COVID-19 could become the new common cold: Experts predict the virus is here to stay
Public health experts say they believe that COVID-19 will likely become an endemic disease, meaning it will always be present in the population but, at the same time, circulating at low rates. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccines may need regular updates as coronavirus evolves, say scientists
In the research, virologists from Charite -- Universitatsmedizin Berlin in Germany studied the genetic evolution of the four currently known 'common cold' coronaviruses, particularly the two longest-known viruses, 229E and OC43. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - March 27, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Janssen Receives Positive CHMP Opinion for PONVORY ™ (ponesimod) for the Treatment of Adults With Relapsing Forms of Multiple Sclerosis With Active Disease Defined by Clinical or Imaging Features
BEERSE, BELGIUM, MARCH 26, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that the European Medicines Agency’s (EMA) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has issued a positive opinion recommending marketing authorisation for PONVORY™ (ponesimod) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) with active disease defined by clinical or imaging features.[3]“Relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) have varied and often unpredictable symptoms, posing a unique human, societal and economic burden,” said Catherine T...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 26, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

UCLA researchers digitize massive collection of folk medicine
A project more than 40 years in the making,the Archive of Healing is one of the largest databases of medicinal folklore from around the world. UCLA Professor David Shorter has launched an interactive, searchable website featuring hundreds of thousands of entries that span more than 200 years, and draws from seven continents, six university archives, 3,200 published sources, and both first and second-hand information from folkloric field notes.The entries address a broad range of health-related topics including everything from midwifery and menopause to common colds and flus. The site aims to preserve Indigenous knowledge a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 25, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Will THIS Covid vaccine mean an end to the common cold?
The team tested its vaccine candidate on pigs, who are infected with a form of coronavirus known as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and found the shot protected against symptoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Will COVID-19 vaccines need to be adapted regularly?
Influenza vaccines need to be evaluated every year to ensure they remain effective against new influenza viruses. Will the same apply to COVID-19 vaccines? In order to gauge whether and to what extent this may be necessary, a team of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin compared the evolution of endemic 'common cold' coronaviruses with that of influenza viruses. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 25, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Will COVID-19 vaccines need to be adapted regularly?
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Influenza vaccines need to be evaluated every year to ensure they remain effective against new influenza viruses. Will the same apply to COVID-19 vaccines? Researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin compared the evolution of endemic 'common cold' coronaviruses with that of influenza viruses. The researchers predict that, while the pandemic is ongoing, vaccines will need to undergo regular updates. A few years into the post-pandemic period, however, vaccines are likely to remain effective for longer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 25, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Coronavirus: How the common cold can boot out Covid
It looks like the viruses that cause colds wins in the battle to infect our cells. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People who've recently had a cold may have some protection against Covid, scientists claim
Lab studies by the University of Glasgow researchers found the common cold triggers the release of antibodies which also target Covid in the nose and lungs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common cold virus saved lives in India
One of the biggest mysteries of the Covid-19 infection in India relative to other countries like the US and UK has been the lower mortality recorded in India. An explanation has been posited in a study carried out by scientists of National Institute of Immunology and AIIMS and published in Frontiers in Immunology, a top-rated medical journal. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - March 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why common colds might spike when kids return to school
(Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - March 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Snow Shoveling, Slips on Ice Bring Cold Weather Dangers
SATURDAY, March 6, 2021 -- Clearing away snow can be hazardous to your health, experts warn. Shoveling snow causes 100 deaths a year in the United States, and injuries due to improper use of snowblowers are common. " Cold weather will cause the body... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 6, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Emergency Medicine Doctor: Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Can Turn Covid Into Common Cold
(Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Roche receives positive CHMP opinion for Evrysdi, the first and only at home spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) treatment with proven efficacy in adults, children and infants two months and older
Basel, 26 February 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended the approval of Evrysdi ™ (risdiplam) for the treatment of 5q spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in patients 2 months of age and older, with a clinical diagnosis of SMA Type 1, Type 2 or Type 3 or with one to four SMN2 copies. SMA is a leading genetic cause of death in infants and 5q SMA is the most common form of the disease . SMA causes progressive muscle weakness and atrophy, and significant unmet need remains, particularly in adults ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - February 26, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche receives positive CHMP opinion for Evrysdi, the first and only at home spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) treatment with proven efficacy in adults, children and infants two months and older
Basel, 26 February 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended the approval of Evrysdi ™ (risdiplam) for the treatment of 5q spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in patients 2 months of age and older, with a clinical diagnosis of SMA Type 1, Type 2 or Type 3 or with one to four SMN2 copies. SMA is a leading genetic cause of death in infants and 5q SMA is the most common form of the disease . SMA causes progressive muscle weakness and atrophy, and significant unmet need remains, particularly in adults ...
Source: Roche Media News - February 26, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Q & A: Does handwashing stem the transmission of Covid-19?
Airborne droplets are more likely to spread coronavirus than touch, scientists believeIn the early days of the pandemic, public health experts emphasised handwashing as a way to prevent infection and the government launched a “Hands, Face, Space” campaign to encourage people to wash their hands, wear masks and keep 2 metres apart. Subsequent research has shown the biggest risk of Covid-19 transmission is through particles in the air.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: James Tapper Tags: Coronavirus Health Flu Common cold Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news & wellbeing Source Type: news

