UK Covid: Johnson suggests testing for people returning from ‘green list’ countries could be simplified – as it happened
Prime minister says easyJet boss right to ask whether it would bepossible to use lateral flow tests for some returning travellers. This live blog is now closed -please follow the global coronavirus live blog for updatesEngland ’s Covid vaccine programme could slow sharply, Sage warnsNo 10 refuses to rule out Covid passports being needed to enter shopsUK ’s long Covid patients facing postcode lottery for supportWhat are Covid-status certificates and how might they work?5.32pmBSTMAIL: Call this freedom?#TomorrowsPapersTodaypic.twitter.com/NUI1LWWTiYTELEGRAPH: No end in sight as ⁦@BorisJohnson⁩ says normal is ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Sparrow Tags: Coronavirus Politics UK news Boris Johnson Labour Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases NHS Keir Starmer House of Commons Health Science Medical research Byelections Opinion polls Travel & leisure Cannabis Dru Source Type: news

Researchers Are Hatching a Low-Cost Covid-19 Vaccine
A new formulation entering clinical trials in Brazil, Mexico, Thailand and Vietnam could change how the world fights the pandemic. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: your-feed-science Clinical Trials Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Eggs Immune System Influenza Factories and Manufacturing Antibodies Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Biology and Biochemistry Gates, Bill and Me Source Type: news

Virus Variants Threaten to Draw Out the Pandemic, Scientists Say
Declining infection rates over all masked a rise in more contagious forms of the coronavirus. Vaccines will stop the spread, if Americans postpone celebration just a bit longer. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli and Benjamin Mueller Tags: your-feed-science Disease Rates Immune System Influenza Vaccination and Immunization Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) AstraZeneca PLC Johnson & Moderna Inc Novavax Inc Oxford University Pfizer Inc Brazil Europe Florida Germany Gre Source Type: news

Should We Keep Wearing Masks Even After the Pandemic Ends?
Riding the New York City subway during cold and flu season used to test your stomach. The woman next to you was coughing. The guy behind her was sneezing. Somebody was always fishing for a tissue. That’s a distant memory now. The subway is far emptier, for one thing—and with the riders onboard almost universally wearing masks, the chorus of sniffles and coughs has been silenced. During the pandemic, the need for that policy is clear. But should the masks stay even after COVID-19 is gone? Before vaccines began rolling out to the general public, masks were among the only tools available for containing SARS-CoV-2,...
Source: TIME: Health - April 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Expands Phase 2a Clinical Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate to Include Adolescents
New Brunswick, NJ (April 2, 2021) – Johnson & Johnson (the Company) has begun vaccinating adolescent participants in the ongoing Phase 2a clinical trial for its COVID-19 vaccine candidate, developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. “The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on adolescents, not just with the complications of the disease, but with their education, mental health, and wellbeing,” said Paul Stoffels, M.D., Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer at Johnson & Johnson. “It is vital that we develop vaccines for eve...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 2, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

The U.S. Death Rate Rose Significantly During the COVID-19 Pandemic
COVID-19 was the third-most-common cause of death in the U.S. in 2020, contributing to more than 375,000 deaths, and a 16% increase in the national death rate, according to provisional data published today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All told, more than 3.3 million people in the U.S. died in 2020, for a rate of about 829 deaths per 100,000 people. That’s up from about 715 deaths per 100,000 people in 2019. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById('wpcom-iframe-cc2cb8dfd195b43a5d43643e9ec19ffa') if ( iframe ) { iframe.onload =...
Source: TIME: Health - March 31, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Will COVID-19 vaccines need to be adapted regularly?
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Influenza vaccines need to be evaluated every year to ensure they remain effective against new influenza viruses. Will the same apply to COVID-19 vaccines? Researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin compared the evolution of endemic 'common cold' coronaviruses with that of influenza viruses. The researchers predict that, while the pandemic is ongoing, vaccines will need to undergo regular updates. A few years into the post-pandemic period, however, vaccines are likely to remain effective for longer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 25, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nanoparticle flu vaccine blocks seasonal and pandemic strains
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Experimental flu shots have now been developed that protect animals from a wide variety of season and pandemic influenza strains. The vaccine candidate is being advanced toward clinical testing. If proven safe and effective, these next-generation influenza vaccines could replace seasonal options by protecting against more strains that current vaccines don't adequately cover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Pandemic and the Limits of Science
What have we learned from the year that lasted a century? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alan Burdick Tags: your-feed-science Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Science and Technology Vaccination and Immunization Epidemics your-feed-health United States Soper, George A Influenza Source Type: news

A viral tsunami: How the underestimated coronavirus took over the world
That virus would slowly reveal its secrets — and proceed to shut down much of the planet, killing more than 2.5 million people in the most disruptive global health disaster since the influenza pandemic of 1918. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - March 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joel Achenbach Source Type: news

