protect patients is to change the culture. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - July 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Pearl, M.D., Contributor Source Type: news

New BU program prepares trainees for teaching modern, integrated medical curriculum
(Boston University School of Medicine) 'Integrating the Educators,' a pilot internship program at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is successful in training biomedical science trainees (graduate students/Ph.D. and postdocs) in the skills of being a medical educator. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mice are not people: Fighting spin in medical science
When it comes to health and science research, spin exaggerates the benefit of a treatment and plays down the risks. And spin can affect how people judge the benefit of treatments they read about in the news, according to the first randomized controlled trial to test the effect of spin on readers. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine names 2019 winner of Switzer Prize
Dr. Zhijian (James) Chen of the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas will be the 2019 recipient of the Switzer Prize, awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Chen has performed groundbreaking work on the mechanisms underlying the cellular response to infection.Chen ’s group has been instrumental in the identification of immune response pathways that have significantly added to scientists’ understanding of how these pathways work in microbial infections and autoimmune diseases.Most significantly, his team at UT Southwestern discovered the DNA-sensing enzyme cGAS, which helps launch the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Breaking down the walls of scientific secrecy
A Canadian research team is pushing the boundaries of transparency in biomedical science by publishing their research notes in real time and refusing to patent their discoveries. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Pew funds biomedical research for 10 Latin American scientists
(Pew Charitable Trusts) The Pew Charitable Trusts today announced the 2019 class members of the Pew Latin American Fellows Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The 10 postdoctoral fellows from six Latin American countries -- Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Mexico -- will receive two years of funding to conduct research in laboratories in the United States, where they will work under the mentorship of prominent biomedical scientists, including members of the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Curbing your enthusiasm for overeating
(University of California - Riverside) Signals between our gut and brain control how and when we eat food. But how the molecular mechanisms involved in this signaling are affected when we eat a high-energy diet and how they contribute to obesity are not well understood. Using a mouse model, a research team led by a biomedical scientist at UC Riverside has found that overactive endocannabinoid signaling in the gut drives overeating in diet-induced obesity by blocking gut-brain satiation signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news