Covid new strain symptoms: How to tell the difference between coronavirus and a cold
COVID new strain symptoms may be difficult to spot at first, but usually include a high fever and a dry cough. But how can you tell the difference between signs of coronavirus and the common cold? There are some subtle differences that you should be aware of. This is when your cold symptoms could be caused by Covid. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prior Exposure to Common Cold Won't Shield You From COVID
A bout of the common cold won't protect you against the new coronavirus infection, researchers report. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prior Exposure to Common Cold Won't Shield You From COVID: Study
THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2021 -- It would be nice if it were true, but a bout of the common cold won't protect you against the new coronavirus infection, researchers report. Colds are caused by seasonal coronaviruses (CoVs) and previous studies have... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 11, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Immunological characteristics govern the transition of COVID-19 to endemicity
We are currently faced with the question of how the severity of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may change in the years ahead. Our analysis of immunological and epidemiological data on endemic human coronaviruses (HCoVs) shows that infection-blocking immunity wanes rapidly but that disease-reducing immunity is long-lived. Our model, incorporating these components of immunity, recapitulates both the current severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the benign nature of HCoVs, suggesting that once the endemic phase is reached and primary exposure is in childhood, SARS-CoV-2 may be no mo...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, J. S., Bjornstad, O. N., Antia, R. Tags: Epidemiology, Immunology reports Source Type: news

Antibodies to common cold coronaviruses do not protect against SARS-CoV-2
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Past exposure to seasonal coronaviruses (CoVs), which cause the common cold, does not result in the production of antibodies that protect against the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, according to a study Penn Medicine. Researchers said although antibodies from prior coronavirus infections cannot prevent SARS-CoV-2 infections, it is possible that pre-existing memory B cells and T cells could potentially provide some level of protection or at least reduce the disease severity of COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Should a runny nose be added to the official Covid-19 symptom list?   
A group of 140 GPs have written to Prof Chris Whitty asking that a runny nose should be included on the official list of symptoms as many Covid-19 patients are initially presenting with signs of a common cold. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

We May Never Eliminate COVID-19. But We Can Learn to Live With It
When does a pandemic end? Is it when life regains a semblance of normality? Is it when the world reaches herd immunity, the benchmark at which enough people are immune to an infectious disease to stop its widespread circulation? Or is it when the disease is defeated, the last patient cured and the pathogen retired to the history books? The last scenario, in the case of COVID-19, is likely a ways off, if it ever arrives. The virus has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and killed more than 2 million. New viral variants even more contagious than those that started the pandemic are spreading across the world. And...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