South Africa: What South Africa Must Do to Prepare for the Third Wave Double Whammy of Covid-19 and Flu This Winter
[Daily Maverick] Pandemic preparedness for the third wave of Covid-19 must include a strong influenza prevention strategy, including vaccination. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 8, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine Launches Initiative on Advancing Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Preparedness and Response
The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) has established an international committee (IC) in coordination with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ’ Office of Global Affairs (OGA) to inform and facilitate efforts to advance global influenza pandemic preparedness. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 5, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: news

Another Covid-19 Threat: Health Care Workers Under Attack
A healthcare worker at a testing facility collects samples for the coronavirus at Mimar Sinan State Hospital, Buyukcekmece district in Istanbul, Turkey. Credit: UNDP Turkey/Levent KuluBy Joe Amon and Christina WillePHILADELPHIA, US, Mar 3 2021 (IPS) In the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, at a certain hour of the evening, people in cities around the world opened their windows or stood on their rooftops and banged pots and rang bells. As the coronavirus spread and the number of deaths mounted, it was a moment for people distancing themselves from others to show solidarity and appreciation for the heroic work of health...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joe Amon and Christina Wille Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

U.S. Will Have Enough COVID-19 Vaccines for All Adults by End of May, Biden Says
(WASHINGTON) — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccines for all adult Americans by the end of May, two months earlier than anticipated, as his administration announced that drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson’s newly approved shot. With the bolstered supply, Biden also announced he would be using the powers of the federal government to direct all states to prioritize vaccinating teachers, and said the federal government would provide the doses directly through its pharmacy program. He challenged states to administe...
Source: TIME: Health - March 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ZEKE MILLER, LINDA A. JOHNSON and JONATHAN LEMIRE/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

Demographic Impact of Coronavirus Pandemic: An Overview
One year after the pandemic was officially declared, the enormous demographic impact of the coronavirus is becoming increasingly evident as more data are compiled and analyzed. Credit: United Nations.By Joseph ChamieNEW YORK, Mar 2 2021 (IPS) The demographic impact of the coronavirus one year after being declared a pandemic on 11 March 2020 has been enormous. The picture that emerges is one of significant consequences on the levels and trends of the key components of demographic change: mortality, fertility and migration. In terms of mortality, the reported number of Covid-19 deaths worldwide is approaching 3 million, with...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joseph Chamie Tags: Global Headlines Health Population Source Type: news

6 Weird Ways People Tried To Cure The 1918 Influenza
It ’s almost impossible to avoid comparing the Covid-19 pandemic to the pandemics of the past, especially the bubonic plague and the 1918 flu pandemic. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 1, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Kiona N. Smith, Contributor Tags: Science /science Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Editors' Pick editors-pick Coronavirus Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces U.S. CDC Advisory Committee Recommends First Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine for Adults 18 and Older in U.S.
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., February 28, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recommended the first single-shot COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, for individuals 18 years of age and older under the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). “For more than 130 years, Johnson & Johnson has come to the aid of people during times of crisis, and we believe ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 28, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Authorized by U.S. FDA For Emergency Use
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., February 27, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for its single-dose COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, to prevent COVID-19 in individuals 18 years of age and older. This decision was based on the totality of scientific evidence, including data from the Phase 3 ENSEMBLE study that demonstrated the vaccine was 85 percent effective in preventing severe disease across all regions studied, and showed protection agai...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 28, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Unanimously Recommended for Emergency Use Authorization by U.S. FDA Advisory Committee
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., February 26, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) unanimously voted to recommend Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the Company’s single-shot COVID-19 vaccine candidate for adults 18 and older, developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. The vote was based on a totality of scientific evidence provided by the Company, including efficacy and safety data from the Phase 3 ENSEMBLE trial. “We are e...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 26, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

