$250,000 awarded to immigrant leaders in STEM
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation has announced the recipients of the 2021 Vilcek Foundation Prizes in Biomedical Science. Awarded annually, the prizes honor the contributions of immigrants to scientific research, discovery, and innovation in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain protein linked to seizures, abnormal social behaviors
(University of California - Riverside) A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside has found a new mechanism responsible for the abnormal development of neuronal connections in the mouse brain that leads to seizures and abnormal social behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poisoning--the road less travelled - Chacko B, Krishna B, Kulkarni AP.
This issue brings to you, dear readers, the antidotes to actual poisons, backed by medical science and evidence for treatments. Way back in 1892, Lord William Bentinck penned an interesting report in the British Medical Journal on "Poisoning in India".1 It... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Biomedical scientists piece together how medication paralyzes parasitic worms
(Iowa State University) A new study upends the widely held belief that a medication used to treat lymphatic filariasis doesn't directly target the parasites that cause the disease. The research shows the medication, diethylcarbamazine, temporarily paralyzes the parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Applying machine learning to biomedical science
(University of Sydney) Dr Pengyi Yang and colleagues from the University of Sydney have brought together the latest developments in applications of machine learning in biomedical science, showing that new techniques are combining ensemble methods with deep learning, with potential applications in cancer research and better understanding viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new treatment concept for age-related decline in motor function
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research group led by Professor Yuji Yamanashi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, conducted experiments using aged mice to demonstrate that muscle denervation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, *1) could be appreciably offset by an NMJ formation-enhancing treatment that strengthened the motor function and muscle of aged mice.The results of this study suggest that NMJ formation-enhancing treatment may be effective to overcome motor impairment and muscle weakness associated with human aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identification of new " oxidative stress sensor " MTK1
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research group at the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo in Japan has uncovered a new mechanism that elicits a cellular response by detecting oxidative stress in the human body. MTK1 SAPKKK functions is identified as a new human oxidative stress sensor that senses excess active oxygen in the body and transmits that information to cells, leading to cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Multiomics investigation revealing the characteristics of HIV-1-infected cells in vivo
In this study, a hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model infected with a gene-modified HIV-1 was used to reveal multiple characteristics of HIV-1-producing cells in vivo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neurons are genetically programmed to have long lives
(University of California - Riverside) Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no " backup " after birth. Researchers have generally believed that their survival is determined nearly extrinsically, or by outside forces, such as the tissues and cells that neurons supply with nerve cells. A research team led by Sika Zheng, a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has challenged this notion and reports the continuous survival of neurons is also intrinsically programmed during development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identification of distinct loci for de novo DNA methylation by DNMT3A and DNMT3B during mammalian development
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research team working at The University of Tokyo and Kyoto University in Japan has announced that they have successfully identified specific target sites for the DNA methylases DNMT3A and DNMT3B . The researchers also found that DNMT3A specifically regulates differentiation-related genes and DNMT3B specifically regulates X-chromosomal genes during mammalian ontogeny.These results were published in Nature Communications (online version). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two Cohrane Croatia members receive awards from the city of Split for 2019
Irena Zakarija Grkovi ć, co-director of Cochrane Croatia, and Matko Marušić, head of quality assurance at Cochrane Croatia, both received awards from the city of Split.  The Split City Council, on May 4, 2020, decided that the traditional awards of the city of Split should be given to two members of theCochrane  Croatia. The personal award was given to Irena Zakarija Grkovi ć, co-director of Cochrane Croatia, for selfless commitment and work on the popularization of breastfeeding. A second award was given to Matko Marušić, head of quality assurance at Cochrane Croatia, for the boo...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 8, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Two Cochrane Croatia members receive awards from the city of Split for 2019
Irena Zakarija Grkovi ć, co-director of Cochrane Croatia, and Matko Marušić, head of quality assurance at Cochrane Croatia, both received awards from the city of Split.  The Split City Council, on May 4, 2020, decided that the traditional awards of the city of Split should be given to two members of theCochrane  Croatia. The personal award was given to Irena Zakarija Grkovi ć, co-director of Cochrane Croatia, for selfless commitment and work on the popularization of breastfeeding. A second award was given to Matko Marušić, head of quality assurance at Cochrane Croatia, for the boo...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 8, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

CityU's CRISPR-assisted novel method detects RNA-binding proteins in living cells
(City University of Hong Kong) A research led by biomedical scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel detection method, called CARPID, to identify binding proteins of specific RNAs in the living cells. It is expected the innovation can be applied in various cell researches, from identifying biomarkers of cancer diagnosis to detecting potential drug targets for treating viral diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

