Roche launches new quantitative antibody test to measure SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, to support the evaluation of vaccines
Basel, 18 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the launch of its Elecsys ® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody test for markets accepting the CE Mark. Roche has filed for Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 serology test can be used to quantitatively measure antibodies in people who have been exposed to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and can play an important part in characterising a vaccine-induced immune response.1 Specifically, the test targets antibodies which are directed against the ...
Source: Roche Media News - September 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche launches new quantitative antibody test to measure SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, to support the evaluation of vaccines
Basel, 18 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the launch of its Elecsys ® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody test for markets accepting the CE Mark. Roche has filed for Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 serology test can be used to quantitatively measure antibodies in people who have been exposed to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and can play an important part in characterising a vaccine-induced immune response.1 Specifically, the test targets antibodies which are directed against the ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

COVID update: Are your symptoms caused by a cold or coronavirus? Signs of infection
COVID UK: Coronavirus symptoms include a high fever, a new cough, and loss of smell and taste. But there are a number of other signs that could be caused by a COVID-19 infection. As the winter flu season creeps closer, could your symptoms be caused by COVID or the common cold? Should you consider getting a free test? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Children with a runny nose DON'T have Covid-19, expert warns
Professor Tim Spector, from King's College London, said that a runny nose, congestion and sneezing were a 'sure' sign a child was suffering from the common cold and not coronavirus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vitamin D deficiency is linked to higher COVID-19 risk and severe outcomes, reveals study
(Natural News) It is a well-known fact that vitamin D performs several important functions, from boosting immune health to regulating blood pressure. Over the past decade, multiple studies have also provided evidence that taking vitamin D could reduce the odds of developing infections like the common cold and the flu. Given these precedents and the ongoing pandemic, scientists... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COVID-19 - talking to children and families about returning to school: guiding principles, RCPCH (updated 10th September 2020)
Paediatricians may receive queries from families about the return to school. Here we provide a summary of the current policy and other guidance in the four nations. Updates in this version (9 September) - Section on Common Cold and COVID-19 symptoms added. Updates in version August 17 version - Northern Ireland: Updated link to Guidance on the new school day for mainstream. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Masks Decreasing Immunity To Other Viruses? Dr. Mallika Marshall Answers Your Coronavirus Questions
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Coronavirus Vaccine Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Vector-Based Vaccines Come to the Fore in the COVID-19 Pandemic
Adenovirus vectors deliver the genetic instructions for SARS-CoV-2 antigens directly into patients' cells, provoking a robust immune response. But will pre-existing immunity from common colds take... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 8, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Study: Common cold may help prevent flu, perhaps COVID-19
The virus most often behind the common cold is capable of preventing the flu virus from infecting airways by jump-starting the body's immune defenses, an analysis published Friday by The Lancet Microbe found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common cold combats influenza
Rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of common colds, can prevent the flu virus from infecting airways by jumpstarting the body ’s antiviral defenses. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 5, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Roche receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization for the cobas SARS-CoV-2 & Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas 6800/8800 Systems
Basel, 04 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the cobas ® SARS-CoV-2& Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas ® 6800/8800 Systems has received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This test is intended for the simultaneous qualitative detection and differentiation of SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A and Influenza B in patients suspected by their healthcare provider of having respiratory viral infection consistent with COVID-19. Additionally, it is available in markets accepting the CE mark.“With the approaching flu season, this new...
Source: Roche Media News - September 4, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization for the cobas SARS-CoV-2 & Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas 6800/8800 Systems
Basel, 04 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the cobas ® SARS-CoV-2& Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas ® 6800/8800 Systems has received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This test is intended for the simultaneous qualitative detection and differentiation of SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A and Influenza B in patients suspected by their healthcare provider of having respiratory viral infection consistent with COVID-19. Additionally, it is available in markets accepting the CE mark.“With the approaching flu season, this new...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 4, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Common cold combats influenza
(Yale University) As the flu season approaches, a strained public health system may have a surprising ally -- the common cold virus. Rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of common colds, can prevent the flu virus from infecting airways by jumpstarting the body's antiviral defenses, Yale researchers report Sept. 4 in the journal The Lancet Microbe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How Common Cold Viruses Are Being Used in Vaccines From Russia, China How Common Cold Viruses Are Being Used in Vaccines From Russia, China
The modified common cold viruses behind high-profile COVID-19 vaccine candidates from China's CanSino Biologics and Russia's Gamaleya Institute have been studied for decades, but are still not widely used.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - September 1, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Scientists See Downsides to Top COVID-19 Vaccines From Russia, China Scientists See Downsides to Top COVID-19 Vaccines From Russia, China
High-profile COVID-19 vaccines developed in Russia and China share a potential shortcoming: They are based on a common cold virus that many people have been exposed to, potentially limiting their effectiveness, some experts say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - September 1, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Could having a common cold protect you from Covid-19? Scientists given £8.4million to answer
The £8.4million will be spread across three separate studies in the UK tasked with investigating the immune response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bee Healthy: Honey May Beat Cold Meds Against Cough
MONDAY, Aug. 24, 2020 -- There may be no cure for the common cold, but a spoonful of honey might make it less miserable, a new research review concludes. Parents have long used honey to soothe kids'sore throats and cough -- probably because their... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 24, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Study: Honey May Be Better At Treating Coughs, Colds Than Over-The-Counter Medicines
(CNN) — Honey may be a better treatment for coughs and colds than over-the-counter medicines, a new study has found. Researchers said honey was more effective in relieving the symptoms of cold and flu-like illnesses than the usual commercial remedies, and could provide a safer, cheaper and more readily available alternative to antibiotics. They encouraged doctors to consider recommending it to patients in place of prescribing antibiotics, which can cause side effects and lead to antibiotic resistance when overused. Honey has long been used as a home remedy for coughs, but its effectiveness in treating common illnesse...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news