We ’ll Probably Never Eliminate COVID-19 from the U.S. It’s Still Worth Trying
2021 got off to a grim pandemic start in the U.S. A huge surge in COVID-19 cases followed the holiday season, peaking at around 300,000 new cases on Jan. 8, 2020. More than 20,000 Americans lost their lives to the virus in a single week in January alone and over 146,00 in total have died since the start of the year. But six weeks later, the picture looks more promising. New daily cases have fallen sharply, daily deaths have fallen to levels not seen since Thanksgiving, and the pace of vaccine roll-out is speeding up. These positive trends mean that we can now begin to ask what the endgame might look like. Would we be happy...
Source: TIME: Health - February 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: William Hanage and Gavin Yamey Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The original antigenic sin: How childhood infections could shape pandemics
(University of Pittsburgh) A child's first influenza infection shapes their immunity to future airborne flu viruses - including emerging pandemic strains. But not all flu strains spur the same initial immune defense, according to new findings published today. The results are relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the senior author, who says they may explain age-based distributions of SARS-CoV-2 disease severity and susceptibility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pre-existing immunity protects against airborne spread of flu viruses
(PLOS) Pre-existing immunity is an important barrier to airborne transmission of influenza viruses and can influence the emergence and spread of potentially pandemic viruses, according to a study published February 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Seema Lakdawala of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Poor support for self-isolation undermines the UK's Covid vaccination effort
The more the virus is allowed to replicate in the community, the greater the risk of mutations that escape the vaccinesThe UK currently has no plan to eliminate coronavirus from our shores. Lockdown will minimise contacts and protect the NHS. Rapid distribution of vaccines will protect the vulnerable, until all adults receive the vaccine in the longer term. Then we can treat the virus like seasonal flu, with booster doses to protect against new variants. At Monday ’spress briefing, the deputy chief medical officer for England, Jonathan Van-Tam, confirmed as much.So the national strategy has not changed. In early Febr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Anthony Costello Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Patrick Vallance Health Infectious diseases Politics Science Society UK news World news Source Type: news

Caution: 1918 influenza provides warning for potential future pandemic reemergence
(Michigan State University) New research from Michigan State University used health data from the initial 1918 influenza spike to provide insights to what " pandemic reemergence " may look like for our future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Submission of Application to the U.S. FDA for Emergency Use Authorization of its Investigational Single-Shot Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., February 4, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced that Janssen Biotech, Inc., has submitted an application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requesting Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for its investigational single-dose Janssen COVID-19 vaccine candidate. The Company’s EUA submission is based on topline efficacy and safety data from the Phase 3 ENSEMBLE clinical trial, demonstrating that the investigational single-dose vaccine met all primary and key secondary endpoints. The Company expects to have product available to ship immediately followi...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 4, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

We May Never Eliminate COVID-19. But We Can Learn to Live With It
When does a pandemic end? Is it when life regains a semblance of normality? Is it when the world reaches herd immunity, the benchmark at which enough people are immune to an infectious disease to stop its widespread circulation? Or is it when the disease is defeated, the last patient cured and the pathogen retired to the history books? The last scenario, in the case of COVID-19, is likely a ways off, if it ever arrives. The virus has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and killed more than 2 million. New viral variants even more contagious than those that started the pandemic are spreading across the world. And...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

What happened to “flu season?” In the age of COVID, “the flu” has been reclassified as coronavirus, says epidemiologist
(Natural News) A few months ago, some infectious disease experts began warning that it would extremely difficult, as the COVID-19 pandemic lingered into the fall, for frontline healthcare providers to determine if sickness was due to the novel coronavirus or good, old-fashioned influenza. The reason, they said, is that in many respects, flu symptoms could... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Like Flu, COVID-19 May Turn Out to Be Seasonal
TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2021 -- Like influenza, could COVID-19 evolve to wax and wane with the seasons? New research suggests it might. Early in the pandemic, some experts suggested that SARS-CoV-2 -- the virus that causes COVID-19 -- may behave like many... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 2, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Single-Shot Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Met Primary Endpoints in Interim Analysis of its Phase 3 ENSEMBLE Trial
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., January 29, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced topline efficacy and safety data from the Phase 3 ENSEMBLE clinical trial, demonstrating that the investigational single-dose COVID-19 vaccine in development at its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies met all primary and key secondary endpoints. The topline safety and efficacy data are based on 43,783 participants accruing 468 symptomatic cases of COVID-19. The Phase 3 ENSEMBLE study is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine candidate in protecting moderate to severe CO...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Single-Shot Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Met Primary Endpoints in Interim Analysis of its Phase 3 ENSEMBLE Trial
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., January 29, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced topline efficacy and safety data from the Phase 3 ENSEMBLE clinical trial, demonstrating that the investigational single-dose COVID-19 vaccine in development at its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies met all primary and key secondary endpoints. The topline safety and efficacy data are based on 43,783 participants accruing 468 symptomatic cases of COVID-19. The Phase 3 ENSEMBLE study is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine candidate in protecting moderate to severe COVID-19, wit...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Anonymous cell phone data can quantify behavioral changes for flu-like illnesses, study finds
Being prepared for a pandemic, like COVID-19, depends on the ability to predict the course of the pandemic and the human behaviour that drives spread in the event of an outbreak. Cell phone metadata that is routinely collected by telecommunications providers can reveal changes of behavior in people who are diagnosed with a flu-like illness, while also protecting their anonymity, a new study has found. The research, led by Emory University and devised by the University of Bristol, is based on data drawn from a 2009 outbreak of H1N1 influenza in Iceland and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)....
Source: University of Bristol news - January 28, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Institutes, I Source Type: news