R & D of mRNA vaccine production technology against COVID-19 and further new coronavirus
(Innovation Center of NanoMedicine) The Innovation Center of NanoMedicine (iCONM) and the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMIMS) started joint research with the aim of establishing a rapid vaccine development technology in preparation for the re-epidemic of covid-19 and the next coming pandemic of further new coronaviruses. An efficient procedure for the production of mRNA vaccine incorporated with immunostimulatory adjuvant functionality will be optimized using iCONM's smart nanomachine technologies and TMIMS's expertise for the discovery of recombinant vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington ’ s and other diseases
Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington ’ s disease. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Postgraduate, Publications, Research; Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Blood cell mutations linked to leukemias are inevitable as we age
(RIKEN) A new study by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan reports differences in blood cell mutations between Japanese and European populations. The study found that these pre-clinical mutations were strongly associated with different types of cancers and can explain why Europeans have higher rates of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, while Japanese have higher rates of T-cell leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 24, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Lancet ’s editor: ‘The UK's response to coronavirus is the greatest science policy failure for a generation’                                                                           '
Richard Horton does not hold back in his criticism of the UK ’s response to the pandemic and the medical establishment’s part in backing fatal government decisionsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThere is a school of thought that says now is not the time to criticise the government and its scientific advisers about the way they have handled theCovid-19 pandemic. Wait until all the facts are known and the crisis has subsided, goes this thinking, and then we can analyse the performance of those involved. It ’s safe to say thatRichard Horton, the editor of the influential med...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Health policy Science Coronavirus outbreak Microbiology Infectious diseases Medical research Chris Whitty Patrick Vallance Medicine UK news Society Politics Economics Public services policy Pharmaceuticals industry Source Type: news

How is electricity being used in wound care?
Some wounds just don't seem to heal. Now, pioneering medical research has come up with some promising new treatments that employ electricity to speed recovery, killing bacteria more effectively than traditional bandages or antibiotics. Here's a brief summary of these dramatic new developments in healthcare.  Medical research is providing revolutionary new wound care treatments that use electricity to speed healing. The problem: slow-healing or no-healing wounds Physicians and emergency room specialists have long been stymied by chronic wounds that resist most efforts to treat them using conventional antibio...
Source: Advanced Tissue - June 10, 2020 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound Care Wound healing Wound Infection Source Type: news

Beyond the COVID-19 Pandemic: What Now?
WHO delivered medical supplies to fight the COVID-19 pandemic in the Republic of Congo in April 2020. Credit: World Health Organization (WHO)By Lawrence SurendraBANGKOK, Thailand, Jun 4 2020 (IPS) In the midst of the COVID 19 pandemic, the much-anticipated 73rd World Health Assembly (WHA) of the WHO concluded without any major controversies or disagreements. The landmark WHA resolution to bring the world together to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, co-sponsored by more than 130 countries, and adopted by consensus, called for the intensification of efforts to control the pandemic, and for equitable access to and fair distribut...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lawrence Surendra Tags: Aid Climate Change Development & Aid Environment Featured Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

How the coronavirus could be prevented from invading a host cell
(University of California - Riverside) How might the novel coronavirus be prevented from entering a host cell in an effort to thwart infection? A team of biomedical scientists has made a discovery that points to a solution. The scientists, led by Maurizio Pellecchia in the UC Riverside School of Medicine, report in the journal Molecules that two proteases -- enzymes that break down proteins -- located on the surface of host cells and responsible for processing viral entry could be inhibited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists at UC Riverside to study how lungs respond to worm infections
(University of California - Riverside) A biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has received a five-year, $3.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, or NIH, to investigate lung immune responses to parasitic worm infections. The research will explore how macrophages, a type of white blood cell, mediate tissue repair following infection-induced injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Safer roads to school - Agrawal A, Bhoi S, Galw.ar S, Pal R, Deora H, Ghosh A, Moscote-Salazar LR.
Any and all advances made by medical science cannot solve the problem of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in school-going children, especially if the only concerned people are those of the medical fraternity. Children are a vulnerable part of the traveling pop... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

VE Day Marks the End of the Second World War-But the World is Still at War
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres calls on President Ashraf Ghani during a visit to Afghanistan’s capital Kabul to show solidarity with the Afghan people. Photo UNAMA / Fardin Waezi/June 2017By Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya, May 11 2020 (IPS) The world commemorated the 75th Anniversary to mark the end of the 2nd World War also called VE Day on 08 May 2020. With her nation, and much of the world still in lockdown due to COVID 19, England’s Queen marked 75 years since the allied victory in Europe with a poignant televised address. From Windsor Castle, Queen Elizabeth said, “the wartime generation ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Siddharth Chatterjee Tags: Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

