New method expands the world of small RNAs
(University of California - Riverside) A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a new RNA-sequencing method-- " Panoramic RNA Display by Overcoming RNA Modification Aborted Sequencing, " or PANDORA-seq -- that can help discover numerous modified small RNAs that were previously undetectable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Caltech professor Ibrahim Ciss é applies physics to decode and understand RNA transcription
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation recognizes the research contributions and work of Caltech professor Ibrahim Ciss é in a new article and video. Ciss é is the recipient of a 2021 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 29, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Specialist Covid infection control scientist faces threat of deportation from UK
Charles Oti should be in his NHS job fighting the virus. Instead, the Home Office wants to send him to NigeriaAn infection control specialist who has been offered a job as a senior NHS biomedical scientist to help tackle the pandemic is facing deportation by the Home Office, prompting fresh calls for a more “humane” approach to skilled migrants.The government has refused Charles Oti, 46, from Nigeria the right to remain in the UK even though the job he was offered is among the government ’s most sought-after skilled positions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Mark Townsend Tags: Immigration and asylum Home Office NHS Priti Patel Coronavirus UK news World news Nigeria Health Africa Human rights Science Source Type: news

How the South African COVID-19 variant was found
(University of California - Riverside) Variants of the coronavirus are appearing in different parts of the world, many of them spreading with alarming speed. One contagious variant is the South African, or SA, variant, identified by an international team of researchers, including biomedical scientists from the University of California, Riverside. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lower dose, less toxic radiopharmaceutical produces better outcomes
(National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine) Together with collaborators at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital, the Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Professor Shawn Chen of the Department of Diagnostic Radiology, NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, has managed to improve the pharmacokinetics and effectiveness of PPRT, while reducing its dosage and toxicity. The researchers did this by introducing a truncated Evans blue molecule onto octreotate peptide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 9, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Molecular biologist Mohamed Abou featured in new video and article from the Vilcek Foundation
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation recognizes the research contributions and work of Princeton University faculty member Mohamed Abou Donia in a new article and video. Abou Donia is the recipient of a 2021 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science. He receives the award for his rigorous work on the impact of the microbiome of humans and other organisms on host health, disease, and the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BCAS3-C16orf70 complex is a new actor on the mammalian autophagic machinery
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) Autophagy is an intracellular degradation process of cytosolic materials and damaged organelles. Targeted cargo are engulfed by membranes called autophagosome, then delivered to lysosomes where they are degraded. This process is complex, especially in mammals, with many regulatory factors. Researchers in the Ubiquitin Project of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMIMS) discovered mammalian BCAS3-C16orf70 as novel proteins that associate with the autophagosome membranes via interaction with phosphoinositide. These studies were published in Autophagy. (Source: ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vilcek Foundation allocates $150,000 for 2022 prizes honoring immigrant scientists
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation has announced that in 2022 it will award three Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science. The foundation has allocated $150,000 to make three awards of $50,000 each to early-career biomedical scientists who have already demonstrated significant accomplishments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Efficient, systematic genetic analysis helps dissect disease inheritance
(City University of Hong Kong) An international research team, including a biomedical scientist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU), has developed a high-throughput biological assay technique which enabled them to conduct a systematic analysis on the impact of nearly 100,000 genetic variants on the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Their findings provided valuable data for finding key biomarkers of type 2 diabetes for diagnostics and treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Largest batch of AIIMS resident surgeons to learn basics of robotic surgery
In the largest such initiative so far, a group of 70 young surgeons specialising in oncology at the premier medical science institute in New Delhi are learning the basics of robot-assisted surgeries in a new two-month course. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - February 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Biotech pursuing deal to access $5B China market with lung cancer test
San Antonio-based bioAffinity Technologies Inc. has secured a non-binding letter of intent from  Shanghai Fosun Long March Medical Science Co. Ltd. to evaluate its initial product — the CyPath Lung. The expectation is that the two companies will negotiate a binding agreement to commercialize the non-invasive test for early detection of lung cancer in China. “China represents a $5 billio n market for CyPath Lung. An estimated 780,000 people will be diagnosed annually in China with lung cancer,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 12, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: W. Scott Bailey Source Type: news

