127 Modifiable Cardiovascular Risk Profile in People with Mild Cognitive Symptoms Attending a Memory Service - an Opportunity to Promote Brain Health

ConclusionThis study highlights the high prevalence of unidentified or poorly controlled VRF in people with mild cognitive symptoms attending a memory service. Given its importance to brain health and mitigation of future cognitive decline, a structured focus on identifying and managing these VRF in this setting is necessary. Exercise-based lifestyle programs should be embedded in post-diagnostic services for this population.
Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

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Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news
ConclusionsOur model indicates that the current NHS Health Check programme is contributing to improvements in health and reducing health inequalities. Feasible changes in the organisation of the programme could result in more than a 3-fold increase in health benefits.
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
"One-tenth of 50-year-old men have a heart age 10 years older than they are," BBC News reports. This is the finding of an analysis of 1.2 million people who used the NHS Heart Age Test. The principle behind the test is that you can "age" your heart through unhealthy behaviour such as smoking and being obese. Underlying conditions like high blood pressure and high cholesterol, which often have no noticeable symptoms, can also age the heart. An obese smoker in their 50s who has high blood pressure and high cholesterol could have the heart of a 60- or 70-year-old. The quick and simple test tells you the...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Stroke is a global health problem that can only be fought with prevention. An innovative company developed a tiny gadget called WIWE exactly for these reasons. It is able to measure ECG, blood oxygen level and pulse, while assessing health risks associated with stroke. Here, let me show you my detailed WIWE review. Name the Problem: Stroke According to the World Heart Federation, 15 million people suffer a stroke worldwide every year. Nearly six million die and another five million are left permanently disabled. The harsh facts also show that stroke is the second leading cause of disability (after dementia) worldwide. In t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers ecg gc3 heart Personalized medicine prevention wearable wearables WIWE Source Type: blogs
This study provides additional fuel to really bolster research efforts by us and others in geroscience, a field that seeks to understand relationships between the biology of aging and age-related diseases. Aging is the most important risk factor for common chronic conditions such as heart disease, Alzheimer's and cancer, which are likely to share pathways with aging and therefore interventions designed to slow biological aging processes may also delay the onset of disease and disability, thus expanding years of healthy and independent lives for our seniors." Longer-Lived Parents and Cardiovascular Outcomes ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study builds on preliminary findings from the first phase of the INTERSTROKE study, which identified ten modifiable risk factors for stroke in 6,000 participants from 22 countries. The full-scale INTERSTROKE study included an additional 20,000 individuals from 32 countries in Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, and sought to identify the main causes of stroke in diverse populations, young and old, men and women, and within subtypes of stroke. To estimate the proportion of strokes caused by specific risk factors, the investigators calculated the population attributable risk for each factor (PAR; an esti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionThis descriptive study has provided information about how many people took part in the NHS Health Check programme in the first four years it was available. While the uptake was initially relatively low, it is increasing. It is also encouraging that some of the more vulnerable groups – those who are older and those in the most deprived social group – are most likely to attend the checks. There were limitations to the data available. For example, it was not possible to directly assess whether all new prescriptions and treatments after the checks were as a direct result of the checks. The proportion of p...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Neurology Medical practice Source Type: news
Conclusion This cohort study of more than 1.9 million UK adults aged over 40 links being overweight or obese to a lower risk of dementia, compared with healthy weight people. Underweight people were at a higher risk of dementia. The study has many strengths, such as its large size and applicability to the UK. However, the authors note their results buck the trend of other research, which found being overweight or obese was linked to an increase risk. They suggest their study is probably more reliable than the past ones as they were smaller. They aren't quite sure what this means, and say: "The reasons for and p...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Obesity Source Type: news
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