New Tasting Liquid Tinctures or Capsules Support Immune System Health
Offers high doses of vitamin C paired with vitamins D3 and vitamin K2 to supercharge the body’s natural defenses Echinacea and elderberry is been used to support body as it fights the common cold, influenza and other viral infections Tincture are available at 500 bottles or moreThis story is related to the following:Tinctures | (Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies)
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - August 19, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

How Covid-19 smell loss differs from the common cold
(University of East Anglia) New research is the first to compare how Covid-19 smell loss differs from what you might experience with a bad cold or flu.The main differences found are that Covid-19 patients can breathe freely, do not tend to have a runny or blocked nose, and they cannot detect bitter or sweet tastes.These findings lend weight to the theory that Covid-19 infects the brain and central nervous system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Immune cells for common cold may recognize SARS-CoV-2
Blood samples taken before the COVID-19 pandemic showed that some people already had certain immune cells that recognize SARS-CoV-2, possibly because of common colds. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - August 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

If you've ever had a cold, your immune system may already know how to fight COVID-19
(Natural News) The La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) has published a new study that suggests people who have been exposed to the common cold may already have immunity to the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19). Since the common cold is a type of coronavirus, bearing many of the same features and attributes as the novel coronavirus,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COVID-19 May Never Go Away — With Or Without A Vaccine
The virus might eventually behave more like the common cold, according to Vineet Menachery, a coronavirus researcher at the University of Texas Medical Branch.(Image credit: Silvio Avila/AFP via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lulu Garcia-Navarro Source Type: news