Biotech pursuing deal to access $5B China market with lung cancer test
San Antonio-based bioAffinity Technologies Inc. has secured a non-binding letter of intent from  Shanghai Fosun Long March Medical Science Co. Ltd. to evaluate its initial product — the CyPath Lung. The expectation is that the two companies will negotiate a binding agreement to commercialize the non-invasive test for early detection of lung cancer in China. “China represents a $5 billio n market for CyPath Lung. An estimated 780,000 people will be diagnosed annually in China with lung cancer,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 12, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: W. Scott Bailey Source Type: news

NASA ’s Climate Communications Might Not Recover From The Damage Of Trump’s Systemic Suppression
Before former U.S. President Donald Trump incited a hostile insurrection against the Capitol, he’d already smashed wrecking balls through the ranks of government agencies. Among the many casualties was the truth about climate science, which NASA was routinely prevented from sharing with the public that supports it. I was the senior science editor for NASA’s Global Climate Change website and witnessed the impact of science suppression firsthand. I’d been at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), one of 10 NASA centers, for a decade when, three weeks into the Trump Administration, on Feb. 16, 2017, t...
Source: TIME: Science - February 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Laura Tenenbaum Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Discovering structural diverseness of neurons between brain areas and between cases
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) Dr. Masanari Itokawa who is the vice president of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science and colleague by the collaboration with Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8) and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory identified that the schizophrenia cases showed a thin and tortuous neuronal network compared with the controls (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lipid composition of microalgae of the Kaliningrad Region was determined
(Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University) Scientists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Kemerovo State University determined the qualitative and quantitative composition of fatty acids that the lipids of microalgae comprise. The results are expected to benefit medical science, cosmetology, energy production and the production of feed additives and functional food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Senolysis by glutaminolysis inhibition ameliorates various age-associated disorders
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A collaborative research group led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) has identified an inhibitor of the glutamate metabolic enzyme GLS1 so that its administration selectively eliminates senescent cells in vivo. They confirmed that the GLS1 inhibitor eliminated senescent cells from various organs and tissues in aged mice, ameliorating age-associated tissue dysfunction and the symptoms of obese diabetes, arteriosclerosis, and NASH. The results of this research were published in 'Science' on January 15,...
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 3, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Remyelinating drug could improve vision in patients with multiple sclerosis
(University of California - Riverside) A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, reports a drug -- an estrogen receptor ligand called indazole chloride (IndCl) -- has the potential to improve vision in patients with multiple sclerosis, or MS. The study, performed on mice induced with a model of MS and the first to investigate IndCl's effect on the pathology and function of the complete afferent visual pathway, is published in Brain Pathology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AHA News: Hormones Are Key in Brain Health Differences Between Men and Women
MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- Medical science has come a long way since the days of " bikini medicine, " when the only time doctors managed a woman's health differently than a man's was when treating the parts of her body... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 1, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Association between Antibiotic Consumption and Incidence of Clostridioides difficile Infection in a Hospital. Journal of Korean medical science 35(47): e407
Previous exposure to antimicrobials is a major risk factor for Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI). Antibiotic prescription and C. difficile toxin assay records of patients admitted to a tertiary hospital in Korea from 2009 to 2013 were collected to investigate the association between antibiotic consumption and CDI incidence. A Spearman's correlation analysis between CDI incidence (positive result of toxin assay/10,000 admissions) and antibiotic consumption (defined daily dose/1,000 patient-days) was performed on a monthly basis. Using the matched month approach, we found a significant correlation between CDI rate and...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Broadening participation in clinical trials: A win for all
The objective is to engage in rea l-world, evidence-based research and bring trials to the local community, where a significant proportion of cancer care is rendered,” he adds.   To help, Cardinal Health ’s real-world evidence and insights teams analyze the real-world data collected from the sites, which can be compared to results from clinical trials to demonstrate the real-world value of therapies.   By bringing these studies to the community, many of the usual challenges are overcome, adds Gajra. These include trial site location (typically academic institutions) and the distances that ...
Source: EyeForPharma - January 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Joseph Constance Source Type: news