NIH Director Francis Collins Is Fighting This Coronavirus While Preparing for the Next One
In May 2020, Dr. Francis Collins, the longtime head of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was called to the White House to meet with Jared Kushner, the then President’s son-in-law and adviser, and Dr. Deborah Birx, the head of the White House Coronavirus Task Force. A few weeks earlier, Congress had given the NIH $1.5 billion to try to speed up the process of developing new diagnostic tests for COVID-19, and the White House, which was dubious about increasing the rate of testing, wanted to know more about what the NIH was doing. Collins is technically the boss of Dr. Anthony Fauci, but during the pandemic he ha...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Nasal spray that protects against COVID-19 is also effective against the common cold
(Hunter Medical Research Institute) Research into a new drug, known as INNA-X, which primes the immune system in the respiratory tract and is in development for COVID-19 shows it is also effective against rhinovirus. Rhinovirus is the most common respiratory virus, the main cause of the common cold and is responsible for exacerbations of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 1, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 Isn't Going Away, Experts Predict
As politicians try to schedule an end to the pandemic, scientists say the virus will stick around as an endemic disease similar to the common cold. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 25, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Africa: When Covid Becomes a Bad Cold - Experts Map the Future of SARS-CoV-2
[Daily Maverick] Scientists predict the virus will be with us for the long run, but probably as just another common cold. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 18, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus Will Resemble the Common Cold, Scientists Predict
Once immunity is widespread in adults, the virus rampaging across the world will come to resemble the common cold, scientists predict. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: your-feed-science Disease Rates Colds Immune System SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Science (Journal) Source Type: news

Another common cold virus? Modeling SARS-CoV-2's progress through the ages
(Emory Health Sciences) What is the endgame for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is causing worldwide devastation? If it becomes endemic -- circulating in the general population -- and most people are exposed in childhood, SARS-CoV-2 may join the ranks of mild cold-causing coronaviruses that currently circulate in humans, according to a model developed by Emory and Penn State scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Unravelling the mystery that makes viruses infectious
(University of York) Researchers have for the first time identified the way viruses like the poliovirus and the common cold virus 'package up' their genetic code, allowing them to infect cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GPs in England see big drop in common cold and flu cases
Exclusive: coronavirus restrictions and increased uptake of flu vaccine is likely explanation, say expertsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGPs in England have reported a big drop in cases of influenza, colds and other common infections – with cold rates now about a quarter of the five-year average, and flu at about a 20th of the usual level for this time of year.Social restrictions brought in to curb transmission of coronavirus combined with an increased uptake of flu vaccine is the most likely explanation, experts say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Flu Common cold World news Infectious diseases Medical research Society Science Health policy England UK news GPs Source Type: news

Unravelling the mystery that makes viruses infectious
(University of Leeds) Researchers have for the first time identified the way viruses like the poliovirus and the common cold virus 'package up' their genetic code, allowing them to infect cells. The findings, published today (Friday, 8 January) in the journal PLOS Pathogens by a team from the Universities of Leeds and York, open up the possibility that drugs or anti-viral agents can be developed that would stop such infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

South Africa to get 1.5 million COVID-19 vaccines from India
The vaccine, developed with the University of Oxford, is made from a virus which is a weakened version of a common cold virus (adenovirus), that has been genetically changed so that it is impossible for it to grow in humans. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - January 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

COVID-19, cold, allergies and the flu: What are the differences?
If you have signs or symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it's important that you contact your health care provider right away for medical advice. But?COVID-19, the common cold, seasonal allergies and the flu (influenza) cause many similar symptoms. So how can you tell if you have?COVID-19? What is COVID-19 (coronavirus), how does it spread, [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - January 7, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Coronavirus symptoms: Is it the flu, a common cold or COVID-19? How to tell the difference
CORONAVIRUS symptoms overlap with signs of the common cold and the flu, so how can you tell the difference between the three viruses? As the UK plunges into a bitterly cold winter, the risk of each one increases. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine Approval May Be the Most Globally Important Yet
The COVID-19 vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca wasn’t the first to be OK’d by regulators in the U.K.—health officials authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech jab nearly four weeks earlier. And it’s not the most effective—Stage 3 clinical trials suggest it prevents COVID-19 symptoms about 70% of the time vs. about 95% for the Pfizer vaccine and a similar one from Moderna (which is authorized in the U.S., but not the U.K.). But the greenlight from the British Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency on Wednesday could be a big step toward bringing the COVID-19 pande...
Source: TIME: Health - December 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Zennie Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer overnight Source Type: news