Common cold could boost COVID-19 immunity, study finds
The common cold might help produce immunity against COVID-19, even in people who have not been infected with the new coronavirus, according to a study published Tuesday by the journal Science. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does the Common Cold Protect You from COVID-19?
There are emerging signs that some people might have heightened protection against SARS-CoV-2, perhaps thanks to recent infection by other coronaviruses. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Brush With Common Cold Might Help Protect Against COVID-19
TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2020 -- Since the pandemic began, it's been known that the severity of coronavirus illness varies widely between people. Could the common cold be the reason why? It's still just a theory, but researchers in California suspect that... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
(La Jolla Institute for Immunology) A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'One big wave' – why the Covid-19 second wave may not exist
With no evidence of seasonal variations, the WHO warns the initial coronavirus pandemic is continuing and acceleratingCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Covid-19 pandemic is currently unfolding in “one big wave” with no evidence that it follows seasonal variations common to influenza and other coronaviruses, such as the common cold, the World Health Organization has warned.Amid continued debates over what constitutes a second wave, a resurgence or seasonal return of the disease, Margaret Harris, a WHO spokesperson, insisted that these discussions are not a helpful way to under...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Peter Beaumont and Emma Graham-Harrison Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news World Health Organization Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

Could prior exposure to common cold viruses affect the severity of SARS-CoV-2 symptoms?
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) A study led by Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) shows that some healthy individuals possess immune cells capable of recognizing the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. The reason for this might be found in prior infections with 'common cold' coronaviruses. Whether or not this cross-reactivity has a protective effect on the clinical course in individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2 will now be addressed by the 'Charit é Corona Cross' study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Major' breakthrough in Covid-19 drug makes UK professors millionaires
Synairgen ’s share price rises 540% on morning of news of successful drugs trialCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThree professors at the University of Southampton school of medicine have this week made a “major breakthrough” in the treatment of coronavirus patients and become paper millionaires at the same time.Almost two decades ago professors Ratko Djukanovic, Stephen Holgate and Donna Davies discovered that people with asthma and chronic lung diseaselacked a protein called interferon beta, which helps fight off the common cold. They worked out that patients ’ defe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rupert Neate Tags: Pharmaceuticals industry Medical research Coronavirus outbreak Business Stock markets Infectious diseases Microbiology Science World news UK news University of Southampton Higher education Source Type: news

Report: Members of Russia ’s ‘Business and Political Elite’ Have Been Receiving Experimental COVID-19 Vaccine
(Bloomberg) — Scores of Russia’s business and political elite have been given early access to an experimental vaccine against COVID-19, according to people familiar with the effort, as the country races to be among the first to develop an inoculation. Top executives at companies including aluminum giant United Co. Rusal, as well as billionaire tycoons and government officials began getting shots developed by the state-run Gamaleya Institute in Moscow as early as April, the people said. They declined to be identified as the information isn’t public. The Gamaleya vaccine, financed by the state-run Russian D...
Source: TIME: Health - July 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stepan Kravchenko, Yuliya Fedorinova and Ilya Arkhipov / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk russia wire Source Type: news

Immunity to Covid-19 could be lost in months, UK study suggests
Exclusive: King ’s College London team found steep drops in patients’ antibody levels three months after infectionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePeople who have recovered from Covid-19 may lose their immunity to the disease within months, according to research suggesting the virus could reinfect people year after year, like common colds.In the first longitudinal study of its kind, scientists analysed the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy ’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust and found levels of antibodies that can destroy the v...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science Health London Society UK news Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

‘ Buyer Beware ’ : Experts Question Accuracy Of Coronavirus Antibody Tests
BOSTON (CBS) – With cases of COVID-19 spiking again in several states, a lot of people want to know if they could be immune to the coronavirus, so they are paying for antibody tests. Hundreds of these have hit the market in just months. But are they accurate? WBZ sister station CBS 2 in Chicago, put these tests to the test. Only 22 have been given Emergency Use Authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The station’s investigative unit chose three tests based on costs and how long it would take to deliver results. Investigative Producer Michele Youngerman led our investigation. She had some of the ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Syndicated Local Antibody Tests Coronavirus Source Type: news