Discovery of aging mechanism for hematopoietic stem cells
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) By transferring mouse aged hematopoietic stem cells (aged HSCs) to the environment of young mice (bone marrow niche), it was demonstrated that the pattern of stem cell gene expression was rejuvenated to that of young hematopoietic stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women ’ s Bodies, COVID-19 and Male Chauvinism
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Dec 11 2020 (IPS) COVID-19 has in some nations been converted into a noxious, political issue. One of many worrying examples is the rhetoric of Brazil´s president. On 10 November, when Brazil´s COVID-19 death toll surpassed 162,000 victims – the numbers have continued to raise and are now 179,032 second only to USA´s 296,745 – Jair Bolsonaro minimized the effects of COVID-19 by stating: ”All of us are going to die one day. There is no point in escaping from that, in escaping from reality. We have to cease being a country of sissies.” Bolsonaro actual...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Education Gender Gender Identity Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour LGBTQ TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Development of a new method for decoding viral genes
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research team led by Professor Yasushi Kawaguchi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, developed a new decoding method for viral genes that can easily and quickly obtain even non-canonical genetic information. Using this new decoding method, they identified nine novel proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) and found that one of them, piUL49, is a pathogenic factor that specifically controls the onset of herpes encephalitis . (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The New Coronavirus Vaccine Is Changing The Future Of Medicine
The success of mRNA vaccines could usher in a new era of medical science — not just for vaccines, but for cancer treatments, gene therapy, and more. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 2, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Caroline Seydel, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Editors' Pick editors-pick Coronavirus Source Type: news

Stanford faculty blasts Hoover senior fellow and presidential adviser Scott Atlas
Dr. Scott Atlas is known to the nation as a controversial Covid-19 advisor to President Donald Trump. But he's also part of the Stanford University community, and faculty there are not happy with him. On Thursday, the Stanford Faculty Senate took up a resolution condemning Atlas and voted overwhelmingly in favor of it — 85% of the faculty joined in to blast his actions to "promote a view of Covid-19 that contradicts medical science." But the Senate did not ask leadership at the Palo Alto uni versity… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 20, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: J. Jennings Moss Source Type: news

Jet-printing microfluidic devices on demand
– a new paper from engineering and biomedical scientists at the University of Oxford and spin-out company iotaSciences Ltd– describes a... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 12, 2020 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have demonstrated that adolescents who valued their interests and curiosity had higher wellbeing in old age from a 60-year-old cohort in the UK. We additionally found that adolescents with low self-control who valued money and steady jobs had significantly lower wellbeing in old age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Issues Recommendations for Certain High-Risk Groups Regarding Mercury-Containing Dental Amalgam
 For Immediate Release:September 24, 2020Statement From:Director - CDRH Offices: Office of the Center DirectorDr. Jeffrey E. Shuren MD, JDPart of our role in protecting patients is to regularly evaluate, monitor and update scientific evidence on the risks from medical devices —including issues related to the materials used in devices, such as metals. In the case of implanted and inserted medical devices, where materials may be in contact with the body for extended periods of time, we evaluate safety issues involved with, among other things, the body’s long-term expos ure to certain materials, taking into a...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - November 11, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

The Covid Pandemic: Broadening the Discourse
Thailand’s COVID-19 response an example of resilience and solidarity: a UN Resident Coordinator’s BlogBy Asoka BandarageCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Nov 10 2020 (IPS) SARS-CoV-2, the corona virus that causes COVID-19, has been spreading exponentially across the world over the last ten or so months. As of November 6th, according to the Center for Systems Science at Johns Hopkins University, there have been 49,195,581 cases of COVID-19, including 1,241,031 deaths. More than a third of the global population has been placed on lockdown. The global economy is experiencing the deepest global recession since World War 2 and m...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Asoka Bandarage Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