Fewer Children Died in 2020, Despite the Pandemic. Experts Are Trying to Figure Out Why
Since the global pandemic began, one of the grimmer features of daily life has been watching the coronavirus death count tick up and up as the months have gone by. With so much unnecessary death in 2020, it’s surprising that in many countries, at least according to preliminary numbers, there was one significant group that actually saw its death rates fall: children. Data from the Human Mortality Database, a research project run by a global team of demographers, suggest that COVID-19 did not reverse years-long declines in child mortality, despite a mortality surge in the general population. Demographers, pediatricians...
Source: TIME: Health - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

If Covid-19 is Primarily a ‘First World’ Virus, Why is the Global South in Lockdown?
A lockdown closer home. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres walking the empty corridors of the UN Secretariat building in New York in 2020. Credit: United NationsBy Darini Rajasingham-SenanayakeCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Jan 7 2021 (IPS) The currently available Covid-19 vaccines have been authorized for ‘emergency use ‘in Europe and North America. This is due to an apparent spike in Covid-19 flu cases in the northern hemisphere as winter advances. Highly advertised vaccines are being produced and rolled out at ‘warped speed’ by powerful pharmaceutical and bio-technology companies headquartered in Euro-Ameri...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Darini Rajasingham-Senanayake Tags: Aid Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Flu Activity Currently Lower Than Last 2 Seasons In Massachusetts
BOSTON (CBS) – Flu activity is currently low in Massachusetts, a good sign as the state struggles like the rest of the country with the coronavirus pandemic. According to the latest weekly flu report from the Department of Public Health, the percent of “influenza-like illness visits” to hospitals and outpatient facilities is at 1.11 percent. That’s lower than the previous two seasons in the same week. The percentage of hospitalizations is also lower than the last two flu seasons at this time. The report said “all regions are reporting minimal influenza-like illness activity.” Authorities...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Flu influenza Source Type: news

NUS researchers develop foldable tent for safe dental care during the pandemic
National University of SingaporeScience Business AnnouncementIMAGE: The Dental Droplet and Aerosol Reducing Tent (Dental DART) was developed by NUS researchers (from left) Professor Freddy Boey, Mr Sudarshan Anantharaman, Associate Professor Vinicius Rosa and their team.viewmore Credit: National University of SingaporeDental treatments are performed at close proximity to the mouths and noses of the patients, and the procedures are often related to the generation of aerosols as well as handling of oral fluids and blood. This puts dentists at a high risk of exposure to COVID-19, and other critical infectious diseas...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 6, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Don ’t Let the Pandemic Stop Your Shots
Even as older adults await the coronavirus vaccine, many are skipping the standard ones. That ’s not wise, health experts say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paula Span Tags: your-feed-science Whooping Cough Shingles (Disease) Diphtheria Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Influenza Elderly Epidemics Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Pneumonia your-feed-healthcare Vaccination and Immunization Hepatitis Tetanus Minorities Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Here's what we know about the new variant of coronavirus | Sharon Peacock
My team at the Genomics UK consortium sequenced the new Sars-CoV-2 variant, but we ’ll need more evidence to understand how it might change the pandemicIt was always predictable that the genome of Sars-CoV-2 would mutate. After all, that ’s what viruses and other micro-organisms do. The Sars-CoV-2 genome accumulates around one or two mutations every month as it circulates. In fact, its rate of change is much lower than those of other viruses that we know about. For example, seasonal influenza mutates at such a rate that a new vacc ine has to be introduced each year.Even so, over time the virus population will a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sharon Peacock Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Source Type: news

What Makes COVID-19 Different From the Flu?
Living through the COVID-19 pandemic is hard. TIME’s advice column is here to help. Trying to decide if that dinner party is safe to attend? Fighting through your quarantine fatigue? Our health reporters will consult experts who can help find a safe and practical solution. Send us your pandemic dilemmas at covidquestions@time.com, and we will choose some to answer in a column on TIME.com. Today, Judy Jones from Missouri asks: Please help. I have a few friends who refuse to take the risks of COVID-19 seriously. They claim that it is no worse than the flu, and that there have always been a certain amount of deaths each...
Source: TIME: Health - December 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

< i > The Lancet Respiratory Medicine < /i > : COVID-19 causes more severe disease than seasonal influenza, comparison of data from over 130,000 hospitalised patients confirms
(The Lancet) Nearly twice as many people were admitted to hospital for COVID-19 at the height of the pandemic than were for influenza at the peak of the 2018/2019 flu season, a study of French national data published today inThe Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal has found (COVID-19, 89,530 patients vs influenza, 45,819 patients). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news