Coronavirus: Catching colds could protect you from infection
Researchers at University Hospital Tübingen in Germany found that the immune systems of people who had never had Covid-19 still reacted to it because some common cold viruses are similar. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Covid-19 and the HIV connection revealed
(Natural News) Coronaviruses are pervasive throughout the human population and their symptoms typically manifest as the common cold. The four most popular coronaviruses identified include 229E (alpha coronavirus), NL63 (alpha coronavirus), OC43 (beta coronavirus), and HKU1 (beta coronavirus). More potent coronaviruses have emerged in recent years. MERS-CoV I is a beta coronavirus that causes Middle... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Roche announces 2-year risdiplam data from SUNFISH and new data from JEWELFISH in infants, children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)
Basel, 12 June 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today presented two-year data from Part 1 of its pivotal SUNFISH trial in people aged 2-25 years with Type 2 or 3 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) at the virtual Cure SMA Annual Conference, 8-12 June, 2020. The results of an exploratory efficacy analysis show risdiplam significantly improved motor function after 24 months of treatment compared to natural history data. In addition, preliminary 12 month data from JEWELFISH, a trial in people with all types of SMA aged 6 months to 60 years previously treated with other SMA therapies, showed that treatment with risdiplam le...
Source: Roche Media News - June 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche announces 2-year risdiplam data from SUNFISH and new data from JEWELFISH in infants, children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)
Basel, 12 June 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today presented two-year data from Part 1 of its pivotal SUNFISH trial in people aged 2-25 years with Type 2 or 3 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) at the virtual Cure SMA Annual Conference, 8-12 June, 2020. The results of an exploratory efficacy analysis show risdiplam significantly improved motor function after 24 months of treatment compared to natural history data. In addition, preliminary 12 month data from JEWELFISH, a trial in people with all types of SMA aged 6 months to 60 years previously treated with other SMA therapies, showed that treatment with risdiplam le...
Source: Roche Investor Update - June 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Are Furniture Deliveries OK Now? Dr. Mallika Marshall Answers Your Coronavirus Questions
BOSTON (CBS) — Dr. Mallika Marshall is answering your coronavirus-related medical questions. If you have a question for Dr. Mallika, email her or message her on Facebook or Twitter. I ordered furniture early in March. It is finally ready, but I don’t know if it’s safe to let delivery people into my house. My husband and I are both over 65 – Kathy If they can leave the furniture outside your door for you to bring in yourself, that’s ideal. But it may be too large and too heavy, and you don’t want to injure yourself. So if you’re going to have delivery p...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Healthwatch Syndicated Local Coronavirus Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Nearly Half of Coronavirus Spread May Be Traced to People Without Any Symptoms
One of the more insidious features of the new coronavirus behind COVID-19 is its ability to settle into unsuspecting hosts who never show signs of being sick but are able to spread the virus to others. In a study published June 3 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers at the Scripps Research Translational Institute reviewed data from 16 different groups of COVID-19 patients from around the world to get a better idea of how many cases of coronavirus can likely be traced to people who spread the virus without ever knowing they were infected. Their conclusion: at minimum, 30%, and more likely 40% to 45%. Such so-ca...
Source: TIME: Health - June 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Steam inhalation and paediatric burns during the COVID-19 pandemic - Brewster CT, Choong J, Thomas C, Wilson D, Moiemen N.
Steam inhalation is traditionally used as a home remedy for common colds and upper respiratory tract infections. The evidence base of the practice is weak, with unproven theories that the steam loosens mucus, opens nasal passages, and reduces mucosal infla... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Checkmate! China ’s Coronavirus Connection
Conclusion In 1919 George A. Soper1 wrote that the deadly Spanish Flu pandemic that swept around the earth was without any precedents, and that there had been no such catastrophe ‘so sudden, so devastating and so universal’. He remarked that, “The most astonishing thing about the pandemic was the complete mystery which surrounded it. Nobody seemed to know what the disease was, where it came from or how to stop it. Anxious minds are inquiring today whether another wave of it will come again”. With close to 3 million positive cases and around 0.2 million deaths worldwide, the coronavirus has compelle...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Simi Mehta Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Stronger and Safer Than Any Vaccine …
The coronavirus exposed the fatal flaw of our mainstream health system: the misguided dependence on the U.S. government and Big Pharma to save the day. Dozens of companies are now in a race to develop a coronavirus vaccine and treatment drugs — with billions of dollars in profits going to the winner. I have news for you: The vaccine won’t stop this virus. You can’t eradicate a virus like this with an external weapon like a vaccine, any more than you can eradicate seasonal flu or the common cold. But you can make sure you never get the coronavirus in the first place — or any other disease-causing...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 8, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr.A.Sears Tags: Health Source Type: news