The sole function of the clitoris is female orgasm. Is that why it ’s ignored by medical science?
Medical textbooks are full of anatomical pictures of the penis, but the clitoris barely rates a mention. Many medical professionals are uncomfortable even talking about itProfessor Caroline de Costa is awaiting feedback. Several months ago the editor of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology requested an editorial from a world-renowned Melbourne urologist to address what she saw as a lack of research and, more concerningly, a persistent lack of knowledge about an essential part of the female reproductive system.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Calla Wahlquist Tags: Women Australia news Health Science Sex Sexuality Medical research Melbourne Adelaide Source Type: news

City, University of London academics develop algorithm to analyse HeLa cancer cells
(City University London) Dr Constantino Carlos Reyes-Aldasoro and Dr Cefa Karabag collaborate with the Francis Crick Institute on a novel approach published in thePLoS ONE journal, which significantly reduces the amount of time taken to analyse the cell line named after Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman whose contribution to medical science was only formally acknowledged decades after her death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 26, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chief Professions Officers ’ medicines mechanisms programme
NHS England and NHS Improvement would like to hear your thoughts on proposals for greater flexibility to be given to how dental hygienists, dental therapists, biomedical scientists, clinical scientists, operating department practitioners, podiatrist independent prescribers, physiotherapist independent prescribers, and paramedics are able to access medicines for their patients. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - October 21, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A new strategy for siRNA stabilization by an artificial cationic oligosaccharide
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) Instability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is one of the obstacles in the development of siRNA-based drugs. Researchers at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science and Tokyo University of Science have developed a new strategy for improvement of siRNA stability by using an artificial cationic oligosaccharide combined with phosphorothioate linkages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA draws record $1.4 billion in research funding
UCLA attracted record support for its wide-ranging research in the 2019 –20 fiscal year, receiving $1.427 billion in research funding.2020 is the third consecutive year that the university has topped its previous best. Research support has grown by 38% since 2015. UCLA now ranks sixth among all universities in total research expenditures.“This is a tribute to the great work being done across disciplines at UCLA,” said Roger Wakimoto, vice chancellor for research. “These funds help bring about major breakthroughs in medical science, advance knowledge in numerous other disciplines, strengthen our teac...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Identification of a viral factor that impairs immune responses in COVID-19 patients
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research team at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) aimed to characterize the viral factor(s) determining immune activation upon SARS-CoV-2 infection and found that ORF3b, a gene encoded by SARS-CoV-2, is a potent IFN antagonist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-myelodysplastic syndrome on long-term outcomes following a
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research group led by Assistant Professor Takaaki Konuma in the Department of Hematology/Oncology, the Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo (IMSUT Hospital) has demonstrated a graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of a previously unknown/novel allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in MDS patients. In addition, they succeeded in identifying a category of patients for whom the GVT effect was identified. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

President Trump ’s COVID-19 Recklessness Will Bring More Illness, Death and Suffering
Here’s where we are: Donald J. Trump, the President of the United States and the most powerful person on the planet, is sick with COVID-19. We do not know with any confidence how ill he truly is; both his physician and White House officials have been unclear and evasive. Journalists’ fascination with Trump’s health may seem morbid, but the presidency confers enormous power—and the example he sets shapes people’s response to the pandemic. The official line is that Trump is improving and is set to be released Monday evening. But he’s receiving a battery of medicinal firepower, some of it e...
Source: TIME: Health - October 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Drug found to correct gene defect that causes immune-driven gut leakiness
(University of California - Riverside) A team of researchers led by biomedical scientist Declan McCole at the University of California, Riverside, has found that the drug tofacitinib, also called Xeljanz and approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis, can repair permeability defects in the intestine. " Our work could help improve identification of patients who will be better responders to this drug, " says McCole, a professor of biomedical sciences in the School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deiner Named to the Garth Professorship
Stacie G. Deiner, MD, professor and vice chair for research in the Department of Anesthesiology at the Geisel School of Medicine and Dartmouth-Hitchcock, has been appointed the William LeRoy Garth Professor in Medical Science at Geisel. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - September 21, 2020 Category: Hospital Management Authors: NonPerson Geisel Web Service Acct Tags: News Press Release Anesthesiology Garth Professorship Home-feature Source Type: news