The Baltimore Bioterrorism Expert Who Inspired South Korea ’s COVID-19 Response
On Oct. 2, 2001, a 62-year-old photojournalist named Bob Stevens became the first victim of a coordinated series of anthrax attacks to be admitted to hospital. Stevens inhaled the deadly pathogen after opening one of several letters laced with anthrax spores which were mailed to the offices of prominent senators and media outlets across the U.S. Over the next seven weeks, he and four others would die as a result of their exposure. For a shell-shocked nation still reeling from the single deadliest terrorist attack in human history on September 11, it was a disturbing realization that there was a new wave of challenges to Am...
Source: TIME: Health - May 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Cox Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Understanding the diversity of cancer evolution based on computational simulation
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) Understanding the principles of cancer evolution is important in designing a therapeutic strategy. A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) announced a new simulation model that describes various modes of cancer evolution in a unified manner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New evidence for optimizing malaria treatment in pregnant women
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) The research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases is the fruit of joint project between investigators from around the world to conduct the largest individual patient data meta-analysis to date under The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) umbrella. The study found that artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and other artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) were significantly more effective than quinine, the current recommended treatment. Authors urgently call for further investigation into dose optimization for pregnant women to ensure the highe...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Proteasome phase separation for destruction
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMiMS) discovered proteasome-containing droplets, which are formed by acute hyperosmotic stress. The proteasome droplets also contain ubiquitin-tagged proteins and multiple interacting proteins, by which induce liquid-liquid phase separation of the proteasome for rapid degradation of unwanted proteins. The ubiquitin-dependent proteasome phase separation may be linked to clearance of aggregates that causes neurodegenerative diseases. These results were published in Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 27, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Free program on conducting scientific research without using laboratory animals
(Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) From June 22 to 25, students and early-career scientists will gather virtually for a free program of lectures, laboratory tours, interactive sessions, e-poster presentations, and virtual engagement with speakers and attendees on innovative methods to reduce and replace animal tests in toxicology and biomedical science. Originally planned to be hosted at Johns Hopkins University, the Summer School on Innovative Approaches in Science will now take place as a virtual meeting due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Learning from Past Pandemics: Bridging the Science Gap
Source: Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma [Columbia University]. Published: 3/31/2020. This 46-minute webinar, part of Reporting and Covid-19: A Webinar Series for Journalists, discusses how journalists can best develop the right expert sources, and how they can effectively bridge complicated medical science and public understanding. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Allegro: A little about Lucinda
  A little about me… After completing a BSc in Biomedical Science and Msc (Res) in Translational Oncology at the University of Sheffield, I took a gap year... The post Allegro: A little about Lucinda appeared first on Ashfield Healthcare. (Source: Ashfield Healthcare News)
Source: Ashfield Healthcare News - March 30, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ashfield Healthcare Communications Source Type: news

Nafamostat is expected to prevent the transmission of new coronavirus infection (COVID-19)
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) Nafamostat mesylate (brand name: Fusan), which is the drug used to treat acute pancreatitis, may effectively block the requisite viral entry process the new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) uses to spread and cause disease (COVID-19). The University of Tokyo announced these new findings on March 18, 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

East Asian Lessons for Controlling Covid-19
By Nazihah Muhamad Noor and Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Mar 26 2020 (IPS) By the third week of March 2020, the number of Covid-19 deaths in Italy had overtaken the number of deaths in China. Authorities all over the world are restricting the movements of their populations as part of efforts to control the spread of Covid-19. For the time being, more and more governments are benchmarking their responses on the very worst outbreaks in Wuhan and northern Italy. But lockdowns inevitably have adverse economic impacts, especially for businesses, particularly small ones heavily reliant on continuous turnover. Are ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Nazihah Muhamad Noor and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Featured Global Globalisation Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Finding the Achilles' heel of cancer cells
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) The key to effective cures for cancers is to find weak points of cancer cells that are not found in non-cancer cells. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science found that cancerous and non-cancerous cells depend on different factors for survival when their DNA replication is blocked. Drugs that inhibited the survival factor required by cancer cells would selectively make cancer cells more vulnerable to replication inhibition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elucidation of mechanisms that coordinate cell memory inheritance with DNA replication
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) Why normal cells turn into cancer cells? One of the factors is deeply related to the failure of the cell differentiation mechanism called DNA methylation. The joint research groups of The Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, Yokohama City University, and Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM) have clarified new mechanism for controlling DNA methylation in cells. Ubiquitination of a protein called PAF15 is an important factor for the inheritance of DNA methylation, according to the new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Vilcek Foundation allocates $150,000 for 2021 Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise
(Vilcek Foundation) The Vilcek Foundation has allocated $150,000 to make 3 awards in 2021 to foreign-born researchers in biomedical science now living and working in the United States. These funds will support the award of the 2021 Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FDA Bans Shock Device Used On Patients At Judge Rotenberg Center In Canton
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal officials on Wednesday banned electrical shock devices used to discourage aggressive, self-harming behavior in patients with mental disabilities. The announcement from the Food and Drug Administration follows years of pressure from disability rights groups and mental health experts who have called the treatment outdated, ineffective and unethical. The agency first announced its intent to ban the devices in 2016. For years, the shock devices have been used by only one place in the U.S., the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center of Canton, Massachusetts, a residential school for people with autis...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Canton News FDA Judge Rotenberg Center Source Type: news