Beat the Common Cold
Researchers in Canada and China are testing a powerful immune booster that provides broad-spectrum protection against the common cold and a number of viruses including SARS, Ebola and H1N1. They’re currently running clinical trials to prove its effectiveness against coronavirus. I’m talking about quercetin – a powerful antioxidant that is already available as a supplement. Previous research shows that quercetin’s antiviral capacity works in three ways. Quercetin can: Stop the virus from infecting cells Reduce the reproduction of cells that are already infected And reduce infected cells resistance t...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 6, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr.A.Sears Tags: Health Source Type: news

Roche ’s COVID-19 antibody test receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization and is available in markets accepting the CE mark
Basel, 03 May 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA)1 for its new Elecsys ® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody test. The test is designed to help determine if a patient has been exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and if the patient has developed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. Roche has already started shipping the new antibody test to leading laboratories globally and will ramp up pr oduction capacity to high double-digit millions per month to serve healthcare systems in countries accepting the CE mark2 as well as the...
Source: Roche Media News - May 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s COVID-19 antibody test receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization and is available in markets accepting the CE mark
Basel, 03 May 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA)[1]  for its new Elecsys ® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody test. The test is designed to help determine if a patient has been exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and if the patient has developed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. Roche has already started shipping the new antibody test to leading laboratories globally and will ramp up pr oduction capacity to high double-digit millions per month to serve healthcare systems in countries accepting the CE mark[2] ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - May 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s risdiplam shows significant improvement in survival and motor milestones in infants with Type 1 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)
Basel, 28 April 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today presented 1-year data from FIREFISH Part 2, a pivotal global study evaluating risdiplam in infants aged 1 – 7 months old with symptomatic Type 1 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The study met its primary endpoint with 29% of infants (12/41; p
Source: Roche Media News - April 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s risdiplam shows significant improvement in survival and motor milestones in infants with Type 1 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)
Basel, 28 April 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today presented 1-year data from FIREFISH Part 2, a pivotal global study evaluating risdiplam in infants aged 1 – 7 months old with symptomatic Type 1 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The study met its primary endpoint with 29% of infants (12/41; p
Source: Roche Investor Update - April 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Coronavirus: five months on, what scientists know about Covid-19
Medical researchers have been studying everything we know about Covid-19. What have they learned – and is it enough to halt the pandemic?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCoronaviruses have been causing problems for humanity for a long time. Several versions are known to trigger common colds and more recently two types have set off outbreaks of deadly illnesses: severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers).But their impact has been mild compared with the global havoc unleashed by the coronavirus that is causing the Covid-19 pandemic. In only a fe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, Science Editor Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news

Coronavirus: five months on, what scientists now know about Covid-19
Medical researchers have been studying everything we know about coronavirus. What have they learned – and is it enough to halt the pandemic?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCoronaviruses have been causing problems for humanity for a long time. Several versions are known to trigger common colds and more recently two types have set off outbreaks of deadly illnesses: severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers).But their impact has been mild compared with the global havoc unleashed by the coronavirus that is causing the Covid-19 pandemic. In only a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news