$250,000 awarded to immigrant leaders in STEM
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation has announced the recipients of the 2021 Vilcek Foundation Prizes in Biomedical Science. Awarded annually, the prizes honor the contributions of immigrants to scientific research, discovery, and innovation in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain protein linked to seizures, abnormal social behaviors
(University of California - Riverside) A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside has found a new mechanism responsible for the abnormal development of neuronal connections in the mouse brain that leads to seizures and abnormal social behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poisoning--the road less travelled - Chacko B, Krishna B, Kulkarni AP.
This issue brings to you, dear readers, the antidotes to actual poisons, backed by medical science and evidence for treatments. Way back in 1892, Lord William Bentinck penned an interesting report in the British Medical Journal on "Poisoning in India".1 It... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Biomedical scientists piece together how medication paralyzes parasitic worms
(Iowa State University) A new study upends the widely held belief that a medication used to treat lymphatic filariasis doesn't directly target the parasites that cause the disease. The research shows the medication, diethylcarbamazine, temporarily paralyzes the parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Applying machine learning to biomedical science
(University of Sydney) Dr Pengyi Yang and colleagues from the University of Sydney have brought together the latest developments in applications of machine learning in biomedical science, showing that new techniques are combining ensemble methods with deep learning, with potential applications in cancer research and better understanding viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new treatment concept for age-related decline in motor function
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research group led by Professor Yuji Yamanashi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, conducted experiments using aged mice to demonstrate that muscle denervation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, *1) could be appreciably offset by an NMJ formation-enhancing treatment that strengthened the motor function and muscle of aged mice.The results of this study suggest that NMJ formation-enhancing treatment may be effective to overcome motor impairment and muscle weakness associated with human aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identification of new " oxidative stress sensor " MTK1
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research group at the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo in Japan has uncovered a new mechanism that elicits a cellular response by detecting oxidative stress in the human body. MTK1 SAPKKK functions is identified as a new human oxidative stress sensor that senses excess active oxygen in the body and transmits that information to cells, leading to cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Multiomics investigation revealing the characteristics of HIV-1-infected cells in vivo
In this study, a hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model infected with a gene-modified HIV-1 was used to reveal multiple characteristics of HIV-1-producing cells in vivo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neurons are genetically programmed to have long lives
(University of California - Riverside) Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no " backup " after birth. Researchers have generally believed that their survival is determined nearly extrinsically, or by outside forces, such as the tissues and cells that neurons supply with nerve cells. A research team led by Sika Zheng, a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has challenged this notion and reports the continuous survival of neurons is also intrinsically programmed during development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identification of distinct loci for de novo DNA methylation by DNMT3A and DNMT3B during mammalian development
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research team working at The University of Tokyo and Kyoto University in Japan has announced that they have successfully identified specific target sites for the DNA methylases DNMT3A and DNMT3B . The researchers also found that DNMT3A specifically regulates differentiation-related genes and DNMT3B specifically regulates X-chromosomal genes during mammalian ontogeny.These results were published in Nature Communications (online version). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two Cohrane Croatia members receive awards from the city of Split for 2019
Irena Zakarija Grkovi ć, co-director of Cochrane Croatia, and Matko Marušić, head of quality assurance at Cochrane Croatia, both received awards from the city of Split.  The Split City Council, on May 4, 2020, decided that the traditional awards of the city of Split should be given to two members of theCochrane  Croatia. The personal award was given to Irena Zakarija Grkovi ć, co-director of Cochrane Croatia, for selfless commitment and work on the popularization of breastfeeding. A second award was given to Matko Marušić, head of quality assurance at Cochrane Croatia, for the boo...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 8, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news