Why Africa ’s COVID-19 Outbreak Hasn’t Been as Bad as Everyone Feared
When COVID-19 initially blazed through Asia, Europe and then the United States, global public health experts worried that it could be catastrophic for Africa, with its crowded cities, poorly funded health sector and lack of testing facilities. The U.N. Economic Commission for Africa in April predicted up to 300,000 deaths this year if the virus couldn’t be contained on the continent. Yet it was the U.S, with its superior health system, that hit that grim milestone first, and so far, Africa has been largely spared the worst of the devastation experienced by the rest of the world. As of Dec. 29, the Africa Centres for ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Londontime Source Type: news

DFW molecular diagnostic company rolls out four-in-one COVID test
An early pivot to focus much of its efforts on the COVID-19 has allowed GeneIQ to rapidly grow, as well as launch a number of efforts aimed at stopping the virus' spread. And its most recently, the company has rolled out a new test that can detect the flu, the common cold and COVID-19. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 29, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Kevin Cummings Source Type: news

The Risks of Using Steroids for Respiratory Infections
Doctors often prescribe them for sore throats and the common cold, even though evidence of benefit is sorely lacking. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jane E. Brody Tags: Steroids Respiratory Diseases Colds Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Source Type: news

Scientists discover role of protein in detecting the common cold virus
(Nanyang Technological University) The role of a protein in detecting the common cold virus and kickstarting an immune response to fight infection has been uncovered by a team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and the National University of Singapore. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How AstraZeneca COVID-19 Vaccine Compares To Moderna, Pfizer
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local AstraZeneca Coronavirus Coronavirus Vaccine Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

The long game: the race for a vaccine against all coronaviruses
There is hope that Covid-19 immunisation might soon be a reality, but some scientists are aiming for a broader solutionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageHopes have been raised worldwide this week that a Covid-19 vaccine is getting closer, after one version was shown to be 90% effective in reducing disease symptoms, but a handful of scientists are working on an ambitious plan for a different sort of vaccine.Their project, which is fraught with technical and financial challenges, is to find a vaccine that could protect against not just Covid, but other viruses in the same family that cause Sar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Source Type: news

Common Cold Coronaviruses Tied to Less Severe COVID-19 Cases
Outcomes in COVID-19 patients may be better in those recently infected with endemic coronaviruses.  (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 11, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Common Cold Antibodies Yield Clues to COVID-19 Behavior Common Cold Antibodies Yield Clues to COVID-19 Behavior
Among people who were never infected with the new coronavirus, a few adults - and many children - may have antibodies that can neutralize the virus, researchers reported in Science.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - November 10, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

New Study Suggests Common Cold Antibodies Could Protect Against COVID-19
Preliminary data shows some people may have pre-existing antibodies that could help mitigate the impact of COVID-19. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pre-existing coronavirus antibodies could help protect children against new pandemic strain
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and University College London have found that some antibodies, created by the immune system during infection with common cold coronaviruses, can also target SARS-CoV-2 and may confer a degree of protection against the new viral strain. In response to infection with a virus, the immune system creates antibodies to help fight it. These antibodies remain in the blood for a period after infection, and in the case of re-infection, they are able to tackle the virus again. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 6, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Pre-existing coronavirus antibodies could help protect children against new pandemic strain
(The Francis Crick Institute) Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and University College London have found that some antibodies, created by the immune system during infection with common cold coronaviruses, can also target SARS-CoV-2 and may confer a degree of protection against the new viral strain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 6, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Three signs you have the common cold and not COVID-19 - and how to treat your symptoms
AS WE prepare ourselves for winter cold and flu season, we are now faced with the resurgence of COVID-19. Defining the symptoms of a common cold and those of coronavirus can seem daunting, but Dr Sarah Jarvis has advice on how to differentiate between the two. There are three signs you have the common cold and not COVID-19. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news