Pence’s role as US coronavirus overseer draws backlash
Critics point to record of scepticism of established medical science by vice-president (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - February 27, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Allegro: A little about Eleanor …
Joining the Allegro programme Originally from Derby, I completed my BSc in Biomedical Science in Manchester. Upon completion of my exams, I made the (somewhat clichéd) choice to... The post Allegro: A little about Eleanor… appeared first on Ashfield Healthcare. (Source: Ashfield Healthcare News)
Source: Ashfield Healthcare News - February 27, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ashfield Healthcare Communications Source Type: news

Iran confirms another dead because of the new coronavirus: official
Iran said on Sunday an Iranian infected by the new coronavirus died in the country, head of the Medical Science University in the Mazandaran province was quoted as saying, bringing the number of deaths to seven in the Islamic Republic. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products
Biological products often represent the cutting edge of medical science and research. Also known as biologics, these products replicate natural substances such as enzymes, antibodies, or hormones in our bodies. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FDA Source Type: news

KU Leuven researchers discover new piece of the puzzle for Parkinson's disease
(KU Leuven) Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven have discovered that a defect in the ATP13A2 gene causes cell death by disrupting the cellular transport of polyamines. When this happens in the part of the brain that controls body movement, it can lead to Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny magnetic structures enhance medical science
(American Institute of Physics) Magnetic nanostructures have interesting properties that enhance novel applications in medical diagnosis and allow the exploration of new therapeutic techniques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Human Bones
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Wild / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research syndication Source Type: news

3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Human Bones
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - January 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Wild / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research syndication Source Type: news

Study: Drinking Tea May Help You Live Longer, Especially If It ’ s Green
This study strengthens the body of evidence that habitual tea drinking is associated with lower rates of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, though it cannot prove that it’s definitely the tea that’s responsible,” Dr. Jenna Macciochi, a lecturer in immunology at the University of Sussex, told the SMC. However, she noted that “a body of evidence in nutrition suggests that whole diet patterns are more informative of diet-disease relationships than any isolated food or nutrient.” Dr. Duane Mellor, a registered dietitian and senior teaching fellow at Aston Medical School, Aston University, sai...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Green Tea Source Type: news

Viewpoint: Medical Science Is Due for a Software Patch
No abstract available (Source: Emergency Medicine News)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - January 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Viewpoint Source Type: news

Here ’s How Conservatives Are Using Civil Rights Law to Restrict Abortion
Six states passed laws in 2019 banning abortions once a “fetal heartbeat” is detected, which can be as early as six weeks into pregnancy. While most of these new laws were challenged in court and are temporarily blocked, the trend has continued: another 10 states introduced similar bills in 2019 and more are expected this year. The sudden success of these measures is not an accident. They are the result of a concerted new strategy by abortion opponents, researchers have found. Instead of focusing on religious or women’s health concerns, supporters of Georgia’s “heartbeat” bill advanced...
Source: TIME: Health - January 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Invest in MSLs to reap bigger gains
  If authenticity, data analysis and good customer rapport are the superpowers pharma needs most today, MSLs are the superheroes most able to wield them.  As the MSL ’s role continues to evolve from a supporting to a far more strategic one, pharma companies have much to gain from getting the most from this ever more important set of colleagues. Pharma therefore needs to invest in them and build MSLs ’ skills and knowledge in new areas, helping them adapt to new ways of interacting and use new technologies that can magnify their impact, says Emma Booth, Director, Medical Capabilities, EU Medical...
Source: EyeForPharma - December 31, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

Invest in MSLs to reap bigger gains
  If authenticity, data analysis and good customer rapport are the superpowers pharma needs most today, MSLs are the superheroes most able to wield them.  As the MSL ’s role continues to evolve from a supporting to a far more strategic one, pharma companies have much to gain from getting the most from this ever more important set of colleagues. Pharma therefore needs to invest in them and build MSLs ’ skills and knowledge in new areas, helping them adapt to new ways of interacting and use new technologies that can magnify their impact, says Emma Booth, Director, Medical Capabilities, EU Medical...
Source: EyeForPharma - December 31, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

From cancer to stroke, the past ten years have seen astounding advances in medical science
Breakthrough cancer therapies, life-saving stroke procedures and 'rebooted' donor hearts - these are just a few of the medical advances over the past decade that are transforming our health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news