Viruses, Vol. 11, Pages 1028: Aptamer Profiling of A549 Cells Infected with Low-Pathogenicity and High-Pathogenicity Influenza Viruses

Viruses, Vol. 11, Pages 1028: Aptamer Profiling of A549 Cells Infected with Low-Pathogenicity and High-Pathogenicity Influenza Viruses Viruses doi: 10.3390/v11111028 Authors: Kevin M. Coombs Philippe F. Simon Nigel J. McLeish Ali Zahedi-Amiri Darwyn Kobasa Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are important animal and human emerging and re-emerging pathogens that are responsible for yearly seasonal epidemics and sporadic pandemics. IAVs cause a wide range of clinical illnesses, from relatively mild infections by seasonal strains, to acute respiratory distress during infections with highly pathogenic avian IAVs (HPAI). For this study, we infected A549 human lung cells with lab prototype A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) (PR8), a seasonal H1N1 (RV733), the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pdm09), or with two avian strains, an H5N1 HPAI strain or an H7N9 strain that has low pathogenicity in birds but high pathogenicity in humans. We used a newly-developed aptamer-based multiplexed technique (SOMAscan®) to examine >1300 human lung cell proteins affected by the different IAV strains, and identified more than 500 significantly dysregulated cellular proteins. Our analyses indicated that the avian strains induced more profound changes in the A549 global proteome compared to all tested low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains. The PR8 strain induced a general activation, primarily by upregulating many immune molecules, the seasonal RV733 and pdm09 strains had minimal effect upon assayed molecules, and th...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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Contributors : Ariel Rodriguez-Frandsen ; Laura Martin-Sancho ; Anshu P Gounder ; Sumit K ChandaSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensInfluenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes yearly global epidemics, and sporadic pandemics due to human adaptation of pathogenic strains. Efficient replication of IAV in different species is, in part, dictated by its ability to exploit the genetic environment of the host cell. To investigate IAV tropism in human cells, we evaluated the replication of IAV strains in a diverse subset of epithelial cell lines. HeLa cells ...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
Conclusions: Human challenge studies and systems biology approaches are important tools that should be used in concert to advance our understanding of influenza infection and provide targets for novel therapeutics and immunizations. Introduction Although influenza virus was recognized as an important pathogen over a century ago, influenza continues to cause a significant burden of disease. In the United States alone, it's estimated that in the 2017–2018 season there were 959,000 hospitalizations related to influenza illness, and 79,400 deaths (CDC, 2018). Worldwide, WHO estimates that annual influenza...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
The objective of this preclinical study was to assess the protective immunity induced by immunization with group 1 hemagglutinin-specific influenza virus vaccines based on chimeric hemagglutinins (cHAs) in a ferret model of influenza. The experimental designs and immunization strategies are summarized in Figure 1. Since most human adults have a primed repertoire of B cells with specificity to the HA stalk domain (19, 30), we included an influenza B virus expressing cH9/1 (B-cH9/1) to mimic pre-existing HA stalk immunity. We then compared the ability of our sequential immunization strategies to boost antibody titers against...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Mandil A, Bresee J, Tageldin MA, Azad TM, Khan W Abstract Infectious diseases continue to represent a significant threat to global health security, particularly in the context of increasing globalization, interconnectedness and interdependence. Chief among such threats are influenza viruses and other respiratory pathogens, such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), because of their risk of high transmissibility and acuity of illness. Annual epidemics of seasonal influenza cause an estimated 3-5 million cases of severe illness and more than 500 000 deaths, with the prospect of pandemic...
Source: Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: East Mediterr Health J Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewZoonotic influenza viruses are those that cross the animal-human barrier and can cause disease in humans, manifesting from minor respiratory illnesses to multiorgan dysfunction. They have also been implicated in the causation of deadly pandemics in recent history. The increasing incidence of infections caused by these viruses worldwide has necessitated focused attention to improve both diagnostic as well as treatment modalities. In this first part of a two-part review, we describe the structure of zoonotic influenza viruses, the relationship between mutation and pandemic capacity, pathogenesis of i...
Source: Current Infectious Disease Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ABSTRACT Seasonal influenza epidemics and periodic pandemics are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Patients with chronic co‐morbid illness, those at the extremes of age and pregnant women are at higher risks of complications requiring hospitalization, whereas young adults and obese individuals were also at increased risk during the A(H1N1) pandemic in 2009. Avian influenza A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) viruses have continued to circulate widely in some poultry populations and infect humans sporadically since 1997 and 2013, respectively. The recent upsurge in human cases of A(H7N9) infections in Mainland China is of gre...
Source: Respirology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Invited Review Series: Respiratory Infections in The Asia ‐Pacific Region Source Type: research
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 10 April 2017 Source:Antiviral Research Author(s): Yang Wang, Jialing Wu, Chunyi Xue, Zhihui Wu, Ying Lin, Ying Wei, Xiaona Wei, Jianru Qin, Yun Zhang, Zhifen Wen, Li Chen, George Dacai Liu, Yongchang Cao Influenza A H7N9 virus is the latest emerging pandemic threat, and has rapidly diverged into three clades, demanding a H7N9 virus vaccine with broadened protection against unmatched strains. Hemagglutinin (HA)-based structural design approaches for stabilizing HA proteins have provided excitingly promising results. However, none of the HA-based structural design approaches has been appl...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Abstract Influenza A H7N9 virus is the latest emerging pandemic threat, and has rapidly diverged into three clades, demanding a H7N9 virus vaccine with broadened protection against unmatched strains. Hemagglutinin (HA)-based structural design approaches for stabilizing HA proteins have provided excitingly promising results. However, none of the HA-based structural design approaches has been applied to a recombinant replicative influenza virus. Here we report that our HA-based structural design approach is a first in the field to generate a recombinant replicative H7N9 virus (H7N9-53TM) showing broadened protection...
Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news
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