Why Does My Nose Run - And Other Common Allergy Questions

Allergies got you down? Wondering how to get relief? Namrata Shidhaye, MD, a family physician at Duke Primary Care Waverly Place, helps sort out the causes and cures for your annoying runny nose. The older I get, the more my nose runs. Can you develop seasonal allergies as an adult that you didn’t have as a child?
Yes, adults can develop environmental allergies at any age. Asthma can develop during adulthood as well. A runny nose isn’t always a sign of allergies, though. Older individuals may experience runny nose due to age-related physical changes—some people, as they age, develop overactive tear ducts and nasal secretions (it’s called cholinergic hyperactivity). Also, some medications taken for other conditions such as high blood pressure, prostate enlargement, or erectile dysfunction can cause a runny nose as a side effect. How do I know when it’s just a cold? When should I consider seeing an allergy specialist?
A common cold is usually associated with a variety of symptoms in addition to a runny nose: cough, body aches, fatigue, and occasional yellow nasal discharge. All of these symptoms usually resolve in one to two weeks. Allergies occur immediately after contact with the allergens that provoke them. They’re associated with clear discharge from the nose, nasal congestion, and itchy eyes, and the symptoms persist as long as contact with the allergens continues. Body aches are unlikely, but fatigue may occasionally occur with alle...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

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In conclusion, poorer task performance (especially inattention) and neurophysiological results in ADHD demonstrate a possible impairment in the interconnection of the association cortices in the parietal and temporal lobes and the prefrontal cortex. Also, the motor control problems in ADHD may arise from neural deficits in the frontoparietal and occipitoparietal systems and other brain structures such as cerebellum. PMID: 29789937 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
HIGH blood pressure symptoms include headaches, chest pain and difficulty breathing. You can compare your hypertension risk with a normal blood pressure for your age. Are you at risk of the deadly condition?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective, predominantly urban, low-income, minority birth cohort, mothers' psychosocial stress before and during pregnancy appears to be an independent risk factor for the development of ADHD in their children. PMID: 29790815 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
The authors regret that on page 42, figure  4 y-axis should read “UAC MAP (mmHg)”, instead of “Diastolic Intra-arterial BP”.
Source: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research
Source: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Source: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Source: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
There is a longstanding debate about the role of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in clinical practice. One view is that ambulatory monitoring should only be obtained infrequently because it is only in marginal situations where the information provided will impact clinical treatment decisions. One such example is a patient with modestly elevated office blood pressure, but no evidence of target organ damage and otherwise low risk for cardiovascular disease. Another position is that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is able to detect “white coat” hypertension and “masked” hypertension, which ar...
Source: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editor's Page Source Type: research
Ronald Victor presented a novel approach to tackling uncontrolled hypertension at the recent American College of Cardiology Meeting. The study was published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine examining the impact of medication management by pharmacists provided onsite in black-owned barbershops in Los Angeles County.1
Source: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Hypertension Highlight Source Type: research
Sex differences exist in the prevalence, presentation, and trajectory of several neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the subject of the article by Martin et  al. (1) in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry. The underlying causes of this sex bias have eluded researchers for decades and have recently become the focus of greater research efforts, thanks in part to funding agencies heeding the call of women’s health advocates.
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Early Career Investigator Commentary Source Type: research
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